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The Household and the War for the Cosmos: Recovering a Christian Vision for the Family

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The household is not just a shelter from a war zone, it is the command center from which we launch our attacks. It's this vision of the world, with the Christian family at the heart, that modern parents desperately need to recover. The household is not just a shelter from a war zone, it is the command center from which we launch our attacks. It's this vision of the world, with the Christian family at the heart, that modern parents desperately need to recover.


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The household is not just a shelter from a war zone, it is the command center from which we launch our attacks. It's this vision of the world, with the Christian family at the heart, that modern parents desperately need to recover. The household is not just a shelter from a war zone, it is the command center from which we launch our attacks. It's this vision of the world, with the Christian family at the heart, that modern parents desperately need to recover.

30 review for The Household and the War for the Cosmos: Recovering a Christian Vision for the Family

  1. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Wilson

    This is one first-rate book. What I really enjoyed was how the entire book was a sustained argument, building to a crescendo. Really good.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    I didn't give this a star rating because I have some questions and concerns about some of it, and because I listened to the audio book in a single day and have no hard copy to refer back to or check against my memory. So here's my grain of salt. Please take it. First, the comparison between Abraham and Aeneas was fresh and compelling, and Wiley makes a number of sharp-witted and spot-on critiques of the failings of contemporary secular society and its distortions of what family and the home ought I didn't give this a star rating because I have some questions and concerns about some of it, and because I listened to the audio book in a single day and have no hard copy to refer back to or check against my memory. So here's my grain of salt. Please take it. First, the comparison between Abraham and Aeneas was fresh and compelling, and Wiley makes a number of sharp-witted and spot-on critiques of the failings of contemporary secular society and its distortions of what family and the home ought to be. Second, his explanation of what the first-century Christians would have understood as a household was also helpful and sheds light on how to understand the Bible's regular use of the family/household as a metaphor for the church (the household of faith, the family of God, etc.). A right understanding of the household has big implications for society, the church, and, yes, the cosmos. And a right understanding of the church and the cosmos has big implications for the household as well. But one thing that raised, if not a red flag, then at least a yellow one for me was simply positioning the household as the central institution rather than the church. I'd like to know what he thinks about the roles of those two institutions, since Jesus' call to be willing to leave father and mother, children and lands for His sake seems to indicate that belonging to the church takes precedence over the family. His mother and His brothers, He says, are those who do the will of His Father. And God can raise up children of Abraham from the very stones. The blood of Christ, not the blood of family, is the primary thing that unites us. I'm sure Wiley doesn't disagree, but it doesn't come through very clearly with the centrality he places on the household. The second concern is the almost nostalgic descriptions of the way family life used to be in a pre-industrial world where the economy was driven by husband, wife, and children working harmoniously from home-centered businesses, and so on. His portrayal of the good old days struck me as a bit simplistic and romanticized. No doubt home-based proprietorship was more common in centuries past (this seems beyond dispute), but that this was the norm everywhere and that it therefore ought to be our ideal for 21st-century Christians seems problematic. I say problematic, in part, because my husband recently had a conversation with a young husband and father who had just read this book and was on the brink of quitting his steady job in order to start some kind of unspecified home business. What kind of business he didn't know, but he was feeling burdened with guilt for being "just a wage earner" outside the home. I don't know if Wiley intended this to be the response, but it's not hard to see why it was. And something may be wrong if men come away from this book feeling like they aren't measuring up as Christians unless they're the self-employed owners of their own home-based businesses. Don't get me wrong. Self employment can be great for some. But it can also (as I've repeatedly seen with my own eyes) be financially less secure or even ruinous, not to mention a less efficient use of the talents and human resources that may already be in short supply within a community. The other reason this call to business ownership raises a yellow flag is that we already live in one of the most individualistic cultures in history, and I'd argue that there's actually something spiritually beneficial—for young men in particular—to have to answer to somebody other than themselves as they earn their paycheck. My husband will tell you that getting chewed out by his boss as a young man was one of the best experiences he ever had for shaping the trajectory of his life and work ethic from that point forward. It was the centurion, remember, whose faith grew from his military employment as a man under authority. It taught him something true and commendable about what Christ’s authority was like. There's no question that we've lost something valuable by turning our homes into little more than places of weekend recreation, nor that this loss can distort our understanding of both the church and the world. But at the same time, living in a culture that exalts individual autonomy, and in a sector of Christendom that tends to reject the established authorities and lean heavily libertarian has pitfalls of its own—namely the potential to produce men who have no concept of what it means to live under legitimate authority. My concern here (particularly as the mom of five boys who are just months away from beginning to launch out into the world themselves) is that in rejecting one set of errors, this book could, perhaps, drive some Christians toward a different set of errors as they establish their own households. We have a certain Christian subculture with an already-strong impulse to drive all of our dealings back into the home—to school the children at home, treat medical conditions at home, have babies at home, keep the government out of the home, spend leisure time at home, to work from home and so on. The result is that we have no teachers, no doctors, no governors, and now no bosses to submit ourselves to. None of these things is bad in itself, and I understand the reasons behind choosing to do all of the above. But if no one except God Himself stands as a legitimate authority over a single facet of a man's life, it can—and sometimes does—produce the kind of men who become a law unto themselves and who split churches, ruin marriages, and alienate children. And because church is the one place where authority over these men may still exist, and because they have little practice submitting to legitimate authority or accepting rebuke and criticism from anyone above them, the minute the leaders of that church makes a ruling they don't like, they cast it off and do one (or all) of three things: gather a little clique of fellow dissenters around themselves to complain about and to the authorities, go start their own separate sect where they themselves call the shots (home church, anyone?), or march off to some church down the road that won't tell them what to do. (I am not making this up. I'd go so far as to call it a predictable pattern.) In other words, for some men, working outside of the home for a boss could be the crucial part of character formation that teaches them what it actually means to have a master in heaven and to live accordingly. Lastly, I'm no historian, but I am quite sure there were plenty of men, even in the early church, who were employed by others and were doing God-honoring work out in the world, without wife and children alongside them throughout the day. There were teachers and tent makers, jesters and judges. Take the fishermen Jesus called to follow him. They were engaged in work that necessitated leaving home, and it wasn't exactly family-friendly work either, but Jesus uses fishing as a metaphor for reaching lost souls, and the disciples clearly continued in their work even after the resurrection without being rebuked for falling short of the ideal. Then, as now, there were many ways to make a living, and then, as now, each kind of living must have come with its own set of practical, financial, and spiritual benefits and drawbacks. I wish the book had presented more of a call to faithfulness suited to the post-industrial century into which we were born rather than calling us to the faithfulness that requires the pre-technological underpinninings of a society that has largely passed away. To be fair, I have not yet read Man of the House, so Wiley may very well have made the careful qualifications and caveats that seem to be missing from what he says here. But without them, this book, though valuable in many respects, concerns me in how it may work itself out in the lives of those who read it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Corey

    I never gave the New Testament household codes much thought until I noticed how scrupulously people try to avoid them. That’s when I began to suspect that they could be indispensable. (p. 82) Earns a place on the shelf next to other lightning bolts, like Wilson’s Angels in the Architecture, Esolen’s Ten Ways, and Pieper’s Leisure: books that provide a flash of clarity so bright that some facet of the way you understand the world (and your place in it) is permanently changed. “war for the cosmos” s I never gave the New Testament household codes much thought until I noticed how scrupulously people try to avoid them. That’s when I began to suspect that they could be indispensable. (p. 82) Earns a place on the shelf next to other lightning bolts, like Wilson’s Angels in the Architecture, Esolen’s Ten Ways, and Pieper’s Leisure: books that provide a flash of clarity so bright that some facet of the way you understand the world (and your place in it) is permanently changed. “war for the cosmos” sounds dramatic until you pause and think and realize that yeah - the stakes really are that high.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Ventura

    C.R. Wiley's "Man of the House" was probably the best book I read in 2018. If you haven't read it yet, stop reading this review and go buy it immediately. When I heard a sequel (prequel?) was coming, I had high expectations. I am pleased to say upon finishing this short book (112 pages) that it did not disappoint. Wiley argues that when the household is ordered according to the household code in the New Testament (see Ephesians), it becomes a most potent tool in God's hand for restoring peace to C.R. Wiley's "Man of the House" was probably the best book I read in 2018. If you haven't read it yet, stop reading this review and go buy it immediately. When I heard a sequel (prequel?) was coming, I had high expectations. I am pleased to say upon finishing this short book (112 pages) that it did not disappoint. Wiley argues that when the household is ordered according to the household code in the New Testament (see Ephesians), it becomes a most potent tool in God's hand for restoring peace to the cosmos. A fruitful marriage is then a picture of the Cosmos 2.0 in which all things come together in Christ. There is a lot here to help situate "Man of the House" in a bigger context and internalizing this perspective will transform the way you view your life and ambitions. Highly recommend.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Peter Jones

    A great book that gives the central principles for why the family exists. It provides the foundation for Man of the House. His discussion of piety is excellent as others have noted. More and more I think that sentimentality has destroyed our view of the household, marriage, children, and just about everything else. Wiley is not sentimental. He has the end in mind. What is the goal of the family? It is not so we can all feel good about ourselves. The household is not recreational nor primarily co A great book that gives the central principles for why the family exists. It provides the foundation for Man of the House. His discussion of piety is excellent as others have noted. More and more I think that sentimentality has destroyed our view of the household, marriage, children, and just about everything else. Wiley is not sentimental. He has the end in mind. What is the goal of the family? It is not so we can all feel good about ourselves. The household is not recreational nor primarily consumeristic nor is it a group of independent folks each going their own way and then gathering to sleep in the same dwelling. The household has a purpose. This book is truly counter -cultural and Biblical. I would highly encourage all to read it, but especially young men who are in their teens or preparing to marry or newly married.

  6. 5 out of 5

    J Landon Light

    Christopher Wiley is a pastor and author on a rescue mission. He is on a quest to save some ancient and noble words from being lost. In “The Household and War for the Cosmos” Wiley ably sets out to recover these old words and reintroduce them to a new generation of Christians that desperately need them. The first word to be rescued is ‘piety’. Wiley notes how this word has been displaced by contemporary terms that some might think are synonymous. He is at pains to show that, unlike contemporary Christopher Wiley is a pastor and author on a rescue mission. He is on a quest to save some ancient and noble words from being lost. In “The Household and War for the Cosmos” Wiley ably sets out to recover these old words and reintroduce them to a new generation of Christians that desperately need them. The first word to be rescued is ‘piety’. Wiley notes how this word has been displaced by contemporary terms that some might think are synonymous. He is at pains to show that, unlike contemporary terms like ‘devotions’ or ‘spiritual disciplines’, piety as understood by the ancients, the authors of Scripture, and most of the Christian tradition, is an objective, external, and public sort of thing. It is more than mere personal fervor or private exercise; it encompasses our obligations, first to God, but also to our families, communities, and nations. Wiley traces out the dimensions of piety by looking at the examples of Aeneas and Abraham. By looking at the similarities and differences between their stories he demonstrates how much the ancient pagans and ancient Christians overlapped in their understanding of piety. The upshot of this survey is to show that, while Aeneas (whether he was a real figure or not) and the Romans were ultimately pagans, they had a remarkably similar understanding of the dimensions of piety to that of the Jews and early Christians. Both understood that each man has a responsibility to the god(s), his forefathers, his descendants, and his countrymen. The major difference is at the top of the chain- who is the divine ruler? Now that gods are in the picture, Wiley takes up the second endangered word- ‘cosmos’. Wiley takes time to argue that this word is not a synonym for ‘universe’. It’s more of a political idea than an astronomical one. There are cosmic powers and rulers beyond and among us on Earth. At the top of them all is God Himself, that great Father and Lord of the cosmic household. And that is the third word Wiley is out to save. Again, Wiley feels it important to show that ‘household’ is not just a synonym for a more familiar word. It is not another term for family, though of course they are closely intertwined. The household is also a legal and political thing. It is the structure and rule of a family and its properties. The household is also a microcosm- a miniature cosmos. Like the larger reality it images, a properly functioning household is based on that system moderns dread- hierarchy. Oh, and not just any hierarchy- a *gasps* patriarchy! Wiley examines the household codes of the New Testament, which he argues are largely ignored in most churches today. He brings in the Greek philosopher Xenophon, who living centuries before Christ, wrote about management of households extensively. Once again we see that there are major areas of overlap between Christian and the best pagan teaching on household economy. What is revolutionary about the New Testament is not the obligations and authority structures proposed for the household, but what they represent and the character of the God who stands behind them. I very much enjoyed the historical, philosophical, and biblical survey of ideas presented in the book up to this point. But Wiley does not say so much about how exactly my household relates to the great war for the cosmos in the title. In the final pages he begins to bring it into focus. I do wish he would have said more here, but the alert reader can put the pieces together. Wiley reminds us that the fight Abraham’s children are in is a fight to stay true to the Lord Jesus Christ, who rules over all, even as cosmic powers in rebellion against Christ seek to compel us to serve them instead. Wiley shows us that these powers hate the natural, biblical household because of Who it serves and what it represents, even as they rely on its generative power to create the new generations of workers and subjects they need. And in our time we are at a crisis point. Modern society has eroded and weakened the household severely. And here Wiley lays out why our little households are so important. “You may wonder how your small stake could possibly threaten the powers that be. Just remember, a household ordered by the household code in Ephesians reflects the rule of Christ. Besides that, all things connect. The little tune that your household sings is in harmony with the music of the spheres, and that harmony restores many things that the enemy has perverted.” (page 121) The household, biblically ordered strikes a blow for the Lord of the Cosmos. You and I, ordering our homes to image the rule of Christ, are helping to push back the enemies of our Lord. This is no small thing. This is why our households matter, according to Wiley. And I think he is exactly correct. “The Household and War for the Cosmos” is a very smooth, enjoyable read. Clocking in at 123 pages (not including the excellent foreword and preface by Nancy Pearcey and Anthony Esolen, respectively), it can be read in a few hours. Though it gets into deep concepts, Wiley is good at delivering his ideas without requiring his audience to have advanced knowledge of philosophy and metaphysics. My greatest regret with the book is its brevity. As someone who has been reading a great deal about the subject of the natural family, I would have enjoyed reading Wiley on these matters for another few hundred pages. However, the brevity of the book makes it a perfect introduction to the subject for those who are just beginning to explore it. It would be an ideal starting point for that friend, brother, and (especially) son who needs to become acquainted with piety and a biblical view of the household. Once you have them hooked, you can direct them to Wiley’s previous book “Man of the House” for more concrete application in actually building up their households. For those wishing to explore the topic of the household and natural family in greater historical and sociological detail, you can send them to just about anything by Allan C. Carlson. I intend to pass “The Household and War for the Cosmos” around as a conversation starter. Highly recommended! Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this book for review purposes with no obligation to give it a positive review

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jake McAtee

    Came for the cover. Stayed for the Abram / Aeneas comparisons. Audiobook is on the way.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Schultz

    Focused treatment of a helpful point

  9. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Brown

    The content of this book is very important, and it was well written, but I felt like the book had only just started by the time it ended. This might be because I expected the philosophical sections to lead up to practical application chapters. If Mr. Wiley had explained what the book is and what it is not at the beginning, instead of in the last chapter, maybe that would have helped direct my expectations.

  10. 4 out of 5

    mpsiple

    Great little book. *The Household and the War for the Cosmos* isn't so much about the family, as it is about the family's place in the world. It's an extended argument for the importance of the "household," it's relationship to the created order (cosmos), and how God uses it give the world a vision of the future. If *Man of the House* gave the practical advice, this book provides the foundation. Wiley can meander at times, but the pay-off is great as you see the pieces coming together. He moves f Great little book. *The Household and the War for the Cosmos* isn't so much about the family, as it is about the family's place in the world. It's an extended argument for the importance of the "household," it's relationship to the created order (cosmos), and how God uses it give the world a vision of the future. If *Man of the House* gave the practical advice, this book provides the foundation. Wiley can meander at times, but the pay-off is great as you see the pieces coming together. He moves from Aeneas to Ephesians to argue (persuasively) for the importance of the household. And he has a knack for the aphorism that makes for a fun read. You can feel him smiling, even when he seems grumpy. I'd recommend this for anyone who's wondered about the place of the family in modern life. (I received a free copy of this book for review.)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Logan Thune

    Still a 5.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mike Conroy

    If it is the mere happiness a spouse brings to the other that created and sustained their marriage, then we should not be surprised if either leaves it to find happiness in someone else. The issue Christians face in marriage is our solutions to deal with marriages that aren't working well. For we keep revealing that we have no idea why God created marriage to begin with. Without this foundation, all we are left with is our own persona happiness. Is this what marriage and families are for? C.R. Wi If it is the mere happiness a spouse brings to the other that created and sustained their marriage, then we should not be surprised if either leaves it to find happiness in someone else. The issue Christians face in marriage is our solutions to deal with marriages that aren't working well. For we keep revealing that we have no idea why God created marriage to begin with. Without this foundation, all we are left with is our own persona happiness. Is this what marriage and families are for? C.R. Wiley's little book, "The Household and the War for the Cosmos" does an excellent job to bring us back to the foundations we have long forgotten. He does this through exploring the long-lost ideas of: Piety, The Aeneid, Natural Order in the Universe, the World being governed by an invisible usurper to the real King, the affects of the Industrial Revolution to unravel the concept of Household, and, most importantly, the Bible. Most helpful were his thoughts on Piety and the ancient (pre-industrial revolution) understanding of Household. Piety, according to Wiley, is life in harmony with our duty to our Creator and His Word to us. It is not a private matter, merely a personal relationship, or something that only impacts our "quiet time." But a life that delights in our duties before Him. This implies that what husband and wife do in marriage and cultivating a household together is not a private matter. It is not up to us to determine what we think a family should look like, or what we'd prefer. His biblical and historical insights on the household were really good! It is not random, but a core to the Universe - since they come from God, the Father from whom every family on earth is named. Almost all of our present day confusion about the authority of a husband and the submission of a wife are due to lack of considering: Obedience to God. This was what Dr. Ransom said to Jane in C.S. Lewis' "That Hideous Strength" when she could not understand why a wife would have to submit to her husband. We think that men would lead only for their own ambition or selfish desires. Perhaps that it true. But that is because husband have lost their calling before the Lord. Husband are lost when they think of what it would look like to lead their homes because they don't know why God created families to begin with. I heartily encourage this book to be read and discussed with those who want to order our lives in harmony with the world as the Lord God made it. May our families be little pictures on this world of the life that is coming. (pg. 106)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jared Mcnabb

    Excellent. Provides the backbone on which Wiley’s previous book “Man of the house” is fleshed out. There is a lot of great stuff packed in here, a recovery of the concept of piety, comparison of Aenas, cosmology, and a discussion of the importance of the biblical household codes. My only complaint is that it could have been longer, with some things could have been fleshed out more.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Myersandburnsie

    I listened on audio to this beautiful but sad commentary on US households. I would like to re-read is hard copy to better digest this.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Karli W

    The author makes the argument that gorilla piety is how the church can wage war against the world for the household of God. An interesting read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Josh Dockter

    Very good book. I recommend it to anyone who is a little more than suspicious of the current power holders. Wiley paints a beautiful vision of the Christian home and our central place in the cosmos.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Valerie Kyriosity

    Good, but not very applicable to me, so not as engaging as it would otherwise have been. I know he lives across the country, but (no offense, Ben!) I sure do wish they'd finagled a way to have the author read the audiobook. He's got an amazing voice, and it's too had we don't get to hear it on his book. Good, but not very applicable to me, so not as engaging as it would otherwise have been. I know he lives across the country, but (no offense, Ben!) I sure do wish they'd finagled a way to have the author read the audiobook. He's got an amazing voice, and it's too had we don't get to hear it on his book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Stacia

    I would probably lean closer to 3.5 stars, if that were an option. I really wanted to love this book. I also was expecting something different from this book and so I've tried to reorient my mind. It has definitely made me think a lot. Ultimately, this book is about a philosophy for the household. It is not the applications of the philosophy so much as an argumentation for it. Some criticisms: -The author comes across a bit snarky at times. -He spends a lot of time on the etymology of the words I would probably lean closer to 3.5 stars, if that were an option. I really wanted to love this book. I also was expecting something different from this book and so I've tried to reorient my mind. It has definitely made me think a lot. Ultimately, this book is about a philosophy for the household. It is not the applications of the philosophy so much as an argumentation for it. Some criticisms: -The author comes across a bit snarky at times. -He spends a lot of time on the etymology of the words piety and cosmos. Yet, as far as I can tell, he doesn't give a succinct, helpful, working definition of piety. Just a long explanation of what it means. -He seems to lift up the 1st century household as what we ought to model today without an argument as to why _that_ model is the best of all models. Some praise: -I appreciate the desire to give people a vision for the family and one that reminds us that our homes should be centers of productivity. -It is thought provoking! -Densely packed with A LOT of good information. I underlined a TON in the book. And it has started some great conversations between my husband and myself. It sounds like his first book is the application of this, I think it would be interesting to read, even if it seems more marketed toward men.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

    Wiley's book is a recovery project: reclaiming our understanding of the household as part of a greater ordered cosmos instead of as a recreation center for self-actualizing people. As part of that project, Wiley also seeks to recovery the place of piety (holy duty and obligation to God, family, and community) as the core virtue of the household. The Aeneas/Abram comparison is particularly insightful. Wiley's is a provocative and insightful thesis, which is often persuasive, though the length of Wiley's book is a recovery project: reclaiming our understanding of the household as part of a greater ordered cosmos instead of as a recreation center for self-actualizing people. As part of that project, Wiley also seeks to recovery the place of piety (holy duty and obligation to God, family, and community) as the core virtue of the household. The Aeneas/Abram comparison is particularly insightful. Wiley's is a provocative and insightful thesis, which is often persuasive, though the length of the book prevents him from engaging real potential critiques in any depth and leads to some over-generalizations. For example, is Wiley overstating the place of the household vis a vis the church? And while it's undoubtedly true the a modernity (and the Industrial Revolution with it) have transformed the household in significantly damaging ways, is it as simple as going back to the "good old days" of the productive household? These lines of critique are touched upon, but not really engaged in ways that might make thesis more persuasive.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    So, as with any book, there are parts that I whole heartedly say "Amen!" to and want all the people to read. And other parts that I take issue with. Stop here, and go find Hannah's review. All those things. (Church as center, etc) Just like we cannot idealize the 50's, nor can we with ancient times. While the industrial revolution may have caused some things to change even more in the household (because of sin and abdication, rather than the revolution itself), I will say I appreciate a lot of wha So, as with any book, there are parts that I whole heartedly say "Amen!" to and want all the people to read. And other parts that I take issue with. Stop here, and go find Hannah's review. All those things. (Church as center, etc) Just like we cannot idealize the 50's, nor can we with ancient times. While the industrial revolution may have caused some things to change even more in the household (because of sin and abdication, rather than the revolution itself), I will say I appreciate a lot of what came from the revolution... like air conditioning. ha! However, this book does help one understand Scripture a bit better with the whole importance of the family structure. His part on NT household codes , especially that of slavery, are eye-opening to be sure. I would caution going all in on the book, with every detail, but a wonderful reminder of what a household should look like, priorities, care, and influence on the culture.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dylan Stinson

    I couldn't put this book down. Read it in two sittings. My only critique is I wish the ideas were a bit more detailed. I don't mind short reads (I actually prefer them) but the book seemed like it was just getting started right when it ended. Wiley's vision for the family is great and the comparison between Abraham & Aeneas was interesting. The idea of "guerilla piety" is something I'd love to see the church embrace. Overall, a great read. I'd recommend to anyone who is searching for meaning and I couldn't put this book down. Read it in two sittings. My only critique is I wish the ideas were a bit more detailed. I don't mind short reads (I actually prefer them) but the book seemed like it was just getting started right when it ended. Wiley's vision for the family is great and the comparison between Abraham & Aeneas was interesting. The idea of "guerilla piety" is something I'd love to see the church embrace. Overall, a great read. I'd recommend to anyone who is searching for meaning and purpose in the household/family.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Emma Whear

    I've been hoping to get my hands on a copy of this for a while. Thanks to the materfamilias, who took a trek down to Canon. Lovely- though it makes me want to pick up a copy of "Man of the House," if that's the more practical and less theoretical take on the same subject by the author. Best things about it: -Length. If you can't say it in 112 pages, you don't have the concept nailed down -Tone. Wiley is a clever human, and it shows. -Use of Greek, Latin, Scriptural texts. Pleasurable read as a seco I've been hoping to get my hands on a copy of this for a while. Thanks to the materfamilias, who took a trek down to Canon. Lovely- though it makes me want to pick up a copy of "Man of the House," if that's the more practical and less theoretical take on the same subject by the author. Best things about it: -Length. If you can't say it in 112 pages, you don't have the concept nailed down -Tone. Wiley is a clever human, and it shows. -Use of Greek, Latin, Scriptural texts. Pleasurable read as a second year Greek student. Makes me want to chop-chop on the household building, or at least pick up a copy of Xenophon.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    A great follow up to Man of the House. I really enjoyed this book, it gave a helpful history on the subject of the family & insightful analysis of how we got to where we are today. Most importantly it offers guidance on how to move forward & bring about lasting change that will make a difference in our world that honors & most glorifies God. This would be an excellent resource for a group study too.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kyle M

    Great insight and perspective being brought through the lens of scripture. Wiley takes a broad look at how the family and its parts have been viewed throughout history and how secularism clashes with how it is designed by our Creator. (So that there is no confusion, this is specifically coming from the only consistent worldview that comes from Jesus Christ, the God-Man)

  25. 5 out of 5

    McKinsey Stokes

    Wow, I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Highly thought-provoking and relevant, Wiley gives us a poetic framework for understanding the household in terms of God’s Word. I listened to the audiobook, and now I want a paper copy to mark up! Highly recommend!!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gabie Peacock

    I really enjoyed this thought provoking book and especially felt motivated to press on in the day to day tasks in the Christian household. I truly loved the sections regarding the family economy and how it used to function. Families working together and passing on a legacy to their children!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mary Beth

    Really good stuff. Wiley does a fantastic job giving us well-defined/excellently illustrated big picture views of piety, duty, and (quite literally) the family’s place in the cosmos.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    I think this is the first time I’ve ever said this: if this book were longer it would have been 5 stars. Still very good and worth reading.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Achord

    Very good.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Miska Wilhelmsson

    The foreword by Nancy Pearcey was excellent, and worth the book itself. Some very good stuff in this book, but overall I was disappointed. Too much extra-biblical storytelling for my liking.

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