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Embarrassed billionaires tried to keep a lid on this story, but it cried out to be told: how America's greatest comic-book company was driven to the brink of insolvency by warring tycoons and rescued from the abyss by two obscure but wily entrepreneurs. In the late 1980s, financier Ronald Perelman, worth billions and riding high after his hostile takeover of the cosmetics Embarrassed billionaires tried to keep a lid on this story, but it cried out to be told: how America's greatest comic-book company was driven to the brink of insolvency by warring tycoons and rescued from the abyss by two obscure but wily entrepreneurs. In the late 1980s, financier Ronald Perelman, worth billions and riding high after his hostile takeover of the cosmetics firm Revlon, bought Marvel Entertainment–legendary creator of Captain America, the Incredible Hulk, Spider-Man, the X-Men, and other superheroes–and he had big plans. He not only began churning out more comic books, he also acquired sports cards and other subsidiaries, impressing Wall Street so much that after he took the company public, Marvel’s market value ballooned to over $3 billion. Perelman took advantage of the company’s inflated valuation by selling junk bonds, and personally pocketing nearly $500 million. Meanwhile, Marvel’s bank debt rose to more than $600 million. And then came the collapse of the comic-book and trading-card markets. Enter rival corporate raider, Carl Icahn, who sank a fortune into Marvel’s bonds in an effort to wrest away control of Marvel–and to beat Perelman at his own game. As the competing tycoons went head-to-head, Ike Perlmutter and Avi Arad, two entrepreneurs who ran Toy Biz, a company that depended on Marvel superheroes, realized that their fate hung in the balance. They soon put in motion plans to take control themselves. Bunkered in The Townhouse, his high-security Manhattan corporate headquarters, Perelman had Marvel declare bankruptcy. Icahn, an avid poker player, had to figure out if his foe was bluffing; the Toy Biz entrepreneurs needed to find a way to save the company they loved from ruin; and a team of killer lawyers representing the banks was faced with recouping their colossal debt. Thus, in United States Bankruptcy Court, began the comic war–as ferocious and outlandish as any of Marvel’s tales of good vs. evil. Combining meticulous investigative reporting with entertaining storytelling, Comic Wars exposes the actions and motives of two Goliath-style corporate raiders, two innovative Davids, and some of the world’s most prominent banks. It is the rollicking true tale of a unique Wall Street showdown, of Marvel’s surprising emergence from the ashes of bankruptcy, and of its triumphant reinvention as the producer of such hit Hollywood movies as X-Men and Spider-Man.


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Embarrassed billionaires tried to keep a lid on this story, but it cried out to be told: how America's greatest comic-book company was driven to the brink of insolvency by warring tycoons and rescued from the abyss by two obscure but wily entrepreneurs. In the late 1980s, financier Ronald Perelman, worth billions and riding high after his hostile takeover of the cosmetics Embarrassed billionaires tried to keep a lid on this story, but it cried out to be told: how America's greatest comic-book company was driven to the brink of insolvency by warring tycoons and rescued from the abyss by two obscure but wily entrepreneurs. In the late 1980s, financier Ronald Perelman, worth billions and riding high after his hostile takeover of the cosmetics firm Revlon, bought Marvel Entertainment–legendary creator of Captain America, the Incredible Hulk, Spider-Man, the X-Men, and other superheroes–and he had big plans. He not only began churning out more comic books, he also acquired sports cards and other subsidiaries, impressing Wall Street so much that after he took the company public, Marvel’s market value ballooned to over $3 billion. Perelman took advantage of the company’s inflated valuation by selling junk bonds, and personally pocketing nearly $500 million. Meanwhile, Marvel’s bank debt rose to more than $600 million. And then came the collapse of the comic-book and trading-card markets. Enter rival corporate raider, Carl Icahn, who sank a fortune into Marvel’s bonds in an effort to wrest away control of Marvel–and to beat Perelman at his own game. As the competing tycoons went head-to-head, Ike Perlmutter and Avi Arad, two entrepreneurs who ran Toy Biz, a company that depended on Marvel superheroes, realized that their fate hung in the balance. They soon put in motion plans to take control themselves. Bunkered in The Townhouse, his high-security Manhattan corporate headquarters, Perelman had Marvel declare bankruptcy. Icahn, an avid poker player, had to figure out if his foe was bluffing; the Toy Biz entrepreneurs needed to find a way to save the company they loved from ruin; and a team of killer lawyers representing the banks was faced with recouping their colossal debt. Thus, in United States Bankruptcy Court, began the comic war–as ferocious and outlandish as any of Marvel’s tales of good vs. evil. Combining meticulous investigative reporting with entertaining storytelling, Comic Wars exposes the actions and motives of two Goliath-style corporate raiders, two innovative Davids, and some of the world’s most prominent banks. It is the rollicking true tale of a unique Wall Street showdown, of Marvel’s surprising emergence from the ashes of bankruptcy, and of its triumphant reinvention as the producer of such hit Hollywood movies as X-Men and Spider-Man.

30 review for Comic Wars: How Two Tycoons Battled Over the Marvel Comics Empire--And Both Lost

  1. 4 out of 5

    Giddy Girlie

    So I read this book thinking that I'd get a better glimpse into Marvel Comics. My husband has worked for them on several comic titles, and from that interaction I had a million questions about marketing tactics, future of the business, etc. This book answered NONE of them and barely gets us to "present day" operations. Instead, this book is a line-by-line dissection of the investors' dirty dealings (junk bonds, dummy corporations, acquisitions, etc.) and how it led to incredible instability withi So I read this book thinking that I'd get a better glimpse into Marvel Comics. My husband has worked for them on several comic titles, and from that interaction I had a million questions about marketing tactics, future of the business, etc. This book answered NONE of them and barely gets us to "present day" operations. Instead, this book is a line-by-line dissection of the investors' dirty dealings (junk bonds, dummy corporations, acquisitions, etc.) and how it led to incredible instability within the company and the industry. I learned a lot, but this wasn't the "insider's glimpse" that I was hoping for. It was chock full of legal maneuvers and such (although very well translated for the layman) that the company endured under Perelman and Icahn. if you're into details and how junk bonds and dummy corporations are created everywhere -- including comic books -- then you might enjoy this book. For me, it was SLOW GOING, waiting for the big "aha" moment that didn't come. Like I said, I started off with incorrect assumptions about the book, so it's my fault that I didn't find what I was looking for.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Todd Wood

    It's not every day you get to read a distressed debt thriller! It's not every day you get to read a distressed debt thriller!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    This is a shockingly good book. Compelling, with interesting (non-fictional) characters replete with conflict and tragic flaws. A must for comic book fans, who will feel an immediate attachment to the material, but also a wonderful primer on the world of Extremely Shady Finance. Who knew that Marvel's financial crisis in the late 90s would look startlingly like the nation's financial crisis in 2008? And that many of the players-- Bear Stearns, Morgan Stanley Dean Witter, Carl Icahn-- would be th This is a shockingly good book. Compelling, with interesting (non-fictional) characters replete with conflict and tragic flaws. A must for comic book fans, who will feel an immediate attachment to the material, but also a wonderful primer on the world of Extremely Shady Finance. Who knew that Marvel's financial crisis in the late 90s would look startlingly like the nation's financial crisis in 2008? And that many of the players-- Bear Stearns, Morgan Stanley Dean Witter, Carl Icahn-- would be the same jackasses who literally gambled the world's economy on their own short term gains? The fact that the corporate tycoons that are the headliners in the story act like supervillains doesn't hurt either. Ron Perelman (whose name sounds like Peril Man, obviously a bad guy) is a pure vulture capitalist and legal fraud artist, pumping up Marvel's value through unwise expansion and $700 million in debt in order to sell billions in high-risk junk bonds to investors. Carl Icahn is the "corporate terrorist" who recognizes the financial weakness inflicted by Perelman and purchases enough of the company to sue everyone associated with it like a madman while threatening to sell off Marvel's intellectual property for "parts." Finally, Toy Biz founder Ike Perlmutter is there, both championing Marvel as a company and trying to save it from the above two figures, while also proving to be a paranoid control-freak who could easily destroy the company he's fighting to save. Very well-written and accessible. This is a fun read, filled with tension and absurdity. And I love the cover, where two middle-aged businessmen duke it out while Wolverine, Captain America, and She-Hulk stand nearby and look vaguely embarrassed and Spider-Man narrates the scene. For more on comics, humanity, morality and the world check out The Stupid Philosopher, aka a place where I put my words.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jay Rain

    Rating - 8 Very interesting behind the scenes expose on the business of comics and the clash of super-egos; Further evidence that life and entertainment are all about fat pockets and not about the consumer Writing is simple and fast-paced, cannot feel empathy for an underdog w a net worth of $100MM, and as a reader I am offended for what comes across as a very biased account of what transpired

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    An interesting story, but not very interestingly written. The business stuff is scary but far to dense and complicated. The comic history stuff is often inaccurate and completely misunderstands many things.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Manganiello

    A shining example as to why beloved companies such as Marvel should never go public. This is a story about greedy Wall Street types, who don't give a shit about the companies they own. Hell, the people who owned the majority share of Marvel throughout the time period this book covers never even read a single comic book, or gave a single shit about the characters they owned the rights to either. Although Disney is a public company, and is now riding the social justice warrior train at the time of th A shining example as to why beloved companies such as Marvel should never go public. This is a story about greedy Wall Street types, who don't give a shit about the companies they own. Hell, the people who owned the majority share of Marvel throughout the time period this book covers never even read a single comic book, or gave a single shit about the characters they owned the rights to either. Although Disney is a public company, and is now riding the social justice warrior train at the time of this review, I do believe they are smart enough to realize that if they don't start making great none-snowflake movies like the Iron Man movies soon, that the fans will just totally turn off and leave. People want their characters to be like them, not like the 1% who live in Hollywood... and that's a fact!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Kahn

    Interesting enough read. I'm not a big business guy - I read it as more of a Marvel fan - but it was fascinating to see all the egos at play. It's ridiculous and a little depressing to see how much money gets wasted just so someone can trump someone else. It's all a little sleazy and depressing. I think in light of all that's happened since in terms of Marvel movies, an updated edition with developments to date would be welcome. Interesting enough read. I'm not a big business guy - I read it as more of a Marvel fan - but it was fascinating to see all the egos at play. It's ridiculous and a little depressing to see how much money gets wasted just so someone can trump someone else. It's all a little sleazy and depressing. I think in light of all that's happened since in terms of Marvel movies, an updated edition with developments to date would be welcome.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    An impressive book as far as legal and business dealings and details. Big business is can be truly complex, especially when big egos are involved. Although interesting, detailed, and a subject I'm drawn to (the comic book industry), it took me forever to get through this relatively short book because I would read it in bed and it was guaranteed to put me to sleep after a page or two. An impressive book as far as legal and business dealings and details. Big business is can be truly complex, especially when big egos are involved. Although interesting, detailed, and a subject I'm drawn to (the comic book industry), it took me forever to get through this relatively short book because I would read it in bed and it was guaranteed to put me to sleep after a page or two.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jeno

    Great read (as long as you know ahead of time what the book is actually about)!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tim Vargulish

    I always love learning about what goes on behind the scenes in comic books unfortunately though this was pretty dry and boring.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Bryson McCheeseburger

    I'm done, and by done, I mean I have closed the book and am not going to continue. It really is a sad attempt to take a true story, and weave some actual storytelling into it, to make it more dramatic, but it just comes off as dull. I really wanted to know the whole story, but the writing and style are awful to follow. The writer tries to make the characters larger than life, much like the comic characters Marvel created, but it just comes off as trying way too hard. Now I'm searching for online I'm done, and by done, I mean I have closed the book and am not going to continue. It really is a sad attempt to take a true story, and weave some actual storytelling into it, to make it more dramatic, but it just comes off as dull. I really wanted to know the whole story, but the writing and style are awful to follow. The writer tries to make the characters larger than life, much like the comic characters Marvel created, but it just comes off as trying way too hard. Now I'm searching for online sources to fill in the gaps and finish the information for me. It could have been done much better, and it could have still been made interesting, but in this one, it falls flat.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    In the early 1990s, Marvel comics was a superstar of the industry. With several fan-favourite artists, they were selling huge numbers of comics with alternate covers and luxurious production values, they were raking in money as fans and speculators coudln't get enough. A couple of years later, they were in bankruptcy court. What happened? This book tells us, in dramatic detail. When Marvel's original owner, Marty Goodmon, sold the company, he sold it to New World, who may have known something abo In the early 1990s, Marvel comics was a superstar of the industry. With several fan-favourite artists, they were selling huge numbers of comics with alternate covers and luxurious production values, they were raking in money as fans and speculators coudln't get enough. A couple of years later, they were in bankruptcy court. What happened? This book tells us, in dramatic detail. When Marvel's original owner, Marty Goodmon, sold the company, he sold it to New World, who may have known something about publishing, but nothing about comics - the buyer thought he was getting Superman. Soon later the company landed in the hands of Ron Perelman, a multi-billionnaire who built his fortune on taking companies (like Revlon) and gutting them for every penny, then selling them and moving on. Ina flurry of junk bonds and speculative financing, Marvel fell between Perelman and rival financier Carl Icahn, with Ike Perlmutter (of the little company Toy Biz) and his pal Avi Arad getting caught in the crossfire. Huge sums of money, played like poker chips, were at stake among men whose wealth was already incalculable. They didn't need more money, but they didn't want to lose. Lawyer got into the act, fighting each other like foul-mouthed schoolboys. Judges assigned to the case started fighting each other. It looked for a while as if Marvel would not - could not - survive. And one thing was clear: no one involved cared in the least about comics. Raviv has made this a fascinating tale, in which I became more appalled by the cutthroat world of big business than ever. The product didn't matter, much less the fans, the creativity, the livelihoods and the business of comics. Lucky thing that, while reading, I already knew from hindsight that Marvel had survived. http://www.randomhouse.com/features/c... Sometimes I wondered how Raviv knew the personal details he describes - my best guess is that Ike Perlmutter was his source of information. Sometimes Raviv plays the action up like a comic book of old, and the analogy gets a little strained. But the chapter headings are terrific.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Erik

    Once upon a time, Marvel Comics almost went bankrupt. No, it wasn’t solely the result of falling profit margins – although that certainly didn’t help matters. Rather, it was in danger of imminent collapse when a certain corporate raider by the name of Carl Icahn – most famous for tearing apart TWA, U.S. Steel, and Texaco – bullied his way into the Marvel boardroom, and attempted to suck dry Marvel Comics like a modern pirate aboard a commercial shipping vessel off the coast of Somalia. (Of cours Once upon a time, Marvel Comics almost went bankrupt. No, it wasn’t solely the result of falling profit margins – although that certainly didn’t help matters. Rather, it was in danger of imminent collapse when a certain corporate raider by the name of Carl Icahn – most famous for tearing apart TWA, U.S. Steel, and Texaco – bullied his way into the Marvel boardroom, and attempted to suck dry Marvel Comics like a modern pirate aboard a commercial shipping vessel off the coast of Somalia. (Of course, much could be said about the ludicrous over-speculation of the collecting frenzy of the early 90s, and the predominant narrative and artistic tripe that Marvel – if not the industry as a whole -- was churning out on a weekly basis.) Whether or not comic books are your thing – or if you just like the block-bluster movies Marvel Studios is putting out these days – Raviv’s narrative is a bona-fide page-turner that will leave you speechless at the corporate greed that possesses many members of the mega-wealthy elite. If the collapse of U.S. economy in the last year and half is any indication, corporate greed just may be a thing of the past (one can only hope), and Raviv’s meticulous research is likely one of the most thorough autopsy of wheelin’-and’dealin’ gone almost completely and horribly wrong. But like all good tales, there is a knight in shining armor: Ari Avad. I’ve seen his name alongside “producer” on most Marvel comics-turned-movies in the past decade. And nowhere has his praise been more highly sung than here. It is no faint praise to claim that Avad is to Icahn as Peter Parker is to Norman Osborn. (And no doubt he’d love that comparison.) For those of you (like me) who weren’t paying the least bit attention to comic books in for most of the late 80s and 90s, but who have a financially savvy mind, this book is one that will be hard to put down.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Zeljka

    Scary saga about the clash of business tycoons, who hadn't basically ever read a single page of a comic book, but found Marvel anyway interesting pick because of its peculiar numbers. In this book you will discover what brought Marvel to bankruptcy and what kind of powers struggled to gain the control over it by paperwork, just to make more profit by exploiting its weaknesses and assets, without exhibiting a bit of interest to the creative and real value adding aspect of the company. What kind o Scary saga about the clash of business tycoons, who hadn't basically ever read a single page of a comic book, but found Marvel anyway interesting pick because of its peculiar numbers. In this book you will discover what brought Marvel to bankruptcy and what kind of powers struggled to gain the control over it by paperwork, just to make more profit by exploiting its weaknesses and assets, without exhibiting a bit of interest to the creative and real value adding aspect of the company. What kind of life is this these stock and bond market businessmen lead? They live for a work almost 24 hours a day, think only about numbers and zeros they might add (or subtract, given the case) to their bank accounts (without really harming their financial positions and lifestyles) and casually chat with their potential business partners or enemies (again, given the case...) about everything (but comics) over the lunch break while at the same time pondering how to outsmart and beat them, without basically having a clue about the actual companies they are fighting over. I define that really scary. Playing such a persistent game with people's lives and dreams (depending on the perspective, whether you're insider or outsider in the entire story) because of the egos, and of how much fortune they personally might yield of it? Do not talk to me about the pocket money they give for their philanthropic causes, please - that would be quite a hypocrisy.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    As a comic book geek and a corporate investigator, this book has so far been an interesting read. Don't let the Spiderman on the cover fool you, this book is really more about the machinations of some of America's top corporate raiders, Marvel just happened to be the company caught in the middle. The author tries to make an emotional connection the comicbook fan base by pointing out on various occasions how the people involved didn't care about the fate of Spiderman, the Hulk or the Fantastic Fo As a comic book geek and a corporate investigator, this book has so far been an interesting read. Don't let the Spiderman on the cover fool you, this book is really more about the machinations of some of America's top corporate raiders, Marvel just happened to be the company caught in the middle. The author tries to make an emotional connection the comicbook fan base by pointing out on various occasions how the people involved didn't care about the fate of Spiderman, the Hulk or the Fantastic Four and empasizing how close Marvel came to being liqudated or sold to some media conglomerate (in case you're wondering, DC considered it for about 2 seconds before running screaming in the opposite direction because of all of the debt Marvel was carrying). But really, this isn't surprising. The likes of Ron Perelman and Carl Icahn are rarely interested in the substance of the companies they target, beyond turning them into money makers. What's interesting for me is that I started reading Marvel comics right around the time this was going on, and didn't have a clue the company was in such dire straits. I vaguely remember being in high school and looking into investing in companies that I was interested in and being shocked to find that Marvel was trading at less thatn $2. Now I know why.

  16. 5 out of 5

    James T

    I typically do not read non-fiction (feels like I just used a double negative) but in this case the subject matter intrigued me. This tells the story about Marvel Comics' bankruptcy and as the title indicates how two tycoons (who are still really rich and well known btw) lost it to a toy company. The best part for me was how it ended up and how the new "buyer" saw the importance and power of the characters and the Marvel brand. One of the principles from the toy company was keenly interested in t I typically do not read non-fiction (feels like I just used a double negative) but in this case the subject matter intrigued me. This tells the story about Marvel Comics' bankruptcy and as the title indicates how two tycoons (who are still really rich and well known btw) lost it to a toy company. The best part for me was how it ended up and how the new "buyer" saw the importance and power of the characters and the Marvel brand. One of the principles from the toy company was keenly interested in turning the properties into movies and we all know how well that turned out. Like the window it provided into the world of high finance and the American court system (in regards to business transactions). Enjoyable and a relatively quick read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Langford

    With my interest and love of comics, I was curious how Marvel go into trouble financially after being on top of the industry for so long. One of the aspects of the book centers around the unique aspects of the consumer side of the comic industry and how those that bought and owned the Marvel failed to recognize this and it almost put Spiderman and his pals on the bankruptcy auction block, and it almost destroyed the industry. However, the good side is how two business men (one being a fan of Mar With my interest and love of comics, I was curious how Marvel go into trouble financially after being on top of the industry for so long. One of the aspects of the book centers around the unique aspects of the consumer side of the comic industry and how those that bought and owned the Marvel failed to recognize this and it almost put Spiderman and his pals on the bankruptcy auction block, and it almost destroyed the industry. However, the good side is how two business men (one being a fan of Marvel) wound up with control and then (as I see it) transformed this media industry. All of this transpired in the 1990's. I wonder how well is measures in today's world of corporate troubles.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Andy Luke

    Insightful, funny and horrendous legal narrative of Marvel's 1990s bankruptcy crash trials; and how two founders of the smaller, more profitable Toybiz fought off an attack among two Goliath parasites. The author translates legalese into common logic and where this book falls down (in the latter chapters), is also his accomplishment, as in the long, protracted nature of the conflict. I registered this book at BookCrossing.com! http://www.BookCrossing.com/journal/12954933 Insightful, funny and horrendous legal narrative of Marvel's 1990s bankruptcy crash trials; and how two founders of the smaller, more profitable Toybiz fought off an attack among two Goliath parasites. The author translates legalese into common logic and where this book falls down (in the latter chapters), is also his accomplishment, as in the long, protracted nature of the conflict. I registered this book at BookCrossing.com! http://www.BookCrossing.com/journal/12954933

  19. 5 out of 5

    Garrett

    Fascinating - I remember a lot of what happens in this book from the nervous consumer angle, and then there was a point when I wasn't really paying attention to the legal wrangling; I'm not sure how much of it would have been printed in things I read anyway. Tells a story of greed and rich men who fly in the face of Warren Buffet's advice about "knowing about what you invest in," while also giving a clearer picture of what led Marvel to the re-organization of 2000 and the forces that shaped even Fascinating - I remember a lot of what happens in this book from the nervous consumer angle, and then there was a point when I wasn't really paying attention to the legal wrangling; I'm not sure how much of it would have been printed in things I read anyway. Tells a story of greed and rich men who fly in the face of Warren Buffet's advice about "knowing about what you invest in," while also giving a clearer picture of what led Marvel to the re-organization of 2000 and the forces that shaped even what they're doing now.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Vince

    Pretty good book. Not the information I was looking for exactly. I wanted more of a look at the mechanics involved and something a little more judgemental. After all Pearlman managed to take a 50+ year old solvent company with the potential to be worth billions, check the grosses on the Spider-Man and X-Men films, and screw it all up. Still worth a read if you are of a certain age and more than a casual fan of comics or any toher creative industry.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jdetrick

    The story here is interesting, but the writing is poor. The author repeats information again and again, often within the same chapter and certainly between chapters. If he stopped telling the reader the same thing repeatedly (and honestly, he often states the same facts in the exact same way multiple times), the book would be half the length.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    "Fascinating at times, but dragged down by a detailed accounting of the terrifically complex bankruptcy case of Marvel Comics. The views of the personalities and habits of NY billionaires like Ronald Perlman and Carl Ichan add a lot. And the good guys win!" "Fascinating at times, but dragged down by a detailed accounting of the terrifically complex bankruptcy case of Marvel Comics. The views of the personalities and habits of NY billionaires like Ronald Perlman and Carl Ichan add a lot. And the good guys win!"

  23. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Nichol

    This is a detailed tale about the bankruptcy of Marvel Comics and the corporate takeover battle that ensued. Raviv also notes these problems also led to the nearly 20-year delay in producing any Spider-Man movie.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Interesting book. The author does a good job explaining in plain English the corporate games that occurred. One thing that is clear from this book is the incredible level of greed the people at the top exhibit, while pretending they are there to help out troubled companies.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mark Schomburg

    Sales slumps. Bankruptcy, Action figures. Disney. Carl Icahn. Buyout battles. Stan Lee. Angel Investors. The story of how Toybiz picked itself up to jump start what became the Marvel powerhouse that we know today.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    Interesting, but not fascinating in the way some financial histories can be.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Danny

    I couldn't even finish this book. It was so long, drawn out and boring. I couldn't even finish this book. It was so long, drawn out and boring.

  28. 5 out of 5

    petrolio Galindo

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mindy

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kseniya

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