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Dream Psychology: The Complete Work Plus an Overview, Summary, Analysis and Author Biography (Audible Audiobook)

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One cannot enter into a study of psychology without coming across the name of Sigmund Freud. Even in popular culture, his name stands in common with others like Albert Einstein and Karl Marx. There are downsides to this level of popularity. One often encounters the criticisms of Freud's work before ever reading his texts. The works of Sigmund Freud are the foundation of mo One cannot enter into a study of psychology without coming across the name of Sigmund Freud. Even in popular culture, his name stands in common with others like Albert Einstein and Karl Marx. There are downsides to this level of popularity. One often encounters the criticisms of Freud's work before ever reading his texts. The works of Sigmund Freud are the foundation of modern psychology. They display a brilliance and insight into the mind which overshadows the understanding of many of those to follow. This insight is demonstrated beautifully in Dream Psychology, which is a condensation of Freud's earlier work The Interpretation of Dreams. A comprehensive summary precedes the narration of the text. The summary includes a biography and background information on the author and a review by chapter. Also included are an overview, synopsis, and analysis of the text, and a section which explores the historical context, criticisms, and social impact of Freud's work. This is a must-hear for any who wish to understand the workings of the mind, or to explore the revolutionary impact of Freud on the field of psychology.


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One cannot enter into a study of psychology without coming across the name of Sigmund Freud. Even in popular culture, his name stands in common with others like Albert Einstein and Karl Marx. There are downsides to this level of popularity. One often encounters the criticisms of Freud's work before ever reading his texts. The works of Sigmund Freud are the foundation of mo One cannot enter into a study of psychology without coming across the name of Sigmund Freud. Even in popular culture, his name stands in common with others like Albert Einstein and Karl Marx. There are downsides to this level of popularity. One often encounters the criticisms of Freud's work before ever reading his texts. The works of Sigmund Freud are the foundation of modern psychology. They display a brilliance and insight into the mind which overshadows the understanding of many of those to follow. This insight is demonstrated beautifully in Dream Psychology, which is a condensation of Freud's earlier work The Interpretation of Dreams. A comprehensive summary precedes the narration of the text. The summary includes a biography and background information on the author and a review by chapter. Also included are an overview, synopsis, and analysis of the text, and a section which explores the historical context, criticisms, and social impact of Freud's work. This is a must-hear for any who wish to understand the workings of the mind, or to explore the revolutionary impact of Freud on the field of psychology.

30 review for Dream Psychology: The Complete Work Plus an Overview, Summary, Analysis and Author Biography (Audible Audiobook)

  1. 5 out of 5

    kwesi 章英狮

    We sleep 6 to 12 hours a day, and 2 hours of our sleep we dream of something. Some said they are omens, some they are messages and sometimes people thought you were a son or daughter of something satanic. Everyone have different beliefs depending on the place we grow and develop culture. There are four ways to define a dream depending on our culture; 1. History, people have sought meaning in dreams or divination through dreams. 2. Physiologically as a response to neural processes during sleep 3. P We sleep 6 to 12 hours a day, and 2 hours of our sleep we dream of something. Some said they are omens, some they are messages and sometimes people thought you were a son or daughter of something satanic. Everyone have different beliefs depending on the place we grow and develop culture. There are four ways to define a dream depending on our culture; 1. History, people have sought meaning in dreams or divination through dreams. 2. Physiologically as a response to neural processes during sleep 3. Psychologically as reflections of the subconscious 4. Spiritually as messages from gods, the deceased, predictions of the future, or from the Soul. - Wikipedia Prophets also practice dream incubation, they sleep in a sacred place to receive a divine message from the above. For example the 55 prophets of the bible; they wrote prophetic works as God's tool to share to people his words, Nostradamus; the well-known prophet, and many more. Only few believe to the power of dream, people thought they were just fantasies of our mind to satisfy our sleep. But until now, the content and purpose of dreams are not yet understood, though they have been a topic of speculation and interest throughout recorded history and the scientific study of dream is called oneirology - which came from the Greek word oneiros or dream and logia, the study of. There were uncountable number of psychologist who already studied dream; one of them was Carl Jung, a Swiss psychologist who emphasizes dream analysis. He introduce himself as a natural scientist rather than theoretical psychologist, he studied Eastern and Western philosophy, alchemy, astrology, sociology, as well as literature and the arts; he was also important to divination and tarot reading. Reading books for tarot and divination, authors will always refer to his works and almost of his concept were used in numerology. Jung's adviser, Sigmund Freud published a book that simply explains his own theory of meaning of dream, a part of psychoanalysis in which we understand ones people characteristic by giving meaning to their dreams. What make special to his work was, he uses his own dreams and client dreams, which are unnamed, that are easy to understand for the readers. A dream of one person is depending on its experience, explaining a whole dream can formulate hundreds or thousands of answers. It also depends on the ties or bond or connection between you and your own client. Sigmund Freud was the father of modern abnormal, just by looking to his picture - kidding. According to Freud, a dream is a sum up of two main content. First, the manifest, is what a dreamer remembers upon waking and Lastly, latent, can be said to be coded. Since latent can be coded it was also subdivided by Freud according to its properties and he called it dream work (an idea merely existing in the region of possibility is replaced by a vision of its accomplishment, meaning, it changes a latent or complicated dream into a manifest). 1. Condensation - where several thoughts were combined. 2. Displacement - where a forbidden thought is transferred into a harmless substitute. 3. Symbolism - where concepts become a concrete image 4. Secondary Revision - where reconstructing of the dream material gives it the illusion of coherent. This two terms are gradually used in the book and needed to be understand before you proceed reading it. They are also subdivided into classes; 1st class, meaning and intelligible; 2nd class, self-coherent and have a distinct meaning - this is the case when we dream, for instance, that some dear relative had died of plague when we know of no ground for expecting, apprehending, or assuming anything of the sort; 3rd class, incoherent, complicated and meaningless - almost of our dreams partake this group. They had unknown origin but simply manifest by condensation and displacement, which already stated above. Once we agree with the meaning of a dream, Freud called it Dream Mechanism. Something with similarity, identity and agreement that produces unity to the dream and the dreamer. How do we really emphasizes a dream to produce unity, by simply following the steps above and lastly by dramatization, transformation of thought into a scene. A dream can be disguise as human desires. To sum up Freud's idea of dream analysis, First, Freud pointed out constant connection between some part of every dream and some detail of the dreamer's life during the previous waking state. Second, every dream attempted or successfully gratification of some wishes, conscious or unconscious. Third, he proved that our dreams are symbolical that makes it transparent or unintelligible to the observer. Fourth, sexual desires play an enormous part in our unconscious. Lastly, a direct connection between dreams and insanity. Until now, psychologist still trying to discover human's function of dreams and uses it to psychoanalysis, taking a deep breath out of your blowing insanity. Sigmund Freud was born in 1856 in the Austrian Empire city of Freiberg. Freud was recognized as intellectually gifted at an early age an encouraged in academic pursuit by his Jewish parents, despite the family's limited means. His family moved to Vienna in 1860 and by the age of seventeen, Freud entered the University of Vienna, receiving his medical degree in 1881. He began practicing medicine as a neurologist in Vienna in 1886, the same year he married Martha Bernays. It is said that Freud's interest in dreams dated from an early age an that he kept a dream journal. By the last decade dated from the nineteenth century, he began making an intensive study of himself as the model for the explorations of personality development, memory, and dreams, which led to his revolutionary theories. Freud and his family left Austria for England shortly before World War II. In 1939, Freud died after a long struggle with cancer. - At the back of the book. Rating - Dream Psychology: Psychoanalysis for Beginners by Sigmund Freud, 4 Sweets and the insanity that blows the mind of individuals. (At first place, by choosing this book as part of my book or journal report, before reading it I was interested with dreams. From my childhood nightmares until now, I can see that my desires are more powerful than the things that I wanted to overcome. According to the book, dreams are representing desires of human that inherit the mental and physical activities. It leads to insanity, for short. I'm not a psychology major student but I become more deeply attached to this subject because it answered my questions that are far from my own knowledge by reading and listening to discussion that are interesting. For example dreams, I thought, dream interpretation are for those people who deeply desired of understanding its divine meaning and not for scientific basis. But reading the book, it clearly shows that dreams were studied well by Freud and his people. Their are hundreds or maybe thousands of psychologist right now who studied psychoanalysis but the fact that a psychologist might only be a theological but they can be simply natural according to Jung.) Challenges: Book #43 for 2011 Book #27 for Off the Shelf!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Pradnya K.

    To me, the most curious object on earth, is human mind. It's a Pandora box in itself which hold a curious mixture of 'gifts' and 'evils'. It's also like an iceberg, with two third of actual mass submerged, hidden away from plain sight. To get to know the man, one has to dive deep inside the unconscious mind which is vast store of experiences, triggers, desires like a sea holding shells. Dreams are those shells thrown out after rubbing n polishing them, thus altering their true nature. The book is To me, the most curious object on earth, is human mind. It's a Pandora box in itself which hold a curious mixture of 'gifts' and 'evils'. It's also like an iceberg, with two third of actual mass submerged, hidden away from plain sight. To get to know the man, one has to dive deep inside the unconscious mind which is vast store of experiences, triggers, desires like a sea holding shells. Dreams are those shells thrown out after rubbing n polishing them, thus altering their true nature. The book is all about dreams and their meanings. It also throws light on the background where dreams are formed and the complete mechanism, Freud calls as apparatus. He has presented case studies of his patients and how they unraveled the formation and meaningful message. The core of book is summed up in the central idea - the unconscious is where wishes are formed and stored throughout the day, when we are oblivious to the impact of day to day life. We feel urge to do something and our active foreconscious refuses the idea, dismisses it which now goes and holds its place in unconscious mind. “Nothing can be brought to an end in the unconscious; nothing can cease or be forgotten” The unconscious, in the middle of the night, when the guarding foreconscious mind is tired and resting, sends the wish disguised in the elements of recent developments of everyday events. The guard, though resting, is still active enough to censor the apparatus of unconscious and might wake us up if the dream content sounds harmful to it. “the symptom has been constituted in order to guard against the outbreak of the anxiety. The phobia is thrown before the anxiety like a fortress on the frontier.” However, its purpose is to make sure our body gets sound sleep and hence the harmful dream continues sometimes mixing itself with real life happening, distorting its contents by 'condensation' and 'displacement'. A lot of symbolism goes there interwoven with day to day memories. Thus the repressed wish gets renewed and seeks fulfillment reinforced by power of unconscious. “The dream is the (disguised) fulfillment of a (suppressed, repressed) wish.” The wishes foreconscious better hide from us. No wonder it makes us forget the dream as soon as we get up. The whole dreaming part is a clever mechanism of our clever brains. “if the discharge of presentation should be left to itself, it would develop an affect in the Unc. which originally bore the character of pleasure, but which, since the appearance of the repression, bears the character of pain” Sometimes dreams are scary with painful contents. The anxiety dreams as they called, have their roots in long suppressed wishes. According to Freud, most of the dreams carry messages about sexual desires. “the content of anxiety dreams is of a sexual nature, the libido belonging to which content has been transformed into fear.” I've few times woke up while dreaming a movie where the end clamor is nothing but the shriek sound of a real television anchor rushing through headlines, in my home. I was amused then how the dreams fuse themselves with the sounds of reality whilst I'm still in half slumber. I do dream a lot, completely incoherent stuff which would make me laugh at it. And I recall most of the dreams, vividly. Since I read the book, it's fun deciphering them, knowing how that neglected pen on desk appears in my dream, making it an object of magical powers to write with. Or a long forgotten friend makes visit in dream and next day something related to her pop up in real world. The book wasn't a fun read but the knowledge it left with me is very enlightening and apparatus of fun.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Hirdesh

    4.5 STARS. Extremely beginner's one. As I'm keen reader of psychology and read a lot about Psychology behind dreams always making my curiosity enhanced as well as enlighten my own perceptions about it. Classic book for beginner of Psychology, it also improvise Facts and old theories about Dream. Learning with simpler definition and examples. Good lines- *"Firstly come those which exhibit a non-repressed, non-concealed desire; these are dreams of the infantile type, becoming ever rarer among adults. Sec 4.5 STARS. Extremely beginner's one. As I'm keen reader of psychology and read a lot about Psychology behind dreams always making my curiosity enhanced as well as enlighten my own perceptions about it. Classic book for beginner of Psychology, it also improvise Facts and old theories about Dream. Learning with simpler definition and examples. Good lines- *"Firstly come those which exhibit a non-repressed, non-concealed desire; these are dreams of the infantile type, becoming ever rarer among adults. Secondly, dreams which express in veiledform some repressed desire; these constitute by far the larger number of our dreams, and they require analysis for their understanding. Thirdly, these dreams where repression exists, but without or with but slight concealment." *"If we keep closely to the definition that dream work denotes the transference of dream thoughts to dream content, we are compelled to say that the dream work is not creative; it develops no fancies of its own, it judges nothing, decides nothing. It does nothing but prepare the matter for condensation and displacement, and refashions it for dramatization, to which must be added the inconstant last-named mechanism" *"Schubert, for instance, claims: "The dream is the liberation of the spirit from the pressure of nature, a detachment of the soul from the fetters of matter."" *"With the rise of scientific thought the whole of this expressive mythology was transferred to psychology; to-day there is but a small minority among educated persons who doubt that the dream is the dreamer's own psychical act." *"Self-deception is a plant which withers fast in the pellucid atmosphere of dream investigation"

  4. 5 out of 5

    Saadia B. || CritiConscience

    One of those books I was looking forward to. However didn’t like the analysis as everything was indirectly or directly linked with sexual illusions. Blog | YouTube | Instagram | Facebook | LinkedIn One of those books I was looking forward to. However didn’t like the analysis as everything was indirectly or directly linked with sexual illusions. Blog | YouTube | Instagram | Facebook | LinkedIn

  5. 4 out of 5

    BAM The Bibliomaniac

    2018 book for all seasons challenge: controversial or banned book So I picked this because Freud right? What about him wasn't controversial? But it's all true he really does see sec in everything or it's not worth looking at. It's all blah, blah, blah then something ridiculous. I will admit I am analyzing my dreams a bit more objectively now. What did I do yesterday? What was I reading? Did I fall asleep to music? Who have I not spoken to in awhile? Etc this is bro going more focus to my mornings 2018 book for all seasons challenge: controversial or banned book So I picked this because Freud right? What about him wasn't controversial? But it's all true he really does see sec in everything or it's not worth looking at. It's all blah, blah, blah then something ridiculous. I will admit I am analyzing my dreams a bit more objectively now. What did I do yesterday? What was I reading? Did I fall asleep to music? Who have I not spoken to in awhile? Etc this is bro going more focus to my mornings.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kellen Wilson

    Interesting read but I can't help but to feel the age of this volume. Personifications of certain psychic functions felt like an over simplification, and aspects of his finite conclusions had possibilities other than his conclusions. Of course I could see the flaws in Freud's logic on certain things through the lens of modern discoveries, hence why the book felt dated, but I also felt that there was some grasping at straws when it came to certain dream analysis. Seeing certain objects in the dre Interesting read but I can't help but to feel the age of this volume. Personifications of certain psychic functions felt like an over simplification, and aspects of his finite conclusions had possibilities other than his conclusions. Of course I could see the flaws in Freud's logic on certain things through the lens of modern discoveries, hence why the book felt dated, but I also felt that there was some grasping at straws when it came to certain dream analysis. Seeing certain objects in the dreamscape and actions related to those objects that originate from the day before or past experiences aren't so easily attached to wish fulfillment as much as they can be a brain's analysis of past events and a survey of possible results from a hypothetical change in a real event, this allows the brain to explore what could have happened. This explanation allows for a possible wish fulfillment scenario but exemplifies that the process could also be a function of the brain trying to better understand past events. Freud talked as though the wish fulfillment was the finite answer in such a situation but I felt that this conclusion was far from foregone for some of the reasons stated above. I haven't touched on Freud's ideas of sex being a factor in most dreams because all I can do is state opinion here. Did he over emphasize sex? Probably, but considering most of society back then was under emphasizing it... Conjecture on his part and mine. I see more interesting and scientifically open analysis coming from Jungian methods, but I think theFreudian methods are scientifically important, picking up things that the Jung analysis did not and vice versa.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kevin McAllister

    Freud has often bee accused of being overly obsessed with sex and after reading Dream Psychology I can definitely see why this is the case. While he does raise and discuss several interesting theories about dreams in general, eventually for Freud, they almost all come down to sex. He actually discussed a dream he himself had as a seven year old boy in which his "beloved mother" dies and states that this dream was a "repression to an obscure obviously sexual desire". Well, I do admire Freud and w Freud has often bee accused of being overly obsessed with sex and after reading Dream Psychology I can definitely see why this is the case. While he does raise and discuss several interesting theories about dreams in general, eventually for Freud, they almost all come down to sex. He actually discussed a dream he himself had as a seven year old boy in which his "beloved mother" dies and states that this dream was a "repression to an obscure obviously sexual desire". Well, I do admire Freud and what he did for the field of psychology, but that example really does seem to be stretching the sex card a bit to far.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Maritina Mela

    I thought I could do it. And I was wrong. Maybe some other time, when I am not reading 5 other books at the same time...

  9. 4 out of 5

    نزار شهاب الدين

    Although I read this book on a long stretch, due to the fact that I was reading it on my mobile during transitive times (waiting times at banks, restaurants, traffic signals, etc.), I enjoyed it, because I was interested in the concept it proposed - in regards of the kind of dreams it dealt with of course, because in Islam, dreams are of several categories, and the category of Ru'yah (vision), for instance, is not valid in Freud's belief. I have my reservations of course towards taking sexual mo Although I read this book on a long stretch, due to the fact that I was reading it on my mobile during transitive times (waiting times at banks, restaurants, traffic signals, etc.), I enjoyed it, because I was interested in the concept it proposed - in regards of the kind of dreams it dealt with of course, because in Islam, dreams are of several categories, and the category of Ru'yah (vision), for instance, is not valid in Freud's belief. I have my reservations of course towards taking sexual motives as the roots of all dreams. Moreover, the concept of conscience, fore-conscience, and unconscious is merely a theoretical attempt to explain how the psyche works. It remains just interesting but will always lack evidence.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Solo Lounsbury

    This book starts off rather interesting in deconstructing the idea that a dream is meant to fulfill a desire but as I read this the points seemed to hammer on and on in the same fashion until I was bored to tears. Good start, could have been a bit more I interesting.

  11. 5 out of 5

    daniel

    The words "dream interpretation" were and still are indeed fraught with unpleasant, unscientific associations. They remind one of all sorts of childish, superstitious notions, which make up the thread and woof of dream books, read by none but the ignorant and the primitive. Freud's theories are anything but theoretical. [...:] He was moved by the fact that there always seemed to be a close connection between his patients' dreams and their mental abnormalities, to collect thousands of dreams and to The words "dream interpretation" were and still are indeed fraught with unpleasant, unscientific associations. They remind one of all sorts of childish, superstitious notions, which make up the thread and woof of dream books, read by none but the ignorant and the primitive. Freud's theories are anything but theoretical. [...:] He was moved by the fact that there always seemed to be a close connection between his patients' dreams and their mental abnormalities, to collect thousands of dreams and to compare them with the case histories in his possession.He did not start out with a preconceived bias, hoping to find evidence which might support his views. He looked at facts a thousand times "until they began to tell him something."His attitude toward dream study was, in other words, that of a statistician who does not know, and has no means of foreseeing, what conclusions will be forced on him by the information he is gathering, but who is fully prepared to accept those unavoidable conclusions.Available at: http://librivox.org/dream-psychology-...Original Text at: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/15489/...

  12. 4 out of 5

    LemontreeLime

    I crashed through the audiobook version of this in a weekend to prepare for an assignment. Here's my take away: ...Holy jumpin jephoosaphat God DAMN!!! Had no idea. I had always heard this was his best work of all his books. (And this is the edited later updated one, not the original turn of the century version.) He does have quite the fixation at one point in the text on sexual imagery in dreams which i personally believe is simply a product of growing up in a nigh Victorian level of emotional I crashed through the audiobook version of this in a weekend to prepare for an assignment. Here's my take away: ...Holy jumpin jephoosaphat God DAMN!!! Had no idea. I had always heard this was his best work of all his books. (And this is the edited later updated one, not the original turn of the century version.) He does have quite the fixation at one point in the text on sexual imagery in dreams which i personally believe is simply a product of growing up in a nigh Victorian level of emotional sexual repression. But many of the things he has to say about how the mind manipulates subconscious imagery is potentially spot on. I don't know if i would have read this if I hadn't needed to for a class, and I would have missed something very interesting. Worth digging through the bins for, and then wading through Sigmund's top dollar intellectual verbiage, his vocabulary is extreme and not for the faint of heart or light readers. (I will probably have to listen to this a second time just to make sure i understood the concepts that he really piled the academic diction on.) Good luck, and good night, indeed!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Minh Quan Nguyen

    The first book about psychology that I read. I always like books that open a new field to my knowledge. This book is funny and strange. At that time, to read about dreams and psychoanalysis was an amazing experience. Ok, maybe all of the thing that Freud talked in this book is wrong now. But at the time I read it, it is reasonable, articulated and funny. Freud's way of writing is very interesting. And the nature of dreams is so fascinating. I always wonder whether my dreams has any meaning and t The first book about psychology that I read. I always like books that open a new field to my knowledge. This book is funny and strange. At that time, to read about dreams and psychoanalysis was an amazing experience. Ok, maybe all of the thing that Freud talked in this book is wrong now. But at the time I read it, it is reasonable, articulated and funny. Freud's way of writing is very interesting. And the nature of dreams is so fascinating. I always wonder whether my dreams has any meaning and this book give so many reasonable explanation. At that time, I even kept a dream journal for future reference but I lost it somewhere. I hope that nobody will find it! And I remember that I read some case studies of Freud (not sure in what book) and they are amazing. It is more fearsome than any scary book that I have read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    zainab_booklover

    Few years ago I had to prepare an assignment about Modernism and modernist writers and how they were influenced by thinkers such as Friedrich Nietzsche and Sigmund Freud ... So a part of the assignment consisted of researching and reading about Freud's achievements and breakthroughs. What might shock you, as it did shock my teacher and my classmates at that time , is that reading about Freud and his acclaimed breakthroughs only resulted in me despising him v.v Hence. when I had to choose in my r Few years ago I had to prepare an assignment about Modernism and modernist writers and how they were influenced by thinkers such as Friedrich Nietzsche and Sigmund Freud ... So a part of the assignment consisted of researching and reading about Freud's achievements and breakthroughs. What might shock you, as it did shock my teacher and my classmates at that time , is that reading about Freud and his acclaimed breakthroughs only resulted in me despising him v.v Hence. when I had to choose in my reading challenge list a work written by someone I hate and haven't read his works before; I couldn't think of anyone except for Feud. I know I'm not the only who is not a fan of his after reading how heavily he is criticised by some psychiatrists and psychologists. P.S. if I have read it before I would've quoted it in the dissertation though :3

  15. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Threlfall

    I finally read a Freud book from cover to cover. My thought after reading the book is amazement. Not amazement at Freud's intellect, but confusion regarding why he's heralded as such an authority. I assume his enduring impact is due to his pioneer status, not the substantive quality of his writing. This book consisted of unprovable statements with no successful argumentation. Nowhere throughout the book did I find a compelling rationale or evidence-backed claim. Instead, he layered supposition up I finally read a Freud book from cover to cover. My thought after reading the book is amazement. Not amazement at Freud's intellect, but confusion regarding why he's heralded as such an authority. I assume his enduring impact is due to his pioneer status, not the substantive quality of his writing. This book consisted of unprovable statements with no successful argumentation. Nowhere throughout the book did I find a compelling rationale or evidence-backed claim. Instead, he layered supposition upon random supposition, upon random guesswork, upon whatever caught his fancy.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    After using some of Freud's techniques on my own dreams it is hard to deny that there is some truth behind some of his theories, even as strange as some of them might be. However, I can never be a full believer of psychoanalysis simply because there will always be a piece of my heart that wants to believe some of the messages in my dreams come from a source beyond me, but I will say that I enjoyed the read. It was fun and definitely informative.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Marts (Thinker)

    This title is, in essence, a comprehensive analysis of Freud's psychoanalytical studies, research and empirical observations. Freud begins by explaining the meaning of dreams through presentations of varied real examples. He then proceeds to explain the causes of dreams and their relation to past and on-going events in our lives, he analyses dream elements, and then explores specified topics such as sexual thoughts in dreams and humans desires and wishes...

  18. 5 out of 5

    Katy Edwards

    While aged, it is applicable and strong in its practice. Freud has unsurprisingly provided an informational read that doesn't take your brain through the wringer just to make a point.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Abdulaziz Al-Mannai

    Good introduction to understand the psychology behind dreams.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Raul Bimenyimana

    Terrible! Would not recommend. Started as an interesting analysis but turned into pages and pages of obsessive sex-dream connections.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    I am not a fan of Freud (overly sexualizing everything, general pseudoscience), but dreams are interesting on their own. There was a bit of insanity here, and some common sense (which might just be widely accepted forms of Freud's ideas, since it's been a century...), and a few things I hadn't thought of which seemed interesting. Overall, still not worth reading, but not horribly unentertaining.

  22. 4 out of 5

    RealDeadpool,The

    On dreams It's Freud's "On Dreams" rebaptized. Essentially, according to this book, dreams manifest from either recent impressions, repressed emotions or wishes.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ivana

    Took me a long time to read this... I did enjoy it at moments, however, I was often bored.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Anuraag Sharma

    I didn't know anything about dreams before reading this. MIND = BLOWN

  25. 5 out of 5

    Pedro

    Favourite passages: First of all, Freud pointed out a constant connection between some part of every dream and some detail of the dreamer's life during the previous waking state. Secondly, Freud, after studying the dreamer's life and modes of thought, after noting down all his mannerisms and the apparently insignificant details of his conduct which reveal his secret thoughts, came to the conclusion that there was in every dream the attempted or successful gratification of some wish, conscious or u Favourite passages: First of all, Freud pointed out a constant connection between some part of every dream and some detail of the dreamer's life during the previous waking state. Secondly, Freud, after studying the dreamer's life and modes of thought, after noting down all his mannerisms and the apparently insignificant details of his conduct which reveal his secret thoughts, came to the conclusion that there was in every dream the attempted or successful gratification of some wish, conscious or unconscious. The dream gave him what the day had withheld. Age is no protection against folly. I believe, however, that at all events the Roman Emperor was in the wrong who ordered one of his subjects executed because the latter dreamt that he had killed the Emperor. He should first have endeavoured to discover the significance of the dream; most probably it was not what it seemed to be. And even if a dream of different content had the significance of this offense against majesty, it would still have been in place to remember the words of Plato, that the virtuous man contents himself with dreaming that which the wicked man does in actual life. I know that the formation of an hysterical symptom necessitates the combination of both streams of our psychic life. The symptom is not merely the expression of a realized unconscious wish, but it must be joined by another wish from the foreconscious which is fulfilled by the same symptom; An hysterical symptom originates only where two contrasting wish-fulfilments, having their source in different psychic systems, are able to combine in one expression. the vomiting might spoil the patient's figure and beauty, so that she would not find favour in the eyes of mankind Around the psychical stuff of dream thoughts there are ever found reminiscences of impressions, not infrequently of early childhood—scenes which, as a rule, have been visually grasped. The scene of the dream is not infrequently nothing but a modified repetition, complicated by interpolations of events that have left such an impression; These wishes and phantasies, which analysis discloses in our dreams at night, often present themselves as repetitions and refashionings of the scenes of infancy. Apart from individual symbols and the variations in the use of what is general, one never knows whether an element in the dream is to be understood symbolically or in its proper meaning; the whole content of the dream is certainly not to be interpreted symbolically. "You know that the stimulus for a dream always lies among the experiences of the preceding day." "we may deduce the conclusion that the content of anxiety dreams is of a sexual nature, the libido belonging to which content has been transformed into fear." Children also in the dream often signify the genitals, as men and women are in the habit of fondly referring to their genital organ as their "little one." As a very recent symbol of the male genital may be mentioned the flying machine, utilization of which is justified by its relation to flying as well as occasionally by its form. To play with a little child or to beat a little one is often the dream's representation of onanism. According to the correct but concise definition of Aristotle, the dream is a continuation of thinking in sleep (in so far as one sleeps). What part is played in this dream by the wish-fulfilment, and which are we to suspect—the predominance of the thought continued from, the waking state or of the thought incited by the new sensory impression? I thus find a threefold possibility for the origin of a wish. Firstly, it may have been incited during the day, and owing to external circumstances failed to find gratification, there is thus left for the night an acknowledged but unfulfilled wish. Secondly, it may come to the surface during the day but be rejected, leaving an unfulfilled but suppressed wish. Or, thirdly, it may have no relation to daily life, and belong to those wishes that originate during the night from the suppression. Finally, we have learned from numerous analyses that the wish in all dreams that have been subject to distortion has been derived from the unconscious, and has been unable to come to perception in the waking state. I believe that the conscious wish is a dream inciter only if it succeeds in arousing a similar unconscious wish which reinforces it. Following the suggestions obtained through the psychoanalysis of the neuroses, I believe that these unconscious wishes are always active and ready for expression whenever they find an opportunity to unite themselves with an emotion from conscious life, and that they transfer their greater intensity to the lesser intensity of the latter. As I have often repeated, the theory of the anxiety belongs to the psychology of the neuroses. I would say that the anxiety in the dream is an anxiety problem and not a dream problem. We have nothing further to do with it after having once demonstrated its point of contact with the subject of the dream process. There is only one thing left for me to do. As I have asserted that the neurotic anxiety originates from sexual sources, I can subject anxiety dreams to analysis in order to demonstrate the sexual material in their dream thoughts. the suppressed material becomes the mainspring of the dreaming. If we are to conclude anything from this state of affairs, it will at most prove that the most complex mental operations are possible without the coöperation of consciousness, which we have already learned independently from every psychoanalysis of persons suffering from hysteria or obsessions. so much is based on fact that the primary processes are present in the apparatus from the beginning, while the secondary processes develop gradually in the course of life, inhibiting and covering the primary ones, and gaining complete mastery over them perhaps only at the height of life. the existence of a store of infantile memories, from the very beginning withdrawn from the Forec., becomes the preliminary condition of repression. The theory of the psychoneuroses asserts with complete certainty that only sexual wish-feelings from the infantile life experience repression (emotional transformation) during the developmental period of childhood. I have already passed a step beyond the demonstrable in assuming that the dream-wish invariably originates from the unconscious. At any rate the interpretation of dreams is the via regia to a knowledge of the unconscious in the psychic life. In the words of Lipps, the unconscious must be accepted as the general basis of the psychic life. The unconscious is the larger circle which includes within itself the smaller circle of the conscious; everything conscious has its preliminary step in the unconscious, whereas the unconscious may stop with this step and still claim full value as a psychic activity. Properly speaking, the unconscious is the real psychic; its inner nature is just as unknown to us as the reality of the external world, and it is just as imperfectly reported to us through the data of consciousness as is the external world through the indications of our sensory organs. Lipps gives us the more far-reaching theory that everything psychic exists as unconscious, but that some of it may exist also as conscious. When an idea to be rejected has once failed to become conscious because it has succumbed to repression, it can be repressed on other occasions only because it has been withdrawn from conscious perception on other grounds. These are hints employed by therapy in order to bring about a retrogression of accomplished repressions. "Un rêve c'est un réveil qui commence." we must consider it probable that the first part of the dream-work begins during the day when we are still under the domination of the foreconscious. The second phase of the dream-work, viz. the modification through the censor, the attraction by the unconscious scenes, and the penetration to perception must continue throughout the night. a remarkable peculiarity of the unconscious processes is the fact that they remain indestructible. Nothing can be brought to an end in the unconscious; nothing can cease or be forgotten.

  26. 5 out of 5

    பாரதி ராஜா

    Just finished Freud's "Dream Psychology"... The summary of the book is: 1. It's not for easy reading. The subject is an interesting one but it can be dry and boring if we are not in the right frame of mind to read it. 2. He says that though we have been taught to believe from ancient times that dreams tell us something about future as well, the fact is it's only about our past and how we have processed them on the day before. He doesn't rule out seeing future through dreams but advocates that it's Just finished Freud's "Dream Psychology"... The summary of the book is: 1. It's not for easy reading. The subject is an interesting one but it can be dry and boring if we are not in the right frame of mind to read it. 2. He says that though we have been taught to believe from ancient times that dreams tell us something about future as well, the fact is it's only about our past and how we have processed them on the day before. He doesn't rule out seeing future through dreams but advocates that it's still a result of processing of the past events. 3. Dream is just a wish fulfillment process. What we were not able to get fulfilled will come as dream in a distorted format to make us feel fulfilled. There are many wishes that our unconscious has but the fore-conscious suppresses them due to the societal conditioning, as a result of which they come out in dreams. 4. He is 'the' first one or one of the first few to talk about multiple layers of consciousness. He talks about two systems, fore-conscious and unconscious, in this book extensively. The dreams are what get transferred from fore-conscious to unconscious. 5. Dreams don't disturb sleep. They protect us from getting disturbed while asleep. 6. Mankind in general and the individuals in specific have symbols assigned to events. For example, if we were thinking about death the previous evening, it doesn't necessarily come as death itself in the dream. It may come as a symbol that we have assigned to death. 7. A dream can neither be ruled out as purely physical nor mental. It's a combination of both. Our sexual desires play a major role in deciding what we dream! 8. He has explained the process flow of how a dream gets triggered, formed and presented from the previous day's thoughts. In essence, he says every dream can be linked to an event or thought that we had the previous day.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sotiris Makrygiannis

    Friday night and was bored, so I looked into free movies and found "My Scientology movie". https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qFjwf... The movie is about reported abuses within the Scientology church and is rather good. The history of the church starts with a failed SciFi writer; he made few books - they failed so he decided to create a Church. Dianetics is the first book of the Church that now is almost a billion euros global business. Scientology is psychoanalysis mixed with a SciFi novel that is co Friday night and was bored, so I looked into free movies and found "My Scientology movie". https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qFjwf... The movie is about reported abuses within the Scientology church and is rather good. The history of the church starts with a failed SciFi writer; he made few books - they failed so he decided to create a Church. Dianetics is the first book of the Church that now is almost a billion euros global business. Scientology is psychoanalysis mixed with a SciFi novel that is converted into a Hollywood-like production and governed like an army. Just brilliant! I got interested on the subject, and I dig in to find out more, so I picked up Freud. What are dreams? As an engineer, I tend to see our body and brain as a computer. Is a simplification, I know but is the easiest way to describe it. Dreams are like the browser cache that needs to be flashed out often so the web pages can render normally. Must be done every day so you don't get buffer overflows. Some of the processes, created by daylight, need to be resolved but since the computer robotic arms are hibernating, the only action that can be taken is to Dream. Unresolved measures and issues are displayed in a full motion picture in our brains. Desires as well and there Freud is making the assumption that sex is dominating our dreams. Well, recent studies tell that we think about it 7,200 times per day! http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20140... So Freud by intuition understood that since this Sex subject is dominating our heads daily, it must also be one of the most dominant items cached in our brain. more on www.sotirism.com

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bob Couchenour

    Having been influenced by the philosophy and psychology of Carl Gustav Jung I might be a little bit prejudiced in my assessment of reading Sigmund Freud. But in his dream analysis I do believe some of the assertions made against Freud are valid. I think Freud goes out of his way to try and find a sexual explanation to everything that is revealed in our dreams. Although I do believe Freud is correct in his assertion of the repressed state of sexuality resulting primarily from our religious herita Having been influenced by the philosophy and psychology of Carl Gustav Jung I might be a little bit prejudiced in my assessment of reading Sigmund Freud. But in his dream analysis I do believe some of the assertions made against Freud are valid. I think Freud goes out of his way to try and find a sexual explanation to everything that is revealed in our dreams. Although I do believe Freud is correct in his assertion of the repressed state of sexuality resulting primarily from our religious heritage, I do not believe he is correct in trying to deduce a sexual explanation of everything revealed in our dreams. A proof realized in quantum physics research is that the observer influences the outcome of that which is being observed IE scientific experiment can be proved one way or the other by the intentions and predispositions of the one making the experiment or observing. This I believe may be a fault Freud succumbs to. There are a great many things I believe Freud understands and deduces correctly but a sexual root to every mental or psychological issue is in error. Again, sexual repression is not the issue, what is the issue is attributing a sexual cause to every psychic unconscious reality. I will be re-reading this book, it is almost obligatory. With the influence that Sigmund Freud has had in the area of psychoanalysis it would be negligent on my part not to read and understand fully what he is trying to prove. Admittedly there may be much that I missed, but from a first reading I come away thinking he is prematurely pressing the sexual issue.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Raman Chopra

    I am a newbie to Sigmund Freud, this was my second book - and considered the literature that he has written, I have barely just started. I enjoyed the book, as I commented on his last book too, I love his writing style - he takes a moment at times to answer the questions that may arise in the reader's mind after reading the last couple of pages. :) This book delved deep into the analysis of dreams, what they mean, where from they originate, and how their source ideas receive the portrayal as we ex I am a newbie to Sigmund Freud, this was my second book - and considered the literature that he has written, I have barely just started. I enjoyed the book, as I commented on his last book too, I love his writing style - he takes a moment at times to answer the questions that may arise in the reader's mind after reading the last couple of pages. :) This book delved deep into the analysis of dreams, what they mean, where from they originate, and how their source ideas receive the portrayal as we experience them in dreams. Very insightful. I would definitely recommend the book to people interested in dream psychology, understanding the relationship between our concious and our subconscious or unconscious mind. And one line quoted in the book (from Plato) "The virtuous man contents himself with dreaming that which the wicked man does in actual life."

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    This was my first actual reading of Freud's primary works, but there were hardly any surprises. This text is concerned mostly with examples from his personal Psychotherapy practice, and left me seeking a more detailed and supported explanation of his underlying theory. Certainly not bad for an introduction to Freud, though.

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