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Any Other Name by Craig Johnson Unabridged CD Audiobook

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Unabridged CD Audiobook 7 CDs / 8.5 hours long.... Narrated by George Guidall


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Unabridged CD Audiobook 7 CDs / 8.5 hours long.... Narrated by George Guidall

30 review for Any Other Name by Craig Johnson Unabridged CD Audiobook

  1. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    A sweet little symphony of all my favorite elements from this series featuring Wyoming Sheriff Walt Longmire. A quest for justice in outdoor settings of the mountain west, teamwork and crackling dialog with his Indian friend Henry and tough sexy deputy Vic, dangerous situations that push Walt to the limits of endurance and courage, and interludes where Walt gains insight from drawing people out in conversation or from subconscious elements that appear in hallucinatory visions when he is near dea A sweet little symphony of all my favorite elements from this series featuring Wyoming Sheriff Walt Longmire. A quest for justice in outdoor settings of the mountain west, teamwork and crackling dialog with his Indian friend Henry and tough sexy deputy Vic, dangerous situations that push Walt to the limits of endurance and courage, and interludes where Walt gains insight from drawing people out in conversation or from subconscious elements that appear in hallucinatory visions when he is near death. This one is an “away game”. The widow of a sheriff’s investigator in a coal mining town in another county asks Walt to look into his apparent suicide. As he goes through the motions on the case, he sees no obvious signs of murder or involvement of his old friend in corruption, but he does get curious about three of his unsolved cases of missing women and the limited efforts of the department in solving them. I love the little elements of foreshadowing Johnson employs in the tale. When he dwells on a coal train at the beginning, it feels like fate that such a train ends up a significant part of the story. When the father of a missing woman asks him to take temporary charge of a huge antique Colt pistol to keep it out of the hands of her depressed brother, you just know it will play a part in the tale. This entry in the series has a lot of thrilling action scenes, often with blizzards as a chaos factor, and suffers a bit from lack of focus on character development of Walt, Henry, and Vic. The latter are actually absent from much of the book. His daughter Cady exists only on the phone as a pressure for Walt to stop tilting at windmills and keep to his commitment to attend to the impending birth of his grandchild. Maybe there is a bit of truth to some reviewers’ complaints that Johnson may be writing with the cinematic values of the TV series in mind. But no matter what I am reading, I will always set it aside when I get a fresh Longmire book in my hands. You just have to take dessert when it’s on the table. For anyone curious about the series, I highly recommend the review and overview by Harry Roolaart.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede

    Sometimes I think Walt Longmire takes his job to serious. As Lucian Connally, his old boss, says about Walt in this book; "Because he's like a gun; once you point him and pull the trigger, it's too late to change your mind." That sums up Walt pretty well. He just can't let go of things. Even when he gets hurt, and let me tell you, he usually ends up with at least one visit to the hospital in every book, at least it feels like that. Lucian asks him for a favor in this book, a simple request to vis Sometimes I think Walt Longmire takes his job to serious. As Lucian Connally, his old boss, says about Walt in this book; "Because he's like a gun; once you point him and pull the trigger, it's too late to change your mind." That sums up Walt pretty well. He just can't let go of things. Even when he gets hurt, and let me tell you, he usually ends up with at least one visit to the hospital in every book, at least it feels like that. Lucian asks him for a favor in this book, a simple request to visit a widow to a recently deceased police. She doesn’t believe that her husband killed himself and Walt agrees to look into the suicide even though all evidence points to suicide and not murder, and even though his daughter Cady is in Philadelphia ready to give birth and want her daddy there.  Luckily he has his friend Henry Standing Bear and his trusty deputy Vic Moretti by his side. I probably had too high expectations after the last book. The ending in the last book had me in bits since I was worried that one of my favorite characters wouldn’t pull through and also since the ending revealed something unexpected and tragic. I found the case in this book a bit lacking. The book was never dull to read, but the case, the suicide that led to missing women wasn’t just my cup of tea. It just never really got intense, not even the ending. It was a good book, but since I have waited to read it for months, longing for it, to have Vic and Walt to have the big talk about what happened in the last book and they just skimmed the surface. So now I have to wait for the next book to see if they will have a heart to heart. I liked it better when I had all the published books to go through instead of this hellish waiting...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    I read it - I really liked it - I love this series. If you've read it and love the series, I need say no more. If you haven't go back and read prior reviews of the earlier books. My suggestion is start at the beginning with The Cold Dish, book #1. And just for the record it's not often a tv series based on a book captures my interest. I really miss the Longmire. There was so much more to be explored. I read it - I really liked it - I love this series. If you've read it and love the series, I need say no more. If you haven't go back and read prior reviews of the earlier books. My suggestion is start at the beginning with The Cold Dish, book #1. And just for the record it's not often a tv series based on a book captures my interest. I really miss the Longmire. There was so much more to be explored.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    I had decided to linger awhile before I opened up my world to this particular read, but then I reevaluated my original decision and decided a few more of you need to get on the Craig Johnson bandwagon before we run your ass over. Whether I decide to drive this truck, or sleep in the passenger seat, this is one ride filled with beautiful prose and strings of curse words (courtesy of Victoria Moretti), a rather large Indian, and more than a little folklore and Wyoming history weaved through its el I had decided to linger awhile before I opened up my world to this particular read, but then I reevaluated my original decision and decided a few more of you need to get on the Craig Johnson bandwagon before we run your ass over. Whether I decide to drive this truck, or sleep in the passenger seat, this is one ride filled with beautiful prose and strings of curse words (courtesy of Victoria Moretti), a rather large Indian, and more than a little folklore and Wyoming history weaved through its elegant pages. And that doesn’t even include the man himself. Longmire, or so the TV series goes, but most of you probably know him as Walt. He may have his way with the ladies, and he hates to run for more than a mile or two, but he can drink a longneck better than any redneck, and he has friends who can commune with the spirits, so yeah, he’s got that going for him. He’s also a bit stubborn, and he has this habit of actually finishing his cases, and not leaving a single man…or woman behind. To top it all off, he’s on the verge of his first grandchild, and he’s been left to the Wyoming elements more than once in his life, but that just means he’s gotten good at dealing with the cold and the snow and even a few coldhearted souls who show their fangs at the first available opportunity. With a lingering sensation at the back of my neck and hairs standing at attention saluting the sky, I charged through this read with my elbows out and my game face on, and I plunged into a universe filled with more than just dead bodies. Victoria “Vic” Moretti might just be one of my favorite fictional characters of the female persuasion. She’s got a mouth on her that could get you arrested in Colombia, and she has more curves than the letter S, and she nips earlobes and other available body parts at will. Boy howdy. That’s all I have to say about that. Now that I have picked my jaw up with the back of my right hand, we’ll move on. Dickzilla. Not to be confused with Bridezilla can be one evil bastard. He’s not known for intelligence, or even a slight amount of competence, but he’ll lead the charge and stomp you into the nearest cow patty. But once you hose yourself off, you’ll soon realize it’s nothing personal. ANY OTHER NAME certainly made me loud and proud and more than a little glad I had the opportunity to do so before the masses. I was entertained for the better part of this tale with my six-shooter on my right hip, and my wink ready to go, along with my cowboy boots and sweet lass on my right arm. But if you really want to see Craig Johnson exhibit his true talents, you may want to start a bit earlier in this series. If you’re a longtime fan, or even if you’ve fired off a round or two with the man himself, you may find yourself happy you hopped along for the ride. I received this book for free through NetGalley. Cross-posted at Robert's Reads

  5. 5 out of 5

    Algernon (Darth Anyan)

    I missed the train on this episode, which is kind of ironic, since the opening chapter features a mile-and-a-half long coal train from the High Plains. But I’m currently reading “Dry Bones”, the next in the series, and I forgot to review this rose by any other name. Something I only realized as I read the opening chapter with a strong feeling of deja vu... Either I’m getting old and distracted, or the series is becoming generic. I am more inclined to put the blame on my own shortcomings, since a I missed the train on this episode, which is kind of ironic, since the opening chapter features a mile-and-a-half long coal train from the High Plains. But I’m currently reading “Dry Bones”, the next in the series, and I forgot to review this rose by any other name. Something I only realized as I read the opening chapter with a strong feeling of deja vu... Either I’m getting old and distracted, or the series is becoming generic. I am more inclined to put the blame on my own shortcomings, since a quick browse through the book shows it is filled with the usual Longmire stuff: crimes involving very strong family connections, long forgotten personal history, in this case from former sheriff Julian Connolly, and a lot of detailed information about vintage guns – a Colt Walker .44s , the ‘Shooting Iron’, featuring prominently in the plot. I’m sorry I can’t be more specific about the book, since the series continues to be well above average for a Western thriller, but considering this is the tenth book in the series, its appeal will be stronger to those already familiar with Absaroka County than to newcomers. While it could be read as a stand-alone, I don’t really recommend it, because the ongoing personal interactions between the members of Longmire’s family and friends are one of the major attractions of the book. I might very well revise my rating upward if I ever do a re-read, but considering how quickly I forgot major elements of the plot I will let the 'good enough' stand for now. Needless to say, I am currently continuing to read about Longmire et Co., something I tend to do when winter season starts.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Harry

    Book Review: Craig Johnson has done it again. I am constantly amazed at how reliable this author is. Like the fabulous books by Dick Francis in which the heroes are always objective and honest Johnson has conjured up a very likeable hero in Walt Longmire: his common sense; his integrity; his dedication to community and family and his fierce sense of justice attract me like few other authors. Every once in a while, we need books like these, books that inspire, that give us a sense of the world as Book Review: Craig Johnson has done it again. I am constantly amazed at how reliable this author is. Like the fabulous books by Dick Francis in which the heroes are always objective and honest Johnson has conjured up a very likeable hero in Walt Longmire: his common sense; his integrity; his dedication to community and family and his fierce sense of justice attract me like few other authors. Every once in a while, we need books like these, books that inspire, that give us a sense of the world as it should be. In this sense, Craig Johnson is gold in the hands to anyone that takes the time to read this series. Winter in the far West is a favorite setting for this author. Nothing arbitray about that. Craig Johnson likes to localize his settings by taking advantage of isolated communities in his fictional Absaroka County, Wyoming. It brings the story home, so to speak. He also uses extreme frigid temperatures to further isolate the happenings in his novels. It's quite ingenious how he does this. The more localized, the more focused the reader becomes. Johnson also likes to contrast this isolation with sharply defined pin-pricks that come from the outside world. As if saying: "Wyoming is isolated but here's how it ties into the rest of the world" Johnson keeps a tight rein on motivation by infusing a high sense of "urgency" to the matters at hand: in this case the imminent birth of his daughter's baby far away in Pennsylvania and the threat of being disowned if he doesn't show up in time; this while on the hunt for human traffickers right under his nose, and in particular a young woman he's intent on saving from a sure-fire death. Johnson pits a new life against imminent death and it is beautifully and compassionately done. Transportation is a thematic device. On the one hand, can he make it to the airplane in time for the birth in the midst of a devastating snow storm? On the other, can he save the bondaged girl who is almost frozen to death and trapped on a coal freighter traveling through the same snow storm? Transportation hints at destiny. Again, expertly done. The writing is filled with wondrous settings and descriptions evocative of Wyoming (I traveled there last summer to experience it for myself). Beautiful country, very isolated, very small communities, a different way of life, pink highways, rolling hills and mountains, and blue horizons. Johnson captures it beautifully. Here's an example. The Wrangler Motel sat on the eastern side of Gilette like it was run out of town. With a lone strip of eight ground-floor and nine second-floor units, it was anchored to the high plains by a decrepit cafe/bar, the Aces & Eights, on one end and an equally run down office on the other. For his readers, the setting comes alive with the simple phrase [...] like it was run out of town. We get it. I highly recommend this series. They are evenly paced, page turners, and filled with inspiration, heroes as they ought to be defined, and a return to all that is good. ------------------------------------------------------------------- Series Review Craig Johnson has written ten novels in his Walt Longmire series. Formerly a police officer; he has also worked as a educator, cowboy and longshoreman. Awards include Tony Hillerman Award, Wyoming Historical Society Award, Wyoming Councl for the Arts Award, as well as numerous starred awards. Johnson was also a board member of the Mystery Writers' of America. Craig Johnson as an artist, as a man who paints with words ascribes to the essential characteristic of what makes art different from anything else: only it can portray the world as the artist thinks it ought to be as opposed to how it is. "Now a days, it's really hard to distinguish the good guys from the bad guys..." he says in an interview. "But Walt's a pretty good guy...the kinda guy if my car slithered off the road on I-80 in a blizzard, he's the guy I'd want to help me out." Johnson admits to portraying Walt Longmire, the hero in this award-winning series, as "The kinda guy my wife says I want to be in about 10 years." Starting from his choice of book title all the way to the final period at the end of the book Johnson's prose fills the reader's soul with a longing for the good. And where else is one to find it but in the fictional county of Absaroka, Wyoming and it's Sheriff Walt Longmire. As with the work of William Kent Krueger Johnson introduces readers to the Western concept of cowboys and indians. Growing up in the Netherlands, I read till late in the night the wildly popular series Winnetou and Old Shatterhand (not available in the States). When playing outside 6000 miles away from American soil, it wasn't cops and robbers we played, it was cowboys and indians. It was this image of America I held in my mind as a 12 year old boy standing on the deck of the U.S.S. Rotterdam as we sailed into New York Harbor and waited in the lines of Ellis Island to be granted access to my boyhood dreams. Unlike older western novels, however, Johnson brings this cultural diversity into the 20th century and without delving into multi-culturalism brings us to that mystical nether region between the two where native american and white man meet each other half-way. Johnson's aim is at portraying a fictional world as it should be and this includes diversity. Henry, a native american is Walt's best friend. The indian community stands ready to aid the law, helps the white man bring justice regardless of race, color or creed. Walt Longmire, in a hallucinatory fit, dances with the Cheyenne spirits who guide him to safety in the midst of a devastating blizzard even though the unconscious man slung over his shoulders is a perpatrator against a Native American woman. Walt does not question his sanity afterwards. Craig Johnson's world is one we might all long for...and isn't that the purpose of art? Too often I read book reviews where the reviewers seem to place verisimilitude above fiction. In my opinion, if you want reality, if you want to read about the way things are, then view a documentary, read a biography, check out reality TV. This is fiction, and if an author changes reality to suit his notion for the book, so be it... For some, the first in the series moves along a bit slowly...but to them I would say: give this writer time to paint his world as he sees fit. Books that concentrate on rural settings often have the advantage of highlighting the human condition in startling clarity. Distractions such as are found in urban settings removed, we see good and evil and compassion in a more profound way. Wyoming's Absaroka County gives us this magnifying glass. I found the plot intriguing and the ending second-to-none. Truly, the titles are well chosen in these novels. There's a huge fan base for Johnson's work out there. A fan base that is after values, the good kind. I'm reminded of my daughter's fascination with Taylor Swift, whose millions of fans adulate her for precisely the same reason: her vision of 'the good'. There is a Renaissance occurring in a real world that at best can be portrayed as lost in the grey fog of compromised values; a Renaissance that has caught the attention of not only our youth, but all ages. And they are telling us what they want. There's a reason A&E's Longmire series has been approved for Season #2/3. The first season sported A&E's #1 original-series premier of all time with 4.1 million total viewers. I plan to read this entire series and after that, I plan to view the A&E series (on Netflix). Johnson, remarking on the television series agrees that he is 100% on board as the televised version is keeping very close to the books. Unless there is a drastic divergence in subsequent Longmire novels, the series portion of this review will be the same for all the Walt Longmire books. Enjoy!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    This is book 10 in the Longmire series. Walt Longmire, Absaroka County Sheriff, is asked by Lucian Connally, previous Sheriff, friend and mentor, to look into the suicide of an investigator in a neighboring county. Walt was planning to fly to Philadelphia to be with his daughter as she gives birth to his first grandchild. He agrees to take on the case, much to the displeasure of his daughter. He gets shot, beat up and still works on this case, telling his daughter "Just one more thing" instead o This is book 10 in the Longmire series. Walt Longmire, Absaroka County Sheriff, is asked by Lucian Connally, previous Sheriff, friend and mentor, to look into the suicide of an investigator in a neighboring county. Walt was planning to fly to Philadelphia to be with his daughter as she gives birth to his first grandchild. He agrees to take on the case, much to the displeasure of his daughter. He gets shot, beat up and still works on this case, telling his daughter "Just one more thing" instead of going to the airport for his flight. He does solve the case, but my wife and I agree he should have put his daughter first. The banter between Deputy Victoria Moretti , Walt and Lucian make for some laugh out lines. Two quotes: Victoria, trying on a fur hat--"I look like a badger is humping my head." Railroad man,describing Lucian-- "That old, one legged boss of yours...He's some kind of loco." I rate this library book 3.5 stars, rounded up to 4

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shorty

    The long-awaited Lola is here. Great series, and all the old cast was present and accounted for. Highly recommended.

  9. 4 out of 5

    ✨Susan✨

    Another great book in an excellent series. In this eleventh addition Walt Longmire, a Wyoming Sheriff, gets a request from his mentor and predecessor, Lucian, to help him conduct an investigation into the unexpected death of an old friend who was the Sheriff in the next county over. During his preliminary questioning of suspects Walt discovers that too many young, pretty girls have gone missing in this small town to be a coincidence. As his investigation progresses Walt starts to realize that th Another great book in an excellent series. In this eleventh addition Walt Longmire, a Wyoming Sheriff, gets a request from his mentor and predecessor, Lucian, to help him conduct an investigation into the unexpected death of an old friend who was the Sheriff in the next county over. During his preliminary questioning of suspects Walt discovers that too many young, pretty girls have gone missing in this small town to be a coincidence. As his investigation progresses Walt starts to realize that this is not just about the Sheriffs death but is developing into a much larger conspiracy that is implicating a whole chain of bottom feeders. The clock is ticking on this one as Katie's baby is due any minute and boy if Grandpa Walt misses it there will be a whole new investigation into his own death. All of the regulars are back Vic, Bear, Katie, Lucian, and Dog to help Walt tie up this mystery that is full of twists and turns, fast action and witty, humorous sarcasm. Craig Johnson does such a great job of keeping the series fresh and original so the books don't all blend together, each one is captivating and distinct. George Guidall is a master at bringing Walt and the rest of the characters right off the page, he never fails to elevate the listening experience to another level. I recommend any of these books but they are best read in order to fully enjoy all the nuances and innuendo's carried throughout the series. Can't wait to see where Walt's next can of worms will take us.

  10. 5 out of 5

    outis

    At this point I am beginning to question whether the Longmire books are intended to be read as stories or to be used solely as plot outlines for the TV series. I haven't watched the series, but this book and A Serpent's Tooth felt a lot more like TV-driven stories than the more complicated stories found in the best books of this series (The Cold Dish, Death Without Company, As the Crow Flies, and Hell is Empty). I miss the more nuanced interactions with the characters other than Walt. In this bo At this point I am beginning to question whether the Longmire books are intended to be read as stories or to be used solely as plot outlines for the TV series. I haven't watched the series, but this book and A Serpent's Tooth felt a lot more like TV-driven stories than the more complicated stories found in the best books of this series (The Cold Dish, Death Without Company, As the Crow Flies, and Hell is Empty). I miss the more nuanced interactions with the characters other than Walt. In this book, Henry Standing Bear is just a buddy and Vic is really not much more than a cursing sidekick. Still a decent enough read, but I'm really hoping the next book is written for the readers and not the viewers.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lesa

    If you only know Walt Longmire because of the Longmire series on A&E, you're missing Craig Johnson's beautiful writing. Any Other Name, the latest mystery in the series featuring the Wyoming sheriff, is a riveting story. And, as always, Johnson has multiple layers and meanings to this story. I know I've missed some, but I wouldn't mind rereading this book. Once I picked it up, I read it straight through. Last year, Johnson's novella, Spirit of Steamboat, was one of my favorite books of the year. If you only know Walt Longmire because of the Longmire series on A&E, you're missing Craig Johnson's beautiful writing. Any Other Name, the latest mystery in the series featuring the Wyoming sheriff, is a riveting story. And, as always, Johnson has multiple layers and meanings to this story. I know I've missed some, but I wouldn't mind rereading this book. Once I picked it up, I read it straight through. Last year, Johnson's novella, Spirit of Steamboat, was one of my favorite books of the year. I'm sure Any Other Name will make the list this year. Sheriff Walt Longmire should be in Philadelphia with his daughter, Cady, awaiting the birth of his first grandchild. Instead, he's with Lucian Connally, his old boss and the retired sheriff of Absaroka County, heading to a neighboring county. Technically, Walt's out of his jurisdiction, but friendship with another lawman knows no boundaries. And, Lucian owed a debt to a dead man. Gerald Holman was investigating cold cases for the Campbell County sheriff's department when he committed suicide. But, the man's widow won't accept that, and Lucian drags Longmire into the search for answers. Why would a man who never broke rules kill himself? Lucian warns Holman's widow that once Longmire starts an investigation, he won't quit, no matter where the search leads. "He's like a gun; once you point him and pull the trigger, it's too late to change your mind." Longmire does uncover something odd; missing women who disappeared from Campbell County. It seems the dead man had three cold cases involving missing women. And, the search leads to the town of Arrosa, a run-down town with a bar, a post office, strip tease joint, and a school. It's definitely on the wrong side of the tracks, as Walt has to wait time and again to get there while coal cars pass. Craig Johnson's latest mystery is filled with all the elements that makes his stories so memorable, beginning with the characters. Walt Longmire is surrounded by strong individuals. Any lawman would welcome the assistance of Vic Moretti, Henry Standing Bear, and Lucian Connally. It's a formidable team. Other cops recognize that Longmire is tough. "As soon as a cop gets killed in this state all the old-timers say we need to bring in Walt Longmire." But, they don't see the more human side of him, as he tries to avoid calls from his pregnant daughter. There is a humorous side to this mystery series. Cady and Dog make Walt human. And, the dry cop humor is wonderful. Walt Longmire is one of the best heroes in contemporary mysteries. His tenacity, his friends, his unusual visions, and his self-deprecating humor set him apart from other investigators. Once you've met Walt Longmire, you won't forget him. Any Other Name is a gripping story, with hints of future trouble for Longmire. By Any Other Name, it can be called one of the best mysteries of the year. Craig Johnson's website is www.craigallenjohnson.com

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jeanette

    Craig Johnson writes clearly and his continuing characterizations give you something surprising about his protagonists with every book in the series. Not that I've read them all. But in piecemeal fashion you get more and more context. It's nearly to an unbelievable level- rather like the 6th or 7th season of a Breaking Bad or Game of Thrones. You don't ever seem, as the reader or watcher, to know all the key components. You just THINK you do. But this one has an intense number of shoot em ups, cr Craig Johnson writes clearly and his continuing characterizations give you something surprising about his protagonists with every book in the series. Not that I've read them all. But in piecemeal fashion you get more and more context. It's nearly to an unbelievable level- rather like the 6th or 7th season of a Breaking Bad or Game of Thrones. You don't ever seem, as the reader or watcher, to know all the key components. You just THINK you do. But this one has an intense number of shoot em ups, crisis medical, timing all gone astray- and those are just the "easy" parts. The hard parts are wounds, snow-out conditions on a mountain side tracking, and being surrounded by a whole herd of buffalo. Well, those are the hard parts for one of the nights this covers. The case is outside of Wyoming and in South Dakota and done for a "favor". Law men friends surround and 3 missing women are a vacant void puzzling few. Only a few relatives and friends still looking for them? Vic is at her most vocal. Henry is all prime and central in the mix. Cady is flagrantly calling again and again. A viscous pit bull gets drugged and finds a new owner we all know. And Dog gets to ride an airplane. It was near perfect, and 5 star entertaining. It lost only a star in the blood loss belief factor and the performance of the ancient Colt. Too large! Yes, I know Longmire is a big man, but come on. Regardless, Craig Johnson's writing style, characters are awesome. Conversations are unique and enticing, enchanting. And Deadwood in this one was also a 5. Almost forgot- I LOVED how they got that hide and leather man in there. And how Walt got his new handmade badge holder wallet. That old stiff, awkard one dropping all the time did make me nuts.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Martha Bullen

    I've read all of Craig Johnson's Walt Longmire mysteries set in Wyoming, and bought hist latest book on his recent book tour in PA. I appreciate the fact that Johnson has always supported and continues to support indie bookstores on his annual national book tours. While I enjoyed this book and the plot held my interest, it didn't live up to earlier books in the series for me. Now that Longmire has become a popular A&E TV show, I feel it's changed the way the other characters view Walt in the nove I've read all of Craig Johnson's Walt Longmire mysteries set in Wyoming, and bought hist latest book on his recent book tour in PA. I appreciate the fact that Johnson has always supported and continues to support indie bookstores on his annual national book tours. While I enjoyed this book and the plot held my interest, it didn't live up to earlier books in the series for me. Now that Longmire has become a popular A&E TV show, I feel it's changed the way the other characters view Walt in the novels. He's no longer just their sheriff, he has become a legendary, larger than life figure that doesn't entirely ring true. And some of the action scenes seem to be written for the sole reason that they would make a good scene in the TV adaptation. I miss the old Walt and his more down to earth depiction from the earlier books. It also frustrated me almost as much as it did his daughter Cady that he wouldn't wrap up his current case and head to Philly to await the birth of his first grandchild, as she kept asking him to do. I hope the next book in the series is a return to form.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joanne

    Walt's back, and perhaps I am identifying too much with the women in his life, but I really want to smack him upside the head, figuratively speaking. Because instead of being in Philadelphia, where his daughter is having a scheduled baby, he's out chasing bad guys. And, of course, that entails wandering around in the snow and being shot at and having some visions, and then escaping the hospital while wounded and some car chases and even a train chase and nearly dying several times. It is exasper Walt's back, and perhaps I am identifying too much with the women in his life, but I really want to smack him upside the head, figuratively speaking. Because instead of being in Philadelphia, where his daughter is having a scheduled baby, he's out chasing bad guys. And, of course, that entails wandering around in the snow and being shot at and having some visions, and then escaping the hospital while wounded and some car chases and even a train chase and nearly dying several times. It is exasperating to read, since any one with half of Walt's supposed common sense would have left already. Plus the plot here is just dumb. The characters, as always, are great. But please, Mr. Johnson, please, have Walt be less absorbed with his own nobility and more considerate of the people around him.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Aisling

    This latest book in the series gets a *ten* from me. I enjoyed every second of this book. Less Indian mysticism and more crackling good and funny dialogue. Two standouts here; Lucian (please don't ever kill him off, Mr. Johnson), and the scene with the Bison. If you've never read a Sheriff Longmire, start now. If you have, this one will not disappoint. Fans of Robert B Parker; this is your Wyoming Spenser.

  16. 4 out of 5

    LJ

    First Sentence: Joseph Conrad said that if you wanted to know the age of the earth, look upon the sea in a storm; if you want to know the age of the Powder River country just be on the wrong side of a coal train. Sheriff Walt Longmire is about to be a grandfather—very soon. He has promised his daughter, Cady, that he will be in Philadelphia for the baby’s birth. His old friend and former boss, Lucian Connally, asks him for a favor of going with him to an adjacent county and visit a woman whose d First Sentence: Joseph Conrad said that if you wanted to know the age of the earth, look upon the sea in a storm; if you want to know the age of the Powder River country just be on the wrong side of a coal train. Sheriff Walt Longmire is about to be a grandfather—very soon. He has promised his daughter, Cady, that he will be in Philadelphia for the baby’s birth. His old friend and former boss, Lucian Connally, asks him for a favor of going with him to an adjacent county and visit a woman whose daughter is missing. One missing woman leads to secrets, corruption and possible death. Johnson is the epitome of a story teller. You are not a viewer; you are a participant. How does he do it? He starts by hooking you into the story from the very beginning by his strong voice and the ability to create a very visual sense of place. He makes you feel and see what he describes. His inclusion of spiritualism adds to the sense of place, the strength of the character and the story. Part of that voice is his humor. It’s not situational, but dry and natural. His dialogue is among the best being written. Most of it is his characters. Walt is such an engaging character. He is truly the “long arm of the law” and well-liked by his colleagues. But he’s not infallible nor is he superman. The supporting characters of Henry Standing Bear and Undersheriff Vic Moretti, Lucian and Dog are significant to the story. Best of all, even the secondary characters are well developed. None of Johnson’s characters are flat or stereotypes. They all have a part to play in the effectiveness of the story. Even the weather becomes a character within the story. “Any Other Name” is an excellent book. It’s filled with tension and breath-catching suspense, but the pacing is perfect with enough pauses in the action for balance. Johnson is an author who both entertains you and educates you. There’s not a single wrong step to be found. ANY OTHER NAME (Pol Proc-Sheriff Walt Longmire-Wyoming, Contemp) - Ex Johnson, Craig – 10th in series Viking, 2014

  17. 5 out of 5

    Karl

    Another great addition to the Longmire cannon is this fast moving thrill a minute chapter in the Wyoming high planes. The story starts out with Walt Longmire being asked to look into someone's suicide, then quickly morphs into a search for three missing young woman. Longmire believes they are both connected. One of the aspects of this series is the humor that Johnson is able to insert into some of these grim events. For example as Longmire and his deputy Moretti are on the trail of one of the miss Another great addition to the Longmire cannon is this fast moving thrill a minute chapter in the Wyoming high planes. The story starts out with Walt Longmire being asked to look into someone's suicide, then quickly morphs into a search for three missing young woman. Longmire believes they are both connected. One of the aspects of this series is the humor that Johnson is able to insert into some of these grim events. For example as Longmire and his deputy Moretti are on the trail of one of the missing women the clues lead them to the city of Deadwood Wyoming. As they are driving there Longmire asks Moretti if she has ever been to Deadwood. Moretti replies "No, but I watched the T.V. show about it, and I really liked it." "Why's that?" asks Longmire, "Cus they said Fuck a Lot" replies Moretti. This was an all around fun and truly enjoyable read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Judith E

    The 10th book in the Longmire series continues the entertaining and fulfilling run. As a favor to his friend and retired sheriff, Lucian Conally, Sheriff Walt Longmire investigates the questionable suicide of a deputy sheriff in a neighboring county. Using the technique that Walter says has served him well, “ask the question, then wait for the answer”, he soon becomes enmeshed in the disappearance of three women. The trail leads Walt into the middle of a buffalo stampede and at the bottom of a c The 10th book in the Longmire series continues the entertaining and fulfilling run. As a favor to his friend and retired sheriff, Lucian Conally, Sheriff Walt Longmire investigates the questionable suicide of a deputy sheriff in a neighboring county. Using the technique that Walter says has served him well, “ask the question, then wait for the answer”, he soon becomes enmeshed in the disappearance of three women. The trail leads Walt into the middle of a buffalo stampede and at the bottom of a coal car, but he is able to be at the birth of his first grandchild in the nick of time. As always, Johnson’s writing is witty, thoughtful and pure fun. An excellent audible listen.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    This book was a return to form after the last entry in the series, A Serpent's Tooth, didn't meet my highest expectations of the Walt Longmire series. The plot was tight, the characters diverse, the mystery elusive, and the subplot of Walt's daughter's giving birth created a tension -- can Walt crack the case in time to fly to Philadelphia for his grandchild's birth? -- to the entire book. This volume also ties up some loose ends (view spoiler)[how Vic and Walt's relationship was affected by Vic This book was a return to form after the last entry in the series, A Serpent's Tooth, didn't meet my highest expectations of the Walt Longmire series. The plot was tight, the characters diverse, the mystery elusive, and the subplot of Walt's daughter's giving birth created a tension -- can Walt crack the case in time to fly to Philadelphia for his grandchild's birth? -- to the entire book. This volume also ties up some loose ends (view spoiler)[how Vic and Walt's relationship was affected by Vic's gunshot wound abortion and inability to have children (hide spoiler)] and left some possibilities for the future of the series (view spoiler)[the revelation that Tomas Bidarte is alive and put out a hit on Walt (hide spoiler)] .

  20. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn F.

    This man is always trudging through snow while dead American Indians talk to him. Is this the third book this has happened to him? The bad guys weren't just bad but demented and if these were real people I would hope that everything they did was done to them twice. I'm going to hold off on the next book in the series because although the series does have some humor, this one made me just sick to my stomach. Even with that, good book/series.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    **As I continue my Longmire series read, full disclosure requires that I openly admit I am a devoted fan of the Longmire television show (on A/E and now Netflix) and have enjoyed reading the previous books in the Longmire book series that inspired that show even more. With that said, I am still doing my best to provide objective and an honest review. ** “Any Other Name” is the tenth book in the “Longmire” mystery series, continuing the fictional adventures of Walt Longmire, Sheriff of Absaroka C **As I continue my Longmire series read, full disclosure requires that I openly admit I am a devoted fan of the Longmire television show (on A/E and now Netflix) and have enjoyed reading the previous books in the Longmire book series that inspired that show even more. With that said, I am still doing my best to provide objective and an honest review. ** “Any Other Name” is the tenth book in the “Longmire” mystery series, continuing the fictional adventures of Walt Longmire, Sheriff of Absaroka County, Wyoming; his daughter, Cady, the world’s greatest lawyer; his best friend, Henry Standing Bear; his loyal and outspoken deputy, Vic Moretti; his loyal and less outspoken deputy, and Dog, his faithful animal companion. The story begins with Walt waiting for Cady to give birth to his first grandchild while he is asked by Lucian, the former sheriff and his previous, to review the suicide of a detective in a nearby county. Lucian had an unspecified personal relationship with the detective’s wife and wants Walt to find out if the man really took his own life, and if so, why. The birth of Walt’s grandchild could involve complications so Cady is scheduled to be induced within a matter of days so with the clock running, Walt reviews the detective’s caseload, and gets started with what he does best, investigating and irritating almost everyone he meets. When Walt’s investigation leads him on the trail of three missing women, he enlists the aid of both Henry Standing Bear and Vic Moretti in his search. Henry is tough as ever, but Vic is carrying the emotional baggage of her personal loss she suffered at the end of the last book ("A Serpent’s Tooth"), a secret she is not aware that Walt knows about. As the story gets going the mystery is nicely layered and develops effectively for the reader. There are some definitely interesting characters, and strong challenges that Walt faces before the outcome is resolved. And there was an interesting reveal of information about a professional contract on Walt’s life that could lead to more conflict for him in future books. There are some really good moments in this book. The interactions between Lucian and Walt are priceless. This time, it Lucian fires his gun several times, including at one particular restaurant pot of coffee. Walt’s moments with Vic are filled with tension and a special bonding. And I personally find that certain swear words are just funnier coming from Vic’s mouth than anyone else. These are some prime examples of what make the “Longmire” series so rich and special for the reader. Now, let me mention two things that are starting to become a pattern and – sorry to say – beginning to be turn into an annoyance. First, it seems like this is the third or fourth time that Longmire is racing through an investigation because he is supposed to be somewhere for his daughter Cady. This can be a nice tool for the writer to run two plots – a professional and personal one – together in a story. It just seems to be a pattern for Walt and I am starting to be annoyed with it for a couple of reasons. One, investigations do not always resolve themselves in a nice and tidy manner in the timeframe required. Yes, I know – UNLESS it is in a novel where the writer has total control. Got it. I think this time it really bugged me because Cady’s argument was absolutely correct. Walt owed her his commitment and he should have showed it because he WANTED to. She is his first priority. Walt’s endless commitment to helping others, even over his own family members, is a habit he refuses to break. Someday, I truly fear he will pay an awful price. Maybe the writer could just tone this aspect down a little bit. Cady deserves some love and respect. Okay, I am done with the rants. And no, they did not take away from the greatness of the characters and the books. And yes, I know that many of you will say, “Yes, but that’s Walt. And we love him for it.” Got it. Overall, “Any Other Name” is a strong story about different aspects of family, including dealing with loss, birth, love, betrayal, guilt, and of course, a tunnel-vision focus on justice the Longmire way. It was also another strong entry in an excellent mystery series.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Albert

    Title - Any Other Name Author - Craig Johnson Summary - Sheriff Walt Longmire's old boss Lucian Connally asks Walt to look into the suicide of a Detective in Campbell County. Lucian has a relationship with the family and the death of the Detective just doesn't ring true. Only problem is the case is closed, its outside of his jurisdiction and his only daughter is having a baby in Philadelphia and he is expected to be there. The clock is ticking and Longmire is smelling something really wrong with Title - Any Other Name Author - Craig Johnson Summary - Sheriff Walt Longmire's old boss Lucian Connally asks Walt to look into the suicide of a Detective in Campbell County. Lucian has a relationship with the family and the death of the Detective just doesn't ring true. Only problem is the case is closed, its outside of his jurisdiction and his only daughter is having a baby in Philadelphia and he is expected to be there. The clock is ticking and Longmire is smelling something really wrong with the death of Detective Gerald Holman. First is it took two shots to kill himself. Next is the last cases Holman was working. Girls gone missing. And too many unanswered questions for Walt to ignore. "..I want to warn you that if you put Walter on this you're going to find out what it's all about, one way or the other." Another pause, and I could imagine the face that was peering down at her, a visage to which I was accustomed. "You're sure you want that? Because he's like a gun; once you point him and pull the trigger, it's too late to change your mind..." With the help of Under-Sheriff Vic Moretti and friend Henry Standing Bear, Walt is set to unravel the mystery of the dead Detective and the slew of missing girls. And somehow be there for the birth of his first grandchild. Review - Most series will lose steam after the fifth book or so. But Craig Johnson has maintained momentum with the Walt Longmire books and the 10th novel in the series is as crisp and well written as the first one. The characters have evolved but in essence stayed incredibly true to themselves. I will admit being a fan of the TV show and was introduced to the characters through the show but the books are incredibly well written and stand on their own. The relationship between Vic and Walt is far more complicated in the novels and Henry Standing Bear much more imposing and zen like. If you have not read any of the novels, you are cheating yourself. They are well written, plotted, and character driven mysteries that are in fact, true mysteries and not just some worn out plot line just there to give the characters something to talk about. Another good read from Craig Johnson.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Collins

    Not one of my favorites in this series. It has a weak mystery, little in the way of character development, and the action scenes are largely a repeat of the same scenario we see in most of these books: Walt stubbornly trudging through the snow, badly injured, chasing a suspect while seeing visions. (I dislike the visions. I don’t want these books to have a supernatural element, and the character is not sufficiently immersed in Indian culture to imagine these scenes.) The ending is particularly o Not one of my favorites in this series. It has a weak mystery, little in the way of character development, and the action scenes are largely a repeat of the same scenario we see in most of these books: Walt stubbornly trudging through the snow, badly injured, chasing a suspect while seeing visions. (I dislike the visions. I don’t want these books to have a supernatural element, and the character is not sufficiently immersed in Indian culture to imagine these scenes.) The ending is particularly outlandish, as the author hunts for ever more absurd ways to place Walt in danger. He’s supposed to be in Philadelphia for the imminent birth of his grandchild, but instead he’s investigating the suicide of a police officer and searching for a missing woman. Henry shows up only to help track a suspect and to intercept calls from an agitated Cady. Vick shows up only to be sexy and make profane comments. I was glad to see Lucian, the old sheriff, but he only shows up to fire his weapon inappropriately. This series is becoming a one-man show, and it would be much more interesting as an ensemble piece. What’s with the new emphasis on Walt’s intelligence? Sure, he’s always been portrayed as smart and particularly well-read, but now he has a photographic memory, and hints gratuitously at a superior score on the Wonderlic. (I had to look it up; it’s a cognitive ability test used by the NFL to assess potential draft picks, a sort of quick IQ test.) This book also seems to have a higher than usual level of hero-worship aimed at Walt. I’m always annoyed when you can tell the villains from the good guys by whether or not they admire the protagonist. I feel like the TV show does a better job showing shades of gray in all the characters. Oh well, maybe the next book will be better, because I’ll probably read it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Thomas

    The 10th Walt Longmire novel finds Walt preparing to travel to Philadelphia to be there for his daughter as she gives birth to his first grandchild. It’s a special occasion, of course, and, naturally, Walt gets talked into taking on a case first. His predecessor as Sherriff of Absaroka County, Wyoming, Lucian Connally, requests Walt’s assistance in a missing persons case that also appears to tie into a suicide by one of Lucian’s old detective buddies. The case takes Walt to the Deadwood and Blac The 10th Walt Longmire novel finds Walt preparing to travel to Philadelphia to be there for his daughter as she gives birth to his first grandchild. It’s a special occasion, of course, and, naturally, Walt gets talked into taking on a case first. His predecessor as Sherriff of Absaroka County, Wyoming, Lucian Connally, requests Walt’s assistance in a missing persons case that also appears to tie into a suicide by one of Lucian’s old detective buddies. The case takes Walt to the Deadwood and Black Hills of South Dakota. I sometimes fear the Longmire novels that take Walt away from his home territory, mostly because that means we don’t get to have the local characters participate. Fortunately, this time out, both Henry Standing Bear and Walt’s undersheriff, Vic Moretti join him in the detective work. As always, plenty of humor pervades the prose and I found myself chuckling out loud several times. There is also plenty of danger to be had including another couple of lengthy sequences with Walt stranded in the middle of nowhere in a blizzard and having to walk or fight his way to safety. Experienced Longmire readers will appreciate the spiritualistic aspects and almost poetic nature of Walt’s outlook on life, combined with his folksy humor. I also enjoyed the pressure-building timeline built into this one as the imminent birth draws near. Will Walt finish up the case in time? Or perhaps, more importantly, will he even survive to ever meet his grandchild? Hope these books keep coming out for a long time to come.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    Any Other Name by Craig Johnson. This story/series is a far cry from the books I've grown accustomed to reading and quite a surprise. The story takes place out west in wyoming...Indian territory. There were 2 situations that had me spellbound. The writing is both smooth as well as quite humorous. Sheriff Walt Longmire has been asked to take on a case out of his jurisdiction. It concerns a longtime friend, Detective Holman, who may have committed suicide. Longmire summons undersheriff Vic Moretti, Any Other Name by Craig Johnson. This story/series is a far cry from the books I've grown accustomed to reading and quite a surprise. The story takes place out west in wyoming...Indian territory. There were 2 situations that had me spellbound. The writing is both smooth as well as quite humorous. Sheriff Walt Longmire has been asked to take on a case out of his jurisdiction. It concerns a longtime friend, Detective Holman, who may have committed suicide. Longmire summons undersheriff Vic Moretti, Henry Standing Bear and Corbin Dougherty to assist in the investigation as they go over Holman's last case. This would be enough for any one Sheriff to take on but at this time Longmire's only daughter is due to give birth to her first child and there are complications. This may have been the most exciting book in this series. I listened to this on CD excellently performed by George Guidall.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Dickison

    My favorite Longmire story yet. Walt is asked by his friend Lucian to check into the suicide of one of Lucian's old friends. The resulting action is excellent, even the scene with the wife of Calvin Coolidge and her pet racoon. Highly recommended.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    A good read but a rather unbelievable plot with unbelievable antics by Longmire. Longmire is grabbed by Lucian and taken to Gillette, WY to investigate the suicide of a lawman. Lucian and the widow's wife had once been an item. Longmire thinks the suicide could be related to the fate of three missing women. And so the journey begins. Longmire is in his sixties as he served in the Vietnam War but he's sparring in bars, getting shot, leaving his hospital bed to crawl along coal cars in below freez A good read but a rather unbelievable plot with unbelievable antics by Longmire. Longmire is grabbed by Lucian and taken to Gillette, WY to investigate the suicide of a lawman. Lucian and the widow's wife had once been an item. Longmire thinks the suicide could be related to the fate of three missing women. And so the journey begins. Longmire is in his sixties as he served in the Vietnam War but he's sparring in bars, getting shot, leaving his hospital bed to crawl along coal cars in below freezing weather, etc. Basically doing what an endurance athlete or a much younger man, say thirty years his junior would be doing. A younger guy could do all of this with no recovery time but not a 60 something. All the time he's doing this he's being barraged with calls from his daughter in Philly who wants him there for the birth of his grandchild. There's a lot of humorous encounters in this book mostly involving Lucian and the general public. There's a road trip to the Black Hills in South Dakota with Longmire having visions during a shootout in a blizzard and the reader is wondering how this trip is connected to the general plot. But all is resolved in another blizzard fueled trip through the rail lines of the coal mine operation back in Gillette. Lots of action and the plot is a little strange but it's still worth the read. Also there's some funny references to New Mexico as the TV show is filmed there.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    I really like Walt Longmire and his friends however, this story was a bit wonky. It starts with some missing women cases and a suicide of a detective looking into them. There's the daughter of the detective/city councilor that wants the case closed despite the fact that her mom is the one that asked Longmire to look into and she just pops up and couple of times. The disappearances were from a smaller town and so the post office employee, bartender, local strip club owner (who happens to be the s I really like Walt Longmire and his friends however, this story was a bit wonky. It starts with some missing women cases and a suicide of a detective looking into them. There's the daughter of the detective/city councilor that wants the case closed despite the fact that her mom is the one that asked Longmire to look into and she just pops up and couple of times. The disappearances were from a smaller town and so the post office employee, bartender, local strip club owner (who happens to be the sister of the sheriff in that county) and assorted residents are thrown into the suspicion bin but it's a hodge podge and all along you really know how it's going to turn out. Midway through, one of the men that has one of the missing women tells Walt that there's a contract out on Walt which I suppose we're to believe this is related to the missing women but clearly it's not but we really find out who has the contract out. Oh, and Cady has her baby.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Deborah

    Excellent mystery series. Craig Johnson is a skilled storyteller, whose characters, wit, and love of Wyoming keep me engrossed. Wyoming Sherriff Walt Longmire has true grit, endurance, tenacity, acuity, intelligence, skepticism, and humanity. Walt's relationships with his best friend, lover, daughter, dog, and former boss enliven the tale.

  30. 4 out of 5

    John Provan

    Craig Johnson books make me laugh and cry. I cannot wait until he finishes another one.

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