counter God Save the Queens: The Essential History of Women in Hip-Hop - Free Download Books
Hot Best Seller

God Save the Queens: The Essential History of Women in Hip-Hop

Availability: Ready to download

Can’t Stop Won’t Stop meets Girls to the Front in this essential and long overdue history of hip-hop’s female pioneers and its enduring stars. Every history of hip-hop previously published, from Jeff Chang’s Can’t Stop Won’t Stop to Shea Serrano’s The Rap Yearbook, focuses primarily on men, glaringly omitting a thorough and respectful examination of the presence and contrib Can’t Stop Won’t Stop meets Girls to the Front in this essential and long overdue history of hip-hop’s female pioneers and its enduring stars. Every history of hip-hop previously published, from Jeff Chang’s Can’t Stop Won’t Stop to Shea Serrano’s The Rap Yearbook, focuses primarily on men, glaringly omitting a thorough and respectful examination of the presence and contribution of the genre’s female artists.   For far too long, women in hip-hop have been relegated to the shadows, viewed as the designated “First Lady” thrown a contract, a pawn in some beef, or even worse. But as Kathy Iandoli makes clear, the reality is very different. Today, hip-hop is dominated by successful women such as Cardi B and Nicki Minaj, yet there are scores of female artists whose influence continues to resonate. God Save the Queens pays tribute to the women of hip-hop—from the early work of Roxanne Shante, to hitmakers like Queen Latifah and Missy Elliot, to the superstars of today. Exploring issues of gender, money, sexuality, violence, body image, feuds, objectification and more, God Save the Queens is an important and monumental work of music journalism that at last gives these influential female artists the respect they have long deserved.


Compare

Can’t Stop Won’t Stop meets Girls to the Front in this essential and long overdue history of hip-hop’s female pioneers and its enduring stars. Every history of hip-hop previously published, from Jeff Chang’s Can’t Stop Won’t Stop to Shea Serrano’s The Rap Yearbook, focuses primarily on men, glaringly omitting a thorough and respectful examination of the presence and contrib Can’t Stop Won’t Stop meets Girls to the Front in this essential and long overdue history of hip-hop’s female pioneers and its enduring stars. Every history of hip-hop previously published, from Jeff Chang’s Can’t Stop Won’t Stop to Shea Serrano’s The Rap Yearbook, focuses primarily on men, glaringly omitting a thorough and respectful examination of the presence and contribution of the genre’s female artists.   For far too long, women in hip-hop have been relegated to the shadows, viewed as the designated “First Lady” thrown a contract, a pawn in some beef, or even worse. But as Kathy Iandoli makes clear, the reality is very different. Today, hip-hop is dominated by successful women such as Cardi B and Nicki Minaj, yet there are scores of female artists whose influence continues to resonate. God Save the Queens pays tribute to the women of hip-hop—from the early work of Roxanne Shante, to hitmakers like Queen Latifah and Missy Elliot, to the superstars of today. Exploring issues of gender, money, sexuality, violence, body image, feuds, objectification and more, God Save the Queens is an important and monumental work of music journalism that at last gives these influential female artists the respect they have long deserved.

30 review for God Save the Queens: The Essential History of Women in Hip-Hop

  1. 5 out of 5

    J Wells

    The book was a 3, the experience I created for myself while reading the book was a 5. I don't always read other reviewer's reviews before I start reading but for this one I did and there was one reviewer who said that they felt as if they were dropped in the middle of a conversation and you had to know every name to make sense. I mostly agree BUT..... that gave me an incentive to get the most out of the book as I could. I turned this book into an interactive experience (as I write this I am liste The book was a 3, the experience I created for myself while reading the book was a 5. I don't always read other reviewer's reviews before I start reading but for this one I did and there was one reviewer who said that they felt as if they were dropped in the middle of a conversation and you had to know every name to make sense. I mostly agree BUT..... that gave me an incentive to get the most out of the book as I could. I turned this book into an interactive experience (as I write this I am listening to Lil' Kim's Hard Core) I took notes of artists I was not familiar with and starting listening to their albums, I put the movie Roxanne Roxanne in my Netflix queue, and I now enjoy the music and artistry of The Lady of Rage whom I had never heard before. It does help if you are already a fan of this music genre because it is easy to get lost as the author does skip around alot and is conversational in her writing style perhaps forgetting who her audience may be. However, reading this opened up a bunch of doors for me musically and filled in some musical gaps and for that I applaud the book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    This book is a reward for stepping into the unknown and trying something you're not sure is your cup of tea. What a fascinating look at the pioneers of a genre of music that until this book was completely alien to me. After reading about all the triumphs and missteps of all these women brave enough to follow their passion, you can't help but cheer them on and then broaden your horizons and seek out their music. A special thank you to Dey Street Books, Harper Collins Publishers and the brilliant a This book is a reward for stepping into the unknown and trying something you're not sure is your cup of tea. What a fascinating look at the pioneers of a genre of music that until this book was completely alien to me. After reading about all the triumphs and missteps of all these women brave enough to follow their passion, you can't help but cheer them on and then broaden your horizons and seek out their music. A special thank you to Dey Street Books, Harper Collins Publishers and the brilliant author of this treasure trove of history, Kathy Iandoli.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Linda McCutcheon

    This book is an eye opening surprisingly touching tribute to both the little known and the well known women of hip hop. God Save The Queens is much more than a text book account of the women in hip hop. It is a thorough look at those who pioneered a new genre of music. Most music historians agree that hip hop originated in the 1970s in Bronx, New York. Sadly, those same historians tend to focus on the men who brought hip hop to the forefront of popular music and forget the women who fought and sa This book is an eye opening surprisingly touching tribute to both the little known and the well known women of hip hop. God Save The Queens is much more than a text book account of the women in hip hop. It is a thorough look at those who pioneered a new genre of music. Most music historians agree that hip hop originated in the 1970s in Bronx, New York. Sadly, those same historians tend to focus on the men who brought hip hop to the forefront of popular music and forget the women who fought and sacrificed to have the world acknowledge hip hop as the cultural phenomenon it became over time. I admit I am not the most knowledgeable person about hip hop. I was a teen living on Long Island when I saw LLCoolJ perform at a college campus. I liked the performance and thought he was very cute. He was still a local performer at the time. As the hip hop movement grew I became aware of groups like N.W.A and RunDMC. My kids are big fans of Tu Pac and Biggie Smalls. Not A woman in the bunch. I became aware of women in hip hop through MTV videos. I thought Salt-N-Pepa were brilliant, Left Eye from TLC was ingenious, but Missy Elliott was truly gifted. When her videos would come on I would stop whatever I was doing to watch and listen to her. It wasn't until I read this book that I became aware of not only all of their struggles to succeed in this music genre but the struggles of the women who shoulders they stand on when they perform. I never heard of Cindy Campbell, known to some as the founding mother of hip hop in the Bronx, who made flyers and put them all over her neighborhood to get people to come and see her and her male counterparts perform. Sadly, there were times the men left no time for her to come to the stage. Then there is Kellogg who was one of the first females to actually battle the male rappers. She took no prisoners and instead of being respected for her battle talent the men often ostracized her because of their own insecurities. If it wasn't for this book bringing these women to our attention, making sure their names appear in a written document on the history of hip hop, they would remain unknown to future generations. The book has some great stories about the more well known female rappers like Lil Kim and Foxy Brown. There is current dirt on Nicki Minaj and Cardi B. The writer doesn't miss a beat. Besides being extremely informative the book is a fun and fulfilling journey of these creative women conquering a male dominated field. The author, Kathy Iandoli, writes this book like having a conversation. I never felt I was reading a text book listing facts. It was more like reading a love letter to these remarkable brave women. They had to fight to be heard and taken seriously and often lost the battle but they did win the war. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher DeyStreet Books/Harper Collins for a fair and honest review. All opinions are my own.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jay Gabler

    A genre that women helped to invent, but that persistently excludes them from narratives of its history. A genre where women have been standout performers at every juncture, but where they rarely achieve the commercial or critical attention men to. A genre where women are constantly breaking the mold, only to find the industry squeezing them back into stereotypes. A genre where many tracks regarded as classics traffic in rampant misogyny. A genre where female artists are abused and marginalized A genre that women helped to invent, but that persistently excludes them from narratives of its history. A genre where women have been standout performers at every juncture, but where they rarely achieve the commercial or critical attention men to. A genre where women are constantly breaking the mold, only to find the industry squeezing them back into stereotypes. A genre where many tracks regarded as classics traffic in rampant misogyny. A genre where female artists are abused and marginalized by peers and producers, and where women of color are particularly vulnerable despite being particularly accomplished. But enough about rock and roll, let's talk about hip-hop. I reviewed God Save the Queens for The Current.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stuart

    I really enjoyed this book. Iandoli does a great job of examining the history and impact of women in hip-hop, through well-researched histories and copious interviews.

  6. 5 out of 5

    kat

    Tell me if you've heard this one before: If you're a woman, you can be either beautiful or talented, but not both. If you're a woman who wants to be taken seriously, you have to dress the part (in this case, tape down your boobs, wear baggy clothing, shave your head, hide behind a ball cap, etc.). If you're a woman who wants to express her sexuality, you're either a depraved whore or there's some man in the background pulling all the strings. This book was truly a loving celebration of the women Tell me if you've heard this one before: If you're a woman, you can be either beautiful or talented, but not both. If you're a woman who wants to be taken seriously, you have to dress the part (in this case, tape down your boobs, wear baggy clothing, shave your head, hide behind a ball cap, etc.). If you're a woman who wants to express her sexuality, you're either a depraved whore or there's some man in the background pulling all the strings. This book was truly a loving celebration of the women in hip hop, and an implicit condemnation of hip hop culture (and toxic masculinity in general) itself. Honestly, it's amazing there even are women in hip hop.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rochelle Hickey

    I did not finish this book. I really wanted to like it but I only made it to part one. The writing felt like I walked into the middle of a conversation and was left asking questions because it assumes you know every single name dropped and their associations with hip-hop. It swaps between the narrator’s history with hip-hop (radio stations and record shops) and the beginning of hip-hop. It was a table-side one way conversation that couldn’t hold me. I feel like if it was written by any of the wo I did not finish this book. I really wanted to like it but I only made it to part one. The writing felt like I walked into the middle of a conversation and was left asking questions because it assumes you know every single name dropped and their associations with hip-hop. It swaps between the narrator’s history with hip-hop (radio stations and record shops) and the beginning of hip-hop. It was a table-side one way conversation that couldn’t hold me. I feel like if it was written by any of the women she talks about it would have been more descriptive and interesting. Thank you to Harper Collins for giving me an advanced readers copy for my unbiased and honest opinion.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Edel Malene

    sir juicy j give Gangsta Boo and La Chat their money back immediately or else

  9. 4 out of 5

    dirt

    Sadly, this book is too short because there were few mainstream women rappers. Kathy seamlessly traced women's role in the creation of hip-hop to the present. Most of the book focused on the contributions of Lil Kim, Foxy Brown, and Missy Elliot because that was who you had to choose from. Sadly, this book is too short because there were few mainstream women rappers. Kathy seamlessly traced women's role in the creation of hip-hop to the present. Most of the book focused on the contributions of Lil Kim, Foxy Brown, and Missy Elliot because that was who you had to choose from.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Shane

    I appreciated that this talked about overarching trends in addition to just profiling the major (and some of the lesser known) players. Very readable and I've got a list of new people to listen to. I appreciated that this talked about overarching trends in addition to just profiling the major (and some of the lesser known) players. Very readable and I've got a list of new people to listen to.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Carla Cherry

    A fascinating, comprehensive history of women in hip hop from the 1970s to the present.

  12. 4 out of 5

    BiblioGeek

    So, Kathy Iandoli is pretty thorough here, in terms of including a significant number of female MCs. It's clear that she's done some research here - interviewing MCs and others who were first-hand witnesses to the rise and fall of various artists. I particularly loved her retelling of how Roxanne Shante's career started, and ultimately, how it fizzled out. But the book seems a bit uneven to me. In that, she seems to place a lot of emphasis on the beefs between the MCs. And while she provides foc So, Kathy Iandoli is pretty thorough here, in terms of including a significant number of female MCs. It's clear that she's done some research here - interviewing MCs and others who were first-hand witnesses to the rise and fall of various artists. I particularly loved her retelling of how Roxanne Shante's career started, and ultimately, how it fizzled out. But the book seems a bit uneven to me. In that, she seems to place a lot of emphasis on the beefs between the MCs. And while she provides focus and detail on SOME MCs (Shante', Lauryn, Lil' Kim), others are mentioned peripherally (MC Lyte, Latifah, Rapsody). The book is good, though. I wonder what else is out there that addresses this topic...

  13. 5 out of 5

    Julie Rowse

    This one took me a while to finish for two reasons. First, it is deceptively dense in its thoroughness. Second, I wanted to stop after every artist I'd never heard of and listen to their music. The parts that covered artists I knew flew by, but when I'd encounter an artist I didn't (which was MOST of them...I am embarrassed at my ignorance), I'd slow down and really try to digest what I was reading. If you like rap and hip-hop, this is a must. This one took me a while to finish for two reasons. First, it is deceptively dense in its thoroughness. Second, I wanted to stop after every artist I'd never heard of and listen to their music. The parts that covered artists I knew flew by, but when I'd encounter an artist I didn't (which was MOST of them...I am embarrassed at my ignorance), I'd slow down and really try to digest what I was reading. If you like rap and hip-hop, this is a must.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jon Allanson

    An excellent oral history of the women who helped create and transform rap music. I lived through so much of the music discussed in these pages that at times the nostalgia was almost overwhelming, in a very positive way. Great stories retold by someone who was there, with interviews with many music luminaries. Recommended.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Danny

    A great book that takes a deep dive into the women who have been involved in hip hop since its beginnings. This is a great look on hip hop history as a whole with a great overview and discussion of artists that are constantly overlooked in hip hop documentaries. The book is a complete look at the history of women in hip hop. The writing style is unique but the author is very passionate about the subject and the inclusion of personal stories at time helps the narrative, in my opinion. It is hard fo A great book that takes a deep dive into the women who have been involved in hip hop since its beginnings. This is a great look on hip hop history as a whole with a great overview and discussion of artists that are constantly overlooked in hip hop documentaries. The book is a complete look at the history of women in hip hop. The writing style is unique but the author is very passionate about the subject and the inclusion of personal stories at time helps the narrative, in my opinion. It is hard for me to stress what a great accomplishment this book is. It serves as a complete primer on the history of women in hip hop and makes a good case for why many of these artists are great. I never would have thought Salt n Pepa would deserve a place in the Rock n Roll Hall of Fame prior to reading this book. After reading the authors description of their influence and success, I find myself wondering why they are not already in the Rock n Roll Hall of Fame. If you have an interest in hip hop history you will likely enjoy this book. The author conducts many interviews with artists I doubt you will see covered in any other book such as Gangsta Boo, Da Brat and Lady of Rage. I was able to get the full story on things I have wondered about for a long time (such as Eve’s involvement with the Roots). I would love to see a sequel to this book that includes song by song coverage of classic hip hop albums by women in addition to coverage of the few things missing in this one (Honestly everything was covered, I was hoping for coverage of Suga T, K. Flay, Lady Sovereign and the 2016 VH1 Hip Hop Honors but I am sure I was the only one) Great book that is highly recommended for fans of hip hop history, or music lovers that like to read about ignored areas of music history.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sophia

    God Save the Queens ~ The Essential History of Women in Hip-Hop by Kathy Iandoli Published October 22, 2019 <3 This brought back so many memories! I was backflipping down memory lane with the artists, songs, drama and chart makers. There needs to be a part two with pics of all the artists and talent mentioned with a disc with all the music and movies mentioned throughout this well researched book. It was so well done! #MUSIC #SOCIOLOGY #WOMENSTUDIES #NONFICTION #colorism #sexuality #doublestandards God Save the Queens ~ The Essential History of Women in Hip-Hop by Kathy Iandoli Published October 22, 2019 <3 This brought back so many memories! I was backflipping down memory lane with the artists, songs, drama and chart makers. There needs to be a part two with pics of all the artists and talent mentioned with a disc with all the music and movies mentioned throughout this well researched book. It was so well done! #MUSIC #SOCIOLOGY #WOMENSTUDIES #NONFICTION #colorism #sexuality #doublestandards #sexism #violence #mentalhealth #LaurenHill #Cardib #LilKim #Bahamadia #Roxanne #FaithEvans #RemyMa #NickiMinaj #RahDigga #Eve #mclyte #QueenLatifah Every history of hip-hop previously published, from Jeff Chang's Can't Stop Won't Stop to Shea Serrano's The Rap Yearbook, focuses primarily on men, glaringly omitting a thorough and respectful examination of the presence and contribution of the genre's female artists. For far too long, women in hip-hop have been relegated to the shadows, viewed as the designated "First Lady" thrown a contract, a pawn in some beef, or even worse. But as Kathy Iandoli makes clear, the reality is very different. Today, hip-hop is dominated by successful women such as Cardi B and Nicki Minaj, yet there are scores of female artists whose influence continues to resonate. God Save the Queens pays tribute to the women of hip-hop—from the early work of Roxanne Shante, to hitmakers like Queen Latifah and Missy Elliot, to the superstars of today. Exploring issues of gender, money, sexuality, violence, body image, feuds, objectification and more, God Save the Queens is an important and monumental work of music journalism that at last gives these influential female artists the respect they have long deserved.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa

    Enjoyed reading this. If you enjoy magazine features, especially about music, you will have fun reading this. I was a little skeptical about a white woman writing about hip-hop (which she mentions in the first few pages), but I put that aside and out of my mind as I read. Iandoli’s knowledge and background are backed through interviews she has with artists, producers and more. (It’s heavy on the interviews.) I think she did a great job in covering well known events/beefs while not losing site of Enjoyed reading this. If you enjoy magazine features, especially about music, you will have fun reading this. I was a little skeptical about a white woman writing about hip-hop (which she mentions in the first few pages), but I put that aside and out of my mind as I read. Iandoli’s knowledge and background are backed through interviews she has with artists, producers and more. (It’s heavy on the interviews.) I think she did a great job in covering well known events/beefs while not losing site of an artist’s environment or what what going on around that time. I enjoyed so many things about this book including hip-hop first ladies, young MCs and rappers trying to make a name and way for themselves. Even the famous female rapper beefs. Something else I applaud Iandoli for was the mention of LGBT+ rappers and artists. I would love to see an update to this a few years down the line either as book two or extension of this one.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Emily Nelms Chastain

    I’m not sure what it was that drew my eye to this book but I was pleasantly surprised at how much I enjoyed it. It contains some interesting background in how women have had to fight their way to the table of hip hop. I really enjoyed reading about how Salt-N-Pepa, TLC, Lauryn Hill, and Missy Elliott saw the world for what it was and demanded to make their art despite the labels and producers around them. I forgot how rich their narratives were and how incredibly intelligent their craft was (and I’m not sure what it was that drew my eye to this book but I was pleasantly surprised at how much I enjoyed it. It contains some interesting background in how women have had to fight their way to the table of hip hop. I really enjoyed reading about how Salt-N-Pepa, TLC, Lauryn Hill, and Missy Elliott saw the world for what it was and demanded to make their art despite the labels and producers around them. I forgot how rich their narratives were and how incredibly intelligent their craft was (and is) and how they helped create space and story for other women. This is a great reminder that when I think it’s hard for women in the Church, there are other spaces that are even harder to navigate your own self and practice at the table.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Sassone

    I understand a lot of the more critical reviews of this book, because Iandoli does use a lot of hip-hop jargon and jumps from rapper to rapper frequently. However, I loved this book. I’m a huge hip-hop fan myself, and am going to teach a course at my college on female rappers, so this book was the perfect fit. I learned so much about the early days of women in hip-hop. The stories of Roxanne Shante and Monie Love can’t just be googled, and having the chronology of forty years of women in hip-hop I understand a lot of the more critical reviews of this book, because Iandoli does use a lot of hip-hop jargon and jumps from rapper to rapper frequently. However, I loved this book. I’m a huge hip-hop fan myself, and am going to teach a course at my college on female rappers, so this book was the perfect fit. I learned so much about the early days of women in hip-hop. The stories of Roxanne Shante and Monie Love can’t just be googled, and having the chronology of forty years of women in hip-hop in one book made it so much easier for me to learn the evolution of said topic. Highly recommend. A great novel to accompany this is Angie Thomas’s “On the Come Up.”

  20. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    I enjoyed this reminder of all the greats of hip-hop. It made me want to go back and listen to the albums I loved and even explore some of the ones I left alone at the time. The major scar on the narrative was the amount of time given to the all-male crew The Roots. Although they are one of my favorites, it felt out of place and feltblike a way of saying thank you to ?uestlove for his contributions. Overall, it renewed my appreciation for all that women have given to hip-hop. The book serves as a I enjoyed this reminder of all the greats of hip-hop. It made me want to go back and listen to the albums I loved and even explore some of the ones I left alone at the time. The major scar on the narrative was the amount of time given to the all-male crew The Roots. Although they are one of my favorites, it felt out of place and feltblike a way of saying thank you to ?uestlove for his contributions. Overall, it renewed my appreciation for all that women have given to hip-hop. The book serves as a recognition of their struggle and a worthy celebration of their accomplishments.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    I love that a book like this exists. Iandoli is a journalist with decades of immersion in the hip-hop scene, and the result of her knowledge and access to influential figures in the genre is this comprehensive history. Iandoli traces the timeline of women's involvement in rap from parties in apartment building common rooms to jaw-dropping response records (read: The Roxanne Wars - I hadn't realized there was more than one "Roxanne" out there) to the present day. Iandoli's style is loose and enga I love that a book like this exists. Iandoli is a journalist with decades of immersion in the hip-hop scene, and the result of her knowledge and access to influential figures in the genre is this comprehensive history. Iandoli traces the timeline of women's involvement in rap from parties in apartment building common rooms to jaw-dropping response records (read: The Roxanne Wars - I hadn't realized there was more than one "Roxanne" out there) to the present day. Iandoli's style is loose and engaging, injected with a touch of humor - a quick jab to readers waiting to "get to the chapter about Nicki Minaj" made me smile - and acknowledgement that the book might not be 100% complete. It may only mean there are still stories to discover, and perhaps a revised edition will appear one day.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Greg Rumpff

    What this book does right: Spending time talking about long-lost pioneers like Debbie D. and her early crew DJ Patty Duke and the Jazzy 5 MCs. Discussing the double-edged sword that is the "B" word (and I don't mean "B-girl"). What it could do better: If you're hoping to discover great underground "femcees" Landoli stays pretty mainstream. She does mention one or two one album wonders to her credit. What it wastes time on: Who is "the one", in other words, the lady rapper who "owns" the scene right What this book does right: Spending time talking about long-lost pioneers like Debbie D. and her early crew DJ Patty Duke and the Jazzy 5 MCs. Discussing the double-edged sword that is the "B" word (and I don't mean "B-girl"). What it could do better: If you're hoping to discover great underground "femcees" Landoli stays pretty mainstream. She does mention one or two one album wonders to her credit. What it wastes time on: Who is "the one", in other words, the lady rapper who "owns" the scene right now. It's an overdone debate whether it's driven by gals or guys.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Bill Chenevert

    Boy did I want to love this one. There’s great herstory, there’s lots of facts about releases and lyrics and sales and the arc of folks’ careers. It’s just kind of haphazardly chronological and it wanders a little. The author inserts first person anecdotes into strange pockets of the book and the focus on certain emcees over others feels a bit skewed. With a focus on beefs and battles, the book also seems to focus more on women in hip-hop tearing each other apart as opposed to the brutal sexism Boy did I want to love this one. There’s great herstory, there’s lots of facts about releases and lyrics and sales and the arc of folks’ careers. It’s just kind of haphazardly chronological and it wanders a little. The author inserts first person anecdotes into strange pockets of the book and the focus on certain emcees over others feels a bit skewed. With a focus on beefs and battles, the book also seems to focus more on women in hip-hop tearing each other apart as opposed to the brutal sexism faced by their male counterparts.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    I'm not a huge hip-hop head but I know some things - and I loved the tidbits and deep cuts this book provided. However, it really lost steam by the time we reached the 2000s - which makes sense since it's a bit of a lull in the scheme of women's hip hop history. The book felt a little thrown together at the end in comparison but overall I enjoyed this quite a lot. I'm not a huge hip-hop head but I know some things - and I loved the tidbits and deep cuts this book provided. However, it really lost steam by the time we reached the 2000s - which makes sense since it's a bit of a lull in the scheme of women's hip hop history. The book felt a little thrown together at the end in comparison but overall I enjoyed this quite a lot.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mr. D

    Engaging and well researched book about the contributions women have brought to hip-hop over the course of its history, from early names like Roxanne Shantae, MC Lyte and Queen Latifah, 90s hit makers Missy Ellliot, Lauryn Hill, Lil Kim and Foxy Brown and modern big names like Nicki Minaj, Cardi B and Megan Thee Stallion. Recommended to any fan of the genre.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    I wish I could give this 3.5 stars. I thought it was good, but it felt rushed and like maybe it needed a volume 1 and volume 2. I feel like parts were glossed over- Missy Elliott needed way more-and I feel like it was somewhat difficult to follow chronologically. Overall a good read, but wanted more.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    This book was fantastic! A great way to get acquainted with the most important women in hip hop. My only struggle was that it jumped around in time a bit, so it was sometimes challenging to follow the artists' career trajectory chronologically. This book was fantastic! A great way to get acquainted with the most important women in hip hop. My only struggle was that it jumped around in time a bit, so it was sometimes challenging to follow the artists' career trajectory chronologically.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    This is a wonderful first look at the history of women in hip hop. Yet I wanted more. Just as the author started to approach the intersectionalities she backed away. This topic deserves more and I hope it encourages her or others to follow up!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Erin Towner

    I don't read a lot of books about music, so maybe some of my reservations stem from that. I loved learning about the relationships between the female artists but the writing was confusing sometimes and could have used a closer edit. I wanted to love this book more than I did. I don't read a lot of books about music, so maybe some of my reservations stem from that. I loved learning about the relationships between the female artists but the writing was confusing sometimes and could have used a closer edit. I wanted to love this book more than I did.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Salliewt

    A history of women in rap, from early pioneers like Cindy Campbell, Debbie D, Patty Duke, and the Jazzy 5 MCs, to artists like Salt N Pepa, Queen Latifah, Da Bratt, and Lil Kim, up to modern artists like Rapsody and Cardi B. There are things that could’ve been done better, but for the most part this was a pretty good look at women in a genre that most people associate with men.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.