counter Fierce Bad Rabbits: The Tales Behind Children's Picture Books - Free Download Books
Hot Best Seller

Fierce Bad Rabbits: The Tales Behind Children's Picture Books

Availability: Ready to download

'An enlightening, perceptive analysis of the books that build us' Sunday Telegraph, 5 star review ________________________________________ What is The Tiger Who Came to Tea really about? What has Meg and Mog got to do with Polish embroidery? Why is death in picture books so often represented by being eaten? We've read Green Eggs and Ham, laughed at Mr Tickle and whetted our ap 'An enlightening, perceptive analysis of the books that build us' Sunday Telegraph, 5 star review ________________________________________ What is The Tiger Who Came to Tea really about? What has Meg and Mog got to do with Polish embroidery? Why is death in picture books so often represented by being eaten? We've read Green Eggs and Ham, laughed at Mr Tickle and whetted our appetites with The Very Hungry Caterpillar. But what lies behind the picture books that make up our childhood? Fierce Bad Rabbits takes us on an eye-opening journey in a pea-green boat through the history of picture books. From Edward Lear through to Beatrix Potter and contemporary picture books like Stick Man, Clare Pollard shines a light on some of our best-loved childhood stories, their histories and what they really mean. Because the best picture books are far more complex than they seem - and darker too. Monsters can gobble up children and go unnoticed, power is not always used wisely, and the wild things are closer than you think. Sparkling with wit, magic and nostalgia, Fierce Bad Rabbits weaves in tales from Clare's own childhood, and her re-readings as a parent, with fascinating facts and theories about the authors behind the books. Introducing you to new treasures while bringing your childhood favourites to vivid life, it will make you see even stories you've read a hundred times afresh. _________________________________ 'A gem, thoroughly enjoyable. Pollard has managed to dissect all our favourite stories with her scalpel, while leaving their magic intact' Spectator 'When I read Fierce Bad Rabbits, I thought, why has no one written this book before? But Clare Pollard has done so superbly - it is perceptive, illuminating, scholarly but at the same time entertaining. It should be essential reading for every thinking parent' Penelope Lively 'This book is a happy way to reconnect with old friends' Times 'Delightful . . . as good a guide as you can hope for' Harper's Bazaar


Compare

'An enlightening, perceptive analysis of the books that build us' Sunday Telegraph, 5 star review ________________________________________ What is The Tiger Who Came to Tea really about? What has Meg and Mog got to do with Polish embroidery? Why is death in picture books so often represented by being eaten? We've read Green Eggs and Ham, laughed at Mr Tickle and whetted our ap 'An enlightening, perceptive analysis of the books that build us' Sunday Telegraph, 5 star review ________________________________________ What is The Tiger Who Came to Tea really about? What has Meg and Mog got to do with Polish embroidery? Why is death in picture books so often represented by being eaten? We've read Green Eggs and Ham, laughed at Mr Tickle and whetted our appetites with The Very Hungry Caterpillar. But what lies behind the picture books that make up our childhood? Fierce Bad Rabbits takes us on an eye-opening journey in a pea-green boat through the history of picture books. From Edward Lear through to Beatrix Potter and contemporary picture books like Stick Man, Clare Pollard shines a light on some of our best-loved childhood stories, their histories and what they really mean. Because the best picture books are far more complex than they seem - and darker too. Monsters can gobble up children and go unnoticed, power is not always used wisely, and the wild things are closer than you think. Sparkling with wit, magic and nostalgia, Fierce Bad Rabbits weaves in tales from Clare's own childhood, and her re-readings as a parent, with fascinating facts and theories about the authors behind the books. Introducing you to new treasures while bringing your childhood favourites to vivid life, it will make you see even stories you've read a hundred times afresh. _________________________________ 'A gem, thoroughly enjoyable. Pollard has managed to dissect all our favourite stories with her scalpel, while leaving their magic intact' Spectator 'When I read Fierce Bad Rabbits, I thought, why has no one written this book before? But Clare Pollard has done so superbly - it is perceptive, illuminating, scholarly but at the same time entertaining. It should be essential reading for every thinking parent' Penelope Lively 'This book is a happy way to reconnect with old friends' Times 'Delightful . . . as good a guide as you can hope for' Harper's Bazaar

30 review for Fierce Bad Rabbits: The Tales Behind Children's Picture Books

  1. 5 out of 5

    Claire Fuller

    Fierce Bad Rabbits is a history of children's picture books, interspersed with memories of Pollard's childhood and the books she reads to her own young children. Erudite but never stuffy, full of fascinating facts about writers and illustrators, Pollard has really done her research. I absolutely loved it, and it reminded me about some books I'd forgotten. My only regret was that it has languished on my 'to read' shelf for so long.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Farah Mendlesohn

    At its best when at its most personal. I definitely recommend it for a lovely exploration of *re-reading* and of the shift between childhood reading and adult reading. Pollard does a lovely job of sifting through some very silly academic interpretations of famous books (tho personally I do wonder if The Tiger Who Came to Tea actually began as a mish mash retelling of the feeding of AA Milne’s Tigger when he first arrives in The wood, no one seems to have noticed it’s the same story). Although Po At its best when at its most personal. I definitely recommend it for a lovely exploration of *re-reading* and of the shift between childhood reading and adult reading. Pollard does a lovely job of sifting through some very silly academic interpretations of famous books (tho personally I do wonder if The Tiger Who Came to Tea actually began as a mish mash retelling of the feeding of AA Milne’s Tigger when he first arrives in The wood, no one seems to have noticed it’s the same story). Although Pollard cites Jacqueline Rose the book - for me - demonstrates what I’ve been arguing for a while: children aren’t a separate species. We are the child we were; the child we were is us. Full disclosure. After reading this book which i’d bought *entirely* because it sounded good, I looked up the author and realised I’m an idiot. She’s the fantastic editor of Magazine of Poetry in Translation (which is why the consideration of children’s poetry here is superior to anything else I’ve read) and I am a Trustee of MPT.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Colleen Fauchelle

    I read a children's because they are sweet and who doesn't like listening to a story. This book will open your eyes to the story behind the story and some of them are very dark. Also you get to know the authors who have written these children's stories. very interesting book, but I think I am happy to just read a sweet story.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Girl with her Head in a Book

    Those searching for the perfect gift for the bibliophiles in their lives need look no further. The relationship we have with the books we read in childhood is incredibly potent and it is one that we carry into adulthood. In Fierce Bad Rabbits, Clare Pollard charts the history of children's picture books from the earliest known illustrated stories right up until the present day. The bibliomemoir has become an increasingly popular genre over recent years but this is much more than that. As a poet, Those searching for the perfect gift for the bibliophiles in their lives need look no further. The relationship we have with the books we read in childhood is incredibly potent and it is one that we carry into adulthood. In Fierce Bad Rabbits, Clare Pollard charts the history of children's picture books from the earliest known illustrated stories right up until the present day. The bibliomemoir has become an increasingly popular genre over recent years but this is much more than that. As a poet, Pollard is particularly well suited to sing the song of the picture book, which is all too often denied its proper seat in the canon of literature. Part history, part psychology, Fierce Bad Rabbits is a meditation on reading and the power of the visual story. I will never look at bedtime stories the same way again. Starting with A Little Pretty Pocket Book in 1744, Pollard chronicles the development of the illustrated story and how the interplay between text and image has changed over time. Almost every page of Fierce Bad Rabbits is packed with revelations about the history of children's publishing. I have always found the work of Kate Greenaway to be rather creepy. Now I know why. She was adapting her work to suit her mentor, John Ruskin. That John Ruskin. He who fell in love with a nine year-old and refused to consummate his marriage to his wife because she had pubic hair. In a letter, Ruskin requested that Greenaway draw little girls without any clothes on, although his concerned companion added an anxious note to the letter 'Do nothing of the kind!'. While I knew that there was some not-so-great elements to Victorian children's literature, I was disconcerted that such a pioneer in illustration was so heavily influenced by a pedophile. From there, Pollard moves on to analysing the shifting role of the anthropomorphised animal, from their earliest forms in Aesop's Fables through to Beatrix Potter and Miffy and Peppa. This was thought-provoking for me as I've been surprised on the re-read by just how brutal a lot of Peter Rabbit and co really are. Specifically, The Tale of a Fierce Bad Rabbit is one of the most alarming pieces of children's literature that I have ever seen. And then there's Alison Uttley's Little Grey Rabbit stories, which I do remember liking as a young child. As an adult, her passive subservience is actually disturbing to the extent that I'm having second thoughts about reading them to my son. Pollard describes how we use these clothed animals to explain the world to our offspring but as the way we live has changed, these stories have become museum pieces. I read Maisie Goes To Nursery with my baby repeatedly before he started in childcare, I have a potty-related book to explain how he might move on from nappies and the Astronaut is always more ready to accept a new concept if it can be reframed through something similar that happened to Bing Bunny. But stories have nothing to do with the behaviours of real animals. One of the unnerving aspects about Beatrix Potter is that it straddles the two worlds. Mrs Tabitha Twitch instructs her children to walk on their hindlegs to appear more human, even though they find it uncomfortable. Mr Jeremy Fisher may be having grand visitors to tea but he serves roast grasshopper with ladybird sauce. Peter Rabbit's father was baked in a pie. Savagery and sentiment exist side by side - it makes for uneasy bedtime reading. Also, while this is not the first time that I've felt like it would be good to find out more about Beatrix Potter, reading Fierce Bad Rabbits made me think that I really do need to read her biography. The woman was incredible in how she managed to break out of a stifling Victorian home and while the contemporary society prevented her from achieving the scientific career she originally desired, her business acumen was fantastic. It takes a remarkable woman to build a career and largely fund the National Trust on the shoulders of a rabbit in a blue coat. She was a pioneer in terms of merchandising and spin-off products and through this she not only made her own fortune but also set the National Trust up in very good stead. Pollard observes at one point, 'Behind every story, another story', and this is really her whole point in Fierce Bad Rabbits. You look at Janet and Allen Ahlberg's Peepo and you see a baby learning about the world. You look again and you realise that the baby is Allen Ahlberg himself and then you know that this baby is newly adopted and learning about this unfamiliar family while World War Two is happening in the background. One particularly poignant section was on the various authors of children's picture books who are also Holocaust survivors. Not only the iconic Judith Kerr of Mog and Tiger Who Came To Tea fame but also The Very Hungry Caterpillar's Eric Carle and Where The Wild Things Are's Maurice Sendak. Pollard draws the link between their shared trauma and their depictions of hunger on the page. Judith Kerr always rejected the idea that the titular tiger represented Hitler. She pointed out that Sophie hugs the tiger and that 'one would never snuggle the Gestapo, even subconsciously'. Sometimes a tiger really is just a tiger. In the case of Eric Carle though, I do now find myself reading his books differently. There is such agony in the fact that he had a happy early childhood in America before his homesick mother moved the family back to Germany just in time for the outbreak of war. The adult Carle fought bitterly with his publisher over the stomachache scene in Caterpillar as he hated the idea of a character being punished for having been hungry. Even years afterwards he felt that including it compromised the book. Reading this in 2020 in the wake of public debate over child hunger, it feels like another example of hunger being shameful. The page makes me uncomfortable. The caterpillar was hungry. He ate. He deserved no retribution. Fierce Bad Rabbits is one of those glorious books that unearths something startling on every single page. So many authors of children's picture books appear to have a background in trauma. Martin Waddell survived a harrowing incident in the Troubles. Shirley Hughes endured childhood bereavement and early poverty. Julia Donaldson lost a son. It is so easy to be dismissive of the picture book. While it is the portal that we pass through on our journey to wards reading, it is also a form that many of us are encouraged to leave behind. I was around seven when my mother told me that she would buy me no more picture books and when I tried to check some out from the library, I was again advised that I should be reading things that were more grown up. It's hard to really place blame here; I was a budding book fiend with an insatiable desire for more and more things to read and priorities had to be struck. But the picture book is not 'lesser'. Telling a complete story in just a few pages and partnering both image and word is no mean feat. I always enjoy the picture books where the illustration mocks the printed word. In Mog and the Baby, the words say that Mog loves babies but we see the cat's aghast expression and recognise this as a lie. One of the many fabulous things about Judith Kerr is that she geared her books towards budding readers and never included words where the picture had already done the job. One of the difficulties for the parent reader though is knowing how to engage with this. In the Meg and Mog books, there is often so much happening at once, how do I convey the chaos to my son? Pollard comments on her own struggle to convey the silences in Where the Wild Things Are with three double pages featuring Max's adventures as monarch of the Wild Things. Do you whoop? Describe what is happening? I think there is no single correct answer. As I often do with bibliomemoirs, I found myself nodding along enthusiastically to a number of Pollard's picture book peeves. I am similarly ambivalent about the recent fashion for bookish merchandising. I understand her thought that child would surely form a bond more easily with an anonymous stuffed cat rather than a branded 'Mog' one. But yet my son loves our giant Moomintroll and is always excited to play 'match' with his snuggly 'Little Nutbrown Hare' when we read Guess How Much I Love You. One point that had me punching the air though was on the gender divides in picture books. During my abbreviated teaching career, I was appalled by how picture books seemed to have been dumbed down into princess books for girls and vomit and excrement related books for boys. As I navigate the challenges of being mother to a male child, his reading has been an area of particular interest to me. I don't want to pick books for him just because I liked them but surely it is patronising to assume him incapable of enjoying books that don't centre around the contents of a toilet? I was intrigued by Pollard's theory that yuk-themed books represent the patriarchy encouraging male children to turn against the female maternal body. I have a nasty feeling that she is on to something - there is a lot of this out there. Yet by shouting 'poopypants' loudly and repeatedly, it only serves to confirm to boys that they are otherwise supposed to find reading dull. It's not about being prudish because there are clever picture books about excrement. The Mole Who Knew It Was None Of His Business is an excellent example. But the vast, overwhelming majority are devoid of any real imagination and mindless rubbish is never going to make a child connect with the magic of reading. Fierce Bad Rabbits is a rallying call for the the picture book and a timely one at that. Increasingly we see the rise and rise of celebrity children's authors, particularly in the illustrated section. In Fierce Bad Rabbits, Pollard reminds us of the particular power of the books that we read first. These are not stories that just anyone could conjure up given an illustrator sidekick. And indeed, while it might seem simple enough to gather together anecdotes about picture books, what Pollard has achieved here is something quite spectacular. She is a poet and in her hands, we soar to new heights and through our reading we travel in time. The book's closing lines made me cry 'The milk is poured; we snuggle on the bed. I am forty and I am four. As I read the story to my children, my father reads the story to me again, and yes, we are lucky'. Buy this for all the bibliophiles in your life. They will thank you.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Carol Hislop

    This is a lovely book and reading it was like wandering down memory lane. The back stories about the authors were interesting too. It has made me look at picture books differently.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    The picture book business is a bunny-eat-bunny world, according to Clare Pollard. In her entertaining history, we learn that Beatrix Potter boiled the flesh off her dead pets so she could study their bones. That Maurice Sendak said all Dr. Seuss's drawings looked like bowel movements. Matching Sendak in viciousness, Alison Uttley described Beatrix Potter as rude and old, and Enid Blyton as "a vulgar curled woman." She in turn earned the soubriquet "the Pied Blighter." That Anthony Browne got bit The picture book business is a bunny-eat-bunny world, according to Clare Pollard. In her entertaining history, we learn that Beatrix Potter boiled the flesh off her dead pets so she could study their bones. That Maurice Sendak said all Dr. Seuss's drawings looked like bowel movements. Matching Sendak in viciousness, Alison Uttley described Beatrix Potter as rude and old, and Enid Blyton as "a vulgar curled woman." She in turn earned the soubriquet "the Pied Blighter." That Anthony Browne got bitten to the bone on meeting his first gorilla. That Babar, alas, is an Imperialist fable. Fierce Bad Rabbits indeed. A wonderful read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Crane

    A mixture of autobiography and insights into the context that picture books were produced in. As well as the general historical and cultural context we get fascinating insights into writers/illustrators own biographies that framed the books they created. Picture books being what they are there is wonderful information into how particular artists created the images they did. Had me going back to the picture books on my bookshelves with a new appreciation of their craft as well as their message.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Carmel

    I loved this book - reminded me of so many favourites I’ve shared with my children and grandchild- and children I’ve taught over the years. I’m looking forward to re-reading some too. Highly recommend this to anyone with an interest in children’s literature.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tweedledum

    A ten star book!!! A must for any book lover who has ever fallen in love with reading thanks to a wonderful picture book. Treat yourself and take a walk down memory lane with Clare Pollard, but be prepared for the real world to break in again and again and again. Authors of great picture books are real people with triumph and tragedy hidden sometimes even in their stories .

  10. 5 out of 5

    Saturday's Child

    The first thing that stood out to me was the title on the spine of this book, it immediately made me think of Beatrix Potter and her Fierce Bad Rabbit. When I removed it from the shelf I noticed the rest of the cover, that it was about children’s picture books. What is not to like about children’s picture books, no matter what age you are? When I started to read it and the author mentioned her love of Hilda Boswell’s Treasury of Poetry I knew that I had chosen to read a book that I would find mo The first thing that stood out to me was the title on the spine of this book, it immediately made me think of Beatrix Potter and her Fierce Bad Rabbit. When I removed it from the shelf I noticed the rest of the cover, that it was about children’s picture books. What is not to like about children’s picture books, no matter what age you are? When I started to read it and the author mentioned her love of Hilda Boswell’s Treasury of Poetry I knew that I had chosen to read a book that I would find most enjoyable.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ellie Page

    Fascinating and beautifully written.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chris Browning

    A glorious book: part history, part memoir, part academic essay, part polemic for why picture books are so important. Pollard is a wonderful writer - to the extent that you can almost hear her talking to you, guiding you through centuries of writers and ideas - and manages to delicately negotiate through well loved classics whilst also showing you new ways to think about them. She's also very funny and able to drop a huge amount of interesting facts without ever showing off. A wonderful book, a A glorious book: part history, part memoir, part academic essay, part polemic for why picture books are so important. Pollard is a wonderful writer - to the extent that you can almost hear her talking to you, guiding you through centuries of writers and ideas - and manages to delicately negotiate through well loved classics whilst also showing you new ways to think about them. She's also very funny and able to drop a huge amount of interesting facts without ever showing off. A wonderful book, a celebration but also an attempt to take the form seriously as an art. As someone who's basically dreamed of doing Picture Books for years it's made me even more determined. Shame there's no mention of the very greatest picture book of all time, The Story of Horace by Alice M Coats but maybe for the second edition?

  13. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    As a kindergarten teacher, this book is an ode to all the book I loved as a child and now as a teacher, with some new titles as well! I loved hearing the stories behind some best loved books, such as Where the Wild Things Are and The Very Hungry Caterpillar. Pollard weaves in her own experiences of reading with her children as well memories of being read to as a child. Overall an excellent read for anyone who loves children's literature. Quotes: When we are small, the stories adults tell us shape As a kindergarten teacher, this book is an ode to all the book I loved as a child and now as a teacher, with some new titles as well! I loved hearing the stories behind some best loved books, such as Where the Wild Things Are and The Very Hungry Caterpillar. Pollard weaves in her own experiences of reading with her children as well memories of being read to as a child. Overall an excellent read for anyone who loves children's literature. Quotes: When we are small, the stories adults tell us shape our world, our selves, our memories. The stories they choose to tell about our childhood, in a way, become our childhood. I wanted to be free but I kept biting my tongue. It occurred to me that this is what adulthood is. Yet we often fail to teach our children that 'good' is not something we are but something we do. When you love a small child, for a little while at least, their joy can be entirely within your gift... happy endings cost a few pence, are two-a-penny

  14. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I don't often review books, at least only the dire ones! However this book is far from dire, it's an exquisite telling of the tales behind the books of our childhood, some familiar and some unfamiliar. I chose to buy it with my audible credit for the month and listen to it on Father's Day, my first Father's Day since my Dad died earlier this year. It was an emotional read and I will confess there were a few tears along the way but that was a reflection on the day and not on the book. I doubt I co I don't often review books, at least only the dire ones! However this book is far from dire, it's an exquisite telling of the tales behind the books of our childhood, some familiar and some unfamiliar. I chose to buy it with my audible credit for the month and listen to it on Father's Day, my first Father's Day since my Dad died earlier this year. It was an emotional read and I will confess there were a few tears along the way but that was a reflection on the day and not on the book. I doubt I could have chosen a better book to listen to today of all days and yet it was a book I hadn't heard of before yesterday. Normally I read books on my kindle rather than listen to audio books but I actually think this book is better on audio than it would have been if I'd read it, the author's own voices adds something to the experience and what better book to be read to you than one about books which are written to be read out loud. Everybody should buy and listen to this book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Colin

    This is the most thoroughly enjoyable, fascinating and life-affirming book I have read for a long time. An enlightening and informative tour through the history and development of children’s picture books, it combines personal experience, child psychology, cultural history and anecdote in just the right combination. I have to confess that the subject matter was a must for me as I spent many years of my life working with children’s books and had always thought that picture books in particular wer This is the most thoroughly enjoyable, fascinating and life-affirming book I have read for a long time. An enlightening and informative tour through the history and development of children’s picture books, it combines personal experience, child psychology, cultural history and anecdote in just the right combination. I have to confess that the subject matter was a must for me as I spent many years of my life working with children’s books and had always thought that picture books in particular were one of the unsung glories of the UK’s cultural life. Fierce Bad Rabbits takes a wider view, but nevertheless triumphantly supports that argument. A treat for parents, grown ups who still remember the experience of sharing books with a parent, and anyone interested in books and publishing from whatever angle.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sally

    Can I give this ten stars?! Fifty?! This is an incredible book. I myself have never lost my love for the books of my childhood, never. One of the things I was most excited about when I was pregnant with my first child was that I was going to get to read a whole bunch of children’s books again. I was reading Hairy Maclary with my son the day we came home from the hospital. This book is an absolute joy, a celebration of children’s literature and full to the brim with interesting facts and tidbits. Can I give this ten stars?! Fifty?! This is an incredible book. I myself have never lost my love for the books of my childhood, never. One of the things I was most excited about when I was pregnant with my first child was that I was going to get to read a whole bunch of children’s books again. I was reading Hairy Maclary with my son the day we came home from the hospital. This book is an absolute joy, a celebration of children’s literature and full to the brim with interesting facts and tidbits. I have always wondered what The Tiger Who Came To Tea was about for example, and here all that wonder is, in a beautiful, clever book. I wanted to turn back to the front cover and read this again after I finished it but alas it must go back to the library, so I am going to go and buy a copy, today! Wonderful book, I want to give Clare Pollard a hug. A new favourite.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Scott

    https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres... Pollard is one of my favourite writers so I tend to devour everything she writes. Fierce Bad Rabbits has been on my radar for ages. The premise sounded really interesting. Some people dismiss picture books as childish and lacking a deeper meaning. How little they know as the opposite is true. Picture books can tackle subjects as deep as adult books. I’ve read a decent amount of picture books as an adult and have also been impressed by how deep they can be. https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres... Pollard is one of my favourite writers so I tend to devour everything she writes. Fierce Bad Rabbits has been on my radar for ages. The premise sounded really interesting. Some people dismiss picture books as childish and lacking a deeper meaning. How little they know as the opposite is true. Picture books can tackle subjects as deep as adult books. I’ve read a decent amount of picture books as an adult and have also been impressed by how deep they can be. I enjoyed listening to this. A wide spectrum of picture books and themes are covered. I’d heard of most of the picture books discussed and referenced here but there are a few that were completely new to me. This is well presented and engaging.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Barnaby Haszard

    Fleeting, fascinating glimpses of the reality behind picture books, and a superb argument for taking this medium as seriously as any other -- Pollard deeply believes these books are a huge part of what shaped her as a person, and that the same is now happening with her children. I always find it infuriating when people dismiss children's or young adult books as beneath them, and look down on other grown-ups who dare to read them -- sometimes openly! Now I can just recommend they read this book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Gemma Scott

    I haven't been so gutted to finish a book in ages! I really looked forward to reading a little of this book every night. My husband kept asking me what I was doing as I would every now and then make surprised noises at the random facts or laugh at the way Pollard phrased something. I found this really interesting and entertaining on so many levels, would definitely recommend!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    No doubt in my five-start rating. Just sobbing now I’ve finished it. Anyone who loves children’s books (that’s probably you) will find a lot to love here. Deeply personal, beautifully described, sober, romantic (in the original sense), informative and always a joy to read. Hard recommend.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bob Mccow

    Great, a very personal look at some of the children's picture books that have had an impact on children. But I think there's a more interesting, in depth study to be written on the authors of these books.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Witt

    Fascinating read about many books that were bought and read to me as a child and I remember many of them. This book also provides a brief biography of some authors and their backgrounds, which explains why they wrote in a particular style or theme.

  23. 5 out of 5

    K Olsen

    Fascinating and engaging. Delving into the history, influence and importance of picture books, interwoven with the personal history of the author. This was a non-fiction book with depth and personality.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Jeffrey

    A brief canter through the history of books aimed at young children. It included many of my favourite books which I read to my own children. It concludes with a satisfying list of the author’s top 50 books.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    A fascinating read - part history, part literary analysis and part personal memoir by someone who has a passion for picture books rooted in her own childhood and her love for her father and further enhanced by motherhood and her own poetry. I wanted more and was sad when I finished it.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    Absolutely fascinating to read. Love learning about the history of children's books.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tina Ambury

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Not only was it fascinating and very informative, I loved the author's personal stories. Recommended

  28. 5 out of 5

    Stuart

    Darling, it's because all they want is what they already had; to repeat it over

  29. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    Not for me. Reads more like a thesis around themes across a number of books. I also didn't enjoy the autobiographical bits.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Elliott

    This was so lovely to read!! Pollard has definitely done her research, and I can’t wait to read more of her work. (Also found out nearly every Children’s book author is Jewish, hell yeah baybeee)

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.