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If no one sees him, does he exist? This superhero-inspired adventure story explores friendship and what it means to be a truly brave. Nadia finds adventure in the pages of her Superman comic books, until a mysterious boy saves her dog from drowning during a storm and then disappears. Now she finds herself in the role of Lois Lane, hunting down the scoop of the Invisible Boy If no one sees him, does he exist? This superhero-inspired adventure story explores friendship and what it means to be a truly brave. Nadia finds adventure in the pages of her Superman comic books, until a mysterious boy saves her dog from drowning during a storm and then disappears. Now she finds herself in the role of Lois Lane, hunting down the scoop of the Invisible Boy, and suddenly she’s in a real-life adventure that’s far more dangerous than anything in her comic books. The Invisible Boy is a mystery and an adventure story, as well as a story about child labor trafficking. Like Katherine Applegate, author of Crenshaw and Wishtree, Alyssa Hollingsworth takes a difficult subject matter and makes it accessible for middle-grade readers.


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If no one sees him, does he exist? This superhero-inspired adventure story explores friendship and what it means to be a truly brave. Nadia finds adventure in the pages of her Superman comic books, until a mysterious boy saves her dog from drowning during a storm and then disappears. Now she finds herself in the role of Lois Lane, hunting down the scoop of the Invisible Boy If no one sees him, does he exist? This superhero-inspired adventure story explores friendship and what it means to be a truly brave. Nadia finds adventure in the pages of her Superman comic books, until a mysterious boy saves her dog from drowning during a storm and then disappears. Now she finds herself in the role of Lois Lane, hunting down the scoop of the Invisible Boy, and suddenly she’s in a real-life adventure that’s far more dangerous than anything in her comic books. The Invisible Boy is a mystery and an adventure story, as well as a story about child labor trafficking. Like Katherine Applegate, author of Crenshaw and Wishtree, Alyssa Hollingsworth takes a difficult subject matter and makes it accessible for middle-grade readers.

30 review for The Invisible Boy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Driver

    Readers prepare: such a treat of a book is coming this summer! Full of hope and adventure, whilst never avoiding difficult truths, this is a beautifully crafted story of friendship and survival, complete with well-drawn characters to fall in love with. Humanitarian themes are wielded with grace, never weighing too heavily on the story. In turn, the story deftly peels away a layer of injustice, revealing an often heartbreaking scene beneath -- but in doing so, letting the light in.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Beth Barron

    Human trafficking is a hard subject to write about for adults, let alone for a much younger audience, but Alyssa does an incredible job shedding light on a global issue that we often see as "surely not happening *here*." Incredibly well done, Alyssa. Thanks for not giving up on telling this story. May we all do more to truly see the people around us.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Misty Miller

    Addressing topics such as human trafficking can be difficult at best – but talking about in terms that do not diminish the importance and staying age appropriate can be next to impossible. Alyssa Hollingsworth address this tough topic perfectly. The Invisible Boy is presented through the eyes of a middle school reporter. Nadia is always on the search for an adventure, but this time she gets more than she bargains for. Hollingsworth skillfully weaves a mysterious adventure story that keeps the re Addressing topics such as human trafficking can be difficult at best – but talking about in terms that do not diminish the importance and staying age appropriate can be next to impossible. Alyssa Hollingsworth address this tough topic perfectly. The Invisible Boy is presented through the eyes of a middle school reporter. Nadia is always on the search for an adventure, but this time she gets more than she bargains for. Hollingsworth skillfully weaves a mysterious adventure story that keeps the readers on the edge of their seats while addressing the sad reality of human trafficking in an age appropriate manner. Readers, young and old alike, will live through Nadia and her adventures and learn that sometime the right thing to do is not always the safe thing to do. This Must Read needs to be on the shelf of every classroom.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chalice

    3.5* I was a little afraid that I really wasn't going to like this book. That is was going to be just another middle grade fiction book, written in that dumbed-down tone for middle-graders. Well, I was wrong. (Yay!) First of all, I somehow read this book without knowing what it was actually about. In other words, when the plot twist (that the Goodreads blurb totally spoils) came, I was actually experiencing it along side the MC. (Wait... does that mean I have the IQ of a 13yo....?) I don't know. B 3.5* I was a little afraid that I really wasn't going to like this book. That is was going to be just another middle grade fiction book, written in that dumbed-down tone for middle-graders. Well, I was wrong. (Yay!) First of all, I somehow read this book without knowing what it was actually about. In other words, when the plot twist (that the Goodreads blurb totally spoils) came, I was actually experiencing it along side the MC. (Wait... does that mean I have the IQ of a 13yo....?) I don't know. But that's the best way to experience a plot twist in my opinion. I didn't like the parents. Seriously, they weren't very good parents. And I didn't like how that caused the main characters to have to take things into their own hands. Parents, be there for your children. Don't write off their concerns. (view spoiler)[Especially if they're concerned about something like human trafficking! (hide spoiler)] Writers of MG fiction, can we have some more respectable parents?? That was my only major problem with this book. I really liked the theme. It's also not one you see very often, especially in MG fiction, and I think it was handled really well. In short, I think we need more books like this (except maybe with some better parents ;P).

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Dixon

    It's one of those things we really don't want to believe can really happen, but slavery is still real in many different ways. This novel takes us along with Nadia, a girl who still believes in superheroes - after all, there's clearly one in the neighbourhood because there was a Rescue - but who discovers that real life holds some nasty truths. I really enjoyed Nadia's worldview and the way she was led to discover that not everything is what it seems (including the boy who broke her canoe's paddle It's one of those things we really don't want to believe can really happen, but slavery is still real in many different ways. This novel takes us along with Nadia, a girl who still believes in superheroes - after all, there's clearly one in the neighbourhood because there was a Rescue - but who discovers that real life holds some nasty truths. I really enjoyed Nadia's worldview and the way she was led to discover that not everything is what it seems (including the boy who broke her canoe's paddle). There's personal growth, learning about friendship, and facing the tough stuff. A good read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sierra Dertinger

    Thank you to MacMillan Children's Publishing for giving #BookAllies a copy of this ARC I was absolutely enthralled with this one and thought Hollingsworth did a phenomenal job blending this tough issue of child labor trafficking into a middle grade novel. This was yet again another page-turner for me. I knew based on the blurb on the back of the book that it would discuss child labor trafficking so I was eager to see how it would turn out since this is such a difficult subject to take on for a yo Thank you to MacMillan Children's Publishing for giving #BookAllies a copy of this ARC I was absolutely enthralled with this one and thought Hollingsworth did a phenomenal job blending this tough issue of child labor trafficking into a middle grade novel. This was yet again another page-turner for me. I knew based on the blurb on the back of the book that it would discuss child labor trafficking so I was eager to see how it would turn out since this is such a difficult subject to take on for a younger audience. As each chapter ended I wanted to learn more about how the author would craft the character of the Invisible Boy and how the main character Nadia would react when she found out what was going on. My heart was racing and I was fighting left and right for justice of the Invisible Boy. I think this would be a great text to connect with my students about real-world issues that are present in today's society. It's a real thing. It is not made up like superheroes are. I think it would be a great read aloud.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Katie Reilley

    Thank you to the author and Roaring Brook Press for providing #bookexpedition an ARC to read and share. Nadia is a budding journalist, reading about adventure in the pages of her Superman comic books and looking for a scoop in her neighborhood. One day during a rainstorm, a mysterious boy saves her dog from drowning, but then disappears! Determined to do some investigating reporting (like her hero, Lois Lane), Nadia searches for the identity of the "Invisible Boy." However, the information she u Thank you to the author and Roaring Brook Press for providing #bookexpedition an ARC to read and share. Nadia is a budding journalist, reading about adventure in the pages of her Superman comic books and looking for a scoop in her neighborhood. One day during a rainstorm, a mysterious boy saves her dog from drowning, but then disappears! Determined to do some investigating reporting (like her hero, Lois Lane), Nadia searches for the identity of the "Invisible Boy." However, the information she uncovers is far more painful and dangerous than the stories she loves to read. Each chapter began with a sketch paralleling the events of the next pages. Full of mystery and adventure, this MG novel touches on the tough topic of child labor trafficking in an age appropriate way. With themes of friendship, hope, and survival, be sure to pre-order your copy now. Publishing September 2020.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Carin

    Nadia wants to be a reporter. So when she sees her classmate she has dubbed "Paddle Boy," who inexplicably broke her family's second canoe paddle, she follows him around, taking notes. Her dog gets swept off into a storm drain and she's worried he's going to drown. When a mysterious boy appears out of nowhere, saves her dog, and vanishes again. Obviously she's now got a bigger story to report! Emulating her hero, Lois Lane, she tries to find the boy she dubs Invisible Boy, as that's obviously his Nadia wants to be a reporter. So when she sees her classmate she has dubbed "Paddle Boy," who inexplicably broke her family's second canoe paddle, she follows him around, taking notes. Her dog gets swept off into a storm drain and she's worried he's going to drown. When a mysterious boy appears out of nowhere, saves her dog, and vanishes again. Obviously she's now got a bigger story to report! Emulating her hero, Lois Lane, she tries to find the boy she dubs Invisible Boy, as that's obviously his secret power. Paddle Boy (who lobbies for a new superhero name) annoying tags along, and they do eventually meet the boy, who lives in the basement of a house on their street, can only talk with them when his "foster mother" isn't home, and doesn't seem to go to school. It takes them a while to figure out what's going on--he's been trafficked and is being forced to work for free all day. What will Nadia do once she figures it out? Luckily the ending really works. It's not one of those implausible crazy endings you sometimes see. Her aunt is a lawyer who actually works with human trafficking (she never understood her aunt's job and thought she worked with traffic as in cars and roads.) And in the end, after a bit of an adventure, they go to grownups for help. The ending was exciting and an adrenaline rush and it doesn't read like a book with an agenda--it reads like a story about a girl who gets caught up in something over her head that she eventually needs help with. This truly could happen to anyone. Luckily Nadia is a persistent, loyal, and determined girl.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

    I'm not a superhero person. I don't care about superheros and I never will. Except Batman (Christian Bale as Batman in Batman Begins and The Dark Knight. The Dark Knight Rises does not exist to me nor does any other Batman). With that being said, Nadia, a 12 year old girl, has an unhealthy obsession with Superman that detached me from the story. I know five year olds with this level of obsession pertaining to Thomas the Train and Dora, but Nadia is 12 and still lives in a fantasy world. The const I'm not a superhero person. I don't care about superheros and I never will. Except Batman (Christian Bale as Batman in Batman Begins and The Dark Knight. The Dark Knight Rises does not exist to me nor does any other Batman). With that being said, Nadia, a 12 year old girl, has an unhealthy obsession with Superman that detached me from the story. I know five year olds with this level of obsession pertaining to Thomas the Train and Dora, but Nadia is 12 and still lives in a fantasy world. The constant Superman talk was overkill. Every other paragraph seemed to mention Superman, Lois Lane, Superman comics, and Nadia's Superman attire. I honestly didn't care and skimmed those sections (which is a large portion of the book) because it had nothing to do with the actual story. Nadia is so obsessed with superheroes that she truly believes a supervillain and a superhero live on her street which is something a child would believe. Not a teenager. It takes her over half the book to realize that superheros and villains do not exist and Eli and Kenny are just kids. I would have rated it 4 stars because of the content and story because the reader has no clue what this is really about based off the summary. The message is an important one, but the Superman obsession ruined it for me. Thanks Edelweiss for an ARC.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Sammis

    The Invisible Boy by Alyssa Hollingsworth is set near Washington D.C. and deals with human trafficking. Nadia loves the Superman comics, specifically she loves Lois Lane and wants to be a reporter like her. She sees her world in terms of ace reporters, superheroes and supervillains. Nadia's first supervillain is a boy she calls Paddle Boy after she witnesses a neighbor take one of her canoe paddles and smash it against a tree. Her first superhero she calls Invisible Boy, a kid who does good deeds The Invisible Boy by Alyssa Hollingsworth is set near Washington D.C. and deals with human trafficking. Nadia loves the Superman comics, specifically she loves Lois Lane and wants to be a reporter like her. She sees her world in terms of ace reporters, superheroes and supervillains. Nadia's first supervillain is a boy she calls Paddle Boy after she witnesses a neighbor take one of her canoe paddles and smash it against a tree. Her first superhero she calls Invisible Boy, a kid who does good deeds around the neighborhood but is otherwise never seen. Over the course of the book, Nadia becomes friends with both Paddle Boy (who isn't a supervillain, nor a bully) and Invisible Boy. Through her aunt's work with a human trafficking non-profit, she also realizes that Invisible Boy is probably being held against his will. She and Paddle Boy decide to team up to help him. http://pussreboots.com/blog/2020/comm... S/M Home Blue Highway 996633

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC from Edelweiss Plus

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mr. Salerno

    It’s rare that an author can write about such a troubling subject for middle grade readers, but Alyssa Hollingsworth has done just that with The Invisible Boy. I particularly loved how Nadia's first person narration gradually shifts from a superhero laced fantasy world to a more realistic one as she herself realizes the situation Eli is in. The book introduces and educates the subject of human trafficking at an age appropriate level without ever reading like an informational pamphlet. A first pu It’s rare that an author can write about such a troubling subject for middle grade readers, but Alyssa Hollingsworth has done just that with The Invisible Boy. I particularly loved how Nadia's first person narration gradually shifts from a superhero laced fantasy world to a more realistic one as she herself realizes the situation Eli is in. The book introduces and educates the subject of human trafficking at an age appropriate level without ever reading like an informational pamphlet. A first purchase for all middle grade and YA libraries. Reviewed from NetGalley copy.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Elle

    The Invisible Boy by Alyssa Hollingsworth was an amazing middle grade fictional story that is part mystery, part adventure, and part informational text on a very real tragedy that occurs every day all over this country. Nadia Quick is a 12 year old aspiring journalist on summer vacation in her hometown of Arlington, Virginia. She is spending her summer trying to right a news story worthy of winning the Junior Journalists Contest. While Nadia is out for a walk, her dog has an accident and is resc The Invisible Boy by Alyssa Hollingsworth was an amazing middle grade fictional story that is part mystery, part adventure, and part informational text on a very real tragedy that occurs every day all over this country. Nadia Quick is a 12 year old aspiring journalist on summer vacation in her hometown of Arlington, Virginia. She is spending her summer trying to right a news story worthy of winning the Junior Journalists Contest. While Nadia is out for a walk, her dog has an accident and is rescued by an unseen boy. Nadia begins searching for this mystery hero, who she nicknames The Invisible Boy. Nadia does find The Invisible Boy and so begins the friendship between The Invisible Boy and Lightning Lane (AKA Nadia). As Nadia gets to know The Invisible Boy, she soon sees who he really is . . . and learns why he is never seen. The truth is super villains and super heroes may only exist in comic books, but evil does live in our cities -- we just don't always see it. Human trafficking often goes unseen because the victims are hard to spot. Many times the victims are children who are groomed in their roles so well that they may not even realize that the are slaves because they are trying to escape to a better life. This was a moving book that presented human trafficking in a way that people can actually understand. Though this is a work of fiction, it does provide very real information in the Epilogue on what human trafficking actually is, how to identify the signs of potential victims, and the National Human Trafficking Hotline if you suspect someone is being human trafficked.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    I received this ARC from the publisher. Nadia Quick is looking for a story. As a budding investigative journalist, she has already decided her neighbor Paddle Boy is the super villain, the mysterious dog-saving invisible boy is the hero, and she is the intrepid reporter, just like Lois Lane. As she gets to know the two boys she realizes that maybe her assumptions are hiding the truth, but does she really want to see what is right in front of her. When I read that this was a story that touched on c I received this ARC from the publisher. Nadia Quick is looking for a story. As a budding investigative journalist, she has already decided her neighbor Paddle Boy is the super villain, the mysterious dog-saving invisible boy is the hero, and she is the intrepid reporter, just like Lois Lane. As she gets to know the two boys she realizes that maybe her assumptions are hiding the truth, but does she really want to see what is right in front of her. When I read that this was a story that touched on child labor trafficking, I thought about putting it at the bottom of the stack, such a heavy topic. What I realized when I read it was that Hollingsworth is telling a story about kids and their view of the world. She is telling a story about making assumptions and judging character. She is telling a story about all different kinds of families. The story does include the topic of child labor and its realities, but it does so in a gentle way that is perfect for middle grade kids. Kids will be there for the story and they will learn harder truths in the end, but the characters continue to shine through. Nadia is such a great character. Her love of comics and the comic inserts before each chapter will pull in those older kids who still haven't branched out into chapter books. I highly recommend this book for grades 4-7.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cassie Reynolds

    *Thank you NetGalley and publisher for an e-ARC in exchange for an honest review* After reading the "blurb" about this book, I was highly interested to see how Hollingsworth would weave such a difficult real-world issue into a middle-grade novel. Wow. This was a book that I could not put down. Full of adventure and curiosity, Nadia is such a great and tenacious character. Even though she keeps getting proven wrong throughout the story, she continues searching for the truth as a budding journalist *Thank you NetGalley and publisher for an e-ARC in exchange for an honest review* After reading the "blurb" about this book, I was highly interested to see how Hollingsworth would weave such a difficult real-world issue into a middle-grade novel. Wow. This was a book that I could not put down. Full of adventure and curiosity, Nadia is such a great and tenacious character. Even though she keeps getting proven wrong throughout the story, she continues searching for the truth as a budding journalist. I loved seeing the friendship between Nadia, "Paddle Boy" and "Invisible Boy" unfold. I think Hollingsworth did an amazing job blending the child labor trafficking issue into this book. This was a moving book that presented human trafficking in a way that people (and kids) can actually understand. I think this would be a great text to connect with my students about real-world issues that are present in today's society that is explained through a kid's eyes. This is one I cannot wait to add to our classroom library!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sara Thompson

    "Doing what's right what is more important than doing what's safe" In Alyssa Hollingsworth's The Invisible Boy, our 13 year old super hero, Nadia, learns this lesson. Nadia has a vivid imagination where the neighbor boy has become her arch nemesis in a world of her making. The neighborhood is a pretty quiet place to be, until she discovers Invisible Boy! He's everything Nadia is looking for, a super hero that will lead to her big break in the Junior Journalism contest. The thing I love best about "Doing what's right what is more important than doing what's safe" In Alyssa Hollingsworth's The Invisible Boy, our 13 year old super hero, Nadia, learns this lesson. Nadia has a vivid imagination where the neighbor boy has become her arch nemesis in a world of her making. The neighborhood is a pretty quiet place to be, until she discovers Invisible Boy! He's everything Nadia is looking for, a super hero that will lead to her big break in the Junior Journalism contest. The thing I love best about Nadia is that she's tenacious. She is repeatedly proven wrong in the story, the things she believes are proven to be erroneous, and yet, she still has courage in her judgment to pursue the truth. Hollingsworth did a tremendous job revealing the truth to the reader. Her characters were very well written and flawed just enough to make them lovable and believable.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Costner

    I won this book in a giveaway and was so excited. I mean, just look at that beautiful cover! I didn’t know what the book was about exactly, so I wasn’t sure what to expect, but boy, was I pleasantly surprised! First of all, there are really cool comic book illustrations at the beginning of every chapter. The main character is the perfect kind of protagonist: super brave, speaks her mind, persistent until the very end. I didn’t know this was going to be a book about human trafficking! It was so b I won this book in a giveaway and was so excited. I mean, just look at that beautiful cover! I didn’t know what the book was about exactly, so I wasn’t sure what to expect, but boy, was I pleasantly surprised! First of all, there are really cool comic book illustrations at the beginning of every chapter. The main character is the perfect kind of protagonist: super brave, speaks her mind, persistent until the very end. I didn’t know this was going to be a book about human trafficking! It was so beautifully written and well done and age accessible. It opened my eyes and helped me be aware of this problem and how it is more prevalent than I thought. Such an important story!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jacquelyn

    Can a girl who pretends to be Lois Lane help save the day? Nadia Quick loves journalism and superheroes. Using her Lois Lane journalism skills, she tries to uncover the truth behind the neighborhood superhero, the Invisible Boy. I love how this book includes real life issues of child labor trafficking, but is also appropriately written for middle grade kids. The beginning of the story reminded me of a Nancy Drew mystery. The book quickly escalates and becomes hard to put down. This a great book Can a girl who pretends to be Lois Lane help save the day? Nadia Quick loves journalism and superheroes. Using her Lois Lane journalism skills, she tries to uncover the truth behind the neighborhood superhero, the Invisible Boy. I love how this book includes real life issues of child labor trafficking, but is also appropriately written for middle grade kids. The beginning of the story reminded me of a Nancy Drew mystery. The book quickly escalates and becomes hard to put down. This a great book to help kids start conversations about real world issues.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    Thanks to SLJ for the ARC! Captivating story about an inspiring journalist who leans to look beyond her fantasies and the truth she wants to find to reality. Loved the Superman angle. The page of drawn story that preceded each chapter made for a more enjoyable read and art was well done. Very good story about how child trafficking can happen anywhere. Good notes included at webs by author as well.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Suzy

    This started out as a story of a girl trying to find herself in her world, a world she fills with super hero thoughts. It turned into a story about human trafficking. This subject was handled well, you learned to like the characters, discovered their flaws, and saw real life issues. I enjoyed the story, I was not expecting where it went, but in hindsight saw all the clues.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gailanne Smith

    Hollingsworth has written about a difficult subject, human trafficking, in a delicate way. Middle grade readers will be drawn into this story of 3 kids who are there for each other when it’s discovered that one of them is being used as a domestic servant and is also being physically abused. While some of the abuse, such as possible cigarette burns, have to be inferred, other signs of abuse and neglect are spelled out more clearly. The story is intense and honest, without being overly aggressive Hollingsworth has written about a difficult subject, human trafficking, in a delicate way. Middle grade readers will be drawn into this story of 3 kids who are there for each other when it’s discovered that one of them is being used as a domestic servant and is also being physically abused. While some of the abuse, such as possible cigarette burns, have to be inferred, other signs of abuse and neglect are spelled out more clearly. The story is intense and honest, without being overly aggressive with its details. There is also just the right amount of humor to make it interesting for middle grade readers.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Day

    Alyssa Hollingsworth's latest book was a great way to talk about important issues with my middle grade reader. We were able to discuss human trafficking as it related to a child his own age featured in this book. We also talked about the misconception that human trafficking only happens elsewhere. I found the book a bit slow to start, but my son loved it right away. Too much Superman and Lois Lane for both our liking. What Nadia's parents do to her is just horrible.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    Thanks to SLJ for a review copy of this book. Nadia Quick loses herself in her Superman comic books as she reads them every day. The one day, a mysterious boy saves her dog from drowning and disappears. Nadia calls him the Invisible Boy. She is determined to crack the real life mystery by finding him and uncovering his identity. This book is both a mystery and an adventure that not only entertains readers but talks about child trafficking on their level.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    Great story, much fun, much awkward pre-teen-ness. The discovery that super-villains are real, but maybe they aren't wearing masks and capes, and maybe you can't even see them. Perfectly balanced writing that introduces young readers to a deep modern issue without being overly graphic for the age group.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Silver - Have a great day, you're loved

    I. Love. This. Book. It puts an incredibly sad and heavy topic into a book that offers hope and advice of how to recognize and report human trafficking. I love how Hollingsworth does this, and I will definietly reread it soon.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    Nadia is one of my top favorite characters! I loved getting to know this young reporter. I hope that we all learn to ‘see’ through Nadia’s eyes. This is an important book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I really loved this book by Alyssa Hollingsworth! It takes a difficult subject and makes it accessible. Loved the characters, Nadia, Kenny and Eli.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Erin Varley

    Wow! Kids will love the superhero theme and will learn about a topic not often shared with kids- human trafficking. Well done and appropriate for Middle Graders.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lily

    😊💙❤️💜

  30. 4 out of 5

    Renee Johnson

    My favorite thing about this book is the complex relationship between the parents and the main character.

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