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Bram Stoker's Dracula (Graphic Novel)

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The comics adaptation based on the film from Columbia Pictures (Sony) and Zoetrope Studios returns with all-new colors. Mike Mignola is one of the most popular comic book artists of the past thirty years, known for such important works as Batman: Gotham by Gaslight, Cosmic Odyssey, and, of course, Hellboy. Considered to be among Mignola's greatest works, Bram Stoker's Dracu The comics adaptation based on the film from Columbia Pictures (Sony) and Zoetrope Studios returns with all-new colors. Mike Mignola is one of the most popular comic book artists of the past thirty years, known for such important works as Batman: Gotham by Gaslight, Cosmic Odyssey, and, of course, Hellboy. Considered to be among Mignola's greatest works, Bram Stoker's Dracula was his last project before Hellboy launched and was originally released as a full-color four issue adaptation of Francis Ford Coppola's 1992 movie released by Columbia Pictures (Sony). It is now presented with all-new colors for this updated edition.


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The comics adaptation based on the film from Columbia Pictures (Sony) and Zoetrope Studios returns with all-new colors. Mike Mignola is one of the most popular comic book artists of the past thirty years, known for such important works as Batman: Gotham by Gaslight, Cosmic Odyssey, and, of course, Hellboy. Considered to be among Mignola's greatest works, Bram Stoker's Dracu The comics adaptation based on the film from Columbia Pictures (Sony) and Zoetrope Studios returns with all-new colors. Mike Mignola is one of the most popular comic book artists of the past thirty years, known for such important works as Batman: Gotham by Gaslight, Cosmic Odyssey, and, of course, Hellboy. Considered to be among Mignola's greatest works, Bram Stoker's Dracula was his last project before Hellboy launched and was originally released as a full-color four issue adaptation of Francis Ford Coppola's 1992 movie released by Columbia Pictures (Sony). It is now presented with all-new colors for this updated edition.

30 review for Bram Stoker's Dracula (Graphic Novel)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ivy_Lost_inside_Pages

    I can’t say how much I love both, the story of Dracula and the drawings of Mike Mignola one of my fav artist when it comes to graphic novels and comics. Great reread great Graphic Novel 🖤5🌿

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    So this is an adaptation of a film based on a book. So this is kind of a weird book. While I enjoyed the 1992 film (questionable accents from some actors aside), it's not one that I'd necessarily want to see adapted into a comic, it was only Mike Mignola's art that got this on my list. Of course the guy who created Hellboy would know how to draw the most famous vampire story of all time. There are times where he's clearly taken inspiration from the film to the point where it looks like he's just So this is an adaptation of a film based on a book. So this is kind of a weird book. While I enjoyed the 1992 film (questionable accents from some actors aside), it's not one that I'd necessarily want to see adapted into a comic, it was only Mike Mignola's art that got this on my list. Of course the guy who created Hellboy would know how to draw the most famous vampire story of all time. There are times where he's clearly taken inspiration from the film to the point where it looks like he's just redrawn several frames from the movie, but it's done in his unique style so it's still a really great mix. Having written all that I only just realised that this book was originally released back when the film first came out, so now this makes a lot more sense than creating it twenty five years later. So, if you're a horror fan, a Dracula fan or a Mike Mignola fan, I'd add this to your list.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Redwan Orittro

    A panel by panel adaptation of the movie. The artwork is nice, could have been better.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sean Carlin

    I was overjoyed to learn this long-out-of-print comic-book adaptation of one of my favorite horror movies (and major formative influences) would finally be available again! Francis Ford Coppola's sumptuous visuals as realized by Mike Mignola's one-of-a-kind pencils is a horror lover's dream come true, and to have the entire miniseries collected in a single-volume hardback was surely worth the "oceans of time" we waited for it! Though released last month, I saved it specifically for Halloween, an I was overjoyed to learn this long-out-of-print comic-book adaptation of one of my favorite horror movies (and major formative influences) would finally be available again! Francis Ford Coppola's sumptuous visuals as realized by Mike Mignola's one-of-a-kind pencils is a horror lover's dream come true, and to have the entire miniseries collected in a single-volume hardback was surely worth the "oceans of time" we waited for it! Though released last month, I saved it specifically for Halloween, and read it while playing Wojciech Kilar's haunting soundtrack in the background (and damn if it didn't scene-sync near perfectly!) Having now read it, I'm going to issue what is sure to be a controversial criticism: This collected edition would've been better in full color, as originally published. Mignola's pencils and John Nyberg's inks are flawless, don't get me wrong -- a Gothic delight -- but this was a color adaptation of a color movie, and it was meant to be experienced in color. Unlike, say, Robert Kirkman's The Walking Dead, this graphic novel wasn't shaded with gray tones to give it depth and dimension. The stark black-and-white "color" scheme, devoid of shade or shadow, though aesthetically appealing in a certain sense, renders much of the storytelling ambiguous. (And not in a dreamlike way, which was the effect in the movie.) Case in point: Any of the panels depicting fluids -- be it bloodletting, or droplets of perfume "falling" upward -- are virtually incomprehensible to those not already familiar with the imagery from the movie. You don't particularly know what you're looking at, so the book doesn't really serve as a complete standalone experience unto itself -- merely an "unfinished workprint" of an adaptation of a movie (itself an adaptation of a novel). IDW ought to have published the full-color version, and included select B&W excepts in the supplemental index. Another issue that stood out were the sometimes-abrupt scene transitions. All of a sudden, we'd cut to a different location, and it felt sometimes like pages or panels were missing. (They weren't.) Coppola had the benefit of cinematic dissolves to signify a change in setting, but Mignola didn't have that luxury. Once again, a change in color tone might've helped cue us to a shift in time/place, but alas... As a huge fan of both Stoker's novel and Coppola's film, I'm happy this comic has been reissued. I just wish, instead of getting artsy, IDW had known enough not to mess with a classic. A missed opportunity, this edition is for diehard Bram Stoker's Dracula enthusiasts only. Curious how other fans of this movie/comic feel...?

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jason Lundberg

    I read this originally when the four-issue limited series was published by Topps (yes, the baseball card people) shortly after the film was released. I’ve always been attracted to Mike Mignola’s art, and his heavy chiaroscuro style was perfect for this adaptation of the Coppola adaptation of Stoker’s novel. I’m so glad IDW has reissued this as a complete graphic novel with remastered colours; it’s even more gorgeous than I remember.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dávid Novotný

    Knowing original Stoker's book or movie will help as script makes sudden jumps from time to time. But it got that gothic horror atmosphere, so it was fine.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Derek

    This is the rare book I give four stars to largely on the strength of its art. It's hard to imagine anyone more suited to an adaptation of Coppola's Dracula than Mike Mignola. His aesthetic fits the material perfectly. His eerie, shadowy style gives everything an otherworldliness that not even Coppola could match onscreen. Writer Roy Thomas' script is overwrought and borderline-incoherent at times, just like the film it's depicting. And just like the movie the over-the-top opulence of it all som This is the rare book I give four stars to largely on the strength of its art. It's hard to imagine anyone more suited to an adaptation of Coppola's Dracula than Mike Mignola. His aesthetic fits the material perfectly. His eerie, shadowy style gives everything an otherworldliness that not even Coppola could match onscreen. Writer Roy Thomas' script is overwrought and borderline-incoherent at times, just like the film it's depicting. And just like the movie the over-the-top opulence of it all somehow just works. If you're a fan of the film you will find a great deal to enjoy here.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Graeme Dunlop

    I have quite mixed feelings about this story (and by extension, the film). Let's start with the artwork, coz that's easy. I'm a huge fan of Mike Mignola's artwork. The spare and yet evocative style is quite unique and really enhances horror. A big thumbs up there. It's the story I'm not as big a fan of. The central idea in "Bram Stoker's" Dracula is the love story between Prince Dracul and Mina/Elizabeta, which is nowhere in the novel. I don't like this because it fundamentally changes Dracula fro I have quite mixed feelings about this story (and by extension, the film). Let's start with the artwork, coz that's easy. I'm a huge fan of Mike Mignola's artwork. The spare and yet evocative style is quite unique and really enhances horror. A big thumbs up there. It's the story I'm not as big a fan of. The central idea in "Bram Stoker's" Dracula is the love story between Prince Dracul and Mina/Elizabeta, which is nowhere in the novel. I don't like this because it fundamentally changes Dracula from a being of pure evil, to a sympathetic character. Whilst I'm sure that's fine for many, it flat-out does not work for me. What I've always liked about vampire stories is a clear battle between the forces of light and the forces of darkness. I get that it adds a bit of complexity to Dracula's character but it's not one that's needed. Maybe that means I'm more comfortable with black-or-white situations than grey, but it's the fight against darkness and evil -- supernatural or human -- that gives a lot of horror its bite. In effect, Dracula as portrayed here is de-fanged. Apart from that, the story is fairly faithful to the original novel and this graphic novel moves through the scenes quite smoothly. For me, it's worth the read for the artwork alone.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kayleigh (Hedwigsbooks)

    So tempted to watch the film tonight now. Such gorgeous art that totally fits the movie's extreme aesthetic.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dann

    Bram Stoker’s Dracula is a heavily stylized, black and white graphic novel adaptation of Francis Ford Coppola’s film. The story follows Count Vlad, a fifteenth century Romanian prince who sells his soul for immortality, becoming a vampire that feeds on the blood of the living, and centuries later he finds his lost love reincarnated in Mina Murray, the fiancée of a solicitor that he has hired to facilitate his purchase of a London estate. Writer Roy Thomas does a fair job at translating the film Bram Stoker’s Dracula is a heavily stylized, black and white graphic novel adaptation of Francis Ford Coppola’s film. The story follows Count Vlad, a fifteenth century Romanian prince who sells his soul for immortality, becoming a vampire that feeds on the blood of the living, and centuries later he finds his lost love reincarnated in Mina Murray, the fiancée of a solicitor that he has hired to facilitate his purchase of a London estate. Writer Roy Thomas does a fair job at translating the film to the page and includes several additional scenes that help flesh out the story (particularly the reincarnation theme). The artwork by Mike Mignola and John Nyberg however, is a bit of a problem; some of it’s good and resembles the actors and set designs from the film, but there are a lot of panels that are kind of abstract and it’s unclear as to what they are and what’s going on in them. Still, the expressionist style is extraordinarily evocative and sets an atmospheric tone. It has its problems, yet Bram Stoker’s Dracula is a compelling gothic-horror comic that captures Francis Ford Coppola’s vision.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Shaffer

    Brilliant art, even if some of the storytelling is rushed at places. Far better than a movie adaptation has any right to be. 🧛🏻‍♂️ Deducted one star because there are less bewbs than in the film.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    This was originally published by Topps Comics, and may have even been their initial offering. Topps Comics was a somewhat short lived foray into comics by the trading card company at time when comic sales were booming but quality was lacking. This was a rare example when a really great creative team was paired to work on a movie adaptation, which were usually handled by lesser known talents, or at least the art was. Instead we got a Roy Thomas/Mike Mignola work of art. It is based directly on th This was originally published by Topps Comics, and may have even been their initial offering. Topps Comics was a somewhat short lived foray into comics by the trading card company at time when comic sales were booming but quality was lacking. This was a rare example when a really great creative team was paired to work on a movie adaptation, which were usually handled by lesser known talents, or at least the art was. Instead we got a Roy Thomas/Mike Mignola work of art. It is based directly on the movie, and is almost an exact panel by panel recreation of the movie. I'd have rather seen them work directly from the book, but that wasn't the point here as this was specifically a movie tie in. This was my first chance to read this in black and white, and I have to say I was very impressed. The starkness of the art really make it striking, and this was really some of Mignola's best work, so I would guess he was a fan of the novel and/or character. If you liked the Coppola Dracula movie this is definitely worth checking out, but really, for any fan of Dracula and/or Mignola this is worth a read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Noel

    I have a thing for the blood suckers and this definitely is on my list of favourite works with such creatures in it. Being and adaptation of a movie that's adapted from a book makes it a biiiit wonky in my opinion. I feel like it requires that you have read the original Dracula and seen the movie to understand the differences and similarities between the two in order to fully understand how this comic tells the story in it's own way. Not that you can't understand the story without it though. Oth I have a thing for the blood suckers and this definitely is on my list of favourite works with such creatures in it. Being and adaptation of a movie that's adapted from a book makes it a biiiit wonky in my opinion. I feel like it requires that you have read the original Dracula and seen the movie to understand the differences and similarities between the two in order to fully understand how this comic tells the story in it's own way. Not that you can't understand the story without it though. Other than that, I think it's a pretty excellent adaptation. I always enjoy seeing comic adaptions of books especially when they're done this excellent. I feel like these pictures are pulled straight out of the gothic realm of Dracula. Which is also my sole reason for rating it five stars because I LOVE Mignola's art! I know some people don't like this black and white version since the movie was in color and the original comic mini series was printed in color but fuck me I just think it's stunning in black and white. It's the perfect aesthetic for Dracula in my opinion and I'd want multiple panels from this books hanging on my walls.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Aaronlisa

    Ever since I heard about the fact that Topps comic had done a comic book series based on the movie, I was rather interested in it. So when I came across the graphic novel at the book store, I didn't really have to think too much about purchasing it. It's not a bad graphic novel but it's not a great one either. For the most part it's a rather faithful adaptation of the film. There are a few scenes that are either removed or added. One of the places where the graphic novels lets it's readers down Ever since I heard about the fact that Topps comic had done a comic book series based on the movie, I was rather interested in it. So when I came across the graphic novel at the book store, I didn't really have to think too much about purchasing it. It's not a bad graphic novel but it's not a great one either. For the most part it's a rather faithful adaptation of the film. There are a few scenes that are either removed or added. One of the places where the graphic novels lets it's readers down is that the movie is visually stunning whereas some of the panels fall rather short. For example, Lucy's extravagant wedding dress in the movie is a gorgeous detail laden costume yet in the graphic novel, it's just so much blank space. That said the colouring the novel is gorgeous. In the end it's certainly something most collectors would enjoy to have but for casual fans, I'd say pass. Either stick with Francis Ford Coppola's film or stick Bram Stoker's original novel.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dillon Hawkins

    Coppola's Dracula is top five for me. I had no idea Mike Mignola contributed to a movie tie-in around the time of the movie's release. I just happened to come across the trade in a clearance bin at a comic shop, and I'm glad I did. If you read this for Mike Mignola's contribution alone you will not be disappointed.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tamara✨

    This is basically an illustrated version of the film. Why did I bother? I love Mignola’s art and it was on the Libby app via the national library in SG and it’s Spooktober. Is it worth reading? Only if you love Mignola’s art and have time to spare and enjoyed the beautiful mess that was this Coppola film. https://hercommonplaceblog.wordpress.... This is basically an illustrated version of the film. Why did I bother? I love Mignola’s art and it was on the Libby app via the national library in SG and it’s Spooktober. Is it worth reading? Only if you love Mignola’s art and have time to spare and enjoyed the beautiful mess that was this Coppola film. https://hercommonplaceblog.wordpress....

  17. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    This is literally a comic version of the Coppola film. The dialog and scenes and characters are all the same. The images even do a pretty good job of looking like all the actors. If you were expecting a little more story to add to the movie (like perhaps I was), this isn't it. It's just the movie in comic form. But it's drawn by Mike Mignola so it's gorgeous.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    Mike Mignola, the preeminent horror artist of this generation lets loose on a horror classic and its pretty classic. He's faithful to the screen play Francis Ford Coppala and its a delight to see the classic movie in a new light. I thought black and white coloring was the best choice but there was maybe too much black in some panels. Overall, a treat for horror fans.

  19. 4 out of 5

    ISMOTU

    Mike Mignola brings his signature style to the comic book adaptation of Francis Ford Coppola's film adaptation of Bram Stoker's novel. The film revamped Dracula by going back to his literary and historical roots and Mignola's dark, moody art perfectly captures this aesthetic. Roy Thomas is a master at adapting movies to comic book form and brings the screenplay to script quite well.

  20. 5 out of 5

    John

    Mike Mignola is justly famous for storytelling and world building and sometimes I think he isn’t appreciated as a great artist. Every page of the adaptation of Coppola‘s Bram Stoker’s Dracula is a marvelous lake of inky horror.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dimi Tsioumbris

    Its interesting to see how they transferred almost the whole movie on paper, good lesson to realise how to put your own ideas too, but other than that its good only for Mignola's Art, the comic script follows the movie exactly as it is.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Goblin

    Great adaptation of the film. Mignola's art suits the style of the Coppola movie perfectly, and you don't have to deal with Keanu Reeves's failed attempt at a British accent. The ends of each issue also come with a few pages detailing the production of the film, which are a fun read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Brennan

    Love that it was in black and white plus some changes to the story and structure to the movie, Roy and Mike made the comic better than the movie in my opinion.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Joanna

    Basically the movie in comic form. Nicely drawn (obvs) but where's the color!? Wah. Look at how gorgeous the panels are with some color. The layers! The mood! It's much more legible. Why they gotta putz around with it. Basically the movie in comic form. Nicely drawn (obvs) but where's the color!? Wah. Look at how gorgeous the panels are with some color. The layers! The mood! It's much more legible. Why they gotta putz around with it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    A luxurious graphic adaptation of the screenplay with B&W artwork from a young Mike Mignola. Out of print for years, but now collected in one volume. Amazing! A luxurious graphic adaptation of the screenplay with B&W artwork from a young Mike Mignola. Out of print for years, but now collected in one volume. Amazing!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mike Marlow

    Hauntingly beautiful. I think this adaptation actually works better than the film.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Paul Wilson

    Breathtakingly beautiful artwork by Mignola. A visual treat.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Andy Calhoun

    This book is killer! The story is great (of course) and Mignola’s Art is phenomenal (of course)! Definitely worth a read or several!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Pete

    Some wonderful Mike Mignola artwork and a decent comic adaptation of the movie adaptation of the original book!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mjspice

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Basically a comic version of the 1993 movie. Mike Mignola's art really makes this more sinister than ever.

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