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A man who has attained mastery of an art reveals it in his every action."-- "Samurai Maximum."Under the guidance of such celebrated masters as Ed Parker and the immortal Bruce Lee, Joe Hyams vividly recounts his more than 25 years of experience in the martial arts. In his illuminating story, Hyam reveals to you how the daily application of Zen principles not only developed A man who has attained mastery of an art reveals it in his every action."-- "Samurai Maximum."Under the guidance of such celebrated masters as Ed Parker and the immortal Bruce Lee, Joe Hyams vividly recounts his more than 25 years of experience in the martial arts. In his illuminating story, Hyam reveals to you how the daily application of Zen principles not only developed his physical expertise but gave him the mental discipline to control his personal problems-self-image, work pressure, competition. Indeed, mastering the spiritual goals in martial arts can dramatically alter the quality of your life-enriching your relationships with people, as well as helping you make use of all your abilities. "If one of your goals is to live with maximum zest and minimum stress, read "Zen In The Martial Arts." The great beauty of the book is that as Hyams' mind receives enlightenment, so does our."-- "Playboy.


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A man who has attained mastery of an art reveals it in his every action."-- "Samurai Maximum."Under the guidance of such celebrated masters as Ed Parker and the immortal Bruce Lee, Joe Hyams vividly recounts his more than 25 years of experience in the martial arts. In his illuminating story, Hyam reveals to you how the daily application of Zen principles not only developed A man who has attained mastery of an art reveals it in his every action."-- "Samurai Maximum."Under the guidance of such celebrated masters as Ed Parker and the immortal Bruce Lee, Joe Hyams vividly recounts his more than 25 years of experience in the martial arts. In his illuminating story, Hyam reveals to you how the daily application of Zen principles not only developed his physical expertise but gave him the mental discipline to control his personal problems-self-image, work pressure, competition. Indeed, mastering the spiritual goals in martial arts can dramatically alter the quality of your life-enriching your relationships with people, as well as helping you make use of all your abilities. "If one of your goals is to live with maximum zest and minimum stress, read "Zen In The Martial Arts." The great beauty of the book is that as Hyams' mind receives enlightenment, so does our."-- "Playboy.

30 review for Zen in the Martial Arts

  1. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Zapata

    This little book shares the insights Joe Hyams experienced while studying karate over the years with such masters as Bruce Lee, Bong Soo Han, Ed Parker, and others. Hyams did not enter the study of karate as a way of spiritual enlightenment; he began classes in 1952 to lose weight and work off hostility. It was not until after a few years of lessons that he began to appreciate the deeper meaning of the martial arts. Twenty years later he arranged what he learned into short chapters which show th This little book shares the insights Joe Hyams experienced while studying karate over the years with such masters as Bruce Lee, Bong Soo Han, Ed Parker, and others. Hyams did not enter the study of karate as a way of spiritual enlightenment; he began classes in 1952 to lose weight and work off hostility. It was not until after a few years of lessons that he began to appreciate the deeper meaning of the martial arts. Twenty years later he arranged what he learned into short chapters which show the issue involved, the way he discovered it, and how he applied the teachings in his life away from the karate dojo. He covers such things as visualization, patience, knowing your limits, instinctive action, facing fear, and breathing, among others. This is more of a personal introduction to what is beneath the surface, rather than an instruction manual. The student who is interested in the martial arts just to break bricks and put on a show needs to read this book to get a glimpse of what the sport is really all about. The student who is interested in the martial arts for the spiritual aspects needs to read this book to have a chance to see how these aspects changed the life of one man and could change their own. This book was easy to read and friendly. I will leave you with a quote from the first chapter: I put this book forward to you, then, in the spirit of sharing what I have learned, and in the hope that some may wish to travel a similar path. Perhaps by sharing my experiences I will also learn more, because that, too, is the way of Zen.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Graeme Rodaughan

    Before there was mindfulness there was Zen. After mindfulness there will still be Zen. A wonderfully accessible recounting of one man's experiences with Zen in the martial arts, and as always, Zen is entirely applicable to living life. Recommended for anyone looking for realistic examples of the application of Zen presence. Before there was mindfulness there was Zen. After mindfulness there will still be Zen. A wonderfully accessible recounting of one man's experiences with Zen in the martial arts, and as always, Zen is entirely applicable to living life. Recommended for anyone looking for realistic examples of the application of Zen presence.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jon Nakapalau

    Nice introduction to this important concept. If you have someone who is deciding to take martial arts classes for the first time give then this book...they will be able to go back to it as they reach the goals that they set for their advancement in rank.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jake Danishevsky

    We have all heard the saying 'Good things come in small packages'. Well, this book is an epitome of that saying. When I first picked up this book, I figured, I would read it in a day. It is only 144 small pages and a very easy to read text, but I was wrong. Joe Hyams started out as a journalist and a writer. He had no idea what martial arts or Zen is all about, until he started his first martial arts training about 25 years ago. He has studied under Ed Parks and the legend himself Bruce Lee. Joe We have all heard the saying 'Good things come in small packages'. Well, this book is an epitome of that saying. When I first picked up this book, I figured, I would read it in a day. It is only 144 small pages and a very easy to read text, but I was wrong. Joe Hyams started out as a journalist and a writer. He had no idea what martial arts or Zen is all about, until he started his first martial arts training about 25 years ago. He has studied under Ed Parks and the legend himself Bruce Lee. Joe has experienced a lot of difficulties in his martial arts training, but most of all is the art to control the impossible, to act without thinking, to move without moving, to use effort effortlessly, the art of ZEN. In this book Joe explains how learning Zen and understanding how to implement it, can help you in various aspects of life. The way you can let your natural body flow without hesitation can help you in any task, such as business, sports, friendships and relationships. The book uses various examples and sayings from very recognized Zen masters. There are various quotes, which require some thinking and make you understand how the person should feel when they reach the stage of enlightenment. One of them I particularly liked, which was: "Knowing others is wisdom, knowing yourself is Enlightenment." ~ Lao-Tzu Joe tells us stories of problems, sticky points in his training and how he overcame those by understanding various aspects of Zen. One of the nice stories is, when he is talking to Bruce Lee at their first meeting and Bruce tells him to forget anything he has ever learned, so Bruce can teach Joe the art of Jeet Kune Do. Joe seemed confused and questioned why he should do that, to which Bruce explained that when the cup is full it would spill out and would not be available for more information to flow into it. I have never read any information on Zen yet and this is my first, but I definitely want to learn more about the subject, and I just started reading another book in the same category. I wasn't sure if this book would be of interest to someone, who is not involved in martial arts, so I showed it to my wife and she expressed some interest in wanting to read it. This is a great book and took me two weeks to read. I swallowed every word, I read each page carefully to make sure I don't miss any information. Don't be fooled by its size, it is a great book and a lot more information then it seems. I just wish there were 6 stars in a rating section. Yes, it is that good.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bernadette

    The first time I read this book, I wasn't "ready" to read it. The second time I read this book, I wasn't ready to "accept" it. The third time I read this book, I wasn't ready to stop reading it. I've decided this will be a book I carry around with me. The first time I read this book, I wasn't "ready" to read it. The second time I read this book, I wasn't ready to "accept" it. The third time I read this book, I wasn't ready to stop reading it. I've decided this will be a book I carry around with me.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Payam

    There are many self-help books out there that want to transform you to a "better" you. This book is no different. This book, presents the same concepts and same "laws" mentioned in other popular books meant to "transform" you. So, if it is not a unique book, why the 5 star rating? The stories in this book intrigue you and hold you due to their human touch. They are unique in that no other book has ever ventured into providing life lessons via Martial Arts examples. The fusion of a physical practi There are many self-help books out there that want to transform you to a "better" you. This book is no different. This book, presents the same concepts and same "laws" mentioned in other popular books meant to "transform" you. So, if it is not a unique book, why the 5 star rating? The stories in this book intrigue you and hold you due to their human touch. They are unique in that no other book has ever ventured into providing life lessons via Martial Arts examples. The fusion of a physical practice with mental growth provides a holistic understanding of what it means to be human. Other books, particularly business books, will attempt to teach you via day-to-day examples and cognitive techniques. This book instead illustrates how you can interact and learn from the world via your body. It is refreshing. It is unique. It is worth buying.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    Every martial artist could benefit from this book. Every person who cares less about martial arts could benefit from this book. Great advice for living, overcoming the struggles of life. The author knew Bruce Lee and we hear wisdom from the Father of MMA himself from an inside view. Hyams takes religious and philosophical subjects and makes them practical, as traditional martial artists do. The arts provide practice for the real world, simulation for facing real threats (physical, mental, spiritua Every martial artist could benefit from this book. Every person who cares less about martial arts could benefit from this book. Great advice for living, overcoming the struggles of life. The author knew Bruce Lee and we hear wisdom from the Father of MMA himself from an inside view. Hyams takes religious and philosophical subjects and makes them practical, as traditional martial artists do. The arts provide practice for the real world, simulation for facing real threats (physical, mental, spiritual, etc.) in effective ways. He wrote it well too. I enjoyed it as entertainment. The book gave me peace.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Devon Toland

    Zen in the Martial Arts by Joe Hyams is truly inspirational, and I can say it has changed my life. Considering the kind of person I am, who doesn't enjoy reading, I've read this book five times. The book follows the life of Joe Hyams, who is very relatable, and he is a nice guy. He takes an interest in the martial arts, and studies with all kinds of famous martial artists. Joe Hyams shares his experiences and lessons with the reader, and they can be applied to everyday life. This book is great f Zen in the Martial Arts by Joe Hyams is truly inspirational, and I can say it has changed my life. Considering the kind of person I am, who doesn't enjoy reading, I've read this book five times. The book follows the life of Joe Hyams, who is very relatable, and he is a nice guy. He takes an interest in the martial arts, and studies with all kinds of famous martial artists. Joe Hyams shares his experiences and lessons with the reader, and they can be applied to everyday life. This book is great for any open minded person who seeks to learn philosophies and techniques to be more at peace with yourself. My experience reading this book has helped me dramatically in my mixed martial arts training, and it has helped me become a better person. Zen in the Martial Arts may not be for some people, but for an open minded philosophical person, it might even change your life.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Goran Powell

    This is a short book written from the personal perspective of the author, Joe Hymas, who trained under such noted masters as Bruce Lee and Ed Parker. Written in 1979, he recounts more than 25 years of experience in the martial arts, writing how Zen principles gave him the mental discipline to cope with issues of self-image, work pressure and competition, and how, through mastering the spiritual goals in martial arts, you can dramatically alter the quality of your life, enriching your relationshi This is a short book written from the personal perspective of the author, Joe Hymas, who trained under such noted masters as Bruce Lee and Ed Parker. Written in 1979, he recounts more than 25 years of experience in the martial arts, writing how Zen principles gave him the mental discipline to cope with issues of self-image, work pressure and competition, and how, through mastering the spiritual goals in martial arts, you can dramatically alter the quality of your life, enriching your relationships with people and make full use of your abilities. All in all a quick, easy and enjoyable read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    A close friend loaned me this book from his personal library, and it was a much enjoyed and appreciated read (bought my own copy from half price books) it tells you not only practical applications of zen in the martial arts, but many very practical lessons we all could use in day to day life. (we all fly through life in anticipation of this or that, but rarely take the time to savor the moment when we reach our goal, kind of like the dog who begs for the steak and swallows it without so much as A close friend loaned me this book from his personal library, and it was a much enjoyed and appreciated read (bought my own copy from half price books) it tells you not only practical applications of zen in the martial arts, but many very practical lessons we all could use in day to day life. (we all fly through life in anticipation of this or that, but rarely take the time to savor the moment when we reach our goal, kind of like the dog who begs for the steak and swallows it without so much as a chew before it goes down) A recommended read for anyone

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    This book is an excellent and easy read. It's delivered by the author in a primarily anecdotal form. It took me a little bit to get used to the way the author lead to the "lesson" in each with a story, but found that I really enjoyed the style. It felt very much to me like having a conversation with the author about the lessons he learned. I will caution anyone expecting a treatise on martial arts history or a "step-by-step" book about martial arts or even how to apply Zen to a martial art. This This book is an excellent and easy read. It's delivered by the author in a primarily anecdotal form. It took me a little bit to get used to the way the author lead to the "lesson" in each with a story, but found that I really enjoyed the style. It felt very much to me like having a conversation with the author about the lessons he learned. I will caution anyone expecting a treatise on martial arts history or a "step-by-step" book about martial arts or even how to apply Zen to a martial art. This is a book that requires the reader to pull the lessons out of the stories.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Juadde The

    It's the first book of my life that lead me in the sacred way of martial arts. I hope everyone who interest in this way. Don't hesitate to read it for your first step on the way of wisdom and courage. Open up the world inside your heart. It's the first book of my life that lead me in the sacred way of martial arts. I hope everyone who interest in this way. Don't hesitate to read it for your first step on the way of wisdom and courage. Open up the world inside your heart.

  13. 4 out of 5

    James

    I have read it several times over the past many years and it has always encourage me to pursue peace, pleasure, health, the non violent use of martial arts and to mentally prepare for violent confrontational engagements.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Seawood

    A great read, and something I'll come back to many times. If you've new to practice and want to make it deeper than rote learning or "just combat", definitely give this a go. I felt very much more aware of the extra dimension in my class today, and it showed. A great read, and something I'll come back to many times. If you've new to practice and want to make it deeper than rote learning or "just combat", definitely give this a go. I felt very much more aware of the extra dimension in my class today, and it showed.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Richard Garcia

    A true classic on Zen and martial arts A classic book on Zen and how the martial arts can be a pathway to learning it. I highly recommend this book to both martial artist as well as anyone who is looking for an introductory book on Zen.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    Easy read but awesome! I am understanding Zen more than ever. The author is so clear in his writing and experiences and also explaining how to apply zen principles in everyday life.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ed

    A very valuable book for those who wish to develop the inner skills of a martial artist. Particularly valuable to practitioners of the arts who are older or who have physical limitations.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Helmlinger

    Can't say enough good things about this book! Can't say enough good things about this book!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Britt

    This was a nice little book to remind you that martial arts isn't all about physical power, there is so much mental work that you can do to win and/or scare off any opponent. It made me really excited to continue my lifelong martial arts learning journey, specifically getting me excited about Akido, although it will be a while til I feel comfortable going to a studio. It was also awesome to hear humbling advice from masters like the late Bruce Lee. Definitely recommend if you're into martial arts This was a nice little book to remind you that martial arts isn't all about physical power, there is so much mental work that you can do to win and/or scare off any opponent. It made me really excited to continue my lifelong martial arts learning journey, specifically getting me excited about Akido, although it will be a while til I feel comfortable going to a studio. It was also awesome to hear humbling advice from masters like the late Bruce Lee. Definitely recommend if you're into martial arts or just want a quick read to make you feel more confident in any dangerous situation.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amanda"Iris"

    This small unpretentious book is composed of little two to five page anecdotes related to the authors experiences studying with different Martial Arts Masters. It’s not at all about fighting technique but about the other personal lessons learned from Martial Arts, and how the author realized how well those principles apply to life. It is especially recommended for people who don’t read often or who don’t have long stretches of free time to read. Perfectly pocket-sized for public transit.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Miroku Nemeth

    Bruce Lee and I were having dim sum, a traditional Chinese breakfast of meat-filled pastries, in a downtown Los Angeles restaurant after a lesson. I seized on this opportunity to tell him that I was discouraged. At forty-five, I felt I was too old and my body too stiff to achieve any real ability in jeet-kune-do. "You will never learn anything new unless you are ready to accept yourself with your limitations," Bruce answered. "You must accept the fact that you are capable in some directions and l Bruce Lee and I were having dim sum, a traditional Chinese breakfast of meat-filled pastries, in a downtown Los Angeles restaurant after a lesson. I seized on this opportunity to tell him that I was discouraged. At forty-five, I felt I was too old and my body too stiff to achieve any real ability in jeet-kune-do. "You will never learn anything new unless you are ready to accept yourself with your limitations," Bruce answered. "You must accept the fact that you are capable in some directions and limited in others, and you must develop your capabilities." "But ten years ago I could easily kick over my head," I said. "Now I need half an hour to limber up before I can do it." Bruce Set his chopsticks down alongisde his plate, clasped his hands lightly on his lap, and smiled at me. "That was ten years ago," he said gently. "So you are older today and your body has changed. Everyone has physical limitations to overcome." "That's all very well for you to say," I replied. "If ever a man was born with natural ability as a martial artist, it is you." Bruce laughed. "I'm going to tell you something very few people know. I became a martial artist in spite of my limitations." I was shocked. In my view, Bruce was a perfect physical specimen and I said so. "You probably are not aware of it," he said, "but my right leg is almost one inch shorter than the left. That fact dictated the best stance for me--my right leg was shorter, I had an advantage with certain types of kicks, since the uneven stomp gave me impetus. "And I wear contact lenses. Since childhood I have been near-sighted, which meant that when I wasn't wearing glasses, I had difficulty seeing an opponent when he wasn't up close. I originally started to study wing-chun because it is an ideal technique for close-in fighting. "I accepted my limitations for what they were and capitalized on them. And that's what you must learn to do. You say you are unable to kick over your head without a long warm-up, but the real question is, is it really necessary to kick that high? The fact is that until recently, martial artists rarely kicked above knee height. Head-high kicks are mostly for show. So perfect your kicks at waist level and they will be so formidable you'll never need to kick higher. "Instead of trying to do everything well, do those things perfectly of which you are capable. Although most expert martial artists have spent years mastering hundreds of techniques and movements, in a bout, or kumite, a champion may actually use only four or five techniques over and over again. These are the techniques which he has perfected and which he knows he can depend on." I protested. "But the fact still remains that my real competition is the advancing years." "Stop comparing yourself at forty-five with the man you were at twenty or thirty, Bruce answered. "The past is an illusion. You must learn to live in the present and accept yoruself for what you are now. What you lack in flexibility and agility you must make up with knowledge and constant practice." For the next few months, instead of spending time trying to get limber enough to kick over my head, I worked on my waist-high kicks until they satisfied even Bruce. Then one day late in 1965, he came by my house to say goodbye before leaving for Hong Kong whree, he said, he intended to become the biggest star in films. "You remember our talk about limitations?" he asked. "Well, I'm limited by my size and difficulty in English and the fact that I'm Chinese, and there never has been a big Chinese star in American films. But I have spent the last three years studying movies, and I think the time is ripe for a good martial arts film--and I am the best qualified to star it in it. My capabilities exceed my limitations." Bruce's capabilities did in fact exceed his limitations and, until his youthful death, he was one of the biggest stars in films. His career was a perfect illustration of his teaching: As we discover and improve our strong points, they come to outweigh our weaknesses.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Roberto

    This book is great if you are interested in zen, martial arts, or both (my specific case). The author tells a series of stories that happened through his life, and how they taught him a zen principle. Even if you are not interested at all in the martial arts, you should read it because of its easy-to-understand way of introducing complex zen concepts. Among my favorite excerpts are the following: - Martial arts are essentially avenues through which the artists can reach spiritual serenity, mental This book is great if you are interested in zen, martial arts, or both (my specific case). The author tells a series of stories that happened through his life, and how they taught him a zen principle. Even if you are not interested at all in the martial arts, you should read it because of its easy-to-understand way of introducing complex zen concepts. Among my favorite excerpts are the following: - Martial arts are essentially avenues through which the artists can reach spiritual serenity, mental tranquility, and self-confidence - A dojo can be seen as a simplification of the world, in which we maked contact with our inner selves - fears, anxieties, reactions, habits --> the conflicts that happen inside the dojo can help us handle conflicts outside of it - A man who has attained mastery of an art reveals it in his every action - The key is to improve the process, not trying to perfect the product - In the present there are no regrets as there are in the past --> while doing something, do it at the fullest, from simple to complex things - Know your limits and accept them as part of yourself --> you will never learn anything new unless you are ready to accept yourself with your limitations - Instead of trying to do everything well, do those things perfectly of which you are capable - To spend time is to pass it in a specified manner. To waste it is to spend it thoughtlessly or carelessly - Anyone who steals my time is stealing my life because they are taking my existence from me - When a problem arises, don't fight with it or try to deny it. Accept and acknowledge it. Be patient in seeking a solution or opening, and then fully commit yourself to the resolution you think advisable - Mastery through adaptation -> what is more malleable is always superior over that which is immoveable - Anger doesn't demand action --> how can you expect to control someone else if you cannot control yourself? - When you lose your temper, you lose yourself - on the mat as well as in life - Control your emotion or it will control you - When your opponent is inside your circle and you cannot or will not retreat any farther, you must fight. But until then, you should maintain your control and your distance - Concentrate all the energy of the body and mind on one specific target or goal at a time. The secret is to exclude all extraneous thoughts, which are not concerned with achieving the immediate goal --> in life as well as on the mat, an unfocused mind wastes energy - When feeling pain, regulate your breathing, fix your eyes and mind on something else. In this way, you will escape the pain by going somewhere else in your mind - Most of the time we generate our own fears, and this is especially true when we confront an unfamiliar situation that shatters confidence - Fear is shadow, not substance - The mind is a powerful factor in everything you do, including those exercises that seem to require a maximum of physical strength - Negative thoughts are overpowering only if you encourage them and allow yourself to be overpowered by then - When an untoward event occurs in your life, react to it without haste or passion. Realize that in almost every instance you probably have more alternatives than you think you have. Hold still a moment before acting or reacting and consider the alternatives. Then, having decided upon a course of action, proceed calmlyThis book is great if you are interested in zen, martial arts, or both (my specific case). The author tells a series of stories that happened through his life, and how they taught him a zen principle. Even if you are not interested at all in the martial arts, you should read it because of its easy-to-understand way of introducing complex zen concepts. Among my favorite excerpts are: - Martial

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nate

    This is a good book for everyone to read, and gain inspiration from it. This book is an excellent and easy read, as it is delivered by the author in a primarily anecdotal form. It is a very inspirational book that I think every martial artist and/or black belt should read at least once a year to go deeper into the study of martial arts and the self. The author is so clear in his writing and experiences and also explaining how to apply zen principles in everyday life. It will always encourage me This is a good book for everyone to read, and gain inspiration from it. This book is an excellent and easy read, as it is delivered by the author in a primarily anecdotal form. It is a very inspirational book that I think every martial artist and/or black belt should read at least once a year to go deeper into the study of martial arts and the self. The author is so clear in his writing and experiences and also explaining how to apply zen principles in everyday life. It will always encourage me to pursue peace, pleasure, health, the non violent use of martial arts and to mentally prepare for violent confrontational engagements both in life and in the dojo. Examples of what you can learn from this book: Know your limits and accept them as part of yourself --> you will never learn anything new unless you are ready to accept yourself with your limitations - Instead of trying to do everything well, do those things perfectly of which you are capable - To spend time is to pass it in a specified manner. To waste it is to spend it thoughtlessly or carelessly - Anyone who steals my time is stealing my life because they are taking my existence from me - When a problem arises, don't fight with it or try to deny it. Accept and acknowledge it. Be patient in seeking a solution or opening, and then fully commit yourself to the resolution you think advisable - Mastery through adaptation -> what is more malleable is always superior over that which is immoveable - Anger doesn't demand action --> how can you expect to control someone else if you cannot control yourself? - When you lose your temper, you lose yourself - on the mat as well as in life - Control your emotion or it will control you - When your opponent is inside your circle and you cannot or will not retreat any farther, you must fight. But until then, you should maintain your control and your distance - Concentrate all the energy of the body and mind on one specific target or goal at a time. The secret is to exclude all extraneous thoughts, which are not concerned with achieving the immediate goal --> in life as well as on the mat, an unfocused mind wastes energy - When feeling pain, regulate your breathing, fix your eyes and mind on something else. In this way, you will escape the pain by going somewhere else in your mind - Most of the time we generate our own fears, and this is especially true when we confront an unfamiliar situation that shatters confidence - Fear is shadow, not substance - The mind is a powerful factor in everything you do, including those exercises that seem to require a maximum of physical strength - Negative thoughts are overpowering only if you encourage them and allow yourself to be overpowered by then

  24. 5 out of 5

    David

    I had heard of Joe Hyams but he was a little before my time, so I wasn't really familiar with this short book of his (written originally in 1979) about Zen and martial arts. Joe was a Hollywood writer. He knew and wrote about and sometimes worked out with big name stars; Bruce Lee is prominently referenced in this book as someone he studied under. Hyams tries to introduce the concept of Zen and martial arts (not as well known in '79 as it probably is now) while relating it to his own life, on and I had heard of Joe Hyams but he was a little before my time, so I wasn't really familiar with this short book of his (written originally in 1979) about Zen and martial arts. Joe was a Hollywood writer. He knew and wrote about and sometimes worked out with big name stars; Bruce Lee is prominently referenced in this book as someone he studied under. Hyams tries to introduce the concept of Zen and martial arts (not as well known in '79 as it probably is now) while relating it to his own life, on and off the mat. The insights weren't particularly novel or deep for anyone who's ever had even passing contact with the philosophical side of martial arts. But the book was kind of interesting as a brief memoir about a guy less interesting than the guys he talks about.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Elliot Hanowski

    I quite liked it overall. Some details seem a little dated but the core of the book is quite profound and reflects insights gained from his long practice of the martial arts. People interested in mindfulness and meditation would also find a lot to appreciate here.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kendrick Smith

    Zen in the Martial Arts is a book that is filled with insights and lessons of humility. It is a work that is most fitting for both martial artist and non-martial artist. It's definitely book that I will continually revisit. Zen in the Martial Arts is a book that is filled with insights and lessons of humility. It is a work that is most fitting for both martial artist and non-martial artist. It's definitely book that I will continually revisit.

  27. 5 out of 5

    D

    highly recommended to anyone interested in zen or martial arts (duh). loved it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alyce

    This book definitely changed who I was as a martial artist. It made me put everything into perspective.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jeanne Kondash

    Concise, thoughtful and full of truths. Applies to life lessons overall. And I found its messages totally enlightening.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Belal Khan

    Great set of lifestyle principles toward the development of personal character derived from one man's journey in training with Bruce Lee. Great set of lifestyle principles toward the development of personal character derived from one man's journey in training with Bruce Lee.

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