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Out East: Memoir of a Montauk Summer

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An Entertainment Weekly Best Book of May 2019 A TIME Magazine Best Book of May 2019 A Cosmopolitan Best Book of May 2019 An Oprah Magazine Best LGBTQ Book of 2019 A gripping portrait of life in a Montauk summer house--a debut memoir of first love, identity and self-discovery among a group of friends who became family. They call Montauk the end of the world, a spit of An Entertainment Weekly Best Book of May 2019 A TIME Magazine Best Book of May 2019 A Cosmopolitan Best Book of May 2019 An Oprah Magazine Best LGBTQ Book of 2019 A gripping portrait of life in a Montauk summer house--a debut memoir of first love, identity and self-discovery among a group of friends who became family. They call Montauk the end of the world, a spit of land jutting into the Atlantic. The house was a ramshackle split-level set on a hill, and each summer thirty one people would sleep between its thin walls and shag carpets. Against the moonlight the house's octagonal roof resembled a bee's nest. It was dubbed The Hive. In 2013, John Glynn joined the share house. Packing his duffel for that first Memorial Day Weekend, he prayed for clarity. At 27, he was crippled by an all-encompassing loneliness, a feeling he had carried in his heart for as long as he could remember. John didn't understand the loneliness. He just knew it was there. Like the moon gone dark. OUT EAST is the portrait of a summer, of the Hive and the people who lived in it, and John's own reckoning with a half-formed sense of self. From Memorial Day to Labor Day, The Hive was a center of gravity, a port of call, a home. Friendships, conflicts, secrets and epiphanies blossomed within this tightly woven friend group and came to define how they would live out the rest of their twenties and beyond. Blending the sand-strewn milieu of George Howe Colt's The Big House, the radiant aching of Olivia Liang's The Lonely City, OUT EAST is a keenly wrought story of love and transformation, longing and escape in our own contemporary moment. "An unforgettable story told with feeling and humor and above all with the razor-sharp skill of a delicate and highly gifted writer." -Andre Aciman, New York Times bestselling author of Call Me by Your Name "Out East is full of intimacy and hope and frustration and joy, an extraordinary tale of emotional awakening and lacerating ambivalence, a confession of self-doubt that becomes self-knowledge." -Andrew Solomon, National Book Award winner


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An Entertainment Weekly Best Book of May 2019 A TIME Magazine Best Book of May 2019 A Cosmopolitan Best Book of May 2019 An Oprah Magazine Best LGBTQ Book of 2019 A gripping portrait of life in a Montauk summer house--a debut memoir of first love, identity and self-discovery among a group of friends who became family. They call Montauk the end of the world, a spit of An Entertainment Weekly Best Book of May 2019 A TIME Magazine Best Book of May 2019 A Cosmopolitan Best Book of May 2019 An Oprah Magazine Best LGBTQ Book of 2019 A gripping portrait of life in a Montauk summer house--a debut memoir of first love, identity and self-discovery among a group of friends who became family. They call Montauk the end of the world, a spit of land jutting into the Atlantic. The house was a ramshackle split-level set on a hill, and each summer thirty one people would sleep between its thin walls and shag carpets. Against the moonlight the house's octagonal roof resembled a bee's nest. It was dubbed The Hive. In 2013, John Glynn joined the share house. Packing his duffel for that first Memorial Day Weekend, he prayed for clarity. At 27, he was crippled by an all-encompassing loneliness, a feeling he had carried in his heart for as long as he could remember. John didn't understand the loneliness. He just knew it was there. Like the moon gone dark. OUT EAST is the portrait of a summer, of the Hive and the people who lived in it, and John's own reckoning with a half-formed sense of self. From Memorial Day to Labor Day, The Hive was a center of gravity, a port of call, a home. Friendships, conflicts, secrets and epiphanies blossomed within this tightly woven friend group and came to define how they would live out the rest of their twenties and beyond. Blending the sand-strewn milieu of George Howe Colt's The Big House, the radiant aching of Olivia Liang's The Lonely City, OUT EAST is a keenly wrought story of love and transformation, longing and escape in our own contemporary moment. "An unforgettable story told with feeling and humor and above all with the razor-sharp skill of a delicate and highly gifted writer." -Andre Aciman, New York Times bestselling author of Call Me by Your Name "Out East is full of intimacy and hope and frustration and joy, an extraordinary tale of emotional awakening and lacerating ambivalence, a confession of self-doubt that becomes self-knowledge." -Andrew Solomon, National Book Award winner

30 review for Out East: Memoir of a Montauk Summer

  1. 4 out of 5

    Larry H

    4.5 stars. Self-esteem can be a powerful weapon, but a lack of it can cause us more problems than we could ever imagine. At age 27, John Glynn was seriously suffering from a general feeling of unworthiness, a debilitating sense of loneliness that he couldn't explain, nor could he determine its source. He wondered if he would ever find someone to love, someone to be with, and if he did, would they love him back? His parents told him to be patient, but with many of his college friends pairing up, h 4.5 stars. Self-esteem can be a powerful weapon, but a lack of it can cause us more problems than we could ever imagine. At age 27, John Glynn was seriously suffering from a general feeling of unworthiness, a debilitating sense of loneliness that he couldn't explain, nor could he determine its source. He wondered if he would ever find someone to love, someone to be with, and if he did, would they love him back? His parents told him to be patient, but with many of his college friends pairing up, he worried that happiness might be unlikely. John had always been driven by companionship and camaraderie, even growing up with his cousins. So in 2013, when the opportunity arose to join a few friends in a share house in Montauk, he jumped at it, and little did he know how much it would change his life. The house, nicknamed the Hive, slept up to 31 people, and was a hub of activity every summer weekend. It didn't take John to feel like he was fitting in on his weekends at the Hive, maneuvering between different groups of friends, helping them with their own relationship-related crises, and spending the majority of the days in a sunburned, drunken haze. But there still was a nagging, almost paralyzing feeling that something—and someone—was missing, and it threatened to derail all of his happiness that summer. But then he met another new member of the Hive, and things started to come into focus for John for the first time. With this new connection came a feeling of happiness, of possibility, but at the same time, new anxieties cropped up, accompanied by his old friend, unworthiness. John isn't sure what all of this means and he's afraid of the upheaval pursuing this person could cause, but he also can't imagine the possibility of not doing so. Out East is a moving story about a man's struggle to find himself and his self-worth, and discover that until he believes himself deserving of love he might never find it. At the same time it's a tremendously compelling look at how our relationships with family and friends throughout our childhood influence what we search for in adulthood. I also was struck by the fact that a young man who appeared to have it all from the outside—good looks, a good job, a loving and supportive family, a friendly personality—could struggle so much with believing he was worthy. While it is a memoir, I found Out East to provide a tremendously entertaining look at the culture of excess that pervades many house shares in areas like the Hamptons. It felt like watching a soap opera or reality program in which these confident, beautiful people who appear to have it all are as much a mess as everyone else (if not more), and their drunken escapades. There are relationship crises galore, hook-ups, and fun memories to observe from the reader's vantage point, all of which made me glad I'm older and perhaps a little sad I didn't experience this lifestyle at least once in my life, even in a minor way. I really enjoyed this book. Glynn didn't pull any punches in sharing his emotions or how he might have been perceived during that time, and his honesty really shined through. He's a terrific writer because he even made me care about people with whom I had barely anything in common, and I wondered what would come of them in the future. If you're looking for a terrific memoir that feels like a beach read, pick up Out East . You may feel like you wandered into a frat party, but you'll discover so much more if you stay. See all of my reviews at itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com. Check out my list of the best books I read in 2018 at https://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com/2019/01/the-best-books-i-read-in-2018.html. You can follow me on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/the.bookishworld.of.yrralh/.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hank Stuever

    I expect people will have two wildly different reactions to this memoir: Some will find it a riveting and accurate (and moving) account of millennial living -- as it was experienced by privileged white young adults working in New York and binge-drinking their summer weekends away in Montauk, Long Island, circa 2013. Another reaction, probably from those of us who are somewhat older than the author, is an astonishment that someone can be so self-absorbed, even in the sharp hindsight of memoir, in I expect people will have two wildly different reactions to this memoir: Some will find it a riveting and accurate (and moving) account of millennial living -- as it was experienced by privileged white young adults working in New York and binge-drinking their summer weekends away in Montauk, Long Island, circa 2013. Another reaction, probably from those of us who are somewhat older than the author, is an astonishment that someone can be so self-absorbed, even in the sharp hindsight of memoir, in a sincerely misguided attempt to convey his fondest memories of self-discovery. It falls so flat. He sees his awkwardness (and his latent sexual issues), but I fear he still doesn't see the utter vacuity of his life then, nor does he recognize the banality of his deepest experiences, childhood nostalgia or experience of the world. Maybe in another 20 years he will. A reader can be forgiven for getting to the end and thinking that the author, as a person, is just a dud. For a group of people this many years out of college (they're all 27 or so), John and his friends place an unhealthy and deeply immature primacy on partying. I hope they've grown out of it -- and not just by marrying and having children. Their lives, as represented here, are/were intensely shallow. That said, there's something to "Out East," mainly as a vicarious document of millennial habits, told with some flourish in a segmented, collage-like style. The entitlement factor is off the charts, but what reader won't stick around for the opportunity to be disgusted? It's undeniably fascinating -- the same reason reality-TV is so often watchable. If you can get through Glynn's endless descriptions of going out to the same bars over and over and over, you might get to a point of sympathy. I did feel sorry for John Glynn. Trying so hard to be one thing and ignoring the truer thing, he wasted a lot of his youth. Sadly, he sees it all as halcyon days.

  3. 5 out of 5

    JanB

    DNF'd at 25%. DNF'd at 25%.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nenia ✨ I yeet my books back and forth ✨ Campbell

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest When I got a copy of this, I anticipated a nonfiction version of THE BEACH crossed with CALL ME BY YOUR NAME. Some of the other advanced reviews made me a little cautious, as they were leaning towards the negative side, but they seemed to be written by older individuals; I hoped that, being a millennial like the author, his experience would resonate with me more, and perhaps I would enjoy the book more than the people who didn't. The pro Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest When I got a copy of this, I anticipated a nonfiction version of THE BEACH crossed with CALL ME BY YOUR NAME. Some of the other advanced reviews made me a little cautious, as they were leaning towards the negative side, but they seemed to be written by older individuals; I hoped that, being a millennial like the author, his experience would resonate with me more, and perhaps I would enjoy the book more than the people who didn't. The problem with OUT EAST is that it is written by someone who seems to think that their life is terribly interesting, when it terribly isn't. This is all about the shared house John Glynn got with a bunch of other young people in Montauk, and his coming of age and then coming out, as he ends up falling in love with one of the other people he's rooming with. It could have been really good, but some people are good story-tellers and some people aren't. Glynn seems to be one of the later. I ended up skimming the last 150 pages pretty hard because it became intolerable. I'm sorry to give this such a low rating, since I do hate to bash advanced reader copies (contrary to what some might believe), but I didn't find this good at all and really can't honestly rate it anything higher than a 1.5, tops. It's hard to rate memoirs because they feel so much more personal than ordinary books. But once the book is out for public consumption and out of the hands of the author, it becomes a product, and should be reviewed as such. Thanks to the publisher for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review!  1 to 1.5 stars

  5. 4 out of 5

    Marialyce (absltmom, yaya)

    Giving up on this one. Just not for me. The writing and the characters are just too immature for me.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dennis

    While the audiobook narrator was phenomenal, this book really just was plain jane boring for me. There are people who don't need to come out in real life and I think that this would be a book for you to read. For those of us who do need to come out, this book is not anything you haven't already heard of. While the audiobook narrator was phenomenal, this book really just was plain jane boring for me. There are people who don't need to come out in real life and I think that this would be a book for you to read. For those of us who do need to come out, this book is not anything you haven't already heard of.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Maria Lago

    But how is it possible for Barbies and Kens to have sex if they lack genitals?? Mr Glynn, please! Don't take us for fools ;) But how is it possible for Barbies and Kens to have sex if they lack genitals?? Mr Glynn, please! Don't take us for fools ;)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    My nana's death was sad but I pregamed fireball ice luge shots with Matt as the Accounting Bros left for the Crusty Crab and a couple people who might be models slammed in the kitchen. Will anyone ever love me? Matt looked cute in his skinny jeans and pink polo. There, I saved you a few hours. My nana's death was sad but I pregamed fireball ice luge shots with Matt as the Accounting Bros left for the Crusty Crab and a couple people who might be models slammed in the kitchen. Will anyone ever love me? Matt looked cute in his skinny jeans and pink polo. There, I saved you a few hours.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Erik

    "Out East" by John Glynn is a surprisingly insufferable memoir of coming out in your 20s against a backdrop of hedonism, wealth, and privileged heterosexuality. John Glynn, an upper middle-class book editor, thought he was straight but felt deeply alone. After agreeing to spend $2000 to spend some weekends at a house in Montauk, he begins to understand that he doesn't like women - that maybe he is gay or bi. The story recounts countless nights of drinking top-shelf liquor, listening to hetero-pop "Out East" by John Glynn is a surprisingly insufferable memoir of coming out in your 20s against a backdrop of hedonism, wealth, and privileged heterosexuality. John Glynn, an upper middle-class book editor, thought he was straight but felt deeply alone. After agreeing to spend $2000 to spend some weekends at a house in Montauk, he begins to understand that he doesn't like women - that maybe he is gay or bi. The story recounts countless nights of drinking top-shelf liquor, listening to hetero-pop (and sometimes Garth Brooks) on repeat, and surrounding themselves with everyone who works in finance and is superficially unaware. This is sad because Glynn truly has a gift for writing, as his prose reveals, and the underlying story, a 28 year old man realizing he might not be straight after an encounter with another man that shakes his being, is a unique one and one that ought to be told. Unfortunately, Glynn spent far too little time discussing these internal tensions and far too much time making his readers suffer through his own privilege, of which he is clearly unaware. And this is yet proof again of why young writers - especially those from privileged backgrounds - should be discouraged from starting their writing careers with memoirs. A general lack of self-awareness in a memoir is always a red flag, and that is no different here.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Miriam Readling

    This sounds like a high schooler who is practicing how to use the five senses in their creative writing e.g “ I walked down the winding, dark, chilly, cold, road...” I want to feel empathy for the narrator and his existential crisis but I’m too distracted by the fact that this is a book about a bunch of privileged douche/ douchettes whose greatest losses at 28 have been their 90 year old grandparents. Every page : we did shots and put on our bikinis and board shorts. Then I sat alone on my bed a This sounds like a high schooler who is practicing how to use the five senses in their creative writing e.g “ I walked down the winding, dark, chilly, cold, road...” I want to feel empathy for the narrator and his existential crisis but I’m too distracted by the fact that this is a book about a bunch of privileged douche/ douchettes whose greatest losses at 28 have been their 90 year old grandparents. Every page : we did shots and put on our bikinis and board shorts. Then I sat alone on my bed and thought : I think I like boys. But then I thought of how much I miss my grandma Kiki. Then someone came and got me and we did more shots.... I would skip it unless you want to listen to that on a loop for four hours

  11. 4 out of 5

    Doug

    This is more or less the literary equivalence of binge-watching a season of 'Big Brother' ... or maybe "Real World' or 'Jersey Shore'... it is definitely 'guilty pleasure' material. And though it seems suspect that someone could both remember entire conversations from 5 years previously verbatim - or reach the age of 27 apparently without a clue that he likes guys more than girls - one kind of does get swept away in the soap opera-ish-ness of the whole thing. Even though the prose is a bit over This is more or less the literary equivalence of binge-watching a season of 'Big Brother' ... or maybe "Real World' or 'Jersey Shore'... it is definitely 'guilty pleasure' material. And though it seems suspect that someone could both remember entire conversations from 5 years previously verbatim - or reach the age of 27 apparently without a clue that he likes guys more than girls - one kind of does get swept away in the soap opera-ish-ness of the whole thing. Even though the prose is a bit over done, and the feelings as well (or perhaps not, when one is in one's 20's), there is something voyeuristically and compulsively readable here ... so there is that.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Basic B's Guide

    Thank you @grandcentralpub for the free copy. I first heard about this book on @sarahsbookshelves podcast. I adore her podcast by the way. She’s snarky, sassy and so very honest. I admire how she has no qualms about DNF’ing a book. I’m taking a cue from her this year and trying not to force myself to finish a book that I’m really struggling with. Onto the book… John is a few years out of college, living in NYC with friends and working at a publishing house. All appears to be okay on the outside, bu Thank you @grandcentralpub for the free copy. I first heard about this book on @sarahsbookshelves podcast. I adore her podcast by the way. She’s snarky, sassy and so very honest. I admire how she has no qualms about DNF’ing a book. I’m taking a cue from her this year and trying not to force myself to finish a book that I’m really struggling with. Onto the book… John is a few years out of college, living in NYC with friends and working at a publishing house. All appears to be okay on the outside, but inside John is struggling. He’s lonely and not quite sure of himself. He longs for that special someone in his life. After his grandmother passes’ he inherits a few thousand dollars. He then uses the money to take a leap of faith and go in on a summer house in Montauk. The place is called The HIVE and upwards of 25+ young adults take turns escaping the city for the beach and nightclub life. As the summer progresses, John is able to open up to the idea of love. This memoir is a coming of age and coming out story. What I was most eye-opening about with this story is that John had the support and love of his family and friends, meanwhile he was still scared to admit that he is attracted to men. The internal struggles really came out in Glynn’s story. He peeled back the layers for us and let us into his heart. Of course, THE HIVE reminded me of the Bravo show “Summer House”, for which I’m obsessed with. What do you get when you put that many people in a house with lots of alcohol? Hmmm…well not all bad things. This story is touching, thought-provoking and beautiful. I give OUT EAST 4.5 stars.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Elissa Sweet

    OUT EAST is a fantastic coming-of-age and coming-out memoir set in a hedonistic party house on Long Island, told with a sharply observed wit and heartbreaking candor—basically, it's Joan Didion meets The Real World. At the beginning of the book, John is an anxious, lonely 27-year-old New Yorker who, while grieving the death of his beloved grandmother, uses her small inheritance to buy into a summer house on Montauk. That summer, amid the binge-drinking party and beach scene, he finds a true trib OUT EAST is a fantastic coming-of-age and coming-out memoir set in a hedonistic party house on Long Island, told with a sharply observed wit and heartbreaking candor—basically, it's Joan Didion meets The Real World. At the beginning of the book, John is an anxious, lonely 27-year-old New Yorker who, while grieving the death of his beloved grandmother, uses her small inheritance to buy into a summer house on Montauk. That summer, amid the binge-drinking party and beach scene, he finds a true tribe of friends and falls in love for the first time with a man, throwing his world and self-image into chaos. OUT EAST is a delightful book—and the perfect smart beach read—about a man discovering his sexuality and finding his way with the support of a loving family and a crazy new group of friends.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Warren

    I've read a lot of LGBT literature recently and it was refreshing to read about another person's experience that was similar to my own - a story not about the 1970's or a high schooler or about conversion therapy or about experimenting in college, but about someone who figured it out a bit later and dealt with the struggles that exist in today's society. John's words are real, his story left you with hope while also not painting a fairytale experience. Out East had me laughing out loud on one pa I've read a lot of LGBT literature recently and it was refreshing to read about another person's experience that was similar to my own - a story not about the 1970's or a high schooler or about conversion therapy or about experimenting in college, but about someone who figured it out a bit later and dealt with the struggles that exist in today's society. John's words are real, his story left you with hope while also not painting a fairytale experience. Out East had me laughing out loud on one page and then left me with tears in my eyes on the next. It made me think of my own personal Hive and my family members who raised me, supported me along my journey. It reminded me of my first love and how weird it was to navigate those murky waters as a closeted twenty-something. Montauk also better watch out because he painted a perfect picture of the camaraderie, spirit and energy of the beach town. After this book comes out, I don't know who wouldn't want to head there for the summer to find their own Hive, Everett, Matt or even just to get to meet the Mayor of Montauk herself :) Overall Out East is the perfect beach read for summer that will leave you yearning for a never ending summer and a new love while giving your an appreciation for your own circle, those who help guide you along whatever journey and challenges you face.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Reed

    I can’t even begin to fathom how/why this shallow little diary got published, let alone to such favorable reviews (well, there is the friends-in-high-places advantage, if you read the acknowledgments and sappy blurbs from otherwise respected authors). Millennials trek to Montauk for the summer weekends, get black-out drunk, then do it all over again within the same short weekend. And then again, weekend after weekend. So enlightening! Meanwhile, the author writes about his friends, and brand nam I can’t even begin to fathom how/why this shallow little diary got published, let alone to such favorable reviews (well, there is the friends-in-high-places advantage, if you read the acknowledgments and sappy blurbs from otherwise respected authors). Millennials trek to Montauk for the summer weekends, get black-out drunk, then do it all over again within the same short weekend. And then again, weekend after weekend. So enlightening! Meanwhile, the author writes about his friends, and brand name bathing suits and lost sunglasses and ballet flats, and fighting train crowds, and dealing with debilitating hangovers... and, oh yes, his personal sappy “struggles” — the cataloging of which has about the same poetic impact and interest as black-out drinking. This book is insulting to the publishing industry (friends in high places again) and numbingly stupid. Total waste of reading time. Stay away unless you’re a shallow millennial or millennial wannabe who thinks this shit drivel brain poop is important and worth a second of attention.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    This book is a memoir, and I don't want to speak negatively about a person's life journey. Life is hard enough without people critiquing you. I only want to talk about the book as a book. This is a terrible book. It's just a recounting of unremarkable events, without an iota of introspection about them. It seems like the narrator didn't actually want to write this book, didn't want to share himself or investigate himself or his history, so he told his story in the most guarded, shallow, unexposed This book is a memoir, and I don't want to speak negatively about a person's life journey. Life is hard enough without people critiquing you. I only want to talk about the book as a book. This is a terrible book. It's just a recounting of unremarkable events, without an iota of introspection about them. It seems like the narrator didn't actually want to write this book, didn't want to share himself or investigate himself or his history, so he told his story in the most guarded, shallow, unexposed way possible. There's a line on page 133 that stopped me: "At twenty-seven, I was experiencing my first true crush." That goes against everything I know of the human experience -- not having a crush until you're 27? How could that be? It would've been interesting to hear why that was the case for him, but unfortunately he doesn't examine it at all. No reason is given or even theorized about. We're also told repeatedly that he's desperately lonely, but his loneliness has no depth, there's nothing causing it; how are we supposed to relate to it? When he does finally get a crush, we don't feel that either. There's no romance. The narrator’s interaction with the love interest fills maybe three and a half pages. How did this guy awaken the narrator from a lifetime of emotional slumber? What was special about him? What do they even have in common? The book doesn't provide answers to any of these questions. I was reading sentences like "My life began when I met Matt," but I was wondering if they even knew each other at all. I don't read much memoir and this one sure hasn't encouraged me to read more. My understanding is that the point of memoir is to illuminate the writer's life and feelings and motivations with the benefit of hindsight and introspection. That has to mean more than a dry recounting of events. What we learn from this book is that the narrator, relatively late in life, felt attracted to a guy and then started dating guys. It never goes deeper than that. It says nothing about being closeted, it says nothing about why it took him so long to feel feelings. I have to believe his emotional journey in real life was much more complicated, because the book simply doesn't ring true as it's written. It's vacuous and without insight. I don't know why the writer even bothered writing it. You shouldn't bother reading it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Goodson

    This is a memoir about self-doubt--especially when you're still figuring that self out--but also about friendship and first, heart-crushing love. It has all the addictive qualities of a great novel, and veers seamlessly between moments of quiet introspection and raucous expansiveness. It's beautiful, romantic, and bittersweet, just like the end of Summer. This is a memoir about self-doubt--especially when you're still figuring that self out--but also about friendship and first, heart-crushing love. It has all the addictive qualities of a great novel, and veers seamlessly between moments of quiet introspection and raucous expansiveness. It's beautiful, romantic, and bittersweet, just like the end of Summer.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shira Selkovits

    Pub date May 14 I loved every page of this sweet memoir. You can smell the ocean, the booze, the hair products, and the sweat of this buzzing beach house in Montauk during the summer of 2013. This story is filled with so much vulnerability and heart, and each personality was treated with utmost respect and care. Every reader will likely picture his or her own emotional awakening while moving through this story - remembering the people who shaped us, the events that made us realize who we are, and Pub date May 14 I loved every page of this sweet memoir. You can smell the ocean, the booze, the hair products, and the sweat of this buzzing beach house in Montauk during the summer of 2013. This story is filled with so much vulnerability and heart, and each personality was treated with utmost respect and care. Every reader will likely picture his or her own emotional awakening while moving through this story - remembering the people who shaped us, the events that made us realize who we are, and those people who continue to love and support us. I also want a spin-off story about Ashley! Thank you to the author for an advanced copy.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ellen Zegura

    A 2.5 but I rounded down because the book so badly needed an editor to reduce the repetitious soul searching that rarely went below about one foot deep. Also the level of mindless partying and drinking was depressing to read about over and over and over. Grow up, privileged young adults. There is an interesting story here, but it required excavation.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jocelyn H

    DNF. Oof! I read 80 pages (1/3 of the book) and I just can’t read anymore. This was so disappointing! I had read about this book before it came out and was really looking forward to it. This wasn’t at all what I was expecting. The book is supposed to be a memoir about a man who has struggled with loneliness and anxiety all his life, who comes to realize in his late 20s that he is gay, during the course of a summer spent at a beach house with a group of gay and straight friends in Montauk, Long I DNF. Oof! I read 80 pages (1/3 of the book) and I just can’t read anymore. This was so disappointing! I had read about this book before it came out and was really looking forward to it. This wasn’t at all what I was expecting. The book is supposed to be a memoir about a man who has struggled with loneliness and anxiety all his life, who comes to realize in his late 20s that he is gay, during the course of a summer spent at a beach house with a group of gay and straight friends in Montauk, Long Island. It sounded like it would be moving and an interesting perspective. Unfortunately, this was more like reading about a bunch of overgrown frat boys, a group of rich white privileged assholes working in finance, slipping on their boat shoes, and getting completely shitfaced morning, noon, and night. How many times do I have to read the words “beer pong” in the first 80 pages?! It felt like I was reading a script from “Jersey Shore”. All of his friends are in their late 20s and early 30s, play drinking games all day long, and talk about their stock portfolios. The author works in publishing, but the writing is also not great. I wanted to read about his experience of coming out and what he goes through, but with the non-stop descriptions of partying and pounding shots at the same bars every day, and playing beer pong in the living room, the repetition and lack of substance, this is just not for me. Meh!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Elle

    I don't like to not finish books, even if I skim or skip sections. But yeah this wasn't for me. I got about halfway through before throwing in the towel. To be fair to the author, I won't leave a rating. There's nothing wrong with his writing. John Glynn seems like a nice guy. The subjects of his memoir just remind me so much of some of the people I went to college with. The ones who never really grew out of those days--not necessarily the drinking or partying, but the mindset. I'm only a few yea I don't like to not finish books, even if I skim or skip sections. But yeah this wasn't for me. I got about halfway through before throwing in the towel. To be fair to the author, I won't leave a rating. There's nothing wrong with his writing. John Glynn seems like a nice guy. The subjects of his memoir just remind me so much of some of the people I went to college with. The ones who never really grew out of those days--not necessarily the drinking or partying, but the mindset. I'm only a few years past and the summer in Montauk feels to me like an extra long spring break, divided by high school cliques. I also probably shouldn't have started this book immediately after finishing one about Syrian refugees. There was too much of a tonal shift. Everything felt trivial, and I'm sorry, but I just don't really care how privileged east coast 20-something's spend their summer bar hopping. *Thanks to Grand Central Publishing & Goodreads for an advance copy!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Christa

    Charming. Authentic. And so real. Reading along and joining John Glynn's journey is a great joy and privilege. Charming. Authentic. And so real. Reading along and joining John Glynn's journey is a great joy and privilege.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kelci

    A major disappointment given the ratings and reviews. This wasn’t the jump into my summer reading list i was hoping for with this raunchy story.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tina

    I thought this was great. Glynn is a gifted writer- he so accurately captured that post college existential dread that many of us face. He shared his coming out story with bravery and heart. The men and women of the Hive are privileged and they party hard, but there's depth to this story. This is a perfect summer memoir- who knew those were a thing? I thought this was great. Glynn is a gifted writer- he so accurately captured that post college existential dread that many of us face. He shared his coming out story with bravery and heart. The men and women of the Hive are privileged and they party hard, but there's depth to this story. This is a perfect summer memoir- who knew those were a thing?

  25. 5 out of 5

    Evie

    Very good memoir. Lots of reference to places I have been in Montauk.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lesley

    I received Out East by John Glynn for free through Goodreads Giveaways program. I wanted to like this book. The premise-- a twentysomething man heading to Montauk for a summer share-- was intriguing. I couldn't get past the first 50 pages, though. Glynn talks a bit about the loneliness he's felt throughout his life, but doesn't delve too deeply into this. I wanted more depth and got snippets instead. In a memoir, you want to feel empathy for the author, and I felt some, but very little. Memoirs c I received Out East by John Glynn for free through Goodreads Giveaways program. I wanted to like this book. The premise-- a twentysomething man heading to Montauk for a summer share-- was intriguing. I couldn't get past the first 50 pages, though. Glynn talks a bit about the loneliness he's felt throughout his life, but doesn't delve too deeply into this. I wanted more depth and got snippets instead. In a memoir, you want to feel empathy for the author, and I felt some, but very little. Memoirs can be overly self-indulgent (part of the problem with the genre in general), and I was feeling that this was the case here. Also, the supporting characters didn't appeal to me. I felt like I was reading about a glorified frat house in Montauk, which is not at all interesting. On the plus side, the writing wasn't too bad. This book may appeal to a younger crowd, but anyone over 30 should pass on it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ross Garner

    Set in idyllic Montauk, this book is poignantly written and is a very powerful coming out / coming of age story. Out East is filled with wit and humor with its robust gaggle of characters all living in the "Hive" and unconditionally supporting each other. This book is a MUST READ for a good cry, a good laugh and a very relatable story. Set in idyllic Montauk, this book is poignantly written and is a very powerful coming out / coming of age story. Out East is filled with wit and humor with its robust gaggle of characters all living in the "Hive" and unconditionally supporting each other. This book is a MUST READ for a good cry, a good laugh and a very relatable story.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Changeux

    I found this on a New Yorker list of books to read this summer. It was a fun read but I wish the editor had done a better job. The author’s overuse of brand names, “The Hive,” and “pregame” was cloying and distracting.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Lobbs

    To be young and privileged does not necessarily a good novel make.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Donna Hines

    This was like a frat party turned drink fest turned sex fest for the ages. It was not my cup of tea for this woman who never drank, got stoned off her rump, or had wild nights as a mother of three teens. I pray I never have to experience this wildness with my teens as they are 18, 16, and 12 and pray that these love fests are not something anyone should have to go through. The reason being one should love oneself not go outside for such comforts and lessen one's soul to feel accepted by anyone. Acce This was like a frat party turned drink fest turned sex fest for the ages. It was not my cup of tea for this woman who never drank, got stoned off her rump, or had wild nights as a mother of three teens. I pray I never have to experience this wildness with my teens as they are 18, 16, and 12 and pray that these love fests are not something anyone should have to go through. The reason being one should love oneself not go outside for such comforts and lessen one's soul to feel accepted by anyone. Acceptance is an internal job and perhaps I'm just an old lady but I was born as a devout Catholic and I didn't believe in groveling, in chasing, in seeking to be liked. I honestly wouldn't give a crats if you liked me or not but for me I missed the mark on this one. Perhaps it's just me and variety is the spice of life so I say enjoy especially if you're young, seeking acceptance in your sexual orientation, and or need to explore life and all its splendor. Thank you to John for this arc which was donated to my local library in exchange for this honest review.

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