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The heart-pounding conclusion to the daring Smoke Thieves trilogy. In this conclusion to the epic Smoke Thieves trilogy, the world has erupted into all-out war. King Aloysius is mining powerful demon smoke and using it to fuel an unstoppable army of children. March, now banished for treason, has joined up with this boy army. Forbidden from ever seeing Edyon again, and overw The heart-pounding conclusion to the daring Smoke Thieves trilogy. In this conclusion to the epic Smoke Thieves trilogy, the world has erupted into all-out war. King Aloysius is mining powerful demon smoke and using it to fuel an unstoppable army of children. March, now banished for treason, has joined up with this boy army. Forbidden from ever seeing Edyon again, and overwhelmed by his own betrayal, March no longer cares if he lives or dies. Catherine--now queen of Pitoria--must find a way to defeat the boy army, while also grappling with her own troubles: her secret demon smoke addiction, and unresolved tension with her former lover, Ambrose. Catherine seeks military support from Calidor by reaching out to her illegitimate cousin Edyon, who has been proclaimed heir to the Calidorian throne. But Edyon has almost no power as he's entangled in the unfamiliar machinations and manipulations of the royal court, finding that being the claimed son of a prince may be no easier than being a bastard. With Catherine, his love, now married off and moving on, and his brother and sister tortured and executed before him, Ambrose doesn't know what his role in this world is any more. He leads an expedition into the demon world, hoping to destroy the boy army's stores of demon smoke. In this underground world, he runs into Tash, whom everyone had believed dead. She has survived in this new world using magical abilities that, prior to now, only demons had. Aloysius will send his demon smoke-powered boy army to kill them all, if he can. But what nobody knows is that there is more to the smoke than meets the eye...


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The heart-pounding conclusion to the daring Smoke Thieves trilogy. In this conclusion to the epic Smoke Thieves trilogy, the world has erupted into all-out war. King Aloysius is mining powerful demon smoke and using it to fuel an unstoppable army of children. March, now banished for treason, has joined up with this boy army. Forbidden from ever seeing Edyon again, and overw The heart-pounding conclusion to the daring Smoke Thieves trilogy. In this conclusion to the epic Smoke Thieves trilogy, the world has erupted into all-out war. King Aloysius is mining powerful demon smoke and using it to fuel an unstoppable army of children. March, now banished for treason, has joined up with this boy army. Forbidden from ever seeing Edyon again, and overwhelmed by his own betrayal, March no longer cares if he lives or dies. Catherine--now queen of Pitoria--must find a way to defeat the boy army, while also grappling with her own troubles: her secret demon smoke addiction, and unresolved tension with her former lover, Ambrose. Catherine seeks military support from Calidor by reaching out to her illegitimate cousin Edyon, who has been proclaimed heir to the Calidorian throne. But Edyon has almost no power as he's entangled in the unfamiliar machinations and manipulations of the royal court, finding that being the claimed son of a prince may be no easier than being a bastard. With Catherine, his love, now married off and moving on, and his brother and sister tortured and executed before him, Ambrose doesn't know what his role in this world is any more. He leads an expedition into the demon world, hoping to destroy the boy army's stores of demon smoke. In this underground world, he runs into Tash, whom everyone had believed dead. She has survived in this new world using magical abilities that, prior to now, only demons had. Aloysius will send his demon smoke-powered boy army to kill them all, if he can. But what nobody knows is that there is more to the smoke than meets the eye...

30 review for The Burning Kingdoms

  1. 5 out of 5

    wakei

    This cover is making me worry—

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rach

    This book is a trilogy and this is the last book in the series. The book picks up right after the ending of the last book. Catherine is Queen of Pitoria after lying about her marriage to King Tzsayn, who is injured and she is left to run the country. Ambrose injured but cannot see Catherine. Tash is still stuck demon tunnels. Edyon is now a prince after finding his father but misses March even after he betrayed him. March decides to try help Edyon by joining the boy army to get inside knowledge This book is a trilogy and this is the last book in the series. The book picks up right after the ending of the last book. Catherine is Queen of Pitoria after lying about her marriage to King Tzsayn, who is injured and she is left to run the country. Ambrose injured but cannot see Catherine. Tash is still stuck demon tunnels. Edyon is now a prince after finding his father but misses March even after he betrayed him. March decides to try help Edyon by joining the boy army to get inside knowledge and March still loves Edyon. Harold, Catherine's brother is now heir to Brigant and plans to use the demon smoke to build a army. We have multiply POV's in this book (i do like multiply POV's). I liked some parts of the book but thought certain parts didn't need to be included. The book has array of characters which some of have been in the other books but some are new characters to this book. On the romance side of things in the book (which isn't the main story in the book) i actually liked how they all ended. The third book is a good final book that ties up all the loosing endings and nothing is left open. Overall a good fantasy with plenty of action, mutiply array of characters and a neat ending. My rating is 3.5 stars for this book. I received a ARC from Netgalley and Penguin Random House Children’s UK for an objection review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    ❀ Alex ❀ (The Scribe Owl)

    This cover is giving me anxiety

  4. 5 out of 5

    Monogamist

    First of all, thank you so much Penguin Books and PuffinBooks for providing an e-copy of this book. It’s always a bittersweet feeling when one of your favourite series is over. This book was definitely my most awaited release of this year. I picked up The Smoke Thieves by chance and I didn’t know I would be this blown away by this story. The ending did not disappoint me. The characters created by Sally Green will creep inside your heart and they will never leave you. I have no other way to expre First of all, thank you so much Penguin Books and PuffinBooks for providing an e-copy of this book. It’s always a bittersweet feeling when one of your favourite series is over. This book was definitely my most awaited release of this year. I picked up The Smoke Thieves by chance and I didn’t know I would be this blown away by this story. The ending did not disappoint me. The characters created by Sally Green will creep inside your heart and they will never leave you. I have no other way to express how much I loved these characters. I can’t say too much about any of the characters, because I don’t want to spoil the ending with this review. However, it was an amazing reading experience to see how Catherine’s character grew up to become an inspiring leader and queen, and I was completely satisfied with her ending. I am sure many will disagree with me, but her choices demonstrated real maturity. It was a perfect ending to a brilliant plot, everything came together gradually and I am so glad we got an even more satisfying epilogue. I will miss March and Edyon so much!! I can’t recommend this trilogy enough! You got badass women, love triangles and heartbreaking LGBT characters. More reviews on my blog Monogamist Reader

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laura *Little Read Riding Hood*

    SPOILER FREE FOR THE SERIES: This is a very good underrated series, and the end of the series does an excellent job of wrapping things up. The large cast of characters at first confused me, because I have a hard time remembering names and places once we get past for main characters, but Green does an excellent job keeping things straight, so I was able to follow along and get to a place where I knew who everyone was and keep connections straight. Going into this third book I was really concerned SPOILER FREE FOR THE SERIES: This is a very good underrated series, and the end of the series does an excellent job of wrapping things up. The large cast of characters at first confused me, because I have a hard time remembering names and places once we get past for main characters, but Green does an excellent job keeping things straight, so I was able to follow along and get to a place where I knew who everyone was and keep connections straight. Going into this third book I was really concerned that I would have forgotten who was whom and where they left off, but like I said, Green does an excellent job helping the reader out. The only magic in the world is the demons and their smoke, and everyone at this point has realized that smoke can make or break them. It has unique properties and I really enjoyed the rules it had to follow, and those rules caused lots of problems for our heroes and villains alike. Normally with the last book in a trilogy, I am let wanting more about what happens during the "after" but again Green does an excellent job giving you enough information to be satisfied. There are some romances that blossom throughout the trilogy, and some love triangles as well, but they never feel forced. There is one relationship that I thought could have used some more ... resolution due to the betrayal that split them up for a time, but all things considered the friendships and loves in this story felt more real to me than in most books. The choices felt true to the characters too. Overall just an excellent story. You should really give this series a shot, and let me know what you think!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    You can also read my review here: https://devouringbooks2017.wordpress.... Review: 4 Stars I was really excited to get a review copy of The Burning Kingdoms, which is the conclusion to The Smoke Thieves trilogy. I really love this series and I feel like it is a great example of how multiple points of view and plot lines can be done really well. In each book in the series every character's POV has its own plot line and they all converge to create a stunning finale in each book. When I first got a You can also read my review here: https://devouringbooks2017.wordpress.... Review: 4 Stars I was really excited to get a review copy of The Burning Kingdoms, which is the conclusion to The Smoke Thieves trilogy. I really love this series and I feel like it is a great example of how multiple points of view and plot lines can be done really well. In each book in the series every character's POV has its own plot line and they all converge to create a stunning finale in each book. When I first got a copy of The Burning Kingdom I was a little worried that I wouldn't remember all the previous events of the series, but Sally Green did a decent job reminding the reader of what happened without completely rehashing everything. I think the characters really help make this series strong. While I still love Tash's character the most, I found myself most invested in Edyon's and March's chapters. I was rooting for their romance, but their plot lines were also extremely interesting. March joined the boy's brigade, so we got to see the Brigant enemy side along with Catherine's cruel younger brother Prince Harold. Edyon's chapters were interesting as he was reunited with his father and legitimized as a prince. The legitimization really effected him because he had always suffered growing up from the fact that he was a bastard. I felt like Ambrose wasn't as important in this installment and his character kind of fell to the background. As usual I still didn't really care for Catherine's chapters that much. The five points of view were balanced pretty well and I was able to keep up with everything that was happening really easily. The Burning Kingdoms was really fast paced and pretty exciting. There wasn't a whole lot of filler chapters, so the action hardly ever stopped. The plot went in directions that I never really expected, but I wasn't happy with all of the final outcomes. But I really think that this concluding book lived up to my expectations and it was a lot of fun to read. It was hard to see the story end because I really loved most of the characters, but I did feel satisfied with the way the series ended. It is a bit of a bittersweet ending. I feel like most of the characters got the ending that they deserved, but it's also hard to say goodbye to this series. The plot and pacing were both pretty great, making The Burning Kingdoms a fast and entertaining read. If you enjoy quick YA fantasy with multiple plot lines I would highly recommend reading The Smoke Thieves series.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    That was... unfortunate.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Christina (A Reader of Fictions)

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. First off, let me say both for people who are not me and for my future self should I read this review again at some point, that in the year of awfulness that is 2020, fantasy really has not been clicking with me, so on some level it's impressive that I finished a fantasy series I wasn't rereading. This didn't end up being a perfect fit for me, but there's a lot that I'm impressed with in the world Sally Green created. As ever, I stand by my comments from book one that the world building and plott First off, let me say both for people who are not me and for my future self should I read this review again at some point, that in the year of awfulness that is 2020, fantasy really has not been clicking with me, so on some level it's impressive that I finished a fantasy series I wasn't rereading. This didn't end up being a perfect fit for me, but there's a lot that I'm impressed with in the world Sally Green created. As ever, I stand by my comments from book one that the world building and plotting are the strongest aspects of the series. As it went along, I felt disconnected from the cast. Partially, I think this was due to the fact that some of the narrators had to be recast, so they didn't feel the same, but I also think this is a less character-focused series than I tend to prefer. That said, I do admire many of the choices made in the end. The leadership exhibited is pretty excellent, particularly the way Edyon recognizes that he probably wouldn't be an amazing King and plans to step back. Catherine and Tzsayn are delightfully schemey and rule-following, and it's cool that Catherine followed her head more than her heart. Though, it would be cooler if the book weren't trying to sell the deep love and passion between the two, because omg I do not feel the chemistry at all. But! I did think she and Ambrose were super toxic, and I appreciated that resolution. Plotwise, I do think the third book is the weakest, which is pretty common with series enders. It's hard to wrap a series up in a way that feels entirely satisfying. For me, the ending was anticlimactic. The fact that the demons just disappear and the smoke conveniently kills almost all the bad guys right when the good guys were in imminent danger felt like SUCH a copout. And with so many POV characters to have NONE of them die is a bit meh imo. The audiobooks are really good, though obviously they would have been better if they could have gotten the same cast throughout. Schedules don't always accommodate unfortunately. Anyway, I would recommend these on audio to readers who enjoy fantasies for the world and plots.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lucy May-Coulson

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It's been almost a year since I read the first two books in the trilogy, so I had forgotten quite a lot, but I did enjoy getting back into the world of the smoke thieves! In book one Tash was my favourite character, in book two Edyon was my favourite, but in this book Catherine was my favourite! I found all her chapters really interesting, and I enjoy seeing more of Tzsayn in her chapters too. I was very pleasantly surprised with the turn of the tides for the Tzsayn-Catherine-Ambrose love triangle It's been almost a year since I read the first two books in the trilogy, so I had forgotten quite a lot, but I did enjoy getting back into the world of the smoke thieves! In book one Tash was my favourite character, in book two Edyon was my favourite, but in this book Catherine was my favourite! I found all her chapters really interesting, and I enjoy seeing more of Tzsayn in her chapters too. I was very pleasantly surprised with the turn of the tides for the Tzsayn-Catherine-Ambrose love triangle! I despised Catherine and Ambrose’s relationship in the previous books, and I shipped Catherine and Tzsayn so much more, but I always assumed Catherine and Ambrose would end up together. I know Catherine and Tzsayn’s relationship was quite rushed but I don’t really care because they’re cute🥺😂 I'm quite dissatisfied with Edyon and March's storyline in this book. It felt super rushed and unnatural; they hadn't even spoken since March's betrayal. I would've much preferred it if there was a more angsty reunion and then they slowly started to trust each other again. I think the demon world storyline was brilliant; I love that the demon world will start over again some day. I thought the plot was good, sometimes predictable, but still enjoyable. Overall, it was an easy read, and I enjoyed seeing the endings for all the characters.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Munch

    I was sent an arc of this book via Netgalley in exchange for a honest review. 4.5 This was much stronger than the second book, it gripped me straight away when it took me nearly halfway through The Demon World to get truly invested. The thing that caused me a lot of annoyance in the last book was Catherine and Ambrose and while it was still there it wasn't as overwhelming plot-wise this time. Ambrose is still my least favourite character but at least he started to grow up near the end. His influen I was sent an arc of this book via Netgalley in exchange for a honest review. 4.5 This was much stronger than the second book, it gripped me straight away when it took me nearly halfway through The Demon World to get truly invested. The thing that caused me a lot of annoyance in the last book was Catherine and Ambrose and while it was still there it wasn't as overwhelming plot-wise this time. Ambrose is still my least favourite character but at least he started to grow up near the end. His influence on Catherine really held her back but she gets her priorities right this time (mostly thanks to Tanya, she just might be one of my new favourites). Tzsayn is still too precious for this world, they have so much more chemistry than she does with Ambrose. I really enjoyed all the politics as well as how the characters had to overcome the various obstacles that come with war, it wasn't all about the battles but alliances, financial worries and soldier morale as well. I was a bit disappointed that March and Edyon weren't together for much of the book but I found their separate plots interesting so I didn't mind too much. I liked Edyon's difficulty with his new life was the main plot point for him, it didn't just all fall into place for him now he is with his father. I liked that March joined up with the boy army (I couldn't read boys' brigade without sniggering, how can you take something like that seriously?). I'm a sucker for a character going behind enemy lines. The conflict he felt while getting to know the other boys and seeing the danger they and their new leader presented to his loved ones was interesting to read (though I did shout, 'just poison him' at the book a few times). Tash is the best character in this series in my opinion, her storyline in the second book was amazing and it was one of the best parts about this one too. Though she doesn't do that much in the first part of the book due to what happened to her at the end of the last one her part is one of the most critical to the end of the conflict. Her connection to the demons and their world gets more complex (and we see Twist again! I love him). There was a character in her plotline that I felt was a bit unneeded since she seemed to only be there to give Ambrose a important bit of information that I'm pretty sure Tash could have found out from the demons in someway instead. Overall I really enjoyed this conclusion to the trilogy, things are tried up bit too easily after so much build up in my opinion but I still felt satisfied with how everything turned out.

  11. 4 out of 5

    thewoollygeek (tea, cake, crochet & books)

    Ok, so I’m sad to say this is the last book and I’m going to miss these books and characters so much. I love this series so much. I thought this was a fitting tribute to a great trilogy, it goes out with a bang and is even better than the second book. As always I love Sally’s use of multiple POV , she is so talented at them, each voice is unique and you can tell each character apart. No spoilers here, because you need to read these for yourself, but this is one of my favourite reads this year. A Ok, so I’m sad to say this is the last book and I’m going to miss these books and characters so much. I love this series so much. I thought this was a fitting tribute to a great trilogy, it goes out with a bang and is even better than the second book. As always I love Sally’s use of multiple POV , she is so talented at them, each voice is unique and you can tell each character apart. No spoilers here, because you need to read these for yourself, but this is one of my favourite reads this year. A wonderful ending to an addictive and amazingly entertaining series. Wonderful strong kick ass women, great representation and amazing writing. If you have not read these books, why not you really need to ! Thanks to netgalley and the publisher for a free copy for an honest opinion

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Griffin

    So good. I'll be reading this again in 2021. Along with the The Smoke Thieves and The Demon World.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lucy

    The Smoke Thieves was one of my surprise favourite reads of 2018. I hadn’t heard anything about it before I snagged a copy, but from the first page I was hooked. I loved everything about it, and frequently recommended it to high fantasy fans. In fact, thanks to the series’ perfect balance of political intrigue, dark magic and an intriguing ensemble cast scattered across a continent, I likened it to the glory days of Game of Thrones. The second book was just as strong, and the final book of the s The Smoke Thieves was one of my surprise favourite reads of 2018. I hadn’t heard anything about it before I snagged a copy, but from the first page I was hooked. I loved everything about it, and frequently recommended it to high fantasy fans. In fact, thanks to the series’ perfect balance of political intrigue, dark magic and an intriguing ensemble cast scattered across a continent, I likened it to the glory days of Game of Thrones. The second book was just as strong, and the final book of the series, The Burning Kingdoms, became one of my most anticipated reads of 2020. Unfortunately, like Game of Thrones, this series ends not with a bang, but with a whimper. My main issue with The Burning Kingdoms is the writing style, which can best be described as ‘tell, don’t show’. Everything - from the pacing to the characterisation - felt flat and lifeless. Green’s characters were one of my favourite parts of the series in the first two instalments, but in The Burning Kingdoms it almost seemed like they were written by a ghostwriter with only the vaguest idea of who these characters were. Even new characters were introduced with so much detachment that I was incapable of forming any kind of opinion - good or bad - about them. There was also no sense of urgency, even while the narrative was building up to its climax - largely, because Green revealed exactly what was going to happen several chapters before it did. It was clear to the reader that the characters, who thought they were in mortal danger, were actually all going to be fine, which meant that there were literally no stakes. I was invested enough in the characters and their journeys to continue to the end, but I’m not sure I’ll be recommending this series anymore. A disappointing ending. Many thanks to Penguin for providing a copy of The Burning Kingdoms. The opinions expressed in this review are my own. Publisher: Penguin Rating: 2 stars | ★★✰✰✰ Review cross-posted to Paperback'd Reviews

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elpida (hopenwonders)

    A great conclusion to a really good fantasy series. I love how action packed it was and that our main characters got the ending they deserved. It was fast paced and a really quick read overall. One complaint that I have is that the ending felt a bit rushed. I would have liked it to have been more drawn out and for us to have spent some more time with the characters and maybe gotten to know some of the new ones that were introduced in this one. But all in all, I still very much enjoyed it, the wr A great conclusion to a really good fantasy series. I love how action packed it was and that our main characters got the ending they deserved. It was fast paced and a really quick read overall. One complaint that I have is that the ending felt a bit rushed. I would have liked it to have been more drawn out and for us to have spent some more time with the characters and maybe gotten to know some of the new ones that were introduced in this one. But all in all, I still very much enjoyed it, the writing was just as beautiful as always and I can't wait to see what else this author writes in the future.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    GAAAAAHHHHHH I JUST FINISHED THIS SERIES AND HAVE SO MANY THOUGHTS AND FEELINGS!!!! 😭 😭 😭 I can only hope I’ll remember everything and do this book justice When I first picked up the first book I had such high hopes for the series because of the intriguing premise, and although the book took a MUCH different direction than what I thought it would (I had no idea it was a high European Medieval fantasy), it still far surpassed even my high expectations. Once again this book, like the first one, gri GAAAAAHHHHHH I JUST FINISHED THIS SERIES AND HAVE SO MANY THOUGHTS AND FEELINGS!!!! 😭 😭 😭 I can only hope I’ll remember everything and do this book justice When I first picked up the first book I had such high hopes for the series because of the intriguing premise, and although the book took a MUCH different direction than what I thought it would (I had no idea it was a high European Medieval fantasy), it still far surpassed even my high expectations. Once again this book, like the first one, gripped me so hard I couldn’t stop reading it and devoured it within 2 days (and staying up waaaayyyy too late reading it, like, 6:30 a.m. even though I had class the next day lol). My ebook was FILLED with highlights every other page in various colors and comments. I feel a little obsessed and will definitely be returning to this world, the great action-packed plot, and the beloved characters again in the future :( The Characters I love each of the 5 main characters, and I care very much for them, although I had my gripes with them at some point in each of their character arcs (especially the 2nd book) lol. But overall, I’m very happy with where each of them ended up and who they’ve become as people, and I can’t stress enough how pleasing and satisfying the end to this series was. March I was most excited for him and his story/character arc, and was so disappointed when his romance with Edyon turned into his only personality trait in the 2nd book. I was soooo excited for him because his premise was an indigenous boy who seeks to avenge his slaughtered people. He literally survived a GENOCIDE of his ENTIRE PEOPLE (whose survivors were enslaved) and his fuel and motivation for living at the very beginning was to find closure for his people. I thought we would get development of genocide of indigenous peoples and their abhorrent treatment, how the wrongs can be righted, and exploration of land reclamation but...it just devolved into this romance with some idiot twink. I still very much enjoy his character though, and although 99% of his motives revolved around Edyon in this book, I was still happy with where he ended up and how his story concluded. I love his little smart mouth and how much of a sarcastic shit he is, and some of his quips are always the funniest in the entire series lol “March[, you] look like you’re going to pee in your pants.” March bent down to rub his palms on his trousers and muttered, “Fuck you, Your Highness,” before standing upright, hauling his arm back, and throwing. — “I’m not really the helping sort. What sort are you, March?” “Generally pissed off. And really pissed off when people point spears at me.” And I guess his ending and conclusion with his people and their land is satisfying enough :”) Edyon Okay I lied, I actually don’t LOVE him, but I do like him a lot now more than I have in previous books. He started out as a dumb and horny twink whose only personality trait was fetishizing an indigenous person of color and Boys, and his thing as a “thief” was half-baked even to the end and really unnecessary. But his kindness, wit, gentleness, and care for other people really shined through in this book, and by the end I could see that he would actually make a very fine ruler, and am very glad he’s in the position he is now. The constant “I MISS MARCH!!!!” and “I MISS EDYON!!!!” in their respective chapters was...so frequent it was a little irritating, but I skimmed these parts so it didn’t bother me too much this time around lol. I could appreciate their romance more in this book than the others, where I found it grating and annoying. Catherine I liked her a lot in this book, much more than in the 2nd, where her power-hungriness was a big turn off, and her random purple smoke addiction was annoying, as well as her stringing along both Ambrose and Tzsayn. Here she finally makes a decision, and, OH GOD, her relationship with Tzsayn is so TT_TTTTTT I’m happy for her development and where she is now, with a balance between her ambition and autonomy and tempering it with her love for Tzsayn and developing alongside him. Tash I love this little girl so much lol. I loved her relationships with the demons and her eventual care and finding a father figure in Geratan :( Not much to say because I just love her little shit character and the action of her chapters. Ambrose I feel so bad for Ambrose constantly getting shit on by (it seems) every single reviewer who’s read this series, but he’s actually one of my top favorites, along with Tzsayn and the Pitorian soldiers/guards (I WOULD LITERALLY GIVE MY LIFE FOR ALL OF THEM I LOVE THEM SO MUCH). But he has so many good qualities, including his deep love for his loved ones, his unwavering loyalty and faith, his tenderness and willingness to let go of Catherine for her own happiness, at the expense of his own. I really love his character, his ideals, morals, sense of justice, etc. He never fully lets go of his jealousy for Tzsayn, but he’s developed so much and doesn’t let it drag him down anymore, or take it out on other people. His fighting skills and prowess were really showcased well in the first book (BADASS SWORDSMAN AND SKILLED AF SOLDIER ILYSM), glossed over in the 2nd, but really shined in the 3rd book. I love his leadership skills and how it’s shown how he excels at it, how he commands and leads so well, and really loved the opportunities and positions he was given to lead, the love, trust and loyalty his soldiers and other people put in him, and their faith in his skills. I love his autonomy AWAY FROM CATHERINE that we get to see in this book, how he starts focusing less on living for her and trying to find a purpose for himself. I understand that he thinks of lives as threads and that meaning is found when they’re interconnected; I understand that he places much of the meaning of life on living for the ones he loves, and that life without relationships is pretty meaningful. That’s what makes it even more tragic that he loses his entire family and only has Catherine, who eventually “leaves” him for Tzsayn (although I do like to feel they’ll always be connected and love each other). But I love that he begins finding life worth living for himself and starts enjoying the freedom of life he’s always liked but never had the chance to pursue before, traveling and riding like he’s always wanted, and finding a sense of home again :”) Ambrose had lost all his family and his home, but throughout it all Catherine had been his shining light, the person that had kept him hopeful. He’d clung to Catherine as they’d escaped Tornia, and clung to her even more as they’d crossed the Northern Plateau after leaving Rossarb. She had been his rock when all else was lost. And now he couldn’t hold her anymore. He wasn’t sure what else he had to anchor him. ——— Could he do it? Did he want to do it? Ambrose felt like gathering Catherine in his arms and sweeping her away. But this wasn’t the Catherine of even just a few weeks ago. The girl had gone, and now there was a woman. Well, he was a man to match her. He stood straighter, his head up. “I’ll fight, Catherine. I’ll lead the attack into the demon world. But not for you, or for Tzsayn, or even for Pitoria, but for me, my family, and Brigant.” The Side Characters OH GODDDDD, THE SIDE CHARACTERS!!!! TT_TTTTTT Even though they’re like, not as important to the story as the main 5, they still play very important roles and I grew so fond and attached to so many of them, and am very happy we got to see so much of them and their development although of course I’d pay so much more to see them even more....can you tell I really like this series and the characters kldfkdjf They were my favorite part of this series, tbh. I love each of the good side characters who show up and mourn each of the ones who end up dying :( I loved Byron, Rafyon, Davyon, Geratan (and his relationship with Tash OH GOD), Twist, etc. I even really like the minor characters like the old fart generals from Calidor who ended up being very useful lol. I just. Really really really REALLY want to see even more of them and their development...🥺 Tzsayn Of course Tzsayn gets his own special section tf. “He’s awake?” “Awake but weak. If you could encourage him to rest, Your Majesty, that would help.” “I’ll do my best, but he has a will of his own.” And he always claimed he was well even when he was clearly feverish or in pain. What was it about Tzsayn that made him unable to admit to weakness, even to himself? Catherine remembered the first time they had met, on her arrival in Tornia, how proud and aloof Tzsayn had appeared. She’d learned a little more about him since then—and, yes, he was proud, but he was not aloof at all. He loved his family and his country. He was intelligent, witty, extremely brave, and aware that his life hung on a thread that could snap—or be cut—at any moment. Hot, tall, handsome, skilled, sexy, fashionable, stylish, loving, tender, loyal, a great leader, a great strategist, progressive, feminist, antifa, WAY AHEAD OF HIS TIMES, gender nonconformist, knows gender is fake, intelligent, funny, witty, learned, handsome, HOT....what is there NOT to love!!?! 😭 😭 😭 🥺 🥰 🥺 🥰 🥰 https://img.buzzfeed.com/buzzfeed-sta... ...But Goodreads is being racist with the character limit, so more on that in the comments ://// The Plot/Story Probably the 2nd biggest reason why I was so in love with this series, besides the characters. I usually hate made up kingdoms and politics (they’re usually really badly done, a la Red Queen, where everything is quarter-baked, nonsensical, and boring as shit) but I was actually soooo invested in the there kingdoms of Pitoria (!!!), Calidor, and Brigitane. They and their cultures were developed enough that I was so interested in the kingdoms’ interconnectedness and the plot, and actually really cared about what would happen to them. I usually have trouble keeping up with so many characters/made up kingdoms and geography, but Sally Green actually does a fantastic job of keeping everything distinct and easy to keep track of. I didn’t even need the handy guides to characters/kingdoms at the end, and I have seveeeereeeeeee ADHD-C with shit working memory lol. The violence in here is graphic and tragic, but it’s not overly gratuitous like it was in the previous books. I found the plot with the demons/smoke satisfying, and liked the conclusion to it and the full circle it made. The Writing Engaging, action-packed, and very funny. We get succinct descriptions of characters’ thoughts and feelings and it’s not rambled about in long passages, but the succinctness of what we do get is very well done and captures tenderness and love of characters sooooo well. It fits the Medieval theme, I think. I’m still so obsessed with the tenderness between Tzsayn and Catherine. I’m still SO OBSESSED with Tzsayn I love him SO MUCH. CAN YOU TELL I JUST REALLY REALLY WANT MORE TENDERNESS And TZSAYN I— My favorite part of the book, of course, was all of Tzsayn’s scenes and his relationship development with Catherine, though I wanted to soooo much more. Also, I don’t see this talked about much, but Sally Green is funny as shit lol. There’s soooo many funny, witty passages and quips from characters WHY IS IT NOT TALKED ABOUT— AFTER HIS father had ridden off to the border wall, Edyon had followed all the instructions he’d been given. “Stay in the castle”—he’d stayed in the castle. “Let Byron protect you”—he’d definitely let Byron protect him. “The castle is impregnable”—he’d heard that one before. The Ending My only complaint is that the ending felt a little rushed. I was SO disappointed with this; after getting three books to really know and love these characters, I wanted a REALLY REALLY fleshed out ending. Although the ending was very satisfying and we are given a great balance between an open ending and a happy conclusion, I still wanted to see so, SO much more of the characters’ lives, their interactions and thoughts and feelings. I love Tzsayn SOOOOO GODDAMN MUch PLeSAeSe—— Like, entire chapters dedicated just to each of them and their endings, PLEASE TT_TTTTT (why was the ending so rushed? The book was only 400 pages and it could have easily been stretched into 500 pages. I would dedicate most of those 100 pages for Tzsayn and Ambrose but STILL) Besides the epilogue, the overall pacing/structure of this book was so strong for the first 90%, and then when we reach the climax...it’s not as developed or stretched out as I would have liked. It felt a little underdeveloped, underwhelming, and anticlimactic, although I was VERY satisfied with the outcomes. I just wish the way we got there was more developed. If I were to compare it to a roller coaster, I would say it was a HUGE, impressive structure with strong support, lots of good twists, turns, loops, and whatever other stuff makes rollercoasters enjoyable. It was SUCH a good set up and seemed like it was promising SUCH a thrilling payoff and even better finale and then...when you get to the end of it, there’s no more loops and the structure is just some wooden planks :( It was disappointing after such a good beginning and middle/setup! Why wasn’t this book longer? It would have been so much stronger and I would have been so much happier to read more of this story, even though I have ADHD and the literal attention span of a squirrel during nuts season. Was it a time crunch? Was her pay getting cut and the publisher ran out of trees to print pages on???? how do i write a complaint to the publisher But at least if you’re hesitating to get into this series, know that it ends on a satisfying note :”) Overall: 4.5 Stars, rounded up to 5. I would highly recommend this series, and it was such an enjoyable journey to read it! The fact that I’m even writing this review at all is testimony to how much I loved this series, as I’ve been so fatigued and exhausted (the past few years) I haven’t written reviews or socialized in years, barely even updating GR progress. I’m so sad this series had to end as I loved the journey, but I’m glad I got the chance to go on it. I can’t remember loving a series (especially fantasy) like this in sooooo long, it’s made me so happy and restored my faith in the YA genre :)))))))) I’ll definitely order/buy a physical copy of this book too! <3333333

  16. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    A perfect conclusion to an excellent high fantasy series.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Annie (Annie's Readingtips)

    “Fight to the death and then keep on fighting.” The Burning Kingdoms is the third book and conclusion to the wonderful and adventurous The Smoke Thieves series that takes place in a fantasy world that resembles Game of Thrones quite a bit, with fights for power, wars between kingdoms and a magic twist with demons and the hunting for demon smoke. Just like the previous two books, The Burning Kingdoms was a fast and easy read with action throughout; with the all-out war that has erupted and the “Fight to the death and then keep on fighting.” The Burning Kingdoms is the third book and conclusion to the wonderful and adventurous The Smoke Thieves series that takes place in a fantasy world that resembles Game of Thrones quite a bit, with fights for power, wars between kingdoms and a magic twist with demons and the hunting for demon smoke. Just like the previous two books, The Burning Kingdoms was a fast and easy read with action throughout; with the all-out war that has erupted and the threat from the unstoppable boy army fueled with demon smoke that evil King Aloysius is creating. But plot-wise, this was definitely the weakest of the three books and the characters felt flat and the pacing off somehow. The story was still told from the five POVs Catherine, Ambrose, Tash, Edyon and March, but I was disappointed in the small part that Tash got. She’s been my favorite character from the start; this seventeen-year-old demon hunter was such a badass, strong and shining character in the previous books that it was impossible not to fall in love with her. So the story definitely got weaker when her part was so limited in this book. I also felt that it was unfortunate that the five characters were split apart again and that the relationships that had formed in the second book were not evolved but rather put on hold here. Still, it was a very solid and enjoyable fantasy story, with a great world building and an interesting take on demons as victims. And I really enjoyed the ending, I just wish for some more suspense and a slightly more addictive plot to get there.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Milva

    3.5 The finale to the Smoke Thieves trilogy felt a bit off to me. I cannot put the finger on what was not right or why I didn't love it as much as first two books but it is a fact that I kind of stop caring about most of characters. Still, it is a very solid fantasy withamy characters, great politics, war and interesting fantasy elements.

  19. 4 out of 5

    A.R. Collins

    As I start my review, I haven't yet decided how to rate this conclusion of the trilogy. I read it fairly quickly, engaged by Green's writing and these characters who speak to me. I did think that their stories felt rather too separate, with the five of them splitting up again and only Ambrose providing a link between two (which is by no means all) of the strands. The characters being separate worked well in The Smoke Thieves when they didn't actually know each other, and they started to come tog As I start my review, I haven't yet decided how to rate this conclusion of the trilogy. I read it fairly quickly, engaged by Green's writing and these characters who speak to me. I did think that their stories felt rather too separate, with the five of them splitting up again and only Ambrose providing a link between two (which is by no means all) of the strands. The characters being separate worked well in The Smoke Thieves when they didn't actually know each other, and they started to come together at a perfectly reasonable pace. Now, they do know each other and they're even more separate! For me, the ending was satisfying, but the way they got there was not. It involved too little characterisation and too much of a fix-all, in my opinion. I was also disappointed that more was not made of Frost, after her build-up in the previous book. Considering all that, I enjoyed the book, though in places it wasn't quite what I'd hoped. And now, in my tradition for this series, I shall consider each of the protagonists in turn - this time in order of how much I liked them in The Demon World. March has a very engaging narrative, though possibly not as engaging as in the previous two instalments. I suppose I can't blame him for lacking some focus at first, and he does use the time available to think of some ways to try and sort things out. I did have my own particular idea about something I would like him to do, but he doesn't do it, and I can't really hold that against him. His characterisation holds up here; I do think it's a shame that it gets rather swallowed in the end by the fix-all. Tash also has an engaging narrative - perhaps the most engaging, as I kept deciding to stop after I'd got to Tash's next bit. These were not much less frequent than the other characters' narratives, but considerably shorter. I was engaged by her and still liking her, but I don't seem to have been left with much overall impression as to what she actually does! Edyon has got braver, and I found I was behind him most of the way. I'm struggling to think of what else to say about him; his situation has stagnated somewhat, so he doesn't have the opportunity to do very much. However, what he does do shows how he has grown as a person. I did enjoy his interactions with Prince Harold; that character's dialogue was brilliantly written, and Edyon rather played second fiddle to it at times, I thought! Catherine went down in my estimation last time, but now I feel she's improved. She does what she has to do both confidently and competently. I found parts of her narrative more engaging than others, and I happen to remember a particular highlight for her, which I can't say about any of the others. Ambrose has been bottom of both my previous lists, not because there was anything really wrong with him but because I found him a little flat compared to the others. This time, I found him more engaging, with more emotional stuff to deal with and a chance to show his true worth as a soldier and a leader. He's been let out of Catherine's shadow for this book, and I think it's done him good. On reflection, I've decided that overall this book deserves one star fewer than The Demon World, which I gave one star fewer than The Smoke Thieves. The series started by gripping me in a big way, and it hasn't really let go, although the stars do deplete; I have become attached to these characters and enjoyed reading about them. But I am struggling to come up with a rank order for them in this book. I think I'll have to take into account the trilogy as a whole for a tie-breaker. So... 1. Tash 2. March =3. Catherine =3. Edyon 5. Ambrose Well, I couldn't do it. Catherine and Edyon tie (and thus are listed alphabetically); some years ago I might have forced myself to choose between the two, but I have now realised that it's perfectly okay (and much more honest) to like some things equally. I don't have to have a favourite, but it so happens that I do, and it's Tash. From what the author has said, I think maybe Tash is her favourite, so she was ever likely to come across well. Poor Ambrose, still at the bottom even after what I wrote today! But I like them all very much.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sifa Poulton

    THE BURNING KINGDOMS is a book that summaries my feelings about the whole trilogy - this is a series with such potential to be engaging and epic and amazing, but falls rather flat in the execution. It's a fun enough read, and I did blitz through it in a day, but I was left wanting so much more from the book (and series) by the ending. The enemy are incredibly powerful and the heroes are scatted, divided (not quite leaderless) at the start, and you know going in that this whole book is racing towa THE BURNING KINGDOMS is a book that summaries my feelings about the whole trilogy - this is a series with such potential to be engaging and epic and amazing, but falls rather flat in the execution. It's a fun enough read, and I did blitz through it in a day, but I was left wanting so much more from the book (and series) by the ending. The enemy are incredibly powerful and the heroes are scatted, divided (not quite leaderless) at the start, and you know going in that this whole book is racing towards the final confrontation. It's a pretty much foregone conclusion that the heroes will win, as that's what we expect as readers, but the how is what we don't know - what we want to find out. And that how needs to be rewarding. When the stakes are this large, there should be gambles and danger and the heroes acting. They should be earning their happily ever after, should be the ones who cause it to happen. It's about creating adequate payoffs that match the set up, and that never happens in this book. The ending is rather a deus ex machina, as it's a little convenient how the army of boys are just dealt with such that the heroes don't have to do anything themselves. Instead, they are rid of their greatest threat (who they cannot beat as they are so powerful) without getting blood on their hands. It does rather ruin the tension of the situation and undermine the finale as it's not the heroes' actions that saves them the day. Their kingdoms are at risk, but the characters don't rise to meet it - instead they win by luck that the world has this get-out clause they didn't know about. The way the information was revealed was also rather odd. Sally Green writes the character who reveals it through a character that she's made untrustworthy and who feels like they've got a scheme up their sleeve that they're just waiting to unleash. Tash and Ambrose clearly don't trust the character either, and so the risks they take on the characters' behalf seem a little silly when they both say they don't believe that they will get information once they fulfil the demands. And yet, when they get the information, they just take the information at face value? It so happens to be true, but it didn't match the build up of duplicity. The prose is still very removed from the action, which is because the writing style is consistent across the trilogy. Between this and the deus ex machina, it does mean that the stakes didn't feel adequately met. There should have been a lot more tension at the end to make the finale more climactic, and so it's not a particularly satisfying last 100 pages - which is a pity as the start of the book had such potential. There's some scheming at the start of the book, which of course got me excited. It all revolves around boats and potential aid/alliance between Calidor and Pittoria. There is so much time spent on this in Edyon and Catherine's chapters, but then it's simply forgotten in the second half. The boats play no part in the finale, and the alliance is rapidly forgotten about in favour of other plot ideas. It's another example of elements that are set up and had potential, but just weren't paid off.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

    I received a free ARC of the book in return for an honest review. Many thanks to NetGalley and Penguin Random House for the opportunity. The Smoke Thieves is a fantasy trilogy and you will need to read the first two books to make sense of this, the final book. Written from the perspectives of five characters whose lives intertwine, the point of view rotates from chapter to chapter. Tash is a thirteen year old and has been raised as a hunter of illegal demon smoke, which can only be obtained by kil I received a free ARC of the book in return for an honest review. Many thanks to NetGalley and Penguin Random House for the opportunity. The Smoke Thieves is a fantasy trilogy and you will need to read the first two books to make sense of this, the final book. Written from the perspectives of five characters whose lives intertwine, the point of view rotates from chapter to chapter. Tash is a thirteen year old and has been raised as a hunter of illegal demon smoke, which can only be obtained by killing a demon. After finding her way into the demon world she feels sympathy for the demons and regrets her actions. Edyon is the illegitimate son of Prince Thelonius, ruler of Calidor. He has been on a journey to meet his father and become a legitimised heir. Edyon has a nasty habit of stealing things that gets him into trouble. March is one of the last surviving Abask people. He blames Edyon’s father for the Abask people being wiped out. He was part of a plot to kidnap Edyon and hand him over to King Aloysius, Edyon’s uncle and cruel ruler of the neighbouring country Brigant, but after developing feelings for the gentle Edyon, he changed course. Catherine is King Aloysius’ daughter, cousin to Edyon. She was sent to another neighbouring country, Pitoria, for an arranged marriage to Prince Tzsayn. This turned out to be a distraction so her father could invade part of the Pitoria that had access to the demon world. Catherine stood with Tzsayn against the Brigantines. Ambrose was Catherine’s personal guard in Brigant, now in exile in Pitoria, he is still deeply in love with Catherine. It has been discovered that purple demon smoke harvested by killing young demons can, when inhaled, give excessive strength and stamina to young people. King Aloysius has an unit of soldiers in the demon world killing demons to farm the smoke whichhe plans to use to power an army of boys, in a plot to seize Calidor from his brother, Prince Thelonius. As you might expect with five strong characters, I found some more likeable than others. Tash is the first character we meet in the first book and remained my firm favourite throughout. She is blunt to the point of obnoxious, and quite foul-mouthed, but her character development through the books is at times painful and emotional. In contrast Catherine, moved from being an oppressed if quietly rebellious young woman, to being a take-charge, do what has to be done character, but never really engendered much affection in me. Ambrose always seemed quite a weak character, but in this final book, his strength finally shone out. March and Edyon had a beautiful love story that won my heart. In books with multiple points of view, it can sometimes be a problem for me distinguishing the voice of one character from another, but this was never an issue here as each character has very distinct narrative voice. I worried early on that one or more of the characters would become redundant as time went on which would have been frustrating as we get to know them so well. However, the actions of all five are essential to the plot so no character fades out before the end. I felt by the end of the book that this world still had more tales to tell. I still had questions about the Edyon/March relationship and the minor character Prince Tzsayn remained a favourite of mine who deserved a story of his own. It seemed to me, quite ambitious at the start to have five full points of view but Green has achieved it admirably. I was invested in the story from first to last and would happily welcome more from this world. The audible versions are also excellent with full cast performance. If you haven’t read the early books you should grab them now. If you have, the final book will keep you on edge almost to the final page.

  22. 5 out of 5

    tthepageturner

    [3.5 stars] Like the previous two books in the trilogy, The Burning Kingdoms, was easy to get through with action throughout. Catherine has been my favourite right from the start. I like how although she can't fight physically she is intelligent and has a fighting spirit. She uses her intelligence and wits to command respect. In a world where woman are treated like second class citizens she shows their true worth. The love triangle between Catherine/Ambrose/Tzsayn was quickly resolved, but the r [3.5 stars] Like the previous two books in the trilogy, The Burning Kingdoms, was easy to get through with action throughout. Catherine has been my favourite right from the start. I like how although she can't fight physically she is intelligent and has a fighting spirit. She uses her intelligence and wits to command respect. In a world where woman are treated like second class citizens she shows their true worth. The love triangle between Catherine/Ambrose/Tzsayn was quickly resolved, but the romance between Catherine and spoiler was very lacklustre and dull, with the phrase "kissed his hand" constantly being repeated. Edyon and March's romance on the other hand was more enjoyable to read, the yearning was well crafted. Tzsayn, I thought was an intriguing character in book one, and hoped to see more of him in book two. That didn't happen, which was disappointing, he was barely present in book two and three. This meant that we hardly got to know him. Yes, we hear about how good and kind he is, but we never actually see this except maybe in the way he acts towards Catherine. I really felt for Ambrose, he was in pain, dealing with the loss of his family. I was rooting for him, and I admired his loyalty and determination. Overall, a satisfying conclusion to the trilogy. This review also appears on my blog, The Page Turner.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gemma McGee

    The Burning Kingdom brings The Smoke Thieves to a blazing end. Like the previous books, The Burning Kingdom is told via multiple points of view.  My favourite points of view were Catherine, March and Edyon. Catherine Point of View as she shows that a Queen can rule and lead in a war. March point of view as what he is doing and seeing has a greater impact on the story as a whole. Edyon point of view because his life is very different from the previous books. Ambrose, Tash and Harold POV are enjoyable The Burning Kingdom brings The Smoke Thieves to a blazing end. Like the previous books, The Burning Kingdom is told via multiple points of view.  My favourite points of view were Catherine, March and Edyon. Catherine Point of View as she shows that a Queen can rule and lead in a war. March point of view as what he is doing and seeing has a greater impact on the story as a whole. Edyon point of view because his life is very different from the previous books. Ambrose, Tash and Harold POV are enjoyable and add to the story I just was engaged more with the others. One of my favourite elements of The Burning Kingdom is showing strength in being different and allowing them to be their true self. It doesn't matter if your female, gay, disabled or a different race. All that matters that you do the right thing and stay loyal to your friends.  The plot overall has moments that surprised me and other moments that didn't. But these moments made sense to the plot. I was happy with the ending, but Sally nearly gave me a heart attack. As a lot still needed to be resolved with 15% of the book left.   The Burning Kingdom and The Smoke Thieves trilogy is a great YA fantasy where it takes the strangest group of character to stop evil.  My Rating for The Burning Kingdom is 3.7 out of 5.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Whoa, what a conclusion! I tore through this book, this entire series, in a manner only befitting of the best literature. Where do I even begin?! Well, spoiler alert, I'm glad that the main characters are alive! Seriously, the cover had me believing that only Catherine and Edyon would survive this. I'm SO glad I was wrong! I had forgotten about Harold when he returned in the first chapter, so his return was all the more shocking. He was terrifying in a different way than Boris, so I was satisfied w Whoa, what a conclusion! I tore through this book, this entire series, in a manner only befitting of the best literature. Where do I even begin?! Well, spoiler alert, I'm glad that the main characters are alive! Seriously, the cover had me believing that only Catherine and Edyon would survive this. I'm SO glad I was wrong! I had forgotten about Harold when he returned in the first chapter, so his return was all the more shocking. He was terrifying in a different way than Boris, so I was satisfied when March killed him. A review for the series described it as "Game of Thrones" for YA, and I'm inclined to agree. This book was the bloodiest of the three. Am I upset? No...definitely not. I'm happy that there were happy endings all around. Edyon and March are finally together, no secrets between them. I was surprised that the talented Ms. Green decided to put her readers out of their misery by finally destroying that love triangle between Catherine, Ambrose, and Tzsayn. A part of me was surprised that Catherine picked Tzsayn, but I'm delighted. Realistically speaking, they're a better match for each other, especially since Catherine experienced a lot of character development since the first book. So many amazing things about this series, and I'm going to recommend it to anyone listening!

  25. 4 out of 5

    victoria - lost in fiction

    The Burning Kingdoms: 4 Stars [6.68 - really great] I highly enjoyed this final book. The first one is still my fave in the series though. The ending was great and i really liked the twist we did. I also especially liked who got which kill. But that being said I think some points in Catherines and Edyons Storylines could've been done better/more interestingly. (that being said - Edyon was indeed my fave POV - i am biased. His story wasn't the best but it was my favorite) I especially liked Ambrose The Burning Kingdoms: 4 Stars [6.68 - really great] I highly enjoyed this final book. The first one is still my fave in the series though. The ending was great and i really liked the twist we did. I also especially liked who got which kill. But that being said I think some points in Catherines and Edyons Storylines could've been done better/more interestingly. (that being said - Edyon was indeed my fave POV - i am biased. His story wasn't the best but it was my favorite) I especially liked Ambrose and everything that happened with his storyline. Tash and March had great plots as well. One thing that was kind of a bummer for me personally was that for most of this book our characters were seperated. I got why and enjoyed the story and we did get some scenes with characters meeting up - but as a squad lover I did not love that aspect (especially since the reunions were kind of lack-luster)

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shanti

    This serie had it all: War, treason, an unknown component (demons in this case), secret love, love triangle, breaking gender barriers, and gays. But it still let me down. I was unable to relate to any of the characters. I found them all vary flat and I was missing believable motives for people's action. For example the romance seemed to be focused on how attractive people were and how noble they were. But that is a crush. Not 'the love of my life'-love. Yes, I am looking at you, Catherine. I do This serie had it all: War, treason, an unknown component (demons in this case), secret love, love triangle, breaking gender barriers, and gays. But it still let me down. I was unable to relate to any of the characters. I found them all vary flat and I was missing believable motives for people's action. For example the romance seemed to be focused on how attractive people were and how noble they were. But that is a crush. Not 'the love of my life'-love. Yes, I am looking at you, Catherine. I do understand people can have big big biiig crushes on two people at the same time. But her feelings were just poorly written or explained that I rolled my eyes very hard every time she mentioned 'the man I truly love'. Come on, girl. Be real. I don't wanna say more to avoid spoilers, but I was completely not invested in her love life anymore at the end of it all. Couldn't care any less anymore since I didn't believe it. I also couldn't cope with how everyone conveniently happened to be at the right time and right place. Or at least ended up where they needed to be to either save themselves or save another key character. It was like being one of the boys army members when they did not believe March having been at almost every key event and meeting all the key players of this 'game'. Another thing I was waiting for that didn't come (like those more developed feelings you have when really loving somebody), was any kind of explanation why the king was so evil. Why did he do and why were the people of Brigante so accepting of this war. Catherine mentioned briefly that her father's father was the same. And all before him as well. So it was rotten to the core. But that is a too easy explanation in my opinion. After all these examples of why it disappointed me; Why do I still give it 2 starts? Even if the things above were lacking and I didn't really end up relating or rooting for somebody, it was an enjoyable and easy read. There were some clever plots and twits. But in the end it felt all too easy explained and predictable. I felt no connection to the ones who died and already knew that the ones we were reading about would survive and win the war. No surprise there. It also stops where you think that everyone is alright now. But what about the ramification about this war with it's divided continent and violent past?

  27. 5 out of 5

    Madeline (The Bookish Mutant)

    Admit it: everybody–yes, everybody–who has ever dyed their hair has done the exact same thing as Geratan–dye it, put on a hat, and then dramatically rip it off in front of everybody. The only proper way to reveal your new hair color, if you ask me. All of my fellow book bloggers and readers know the feeling that comes along with finishing the final book in a series. It’s like reuniting with an old friend, only to have them leave you. No matter what, though, their memory will live on in you foreve Admit it: everybody–yes, everybody–who has ever dyed their hair has done the exact same thing as Geratan–dye it, put on a hat, and then dramatically rip it off in front of everybody. The only proper way to reveal your new hair color, if you ask me. All of my fellow book bloggers and readers know the feeling that comes along with finishing the final book in a series. It’s like reuniting with an old friend, only to have them leave you. No matter what, though, their memory will live on in you forever. That’s the feeling that finishing a great series gives you, and certainly the one that The Burning Kingdoms gave me. This entire series is criminally underrated, a true force to be reckoned with in the world of YA fantasy, and I’m delighted to say that book 3 is no exception! The Burning Kingdoms is definitely one of those books where you’re just being dragged along with the character’s bad decisions–five POVs, five times the grave mistakes! (Quite a lot of “March, no–” “MARCH YES” going on). However, it isn’t to the point where you’re internally groaning in frustration, because it propels quite a lot of action, and provides for character development in all five. As always, I loved seeing how the relationships between the characters developed. March is still my favorite of the bunch, but I had such a blast getting back into all five of their heads and exploring their internal conflicts. Green does such a masterful job of writing both authentic characters, but genuine development for them as well. The immersive and detailed worldbuilding and politics were as sharp as ever, making for a novel that I could imagine nearly every detail of. There’s plenty of action and drama to spare, and I enjoyed every page. The Burning Kingdoms is a finale that truly has something for everyone–and delivers on every possible aspect. All in all, a beautiful end to an underrated and immersive fantasy. 4.5 stars!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alison

    For a moment there I thought Sally was going to kill everyone and leave Ambrose all alone, thank heavens for good timing! I have enjoyed this whole series, especially the way so many characters lives, seemingly separate, were woven together so beautifully. I also really liked that the demonic characters were not the mindless evil they were originally shown to be, but the victims. Sally’s plot twist in this conclusion was brilliant, could easily recommend this series to any teen.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alison

    For a moment there I thought Sally was going to kill everyone and leave Ambrose all alone, thank heavens for good timing! I have enjoyed this whole series, especially the way so many characters lives, seemingly separate, were woven together so beautifully. I also really liked that the demonic characters were not the mindless evil they were originally shown to be, but the victims. Sally’s plot twist in this conclusion was brilliant, could easily recommend this series to any teen.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jasynda

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I loved the first two, and I really really hate to say this....but I was kind of of disappointed. I know a war was to happen in the book, but it was the entire book to build to this one battle. Which sort of got boring. Too much training, and journey. We got introduced to new characters who then killed off, which felt like an unnecessary rollercoaster ride, to become invested in them. And then last few chapters seemed like a rushed, round of to the series.

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