counter Superman: Action Comics: World Against Superman - Free Download Books
Hot Best Seller

Superman: Action Comics: World Against Superman

Availability: Ready to download

After moving to the big city to start a new life, Clark Kent soon finds that he is more isolated than he ever knew. Alone but hopeful, he dons a simple T-shirt emblazoned with a giant S and begins his career as a champion of justice. As Superman, he immediately comes face to face with a slew of classic villains who are eager to test his courage and resoluteness. Introducing After moving to the big city to start a new life, Clark Kent soon finds that he is more isolated than he ever knew. Alone but hopeful, he dons a simple T-shirt emblazoned with a giant S and begins his career as a champion of justice. As Superman, he immediately comes face to face with a slew of classic villains who are eager to test his courage and resoluteness. Introducing the Man of Steel as you've never seen him before, the award-winning team of Grant Morrison (All-Star Superman) and Rags Morales (Identity Crisis) present a bold new take on the origin of Superman and his early days as the one true savior of Metropolis. Superman: World Against Superman includes Action Comics #1-10 and presents an exciting entry point into the DC Universe.


Compare

After moving to the big city to start a new life, Clark Kent soon finds that he is more isolated than he ever knew. Alone but hopeful, he dons a simple T-shirt emblazoned with a giant S and begins his career as a champion of justice. As Superman, he immediately comes face to face with a slew of classic villains who are eager to test his courage and resoluteness. Introducing After moving to the big city to start a new life, Clark Kent soon finds that he is more isolated than he ever knew. Alone but hopeful, he dons a simple T-shirt emblazoned with a giant S and begins his career as a champion of justice. As Superman, he immediately comes face to face with a slew of classic villains who are eager to test his courage and resoluteness. Introducing the Man of Steel as you've never seen him before, the award-winning team of Grant Morrison (All-Star Superman) and Rags Morales (Identity Crisis) present a bold new take on the origin of Superman and his early days as the one true savior of Metropolis. Superman: World Against Superman includes Action Comics #1-10 and presents an exciting entry point into the DC Universe.

30 review for Superman: Action Comics: World Against Superman

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    I like what Morrison did here, bringing Superman's powers more in line with his origins in the 1938 comic. He's not invulnerable, he doesn't fly, etc. He's less of a god and much more relatable. Likewise, he's not infallible or supersmart. Clark Kent is a crusader for the poor and less privileged seeking justice over those powerful enough to avoid it. He makes mistakes. He's impulsive. He has friends. Lois and Jimmy are Clark's friends, not Superman's. Some of the single issue stories don't work I like what Morrison did here, bringing Superman's powers more in line with his origins in the 1938 comic. He's not invulnerable, he doesn't fly, etc. He's less of a god and much more relatable. Likewise, he's not infallible or supersmart. Clark Kent is a crusader for the poor and less privileged seeking justice over those powerful enough to avoid it. He makes mistakes. He's impulsive. He has friends. Lois and Jimmy are Clark's friends, not Superman's. Some of the single issue stories don't work quite as well. The Legion story for one was obtuse. I dug Rags Morales's depiction of Superman. The t-shirt and jeans look make much more sense for a young man with no money. Plus, his art is so damn good.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kay

    To me, reading Grant Morrison feels like homework: I don't enjoy it but feel obligated to do it anyway. Sometimes it feels like Grant Morrison has written all the classics and if I want to know what's up in Batman, Superman or the X-Men (to understand the huge turning points in the recent histories of these characters) I need to read his stuff. And I dutifully do, with a lot of patience, a lot of eye-rolling, and sadly, even some page skimming at the end. What kills me the most about Morrison's w To me, reading Grant Morrison feels like homework: I don't enjoy it but feel obligated to do it anyway. Sometimes it feels like Grant Morrison has written all the classics and if I want to know what's up in Batman, Superman or the X-Men (to understand the huge turning points in the recent histories of these characters) I need to read his stuff. And I dutifully do, with a lot of patience, a lot of eye-rolling, and sadly, even some page skimming at the end. What kills me the most about Morrison's writing is how stiff the dialogue reads from one frame to the next. The lines are choppy and weird & have no flow whatsoever... Like he cut down on connecting frames and scenes during a violent and merciless early draft editing. ...Reading Morrison always feels like something is missing/I'm somehow missing something. The story itself isn't bad. I always like a Brainiac plot. Especially with one crazed, self-serving, and slimy Lex Luthor thrown in. What I just don't get is why Morrison keeps writing Superman origin stories. In Superman: Action Comics: World Against Superman we have another slightly different one than the last, but nothing too cannon changing I think (he wears a tee-shirt in this one *shrug*). Clark Kent is a young and poor reporter for the Daily Star, living in a dingy boardinghouse type of situation in Metropolis. He is an orphan, and he didn't grow up with access to his rocket/pod or any knowledge of his Kryptonian origins/heritage in Kansas. He's weirdly cocky and kindof provoking; physically going after mobsters, and verbally going after the police who are targeting him. Superman: "You need to call your doctor about that ulcer, Detective Blake. I can see it throbbing fit to burst from here. How about you and your boys deal with the real criminal scum in this city, and then you won't need me to do it for you?" And General Lane: "...Nobody can do this. At least take some guns." Superman: "C'mon. Guns are for sissies, General Lane." Hmm. Anyway, Clark Kent's secret identity dies at the end and only Superman is left. There's a creepy open-ending with Doctor Psycho, who has been trying to kill Superman the whole volume without anyone the wiser (or successful). I did enjoy the two pages of "Justice League" chit chat before the JL was really formed. Pre-JL. It was an awkward and kinda a fun early interaction between them all. But that was only two pages. Everything else was just OK. Skippable.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Collects Superman: Action Comics (2011) issues #1-10 This collection features the first volume of "Action Comics" from the start of the New 52 era, and it is set in Clark's very early days as being Superman. He doesn't have his familiar suit yet, but we get the story for where it comes from in this universe. A familiar villain is causing trouble during these early issues, and it is interesting that Metropolis has a similar as Gotham prior to Superman being its shining beacon. from the start of th Collects Superman: Action Comics (2011) issues #1-10 This collection features the first volume of "Action Comics" from the start of the New 52 era, and it is set in Clark's very early days as being Superman. He doesn't have his familiar suit yet, but we get the story for where it comes from in this universe. A familiar villain is causing trouble during these early issues, and it is interesting that Metropolis has a similar as Gotham prior to Superman being its shining beacon. from the start of the New 52 era, and it is set in Clark's very early days as being Superman. He doesn't have his familiar suit yet, but we get the story for where it comes from in this universe. A familiar villain is causing trouble during these early issues, and it is interesting that Metropolis has a similar as Gotham prior to Superman being its shining beacon. There is also a two-issue Legion of Super-Heroes story in which Superman teams up with them for a time travel mission. My favorite issue of this whole collection features the debut of the Calvin Ellis Superman from a different Earth. The final issue of this collection features a character very much like Marvel's Kraven the Hunter, and there is set up for future "Action Comics" stories.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    So, first thing's first: I'm not a fan of New 52 Superman. And I'm not a fan of Grant Morrison. However, when I was picking my quarantine stash, I threw this one in because... well, it IS still Superman. And... yeah, it wasn't bad. It's not the Superman I know and love, but the story was perfectly okay, and, by the end, I actually wanted to read what happens next. (Speaking of which... does anyone know what volume comes after this?) I enjoyed the way this Superman was drawn--a nice innocence, ev So, first thing's first: I'm not a fan of New 52 Superman. And I'm not a fan of Grant Morrison. However, when I was picking my quarantine stash, I threw this one in because... well, it IS still Superman. And... yeah, it wasn't bad. It's not the Superman I know and love, but the story was perfectly okay, and, by the end, I actually wanted to read what happens next. (Speaking of which... does anyone know what volume comes after this?) I enjoyed the way this Superman was drawn--a nice innocence, even if he was a little "hipster-esque." I also liked the way Krypton was envisioned; it was an interesting, fresh take on the Kal-El's home world. There is only one--admittedly rather big--problem: This character isn't really Superman. The cockier attitude doesn't fit the Big Blue Boy Scout. That said... this would have been an excellent take on Conner Kent Superboy. And I think that, right there, is my main problem with New 52 Superman. Still, this wasn't a bad read... it just doesn't exactly fit the mold for fans of the Man of Steel.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ming

    This is only about half of Morrison's arc, so there's a lot left hanging. Sometimes he can be a little too big-picture, such that individual issues suffer from being too jam-packed with ideas and information. Still, it's a refreshing take on the character. Note that this trade does not include the backup stories that were in the earlier Vol 1 & 2, to its loss. They helped a lot in fleshing out the world. This is only about half of Morrison's arc, so there's a lot left hanging. Sometimes he can be a little too big-picture, such that individual issues suffer from being too jam-packed with ideas and information. Still, it's a refreshing take on the character. Note that this trade does not include the backup stories that were in the earlier Vol 1 & 2, to its loss. They helped a lot in fleshing out the world.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Colin Parfitt

    This is hard work - there are too many gaps in the narrative, and little or no introduction to who the characters are. For an introduction to a new Superman this is baffling. Bizarrely, the one-off introduction to an alternative Superman in Issue 9 is a superb origin story, so Morrison can write this sort of thing well.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chris Duvall

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth smith

  9. 5 out of 5

    John Horn

  10. 5 out of 5

    James Huston

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mickey

  12. 4 out of 5

    David Skies

  13. 4 out of 5

    Luke Pope

  14. 4 out of 5

    John Gill

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bryson Kopf

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Manning

  17. 4 out of 5

    Thad

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Hatch

  19. 5 out of 5

    Connor McKenna

  20. 5 out of 5

    Richard Stableford

  21. 5 out of 5

    Adam

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Spaulding

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Anderson

  25. 5 out of 5

    Stanius

  26. 4 out of 5

    adam arellano

  27. 4 out of 5

    Musa Blackfrost

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lee Diamond

  29. 4 out of 5

    Callum Waterhouse

  30. 4 out of 5

    enya

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.