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Buttons in my soup: Holocaust survivor story (True WW2 Surviving Memoir)

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"Buttons in my soup" is the story of a boy, Moshe-Yankel Zisovitch, who survived the Holocaust. This is without a doubt one of the most fascinating testimonies of that dark period, thanks to the author's ability not only to recount what he endured, but also to reflect on his feelings back then, in the camps. Existential difficulties preceded the deportation of Hungarian Je "Buttons in my soup" is the story of a boy, Moshe-Yankel Zisovitch, who survived the Holocaust. This is without a doubt one of the most fascinating testimonies of that dark period, thanks to the author's ability not only to recount what he endured, but also to reflect on his feelings back then, in the camps. Existential difficulties preceded the deportation of Hungarian Jewry, yet nothing could have been worse than the extermination camps.Moshe was 15 years old when he arrived at Auschwitz-Birkenau, yet he passed the selection and survived. The Nazis sent the occupants of his barrack to their death, while he managed to slip out of their hands, and survived. He was sent to Buchenwald, worked in hard labor in the quarry, and survived. By joining a new work group, on the spur of the moment, he arrived at a labor camp in Magdeburg Germany, where he also managed to survive. There were 2,800 prisoners with him at Magdeburg, 400 remained when the Nazis dismantled the camp and returned its inhabitants to Buchenwald. Only 200 completed the journey, and when liberation day came only 40 survived, including the 17-year-old author.


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"Buttons in my soup" is the story of a boy, Moshe-Yankel Zisovitch, who survived the Holocaust. This is without a doubt one of the most fascinating testimonies of that dark period, thanks to the author's ability not only to recount what he endured, but also to reflect on his feelings back then, in the camps. Existential difficulties preceded the deportation of Hungarian Je "Buttons in my soup" is the story of a boy, Moshe-Yankel Zisovitch, who survived the Holocaust. This is without a doubt one of the most fascinating testimonies of that dark period, thanks to the author's ability not only to recount what he endured, but also to reflect on his feelings back then, in the camps. Existential difficulties preceded the deportation of Hungarian Jewry, yet nothing could have been worse than the extermination camps.Moshe was 15 years old when he arrived at Auschwitz-Birkenau, yet he passed the selection and survived. The Nazis sent the occupants of his barrack to their death, while he managed to slip out of their hands, and survived. He was sent to Buchenwald, worked in hard labor in the quarry, and survived. By joining a new work group, on the spur of the moment, he arrived at a labor camp in Magdeburg Germany, where he also managed to survive. There were 2,800 prisoners with him at Magdeburg, 400 remained when the Nazis dismantled the camp and returned its inhabitants to Buchenwald. Only 200 completed the journey, and when liberation day came only 40 survived, including the 17-year-old author.

30 review for Buttons in my soup: Holocaust survivor story (True WW2 Surviving Memoir)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Maranda Russell

    I have read a significant number of autobiographies from holocaust survivors, yet I still find that with each new one I read, I am again shocked and sickened at the depth of depravity human beings can stoop to due to hatred, bigotry, and fear. Like the other survivor stories I have read, Moshe Ziv's account is brutal, gripping, and absolutely heart wrenching throughout. Sometimes I wish that every living person was required to listen to and study stories like this one. If that happened, perhaps I have read a significant number of autobiographies from holocaust survivors, yet I still find that with each new one I read, I am again shocked and sickened at the depth of depravity human beings can stoop to due to hatred, bigotry, and fear. Like the other survivor stories I have read, Moshe Ziv's account is brutal, gripping, and absolutely heart wrenching throughout. Sometimes I wish that every living person was required to listen to and study stories like this one. If that happened, perhaps we would better learn to avoid the pitfalls of blaming, scapegoating, and dehumanizing entire groups of innocent people. Unfortunately, I feel that in many ways history is heading for a time when these atrocities might indeed be reignited, especially as the strong spirit of nationalism and fear of the "others" continues to take hold all over the world, as countries strive to figure out "easy" (and almost always error-laden) answers to their complex problems. In some places of the world, you can already see the horrors of genocide being relived. I am thankful for voices like Ziv's that speak the clear and present truth and share it in a way that cannot be ignored or forgotten. If only more people would listen...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Grady

    ‘The women in the nearby beds sang war songs popular at the time, such as “We have one day left in the world”.‘ Author/memoirist Moshe Ziv (Zisovitch) originally wrote his memoir in Hebrew and the book has been translated by Sharolyn Buxbaum. The opening Introductory notes are particularly poignant and only hint that the history about to unravel: ’ In 1938 a military pact was signed between the leader of Hungary, Admiral Miklos Horthy, and the chancellor of Germany, Adolf Hitler. As a reward, ter ‘The women in the nearby beds sang war songs popular at the time, such as “We have one day left in the world”.‘ Author/memoirist Moshe Ziv (Zisovitch) originally wrote his memoir in Hebrew and the book has been translated by Sharolyn Buxbaum. The opening Introductory notes are particularly poignant and only hint that the history about to unravel: ’ In 1938 a military pact was signed between the leader of Hungary, Admiral Miklos Horthy, and the chancellor of Germany, Adolf Hitler. As a reward, territory taken from Hungary under the Treaty of Versailles following World War I was returned to the country. At the time the “Jewish question” was debated in the Hungarian parliament and a series of racial laws was legislated. In 1940, all Jews who had served in the Hungarian army during World War I, including my father, were sent to forced labor battalions. In 1943, a law exiling foreign citizens was passed, mainly affecting the Jewish population. One year later, more than 600,000 Hungarian Jews were sent to extermination camps. I was liberated from the Buchenwald concentration camp on April 11, 1945. In the decades that followed I made notes and partial journal entries as I recalled the events. Following the second international meeting of the “Buchenwald Boys” in April 1990 (in Tel Aviv), and with the encouragement of my family, I decided to turn my notes into a book. In the course of my writing I discovered that I had no need for notes or reminders. Much time had elapsed, almost 50 years, but most of the events were fresh in my memory, and I would not forget them until my last day.’ What follows is one of the more immediately accessible windows into the life of a young lad who is a Holocaust survivor. Moshe’s writing style is terse and that technique of relating his experiences makes the story almost unbearably realistic. ‘All is silent, still and daunting in the emptiness. There is neither sky nor horizon. Heavy clouds hang over us. Thick smoke curls upward from four corners. Is this what Hell looks like? A huge square stretches before us, only black asphalt up to the horizon and a barbed-wire fence all around up to the sky. Everything, like the smoke, is very precise and symmetrical … around me there are thousands of people in striped clothing. Everything is blue and white. This time I am a prisoner with a real identity; this time the Germans kept their promise. I had heard about the “resettlement” for many months. And today, I am on a different planet. Two hours ago we had gotten off the freight train cars. In my car there were close to one hundred people. For a moment I forgot the gnawing hunger inside. A week ago we had been loaded onto the freight cars. My father and I had received two loaves of bread for the journey. My father wanted to be careful: we wolfed down only one loaf of bread on the first day of the journey, saving the other. It was wonderful: fresh bread with a flaky crust…’ It is this sense of communication with which Moshe takes us through his childhood and the gradual encroachment of the atrocities of Hitler’s reign. Moshe introduces Hebrew terms and explains Jewish concepts and places and special days – an ongoing addition to his book that makes is educational as well as a memoir. He details the rise of Hitler’s influence and the eventual deportation to camps in Hungary (Jews were not considered Hungarians!), and the eventual imprisonment in Auschwitz-Birkenau and later Buchenwald. Every detail is here: as for the chosen title of his book, the following explains – ‘I got a bowl of soup and it was thick soup… at the bottom of the bowl I found two buttons, and the soup itself was thin and tasteless. There was no way of knowing its contents. And the buttons? I received a reasonable explanation: every day the freight cars arriving in Auschwitz are cleaned out, and the scraps of food and other “findings” are thrown into the soup pots, thus preparing a dish fit for gourmets.’ Through topic after topic we the readers are allowed an insider’s view of life in the concentration camps, and difficult as it may be to imagine survival on a daily basis, Moshe explains how he made it. ‘Once I heard a kapo say, “Don’t worry Jews. Even if the Germans are defeated, you won’t be alive to see it”. Moshe’s experiences take us all the way through to his destination in Israel and it is there that he leaves us – more sensitive to the horrors and heroism and survival than any other writer has accomplished. Highly Recommended.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    Buttons In My Soup: The Story of a Buchenwald Survivor: Holocaust Survivor Story: True WW2 Surviving Memoir is by Moshe Ziv (Zisovitch). It is the true story of a young boy who is thrust into the concentration camp system at Auschwitz-Birkenau with his Father, Mother, and sister. He and his sister were born in Hungary but their Father was from Slovakia and Mother was also not from Hungary. Because of this, they were deported from Hungary. At the registration, Mother and Kati were separated from Buttons In My Soup: The Story of a Buchenwald Survivor: Holocaust Survivor Story: True WW2 Surviving Memoir is by Moshe Ziv (Zisovitch). It is the true story of a young boy who is thrust into the concentration camp system at Auschwitz-Birkenau with his Father, Mother, and sister. He and his sister were born in Hungary but their Father was from Slovakia and Mother was also not from Hungary. Because of this, they were deported from Hungary. At the registration, Mother and Kati were separated from them. That was the last time he saw his Mother. Moshe and his Father were sent to Sarvar Camp and then to Auschwitz-Birkenau. His Father was entered into the camp with a tattoo; but Moshe was not. However, he managed to avoid liquidation and ended up being sent to Buchenwald. He was only ten when he was on his own in the camps. He was sent to Magdeburg and finally back to Buchenwald. Here he was located in the Kinder Block. He was liberated from Buchenwald and taken to France as an orphan. It was through the school here that he ended up in Israel. In Israel, he was eventually reunited with his sister. This book tells of his terrible journey through the camps as he was worked as a slave, subjected to beatings, and starved. His resilience as a youth was in his favor in some of the camps as he was small enough to be overlooked at times. He spent years just making notes of what he remembered as those memories came to him. After the second international meeting of the “Buchenwald Boys” in 1990, he wrote his memoir after the urging of his family. Even 50 years after the incidents, they were fresh in his mind as he wrote. The book is horrible and very emotional; but one which should be read by Holocaust scholars.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Clayton

    I felt the bitterness as I was reading, indeed, but with this exception: Throughout the book I did feel the purposefulness and hope that would keep any survivor alive, fighting and understanding. Sure, bitterness is powerful, but, when tested, will and purpose is more powerful. The easiest thing to do would have been give up. Overall, though, I love stories of survival, understanding, purpose and persistence. The part where he lost his Father, I most understand.I lost my Father when I was 16 year I felt the bitterness as I was reading, indeed, but with this exception: Throughout the book I did feel the purposefulness and hope that would keep any survivor alive, fighting and understanding. Sure, bitterness is powerful, but, when tested, will and purpose is more powerful. The easiest thing to do would have been give up. Overall, though, I love stories of survival, understanding, purpose and persistence. The part where he lost his Father, I most understand.I lost my Father when I was 16 years old. I graduated early from high school that year in 1991. I took my diploma I got in the mail (no graduation ceremony with caps and gowns) to the hospital at Cedars-Siani Medical Center. He was in room 4913. He smiled, said he loved me and then he died. I got ushered out of the room to the South elevator, my Mom came up the North elevator as I was leaving. I sat in La Cienega Park crying for hours. Then I went home. Sure, nothing compares to the bitterness at life Mr. Zev felt during the holocaust and many others, but I realize the great reminder this story and many others of persistence are though. For a long time I felt suicidal feelings, but we all must trudge back to the light no matter what it takes. You show that is universally possible Mr. Zev. I thank you for that.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    Buttons in my soup An unbelievable story in that it is unbelievable that mans inhumanity to fellow men knows no boundaries. How anyone could survive this treatment is beyond me.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Marci

    Extraordinary Ordinary Memoir This memoir was an incredible recount of the concentration camps in WWII. It carried amazing depth and information as if it were written the day of events, but it was actually decades before this memoir was compiled. Ia e read many WWII memoirs, but never have I learnt so much as I did while reading Buttons in my Soup. It was wonderfully written, following the extraordinary survival of an ordinary Jewish boy.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    Heart wrenching and inspiring The atrocities of the Holocaust will never be forgotten. Each account, while similar in detail, differ so much in power. May God bless you Moshe! You lived!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lisa M Pizarro

    So vivid- amazing recollection This author transforms his experience vividly. Easy to read, easy to place yourself in time. Nicely depicts every day in the holocaust.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Polack

    Great strength by a young boy What can one say? A story of survival from true evil. Why did this happen? Why does it continue? Why

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tahseen Nakavi

    Just over a hundred pages, Moshe Ziv’s `Buttons in My Soup’, is an intensely poignant autobiographical narration of his struggle for survival during the holocaust. This book recounts the sadism and the terrors, endured everyday - mentally and physically by those sent to concentration camps. During World War II, young Moshe Ziv and his family are “relocated” to Camp Sárvár, Hungary after its surrender to Germany. Hitler was at the peak of his madness at that time. At Camp Sárvár, they had to go th Just over a hundred pages, Moshe Ziv’s `Buttons in My Soup’, is an intensely poignant autobiographical narration of his struggle for survival during the holocaust. This book recounts the sadism and the terrors, endured everyday - mentally and physically by those sent to concentration camps. During World War II, young Moshe Ziv and his family are “relocated” to Camp Sárvár, Hungary after its surrender to Germany. Hitler was at the peak of his madness at that time. At Camp Sárvár, they had to go through “registration”. Here, Moshe and his father were separated from his Mother and Kati. Moshe and his father were then sent to Auschwitz-Birkenau. Young Moshe tries to make sense of this tragedy, while struggling to survive. The weather had shown no mercy to these “prisoners”. They had to get through an unforgiving winter, without blankets and jackets. Every page is a harrowing account of life in these camps. Moshe eventually gets separated from his father too, and is out on his own; doing everything he can, to survive. All prisoners lived in murky barracks. They were starved and beaten; forced to live in fear of constant cruel punishment and even death. Death was so common in these barracks that even children seemed unmoved by it, after a while. Every day, Moshe had to face new challenges. He was finally liberated and sent to France; and eventually to Israel. Moshe’s bravery in the face of such adversity is awe inspiring. It is important to remember that he wasn’t even a teenager when he was subjected to such tribulations. His faith was strong, even in the darkest of nights, and he prayed that a messiah would come and save him from this tragedy. I have read many books written by holocaust survivors and every single story is overwhelmingly upsetting. It is hard to make sense of how humans can be so hostile and hateful towards each other. Although this book is short, it is not a light read. Moshe uses simple language throughout the book and draws the reader into his journey, from the very first chapter. The account of his gruesome experiences is so much heavy and powerful that those painful details resonate with you, even after you finish reading the book. Even today, the world continues to be haunted by the holocaust. Anti-Semitism, sadly, still exists even in 2018- 73 years after these incidents took place. With shootings in synagogues and hate filled speeches everywhere, it is important, now more than ever, for us to read such narratives of survivors to remind ourselves that we must, under any cost, not allow history to repeat itself. Nobody should be subjected to such immoral degradation. Along with this book, I will recommend two great films that deal with how Adolf Eichmann was brought to justice. They are `Operation Finale’ and `Walking with the Enemy’. The latter brings out the calamities faced by Hungarians. `Buttons in My Soup’ is a story of the journey of a young boy who did everything to survive; a brave boy, who never gave up hope. I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in autobiographical accounts and historical nonfiction or to those people who want to know more about the holocaust, as no one can explain the conditions better than a survivor.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ganessa Press

    A true testament of Holocaust atrocities If you want to read a wonderfully written, very reader friendly book to gain insight into what horrors were faced by the millions of people imprisoned, tortured, and murdered in concentration camps by the Nazi’s, this is the one to read. As horrific and mind blowing as it was, I was fully engrossed in following the story of this boy and his family, as I felt like I desperately needed to know everything possible about how he somehow managed to survive thro A true testament of Holocaust atrocities If you want to read a wonderfully written, very reader friendly book to gain insight into what horrors were faced by the millions of people imprisoned, tortured, and murdered in concentration camps by the Nazi’s, this is the one to read. As horrific and mind blowing as it was, I was fully engrossed in following the story of this boy and his family, as I felt like I desperately needed to know everything possible about how he somehow managed to survive through those years of terror and trauma. As always, I have the utmost respect and honor for all of the innocent persons who experienced this shameful, barbaric time in history. I am even more amazed by the survivors and hero’s of the Holocaust who have since put themselves back through those horrendous years in order to write their memoirs, for the sake of never letting those unforgivable crimes be forgotten, lest possibly be repeated. The details and clarity of this book were absolutely unbelievable, and many times it was just so heartbreakingly real, I felt as if I was somehow personally involved in his story, and therefore brought to tears. I am floored and simply in awe of this courageous young boy’s resilience and will to survive despite all of the despicable acts he was forced to experience on a daily basis, and all of the pain and loss he endured. I am so thankful that he made it through alive, and that his story will also now live on; out there for the world to see and never allow to happen again. God Bless him.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Derek Sanderson

    Profound telling of a monstrous tragedy! What can be said of such an unspeakable horror? It is a wonder any adult survived it, let alone a child! More often in holocaust memoirs, one reads of youngsters in hiding. Here is a story of one who somehow survived the torment of three camps, I believe---that amidst the outgoing starvation, violence, death, disease, and stink of utmost evil conditions. In vivid, gut-wrenching detail, Moishe explains how he lived, what he saw, felt and did, all he suffer Profound telling of a monstrous tragedy! What can be said of such an unspeakable horror? It is a wonder any adult survived it, let alone a child! More often in holocaust memoirs, one reads of youngsters in hiding. Here is a story of one who somehow survived the torment of three camps, I believe---that amidst the outgoing starvation, violence, death, disease, and stink of utmost evil conditions. In vivid, gut-wrenching detail, Moishe explains how he lived, what he saw, felt and did, all he suffered and lost. He shows how ordinary people, like you and I, can fall into a vicious fight for survival, far removed from our former selves. Worse still, we see the shocking wickedness of camp guards and civilians as they gleefully revel in the misery. How people can become so cruel and savage as to delight in the suffering of innocents, select for death as one disposes of trash, eat in full view of the hungry and dying, indeed, make a game of affliction as though it were a joke, is beyond all earthly reason. It is just so disgusting and devilish that words seem inadequate, yet Moishe somehow manages to speak in a profound and moving way. His story, though hard to read, is an amazing, unforgettable testament to holocaust camp survivors--their indomitable spirit and will to live.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    In this book Moshe Ziv recounts the time he spent in Auschwitz, Buchenwald and the Magdeburg work camp in Germany. For a person so young he had very good instincts that attributed to his survival. He didn't save his bread and that way no one could steal it; he ventured out of his block to find a way to get onto a work detail (as his father advised) so he became more valuable to his captors which meant he got an additional ration of food; he volunteered for night work so he could avoid having to In this book Moshe Ziv recounts the time he spent in Auschwitz, Buchenwald and the Magdeburg work camp in Germany. For a person so young he had very good instincts that attributed to his survival. He didn't save his bread and that way no one could steal it; he ventured out of his block to find a way to get onto a work detail (as his father advised) so he became more valuable to his captors which meant he got an additional ration of food; he volunteered for night work so he could avoid having to stand in the long count lines; and he was determined to survive. He didn't give up. He writes about the physical abuse as well as the psychological abuse that caused him to question his value as a human being. Until this book I had not read about work camps like Magdeburg. While overall treatment was in some ways, somewhat better than in the concentration camps, the punishment was severe and violent. Hard to fathom that some of the locals would watch from their apartment windows when the SS dogs attended to administer punishment. I'm glad that Moshe Ziv survived and that he wrote this book. I was also glad to read that, for the most part, he was treated very well after his rescue, by the Americans and the French anyway. So happy to read the news of Koti and would love to read her story, as well as Moshe Zivs second book, "There Were No Trombones Here".

  14. 5 out of 5

    Judy Stambaugh

    Amazing account of a boy during the Holocaust This book was an amazing account of a Jewish boy who was sent to the work camps. I just can't fathom how human beings can hate with such fierceness and treat others as if they are nothing, deserving no human kindness. It is a wonderful that anyone survived such in human treatment. The Holocaust must be remembered, that such atrocities do not repeat themselves.

  15. 5 out of 5

    michael grant

    Extraordinary The author's incredible memory details horrific experiences suffered at the hands of Nazis, malicious fellow prisoners and German citizens. An incredible story of minute to minute survival through three camps, liberation, and final homecoming in Israel. This book should be forced down the throats of deniers and revisionist so that they may choke on the pages of reality.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    Well worth the read!! I usually highlight parts I want to re-read in holocaust survivor stories. I was so enthralled I didn't even think about it once until the pArt about refilling the wine that made me laugh. One of the best books I have read about surviving. Thanks for sharing your story!! I will read this one to my grandchild that thinks his life is horrible because his mother wont let him get his driving permit until he gets his grades up.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Janet T. Neiss

    Work Makes Free:. A True Tale of Torture, Murder, and Deceit This book was a real eye opener about a work camp that was in reality a torture camp that caused the starvation of body, mind and spirit of the Jewish inmates. Survival of the fittest was an understatement of these prisoners who were led to believe that work would free them while they were in many cases worked to their death. Kudos to Moshe Ziv who managed to survive these horrendous circumstances.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Leslie Lovejoy

    I found it horrifying, knowing that my grandparents, aunts and uncles and their children went through this horror but didn't survive. I'm grateful that this person and all other survivors were able to adapt back to life after such a nightmare. The suffering within suffering seemed endless as it must have been for the people who went through this. The descriptions are clear and the images vivid.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Madeline M Miesen

    I could not put the book down Well written, opened up my eyes to what happened in the camps through a child's eyes. I could feel for this boys stories of days of sorrow, pain and the drive to live on. I am shocked on how a people could let there anger fester to hate and to commit such cruelty. This is a great resource on survival .

  20. 5 out of 5

    Videoclimber(AKA)MTsLilSis

    I could feel myself in Moshe's shoes. He does a wonderful job of describing everything he went through. I don't know how anyone managed to survive these tortures. I am so sorry that people had to go through this. Thank you to the author for sharing his story.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Carmen Werning

    A story of the intense desire to survive This was written so that people could get a picture of what these survivors went through,but most of all that the hope for another day was what kept him alive.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    Capturing When even such a difficult story can be written so well you know that you have a good writer. It took me a while to read it through but that was because of the emotions I experienced.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lester Rosen

    A must readif you are interested in Holocaust This is a true story, author was a young boy, when rounded up and placed in concentration camp. What makes this different from other accounts is, he was at several camps. Hard to put dow down, once you start reading

  24. 4 out of 5

    Julie Howard

    I've read a few autobiographical books about holocaust survivors, always leaves me stunned at the inhuman treatment, even though I'm expecting it! Heartbreaking and a good reality check for what some have had to go through!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    Heart wrenching A very humbling experience to read this extraordinary account and feel the author’s pain as he tells his story of survival in the horrendous nightmare of the Holocaust.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Christine Cazeneuve

    Inspiring How a young man was able to survive this horror story is beyond amazing. You will come to feel what he feels through his words. Very well written and another story that must be told.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sandra K. Rodriguez

    Riveting This book is a page turner. It is unlike most of the Holocaust books in that it covered the author's life as a child. It was so engrossing and I couldn't put the book down!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Richard A. Garrison

    WW2 Holocaust survivor An excellent book about surviving as a young boy in a concentration camp in Europe. He lived to tell about his experience.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Naomi&Adrian

    Well written, his words brought me to his experiences. Well written, his words brought me to his experiences. I could not put the book down and read it in two sittings.

  30. 4 out of 5

    William Hyatt

    Slow at first It was slow to start but captured my attention as it progressed. It left me wondering if the gentleman was able to overcome his hatred for his religion.

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