counter Feminists Don't Wear Pink (And Other Lies): Amazing Women on What the F-Word Means to Them - Free Download Books
Hot Best Seller

Feminists Don't Wear Pink (And Other Lies): Amazing Women on What the F-Word Means to Them

Availability: Ready to download

An urgent and inspirational collection of essays by a diverse group of celebrities, activists, and artists about what feminism means to them, with the goal of helping readers come to their own personal understanding of the word. Feminism has never been more deeply and widely embraced and discussed, but what exactly does the F word mean? Here, personal stories from actors, w An urgent and inspirational collection of essays by a diverse group of celebrities, activists, and artists about what feminism means to them, with the goal of helping readers come to their own personal understanding of the word. Feminism has never been more deeply and widely embraced and discussed, but what exactly does the F word mean? Here, personal stories from actors, writers, and activists explore the contradictions and complications at the heart of the movement. By bridging the gap between feminist hashtags and scholarly texts, these essays bring feminism into clear focus. Published in partnership with Girl Up, the UN Foundation's adolescent girl campaign, contributors include Hollywood superstars like Saoirse Ronan, activists like Alicia Garza, a founder of Black Lives Matter, and even fictional icons such as Bridget Jones. Every woman has a different route to their personal understanding of feminism. This empowering collection shows how a diverse group of women found their voice, and it will inspire others to do the same.


Compare

An urgent and inspirational collection of essays by a diverse group of celebrities, activists, and artists about what feminism means to them, with the goal of helping readers come to their own personal understanding of the word. Feminism has never been more deeply and widely embraced and discussed, but what exactly does the F word mean? Here, personal stories from actors, w An urgent and inspirational collection of essays by a diverse group of celebrities, activists, and artists about what feminism means to them, with the goal of helping readers come to their own personal understanding of the word. Feminism has never been more deeply and widely embraced and discussed, but what exactly does the F word mean? Here, personal stories from actors, writers, and activists explore the contradictions and complications at the heart of the movement. By bridging the gap between feminist hashtags and scholarly texts, these essays bring feminism into clear focus. Published in partnership with Girl Up, the UN Foundation's adolescent girl campaign, contributors include Hollywood superstars like Saoirse Ronan, activists like Alicia Garza, a founder of Black Lives Matter, and even fictional icons such as Bridget Jones. Every woman has a different route to their personal understanding of feminism. This empowering collection shows how a diverse group of women found their voice, and it will inspire others to do the same.

30 review for Feminists Don't Wear Pink (And Other Lies): Amazing Women on What the F-Word Means to Them

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chloe

    "The lies we have been told about feminism have been fed to us to hold us back from a movement that is actually for everyone" I absolutely loved most of the essays in this! I felt inspired, and loved how intersectional most of the essays were. There were some that were not inclusive of trans and non cisgender people which was disappointing. Overall I really loved and learnt from a lot of the essays and would definitely recommend it! tw: rape, transphobia

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lucy Langford

    4**** ”At a time when we are too often reminded of what divides us, there is common ground to be found when we share our stories.” - Emma Watson. This is an inspirational and powerful book in the time of #MeToo and other movements and protests surrounding gender equality. This book comprises a plethora of actors, activists, journalists and others of "celebrity" status on what Feminism means to them. These essays are incredibly personal and each one unique. Each examines what feminism means to tha 4**** ”At a time when we are too often reminded of what divides us, there is common ground to be found when we share our stories.” - Emma Watson. This is an inspirational and powerful book in the time of #MeToo and other movements and protests surrounding gender equality. This book comprises a plethora of actors, activists, journalists and others of "celebrity" status on what Feminism means to them. These essays are incredibly personal and each one unique. Each examines what feminism means to that one person and the closeness or contradictions the individual feels and faces within the feminist movement. This was a great book as it brought together essays from a number of women from diverse backgrounds, with an acknowledgment of experiences of intersectional feminism; black feminism/identity, ableism, trans-women. This book was divided into sections to focus on certain elements of the journey of feminism: epiphany; anger; joy; poetry; action; education; and further reading. This book also provided suggestions for further reading (a nod to "Our Shared Shelf") and your own personal writing space to focus on your own thought and think of your own journey with feminism. My favourite parts of the book included the Education section and Further reading. I loved the Education section as it provided a comprehensible account of the waves of feminism and groups that had formed and taken action throughout the years. In addition, this book also provided statistics (the advantages of equality in women's education and work) and studies (on the colour pink!) which I loved, as I am interested in data. I would recommend this to a number of people as it is very current in describing the different elements of feminism and incorporates so many topics relevant to the movement- FGM, periods, motherhood, weight, and many more! Climate Change? The most cost- effective and practical ways to combat it are the education of girls, and women's reproductive rights.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Magali

    Rating this book is pretty tough because I realized pretty fast that I had made a mistake : I was not the public targeted for that collection of essays on feminism. The fact that adult women, older than me, were saying it was a brilliant book that everyone should read made me buy it. But it actually feels more like a book for teenagers, for very young women wanting to know more about that new word they just learned : feminism and not a book for a 30+ woman that has been a feminist since she was Rating this book is pretty tough because I realized pretty fast that I had made a mistake : I was not the public targeted for that collection of essays on feminism. The fact that adult women, older than me, were saying it was a brilliant book that everyone should read made me buy it. But it actually feels more like a book for teenagers, for very young women wanting to know more about that new word they just learned : feminism and not a book for a 30+ woman that has been a feminist since she was 10. So it's pretty hard for me to write an objective review. I found the book pretty underwhelming, and boring at times. Some essays actually weren't about feminism at all, some were about a very weird conception of feminism. I don't know if I would actually recommand it for young girls that would want to discover feminism, because I'm not sure whether the book actually gives answer at some point. Most (adult) women that wrote in it don't seem to know what feminism is either. There were some good essays in it. But they were not the majority, and none of them were great. An obsolete read for anyone that knows a little about feminism, I would be pretty interested to have the review of someone belonging to the public targeted.

  4. 4 out of 5

    ~Bookishly

    This book was truly motivational, and I feel like it has opened my eyes perhaps a little wider, to what feminism means to some rather amazing women. We all have our own definition of feminism, and exactly what it means to us. We all have different ways of acting on it, if one does at all. We all fight the patriarchy in our own individual ways. This book contains thoughts, essays and poetry from some truly motivational and frankly, fucking amazing women. Many topics are covered here, such as sexis This book was truly motivational, and I feel like it has opened my eyes perhaps a little wider, to what feminism means to some rather amazing women. We all have our own definition of feminism, and exactly what it means to us. We all have different ways of acting on it, if one does at all. We all fight the patriarchy in our own individual ways. This book contains thoughts, essays and poetry from some truly motivational and frankly, fucking amazing women. Many topics are covered here, such as sexism, the history of the waves of feminism, misogyny, the patriarchy and one I found to be most interesting, periods. Yes, that's right, the menstrual cycle. The cycleqa that women have through no choice of their own, yet apparently, through the Government's eyes, we should be taxed on tampons and sanitary towels as they are a more luxurious item than say, chocolate digestives. I cannot understand that in the slightest. It makes absolutely no sense. This book is here, to tell anyone, that they can be exactly who they want to be. This book is not about man hating women that want to go out burning bra's in protest. The accounts in this book are very real, beautiful and thought provoking, and it makes me proud as hell to be a feminist.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cendaquenta

    This book needed half the essays, but at twice the length each. In its current form, it ends up as a collection of punchy but ultimately dissatisfying soundbites.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ashleigh (a frolic through fiction)

    Originally posted on A Frolic Through Fiction *Rated 2.5 stars Picking up this book, I had high expectations. It became an event, with me buddy reading this with my friend Jess and setting time aside in my hectic uni reading schedule to make sure I read it. And then…eh. I don’t know what happened. I have many, many thoughts. So, this book is basically a collection of writings from 50(ish) different well-known women about different topics relating to feminism. One thing I do immediately have to prai Originally posted on A Frolic Through Fiction *Rated 2.5 stars Picking up this book, I had high expectations. It became an event, with me buddy reading this with my friend Jess and setting time aside in my hectic uni reading schedule to make sure I read it. And then…eh. I don’t know what happened. I have many, many thoughts. So, this book is basically a collection of writings from 50(ish) different well-known women about different topics relating to feminism. One thing I do immediately have to praise it for is its inclusivity, and I’m glad a diverse group of women with varying experiences were chosen to participate in the collection. That being said, with there being so many women included…I feel like this was just not put together too well. The writings were categorised into groups such as “epiphany” (discovering feminism), and I almost wish they weren’t. Grouping discussions like this so closely together just made it sound repetitive, with similar thoughts and topics being covered within 20 pages over and over again. It kind of felt like each woman had free reign to write what she wanted regardless of its place in the collection – which in some cases is fab, but not when the book covers certain topics repeatedly. Maybe it needed curating some more, or even just spread out in a slightly different way…but it quickly became a tad monotonous, which breaks my heart to say. ALong with that, this book is advertised as a collection of essays, but it really, really isn’t. Some of them are essays, sure. But some are anecdotes, some are fictional short stories, some are simply lists of thing, there’s a random poetry break halfway through…it made my brain hurt. I couldn’t wrap my head around what I was reading. The writer and topic would switch every few pages, and when the form switched too? It sometimes took awhile for me to catch on to what I was reading. Now it’s not all bad, as negative as it sounds so far. I did enjoy many of the writings. As mentioned before, the diversity is something I’m intensely glad for in this book, and it was definitely the topics relating to race, transgender experiences and lesser talked about topics (like FGM) that caught my attention. I was eager to learn anything new, to hear about things that are generally pushed aside by the media and society as a whole. These topics typically took on a more essay or anecdotal style which I much preferred, and I can’t help but think that this form is one of the best ways to make these women – believe it or not – feel like actual people. Imagine that? Shocker, I know. Unfortunately, it was just very hit and miss. Some of the writings just went over my head entirely, leaving me sat there thinking “ok…but why did I just read that?” The end message of the book is to take action and push feminism and yet after reading, I’m still not sure how. Especially when a lot of the essays just repeated a lot of what’s shouted about on the internet already, so…what can I do beyond that? I don’t know. Was I meant to know after reading this? Now I will just say, I’m not new to reading about feminism, and so that’s probably contributing largely to my disappointment in this book. I’ve heard a lot of what’s said in here before, and while it’s important to keep pushing these topics until something’s sorted, I was hoping for something more (hence my main interest coming from the intersectionality of this book). As an introduction to feminism, I do think this could be a fairly informative place to start, so maybe I was just the wrong audience for it *shrugs* BUT THEN. Here’s where a lot of the contradictory thoughts start getting mixed up… As Jess pointed out in her reading vlog, it feels like you can’t criticise this book. If you’re a feminist, you’re not allowed to. You can’t escape this book without the message of building other women up and supporting them instead of tearing them down as competition, which I 100% get behind (I mean, we’ve been pitted against each other forever. No more). So…to then come away and criticise the large majority of a book that over 50 women worked towards…honestly it feels like blasphemy. I feel like I’m not allowed to criticise this book without being a bad feminist. And maybe that’s more to do with my own thoughts than anything the book said, but it did really push the idea of not criticising women. But criticism is how we grown as people, and nobody/nothing is perfect. So where’s the loophole? I don’t know. It’s a messy bunch of thoughts circling this book. I just think – for the most part – that this book would have benefitted with either A.) more curating leading to a variety of specific topics rather than just generalised writings or B.) less people writing more/longer pieces. Still, it wasn’t awful. It would probably be a good introduction to feminism if you’re wanting to read more into it or discover people hoping to take on a more activist approach. I personally was just expecting more, with less confusion.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Maja - BibliophiliaDK ✨

    Who says feminists can't wear pink?! What a wonderful way to kick off the new year, with a great book like this! This book is a collection of personal essays written by a multitude of brave, clever, strong, passionate women. Some of them you might know before you start reading - like Kiera Knightly, Emma Watson and Kat Dennings - others you will want to know after reading their story! Each essay is a personal story of what feminism means to the individual woman. These stories are wonderful because Who says feminists can't wear pink?! What a wonderful way to kick off the new year, with a great book like this! This book is a collection of personal essays written by a multitude of brave, clever, strong, passionate women. Some of them you might know before you start reading - like Kiera Knightly, Emma Watson and Kat Dennings - others you will want to know after reading their story! Each essay is a personal story of what feminism means to the individual woman. These stories are wonderful because they are real. They are amazing because they are so diverse. They are marvellous because they made me feel! I was crying, laughing, angered and hopeful all the way through this book. In all honesty, this book has left me sort of speechless. I have always been a supporter of equality and have myself been on the receiving end of sexism and misogyny, but with this book my eyes were truly opened. After reading this I am filled with an urgent desire to actually go out and do something about these wrongs! To teach my nephews to treat women with the repsect they deserve. To yell back at the man making kissing noises at me while I walk past him on the street. To share my own story just to help enlighten all of those still in the dark. But first I will encourage all to read this book - men and women alike! Grab this book, read it and learn from it. FOLLOW MY BLOG FOR MORE BOOK GOODNESS I have a mission - to create a world of book lovers. Will you help me?

  8. 4 out of 5

    abilovegood

    The proof is only around 60 pages so I finished it within an hour BUT in those 60 pages there is so much information on feminism and personal experiences that’s it’s easy to mistake it for a much larger book. I loved being able to see feminism through a variety of perspectives from a wide range of women - I’m currently trying to educate myself more on modern issues including feminism, racial bias etc and this was the perfect first step !

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    Another difficult one to rate. Feminists Don’t Wear Pink carries such a valuable sentiment; it’s a fairly decent crash course in feminism; it’s so energetic. It breaks my heart slightly to say that it misses the mark. These are not ‘essays’. Let’s clarify that from the get-go. These entries are more akin to anecdotes. Of course, this is not necessarily an issue; the issue is that they vary so much in quality and relevance that they don’t hang together particularly well as a collection. There are Another difficult one to rate. Feminists Don’t Wear Pink carries such a valuable sentiment; it’s a fairly decent crash course in feminism; it’s so energetic. It breaks my heart slightly to say that it misses the mark. These are not ‘essays’. Let’s clarify that from the get-go. These entries are more akin to anecdotes. Of course, this is not necessarily an issue; the issue is that they vary so much in quality and relevance that they don’t hang together particularly well as a collection. There are incidents that I actually felt perpetuated some stereotypes, and others that functioned only as filler material. There are some isolated moments of sheer brilliance: Jameela Jamil’s ‘Tell Him’, a wonderful call to arms for women looking to tackle misogyny in their own homes, and the outstanding ‘The Weaker Sex’ by Keira Knightley, a powerful exposé of motherhood. Here are some of my favourite sections for your enjoyment: ‘Don’t get me wrong – this isn’t some ‘poor boys’ appeal. It’s just that, in my opinion, it’s as if men are recruited young and brainwashed, in order to be indoctrinated and manipulated into an oppressive patriarchal institution. This is a call to arms for the women who have boys growing up in their houses… We have a lot of work to undo… All you have to do is tell him the truth. Tell him what happened to us.’ ‘Kate Middleton had her baby the day after mine. We stand and watch the TV screen. She was out of hospital seven hours later with her face made up and high heels on. The face the world wants to see. Hide. Hide our pain, our bodies splitting, our breasts leaking, our hormones raging. Look beautiful, look stylish, don’t show your battleground, Kate. Seven hours after your fight with life and death, seven hours after your body breaks open, and bloody, screaming life comes out. Don’t show. Don’t tell. Stand there with your girl and be shot by a pack of male photographers. This stuff is easy. It happens every day. What’s the big deal? So does death, you shit-heads, but you don’t have to pretend that’s easy.’ Ugh, it brings tears to my eyes. I’m so thankful for the relative diversity of experience – it’s a decent specimen of intersectional feminism. I would however have liked to have heard more from trans women in particular. A book of honourable intentions, but I’d recommend Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche’s Dear Ijeawele for highly practical feminist advice. This collection is however worth the read purely for the two contributions I have mentioned above.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Maritza Dubravac

    Seriously, YES to everything in this wonderful feminist collection. As pointed out in the introduction, Feminists Don't Wear Pink isn't an academic collection of feminist essays, but a collection of essays, thoughts, poetry, etc. on all kinds of topics by all kinds of badass women. It's about intersectionality, it covers the history of the waves of feminism (also pointing out the less beautiful aspects of the history of feminism, such as racism), it talks about periods, and about answering the m Seriously, YES to everything in this wonderful feminist collection. As pointed out in the introduction, Feminists Don't Wear Pink isn't an academic collection of feminist essays, but a collection of essays, thoughts, poetry, etc. on all kinds of topics by all kinds of badass women. It's about intersectionality, it covers the history of the waves of feminism (also pointing out the less beautiful aspects of the history of feminism, such as racism), it talks about periods, and about answering the most asked (and often dumb) questions about feminism by boys/men (in a very funny way I might add). It's about what feminism is to many different women, and what it definitely is not. There are beautiful essays about motherhood; on raising sons and daughters. It covers sexism, the patriarchy, misogyny, and well, basically everything and so much more I can't think of right now. This book is specifically aimed at young adults, teaching them that they can be whatever they want to be and letting them know that feminism is a lot, but one thing it definitely isn't: a dirty word that describes man-hating women who burn bras and every other stereotype you can think of. Don't be put off by me saying it is aimed at young adults: Feminists Don't Wear Pink, in my humble opinion, is an amazing collection that everyone should buy and read. I listened to the audiobook but I'm definitely going to buy a physical copy because I find this one of these rare books that I have to add to my bookshelf because it is just such a gem.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Anniek

    After starting this book, I quickly began to feel like maybe it wasn't exactly meant for me. Which is kind of strange, because I'm a feminist and this is a book about feminism. And moreover, I consider myself an inclusive feminist and this book was definitely aiming for inclusive feminism as well. But it's very much Feminism 101, and even though I fully believe being an inclusive feminist is an ongoing process, this book was a little too basic for me at times. That's not to say it's not a valuabl After starting this book, I quickly began to feel like maybe it wasn't exactly meant for me. Which is kind of strange, because I'm a feminist and this is a book about feminism. And moreover, I consider myself an inclusive feminist and this book was definitely aiming for inclusive feminism as well. But it's very much Feminism 101, and even though I fully believe being an inclusive feminist is an ongoing process, this book was a little too basic for me at times. That's not to say it's not a valuable book. Especially because of the inclusive essays, I really do think it would be a great read for teens trying to familiarize themselves with feminism. The good thing about this are the varied perspectives. Because so many women of different backgrounds and with different identities contributed to this anthology, it's a great introductory read that never lectures the reader or imposes a one-sided idea on them of what feminism should be. That said, the essays did become a bit repetitive for me after a while. All in all, I think this is worth the read if you're unsure about what feminism means to you or if you just want to get more of a grasp on the basics. It was good to see how inclusive it was, but I would still very much recommend reading it with a critical eye (not that you shouldn't always do that). CWs: misogyny/sexism, mentions of rape, mentions of transphobia, description of genital mutilation, racism.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn Speckels (Metaphors and Miscellanea)

    Tl;dr - a mixture of cool essays and trite, fluffy pseudo-essays that detracted from the whole. As many of you know, I've been on a "feminist essay" kick lately, and given that this book had such a wide range of contributors--activists, celebrities, writers, and more--I had high hopes. Those hopes were only partially fulfilled. The purpose of this book, I think, was to provide a wider-lens picture of feminism, showing women at all different stages of their feminist journeys. There are women who h Tl;dr - a mixture of cool essays and trite, fluffy pseudo-essays that detracted from the whole. As many of you know, I've been on a "feminist essay" kick lately, and given that this book had such a wide range of contributors--activists, celebrities, writers, and more--I had high hopes. Those hopes were only partially fulfilled. The purpose of this book, I think, was to provide a wider-lens picture of feminism, showing women at all different stages of their feminist journeys. There are women who have only recently become aware of their need for feminism, and there are women who have been attending protests for years. There are women still in high school, and there are women who are well into their forties. They speak in anecdotes, poems, manifestos, lists, and more. Now, some of the essays in this book were brilliant. I loved Evanna Lynch's piece, "Cat Women," a series of musings on periods, feminism, and cat ladies, all in the context of a meeting with a casting agent. Alaa Murabit's "Imposter Syndrome" was a startling look at how often even the most brilliant women are looked down upon and caused to doubt their own abilities. It's no secret that I love Jameela Jamil, and her piece "Tell Him" advocates wonderfully for teaching young boys how to be feminists. Olivia Perez made a list of "10 Ways to Support the Women in Your Life" that was heartfelt and sincere with a dash of humor ("9. Carry lipstick, pain relief like Tylenol or Aspirin, and tampons, always. Save a sister, make a new friend."). And "The Power of the Period" by Amika George was both an ode to that feminine miracle/curse and a plea for feminine hygiene products to be provided all women. However, with the exception of the above, and a couple other highlights, this book was largely a let-down. A lot of the pieces in it were just a page or two long, basically saying, "I had this one experience and realized the patriarchy is bad." When I came across a couple such essays in a row, I started to get bored and almost gave up on the book. Some of the essays didn't even really seem to be directly about feminism at all, but rather on only tangentially related issues--for example, the reason why the cover of this book is a specific shade of pink. And while there was a nice twenty-ish page essay on the history of feminism, it was the very last essay in the book. Like...what? Wouldn't that be a good starting point, not an ending one? I'm not saying this book was bad. Some people might really enjoy it, especially since so many of its components are rather "bite-sized," so to speak. It's easy to digest in short sittings or all at once, and the number of big names in it--Karen Gillan, Keira Knightley, and Saoirse Ronan, to name a few--is certainly an attractive feature. And I will give the book props for including, among other things, a transwoman, a disabled woman, and many non-white women, including women not from Europe or America. Intersectionality is great. But overall, in the end, the ratio of high-quality content to filler was just not enough to satisfy me.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dawnie

    this is a wonderful collection for a huge diversity of authors and voices and defiantly a great read for teens that need to understand why feminism is important and what it can mean and what it isn’t (the hate for any and all things male as do many many people believe feminism stands for). for me personally this book felt a bit too young and a bit too „scratching the surface“. i wanted more and deeper talk from the women this book featured. i wanted to hear their stories, understand their struggle this is a wonderful collection for a huge diversity of authors and voices and defiantly a great read for teens that need to understand why feminism is important and what it can mean and what it isn’t (the hate for any and all things male as do many many people believe feminism stands for). for me personally this book felt a bit too young and a bit too „scratching the surface“. i wanted more and deeper talk from the women this book featured. i wanted to hear their stories, understand their struggles and see their passion. maybe that’s where i went personally wrong since that is just too much to expect out of one book. but i do have to say that this book didn’t do enough for me personally since all it did was share a short little moment of the person. and i wish it would have done more. personal preference but personal review so i can say it. i as i already mentioned, do believe that for the younger readers this book is perfect and just shows an overview of what feminism can mean and that it can be different for everyone and that what connects it all is the simple wish and hope that everyone will one day actual be seen as a person instead of a gender. i think this would be a wonderful book to have in school curriculums, to talk and share and discuss from a young age that it means to be a women or seen as feminin and why do many of those aspects are still seen as something negative and to be looked down upon instead of celebrated or at least simply accepted as something that’s okay to have/be. all in all it’s good book and should be read

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lucie

    I think that this book is a great introduction to feminism and if you're looking to read more on that topic, it's a good place to start! It is a very intersectional read and included experiences from so many different women and I loved that about it. I have to say that it did feel a bit repetitive at times, because the writings were organized in different collections, such as 'epiphany', 'anger', 'poetry break' and such (also I'm not a *huge* fan of poetry, but that's another matter altogether). I think that this book is a great introduction to feminism and if you're looking to read more on that topic, it's a good place to start! It is a very intersectional read and included experiences from so many different women and I loved that about it. I have to say that it did feel a bit repetitive at times, because the writings were organized in different collections, such as 'epiphany', 'anger', 'poetry break' and such (also I'm not a *huge* fan of poetry, but that's another matter altogether). As it's a collection, I loved some of the writings (especially those about lesser talked about topics), when I wasn't convinced by others. As 50 women contributed to this book, I wish some pieces had been longer, because they did feel a bit rushed at times, and I didn't get as much out of them as I did from others. Moreover, as I'm not new to reading about feminism, I feel like I only learnt something new from a minority of writing pieces, so that was a bit of a let-down, but the book isn't at fault in that! Like I said, I think it's a great introduction to feminism, but as I already knew quite a bit about that topic, I wanted to learn more new things and I didn't. So basically, I liked it! I wish I had enjoyed it a bit more, but it was quite interesting to read about so many different women's thoughts on feminism.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nat

    1.5 stars (half star cuz I liked one of the pieces) The standout is undoubtedly "Weaker Sex" by Keira Knightley. 4 stars if that was the only piece in the book. The book just lacked cohesion. There was an attempt for some structure by the various phases in one's feminist journey: epiphany, anger, joy, action, education and a completely random and unnecessary "poetry break". Each piece varied so much in length and depth. Was the brief simply to write anything at all related to feminism? As much as 1.5 stars (half star cuz I liked one of the pieces) The standout is undoubtedly "Weaker Sex" by Keira Knightley. 4 stars if that was the only piece in the book. The book just lacked cohesion. There was an attempt for some structure by the various phases in one's feminist journey: epiphany, anger, joy, action, education and a completely random and unnecessary "poetry break". Each piece varied so much in length and depth. Was the brief simply to write anything at all related to feminism? As much as I adore Saoirse Ronan as an actor, having her piece as the opener was incredibly underwhelming.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    I feel like we have all at some point walked away from an important conversation because we felt overwhelmed by our lack of knowledge. “Feminists Don’t Wear Pink” is a safe haven. Honest, hilarious and open, a space for exploration.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kassie

    Tell Him was my favorite essay ❤️

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dana ⚢

    If you’re looking for a book to gift a teenager or someone just starting out with feminism then this is the one! I really enjoyed reading essays, some serious, some more lighthearted, from women of all different backgrounds on when they discovered feminism and what their personal feminist journey looks like. One that really stood out was Keira Knightley’s ‘The Weaker Sex’, where she opens up about the brutality of motherhood and how her relationship with her work changed once she had a child. The If you’re looking for a book to gift a teenager or someone just starting out with feminism then this is the one! I really enjoyed reading essays, some serious, some more lighthearted, from women of all different backgrounds on when they discovered feminism and what their personal feminist journey looks like. One that really stood out was Keira Knightley’s ‘The Weaker Sex’, where she opens up about the brutality of motherhood and how her relationship with her work changed once she had a child. The disparity between her and her male colleagues was obvious - she is expected to be word perfect, work twice as hard while being twice as tired, while her male counterparts are sloppy, late, don’t know their lines and haven’t gotten up at 3am to do a feed. I also loved Beanie Feldstein’s life motto of ‘stuffing your pockets’ with other women’s stories and experiences, listening to them properly and carrying those stories with you always. Some of the essays tackle extremely important, even life-threatening, topics such as transitioning to female, the death penalty, poverty and FGM, and as a result some of the more lighthearted essays feel trite. It’s good to address a broad spectrum of topics, but some of the more frivolous ones feel out of place, and you want more space given to those urgent topics. But then I read the extra essay by Scarlett Curtis at the end of the paperback edition which I really appreciated. She actually addresses her concerns that some feminists would find some of the essays too frivolous. But this book is meant to be used as a diving board, encouraging people to ask questions and reach for more books, books which approach the topics touched upon here in a more in depth manner. I would definitely recommend this one for younger teen readers, but you can’t go wrong at any age really!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rose Heartfilia

    There are many thoughts to be formed and things to be said when you want to open your mouth and just speak. However, sometimes those words don't come and in waves of anger or sadness only tears show up, which is something that can happen too when you laugh, laugh so hard you cry. Perhaps I did not laugh that hard this time around but it is not something to be forgotten. I am going to make the most honest and personal review I have ever done because I feel that is necessary and that it makes me p There are many thoughts to be formed and things to be said when you want to open your mouth and just speak. However, sometimes those words don't come and in waves of anger or sadness only tears show up, which is something that can happen too when you laugh, laugh so hard you cry. Perhaps I did not laugh that hard this time around but it is not something to be forgotten. I am going to make the most honest and personal review I have ever done because I feel that is necessary and that it makes me proud to do so. I have always thought about feminism, being raised by a single mom with a dad who well did not keep up his part of the bargain (sorry dad), but it was true. That did not mean that I did not love him less, that did not mean I did not tell my mom to stop fighting, because they were already divorced and I just wanted to see my dad. Who travelled every other weekend 2 hours to pick me up, couldn't my mom just offer him a coffee before we would have to go? Yet now I consider how much she had to fight. How much she had to ask from her male colleagues to understand a woman alone with a child. Her proudest story from her boss is that he told her: "you need a course, we will pay for a babysitter." Which she later figured out wasn't true but he decided so because he understood how important it was for her to have one, else she couldn't go. There are guys out there, we should not forget, who understand and who need the equality, the feminism as well. Which is what I try to point out to the people I meet but sometimes I feel like just a voice that is not important. Curtis tells you at the end of the book that it is not true. You be you and do whatever you want and that is what I will do. Because to me, that is necessary and if talking is the most I can do right now than that's it. Perhaps the future would give me a better insight into what I can do and will do and I am trying. I am trying to be a voice for my friends, male or female, for anyone I know to be a woman and to have my share of rights that I can get. I pick classes because of this and I absolutely don't mind to write about it because I want to inspire my professor and let him or her say: oh, she got it. This book made me understand that I am not a defect human being, who doesn't like sex, who doesn't fantasize about it, I am just me and I want to be that way and stay that way. It is not bad to think about things later as long as I am happy about it and figure it out when or wherever I go. I am totally okay with that. The beauty of the fragments, the way it is made up (explaining the history at the end was a great move) makes it so easy to read the fragments, to continue more books for Oursharedshelf, which I try to keep up with. The beauty of this book is it is reality to me, to others. It is a view that doesn't have to be yours per se but it can make yours perhaps better. Thanks for the comebacks Curtis, I will definitely use them. I feel I can do much more now to understand and to fight, for the rights that I think I deserve to have as well as every other woman or men considering feelings, equality and everything that should be a natural right for a person to have, no matter their gender or if they don't feel they belong in any category at all, because who am I to judge them. There is not much more I dare to say, I cried, I laughed, I nodded along while reading this. I just want to say one more thing, my dad might not have kept up his part of his parental-bargain when he divorced my mom. But he helps me fight, he gave this book to me for my 25th birthday. He was there when someone touched me inappropriately, the only man at that point in my life I could stand. I love my father for who he is, perhaps he sometimes needs a nudge in the right direction, but he would fight for equal rights and be femine when he needs to be. He raises my brother that way, to not have to hide for a love of a colour named pink. and I love my mom, for always fighting for herself, for finally loving herself since she was able to fit in a size less, which was not necessary for me and actually not necessary for herself but she was afraid of dying and leaving me alone. She is always the listening ear for when I feel vunerable or when I am angry about something that forms an equality, perhaps not even for me but for someone in my class or a newsarticle I read. My mother is a fighter, when I started this book I asked her: do you consider yourself a feminist? She was quiet, thinking and answered very honest: I never considered it, but I am always fighting to get an equal pay, to be heard, so even if I did not consider it, I sure am one. <3

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tara Costello

    Although 'Feminists Don't Wear Pink' is more diverse than most of its kind, the book still falls a little short for me. It's still overwhelmingly heteronormative and focuses largely on cisgender women, but I guess it's more about the curator's connections and who she wanted to contribute. The language irked me at times too and it did genuinely feel like inclusivity was an afterthought stuck on at the end. For example, there is a line in an essay about periods which states in brackets "(though no Although 'Feminists Don't Wear Pink' is more diverse than most of its kind, the book still falls a little short for me. It's still overwhelmingly heteronormative and focuses largely on cisgender women, but I guess it's more about the curator's connections and who she wanted to contribute. The language irked me at times too and it did genuinely feel like inclusivity was an afterthought stuck on at the end. For example, there is a line in an essay about periods which states in brackets "(though not all menstrautors are women)", but the author makes no effort to use inclusive language throughout the rest of her essay. I also think there are better inclusive terms than "menstruator" out there. The book touches on transgender issues slightly (and features a piece by Charlie Craggs), but again makes no real effort to use inclusive language. Just a few essays in, there's a piece that hails Rose McGowan as a "problematic fave", when I'd argue she has moved beyond that with her inherently transphobic behaviour. This feels odd given the small parts of the book that do focus on transgender rights. Overall, it feels as though the focus of the book is finding balance and including lots of different ideas of feminism, but it feels a little disappointing and lacklustre at times. Another thing I found odd about the book (but is quite insignificant in the scheme of things) is how they obviously struggled to fill some of the pages. A few of the pages highlight quotes from the essays by enlarging them but in really weird places, especially towards the end. One essay ended on the left page and the quote they chose to highlight on the right was the literal last sentence of said essay. Following on from this, I didn't love the format either. The book is set into subsections supposed to mimic the stages of feminism, I felt like some of the essays would probably be better placed elsewhere. One of the last essays is about the history of feminism, which I personally would have preferred to read at the beginning. Having said that, there are some highlights. The 'action' part of the book is probably the most inspiring. It definitely introduced me to some activists I want to research and follow. Some of the poems were enjoyable too. The book closes with lined pages should you have any notes, which I thought was a nice touch. I'd probably rate this 2.5/5 stars if I could, but gone with 3.

  21. 4 out of 5

    elin

    this felt a bit too basic for me, but i probably wasn't the intended audience either. it would probably work better for someone who is only just learning about feminism, even tho there was a certain amount of oversimplification. but yeah, most essays just fell flat to me. some of them were total misses, where the author seemed to have the complete wrong idea of what feminism is, some of them didn't even seem to be about feminist at all, and some of them were just plain weird. generally i think t this felt a bit too basic for me, but i probably wasn't the intended audience either. it would probably work better for someone who is only just learning about feminism, even tho there was a certain amount of oversimplification. but yeah, most essays just fell flat to me. some of them were total misses, where the author seemed to have the complete wrong idea of what feminism is, some of them didn't even seem to be about feminist at all, and some of them were just plain weird. generally i think the book would have benefited from removing some of the essays, and expanding on those that were left bc they were all too short to feel like anything more than a soundbite. that being said i think there were some essays that were truly great, and i'm really glad they included an intersectional perspective!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ruby Valdes

    I'm pretty sure most of you all know my stance on non-fiction books. I'm the type of person who likes to fill my head up with 'happy ever afters.' After realizing that too many romance fiction books is starting to higher my expectations when it comes to dating, I was willing to read any non-romantic book I could get my hands on. I came across this one while in my English class and decided to give it a go. The book was actually really good and informative. I got to understand what feminism means I'm pretty sure most of you all know my stance on non-fiction books. I'm the type of person who likes to fill my head up with 'happy ever afters.' After realizing that too many romance fiction books is starting to higher my expectations when it comes to dating, I was willing to read any non-romantic book I could get my hands on. I came across this one while in my English class and decided to give it a go. The book was actually really good and informative. I got to understand what feminism means to a numerous amount of women. I read real life experiences about women who were victims of patriarchy and how they felt, the aftermath of the situation, how they want to empower the generations to come and hopefully change the world. I encourage you all to read this book and hopefully you can broaden your views on feminism.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Zarina

    4.5 stars

  24. 4 out of 5

    Soha

    While I am not new to feminism, it is true that no 2 people experience feminism in the same way, so regardless of how many (and varied) experiences I have seen around me and read about, there is always more to learn. This collection of essays is divided into five stages (Epiphany, Anger, Joy, Poetry Break, Action) and a section titled Education. Almost every essay contributes something unique to this collection and I loved almost all of them. Some very short essays in between felt like they were While I am not new to feminism, it is true that no 2 people experience feminism in the same way, so regardless of how many (and varied) experiences I have seen around me and read about, there is always more to learn. This collection of essays is divided into five stages (Epiphany, Anger, Joy, Poetry Break, Action) and a section titled Education. Almost every essay contributes something unique to this collection and I loved almost all of them. Some very short essays in between felt like they were written hastily but these are very few. The essays covered a wide range of topics - sexism, FGM, motherhood, body positivity, body autonomy and reproductive rights, period poverty, the stigma around menstruation, female friendships and sisterhood, female desire, ambition, and more. I was impressed with the intersectionality and diversity but it could have been more diverse and inclusive. I've marked the ones I found especially powerful and inspiring so I can go back and read them on particularly draining days. I found the Education section to be so enlightening - the history of the color pink (Baker-Miller pink), groups of women who have stood in sisterly solidarity and created change, and the waves of feminism. This was a powerful and inspiring read. I suppose those who have studied feminist texts might find it underwhelming but I would highly recommend it to everyone else. There are always stories you've never heard of and women who've never made the headlines but should've. Feminism is for everyone.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Abbie | ab_reads

    3.75 stars (#gifted @penguinukbooks) If you’re looking for a book to gift a teenager or someone just starting out with feminism then this is the one! I really enjoyed reading essays, some serious, some more lighthearted, from women of all different backgrounds on when they discovered feminism and what their personal feminist journey looks like. . One that really stood out was Keira Knightley’s ‘The Weaker Sex’, where she opens up about the brutality of motherhood and how her relationship with her w 3.75 stars (#gifted @penguinukbooks) If you’re looking for a book to gift a teenager or someone just starting out with feminism then this is the one! I really enjoyed reading essays, some serious, some more lighthearted, from women of all different backgrounds on when they discovered feminism and what their personal feminist journey looks like. . One that really stood out was Keira Knightley’s ‘The Weaker Sex’, where she opens up about the brutality of motherhood and how her relationship with her work changed once she had a child. The disparity between her and her male colleagues was obvious - she is expected to be word perfect, work twice as hard while being twice as tired, while her male counterparts are sloppy, late, don’t know their lines and haven’t gotten up at 3am to do a feed. I also loved Beanie Feldstein’s life motto of ‘stuffing your pockets’ with other women’s stories and experiences, listening to them properly and carrying those stories with you always. . Some of the essays tackle extremely important, even life-threatening, topics such as transitioning to female, the death penalty, poverty and FGM, and as a result some of the more lighthearted essays feel trite. It’s good to address a broad spectrum of topics, but some of the more frivolous ones feel out of place, and you want more space given to those urgent topics. . But then I read the extra essay by Scarlett Curtis at the end of the paperback edition which I really appreciated. She actually addresses her concerns that some feminists would find some of the essays too frivolous. But this book is meant to be used as a diving board, encouraging people to ask questions and reach for more books, books which approach the topics touched upon here in a more in depth manner. . I would definitely recommend this one for younger teen readers, but you can’t go wrong at any age really! . *Disclosure: this book was originally gifted as part of an advertising campaign for the paperback release. I was not obligated to post a review and all opinions are my own!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Elliot A

    I was reading The Art of Fact for my course when this book became available for pick up at my local library. If you haven’t read my review on the former, it might explain a lot as to way I chose to ignore my homework and read this one in less than 24 hours instead. I was angry at the way racial minorities and women were represented in The Art of Fact and Feminists Don’t Wear Pink turned out to be a very welcomed source of strength. I read somewhere a while ago that Kiera Knightley and Gemma Arte I was reading The Art of Fact for my course when this book became available for pick up at my local library. If you haven’t read my review on the former, it might explain a lot as to way I chose to ignore my homework and read this one in less than 24 hours instead. I was angry at the way racial minorities and women were represented in The Art of Fact and Feminists Don’t Wear Pink turned out to be a very welcomed source of strength. I read somewhere a while ago that Kiera Knightley and Gemma Arterton wrote a piece of non-fiction and a short story respectively, which were to be included in this collection of feminist writings. It was the prospect of reading the work of two women I respect that motivated me to find a copy. I believe Knightley’s non-fiction piece was written in response to Kate Middleton’s appearance, styled and in full make-up, mere hours after having given birth. I appreciated Knightley’s honest, straightforward account of what childbirth and caring for a newborn is really like. I also appreciate women, public figures, stepping up to burst the bubble of “the perfect birth” and what women are supposed to do and look like right after creating and pushing a human being out of their body. Arterton’s short fictional story removes the stereotypical gender expectations of and by men and women. Overall, there are some very inspirational stories in this collection that make it a worthwhile read. I strongly recommend it. ElliotScribbles

  27. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Everyone should read this, everyone. It doesn't matter what sex you identify with, if you're a human bloody read it! I'm going to be recommending this to everyone I come into contact with from now on. There was so much I recognised from my own experiences in this book but also there was so much to teach me. I'll add more when I've gathered my thoughts.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ithil

    If you're starting to get yourself educated into feminism I think this would be a great starter for you. Also, I think I would absolutely recommend it for 12 year old in advance. It has some sexy bit on it, but let's be honest, 12 year olds nowadays are not going to learn anything that the did not know before. And I think it will provide them with quite a lot of knowledge that will come in more than handy for their teens. Unfortunately. I do have to say introduction or young public, as someone w If you're starting to get yourself educated into feminism I think this would be a great starter for you. Also, I think I would absolutely recommend it for 12 year old in advance. It has some sexy bit on it, but let's be honest, 12 year olds nowadays are not going to learn anything that the did not know before. And I think it will provide them with quite a lot of knowledge that will come in more than handy for their teens. Unfortunately. I do have to say introduction or young public, as someone who has learned or studied more into feminism may not enjoy the book as much as them. But again, I have thoroughly enjoyed it, and I don't considers myself into any of those groups. I think the selection of essays is brilliant and can captivate a very wide audience as it is moderately diverse. And that is a very good point at its favour. It is very easy to read, as it does not contain much theoretical feminism of plain collection of historical data without any context whatsoever. The essays are delightful to read, as the length is more than appropriate and can be read in any way, meaning more than one a day or just the odd one before going to sleep. It does not need to be read in any order either, you can just pick and choose. But in any way you're reading it, I would absolutely recommend it. And the cherry of the cake, are the book recommendations by Emma Watson. Just saying.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Soesja Schelling

    I really liked the way this book was set up and I think it’s an admirable project. The introduction was great and so were the short history on feminist theory, the suggestions for further reading and the conclusion and final words. But the meat of the book, the different ‘essays’ that it is made up of, fell a little short for me. While there were some chapters I really enjoyed (I was really impressed with Keira Knightley’s and will happily devour anything Dolly Alderton writes), many were a litt I really liked the way this book was set up and I think it’s an admirable project. The introduction was great and so were the short history on feminist theory, the suggestions for further reading and the conclusion and final words. But the meat of the book, the different ‘essays’ that it is made up of, fell a little short for me. While there were some chapters I really enjoyed (I was really impressed with Keira Knightley’s and will happily devour anything Dolly Alderton writes), many were a little too similar and too simplistic for me. Maybe I’m just already too deep into feminism, as this book felt like a collection of personal experiences that can serve as a great introduction but weren’t necessarilly eye opening for me personally. All in all however it was quite a nice reading experience and I’ll make sure to pass this book along to someone to introduce them to the topic, as I think it could serve really well in doing so.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sam (she_who_reads_)

    If you’re looking for a good introduction to feminist literature, then this would be a fantastic place to start. It’s absolutely packed with contributions ranging from essays, to poetry, to recommended reading lists. This is the sort of book I want to have on the shelf for my daughter to discover, and devour, as she grows up. Some of the entries had me so emotional (and some I think kind of missed the mark) but I was just so inspired and so eager to check out some of the contributors other works If you’re looking for a good introduction to feminist literature, then this would be a fantastic place to start. It’s absolutely packed with contributions ranging from essays, to poetry, to recommended reading lists. This is the sort of book I want to have on the shelf for my daughter to discover, and devour, as she grows up. Some of the entries had me so emotional (and some I think kind of missed the mark) but I was just so inspired and so eager to check out some of the contributors other works and suggested reading! Absolutely would recommend!!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.