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WINNER OF THE ABIA ILLUSTRATED BOOK OF THE YEAR 2019 Family food isn't fancy or complex. Its roots are humble, stemming from recipes passed on through generations, and food rituals born from daily cooking. Most importantly, great family recipes are ones that nurture our souls, our hearts and our tummies. Family food is comfort food. In Family , bestselling author Hetty Mc WINNER OF THE ABIA ILLUSTRATED BOOK OF THE YEAR 2019 Family food isn't fancy or complex. Its roots are humble, stemming from recipes passed on through generations, and food rituals born from daily cooking. Most importantly, great family recipes are ones that nurture our souls, our hearts and our tummies. Family food is comfort food. In Family , bestselling author Hetty McKinnon shares her approach to uncomplicated, hearty and healthy food that is powered by vegetables. These classic, multicultural dishes are the ones she serves around her own family table. Some are heirloom recipes passed on from her mother, others are old family favourites, and many are variations on much-loved comfort food, repackaged with a healthier outlook. These irresistible recipes are interlaced with tender family stories from around the world. Family shows you how to build a repertoire of crowd-pleasing, flavour-bursting vegetarian main meals - a modern guide to successfully eating green, together. This is a specially formatted fixed-layout ebook that retains the look and feel of the print book. SHORTLISTED FOR THE INDIE BOOK AWARD FOR ILLUSTRATED NONFICTION 2019


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WINNER OF THE ABIA ILLUSTRATED BOOK OF THE YEAR 2019 Family food isn't fancy or complex. Its roots are humble, stemming from recipes passed on through generations, and food rituals born from daily cooking. Most importantly, great family recipes are ones that nurture our souls, our hearts and our tummies. Family food is comfort food. In Family , bestselling author Hetty Mc WINNER OF THE ABIA ILLUSTRATED BOOK OF THE YEAR 2019 Family food isn't fancy or complex. Its roots are humble, stemming from recipes passed on through generations, and food rituals born from daily cooking. Most importantly, great family recipes are ones that nurture our souls, our hearts and our tummies. Family food is comfort food. In Family , bestselling author Hetty McKinnon shares her approach to uncomplicated, hearty and healthy food that is powered by vegetables. These classic, multicultural dishes are the ones she serves around her own family table. Some are heirloom recipes passed on from her mother, others are old family favourites, and many are variations on much-loved comfort food, repackaged with a healthier outlook. These irresistible recipes are interlaced with tender family stories from around the world. Family shows you how to build a repertoire of crowd-pleasing, flavour-bursting vegetarian main meals - a modern guide to successfully eating green, together. This is a specially formatted fixed-layout ebook that retains the look and feel of the print book. SHORTLISTED FOR THE INDIE BOOK AWARD FOR ILLUSTRATED NONFICTION 2019

30 review for Family: New vegetable classics to comfort and nourish

  1. 4 out of 5

    Emily Scott

    Haven’t made anything yet but love the pics and everything looks yummo

  2. 5 out of 5

    Shipshapeeatworthy

    From the macro level to the micro, Hetty McKinnon's cookbooks have gone from Community, to Neighborhood, and finally, Family; all with the express purpose of building connections between people using food. As McKinnon explains, what happens around the table is critical to building our sense of self. And, it's true. The act of eating together, bonding over food, strengthening our ties and kinship is something that is common with people the world over. What I've come to appreciate about McKinnon i From the macro level to the micro, Hetty McKinnon's cookbooks have gone from Community, to Neighborhood, and finally, Family; all with the express purpose of building connections between people using food. As McKinnon explains, what happens around the table is critical to building our sense of self. And, it's true. The act of eating together, bonding over food, strengthening our ties and kinship is something that is common with people the world over. What I've come to appreciate about McKinnon is that her recipes rely on the humblest of ingredients and it's what she does with these ingredients that is truly magical. So, it is with her newest book Family that she expands on her amazing salads while also adding delicious and simple recipes for soups, pastas, bakes. Interestingly, she's delved deeper into how her Asian roots have influenced her: "Eating is intensely nostalgic; every bite is sentimental." And, while telling her food story she has encouraged us to tell our own. Just as she did in Neighborhood, she's continued her tradition of sharing recipes and stories from other people in her life. I think it's important that McKinnon has created a space where other families show the importance of food and its impact on their lives. While the meals and recipes may differ from family to family the taste of love remains the same. The beginning of Family is as information-rich as is the rest of the book. With the sections: New family classics, How to eat green together, The family pantry, Midweek cheats, The magic of beans, "Compost" vegetable stock, and Recipe Notes she lays the groundwork for how she approaches mealtime. While the recipes within the book are vegetarian (dairy and eggs are used) the recipes are quite adaptable so if you eat meat or none at all there are many recipes for you to enjoy. The recipes are organized into 7 chapters: Salad Days, Soupy Salads, Pasta Night, Great Bakes, Asian Roots, The Good Egg, and Sweet Talking. As I cook through Family, the recipes represent the best of what vegetarian food is – comforting, familiar and at times a bit daring. What I can appreciate is that these meals rely on pantry/fridge/freezer staples in order to make prep less of a chore. The first recipe I made for my family was her Halloumi, Kale, and Mint Gozleme. The yogurt-based dough can be quickly made and is ready to use within a half hour, and the stuffing consists of kale (since I didn't have fresh, I used frozen), garlic, scallions, mint, and, grated halloumi (who knew this is a thing? Grated halloumi is everything to me now!). It was a huge hit at our table and with such a versatile dough, I can already see how I will stuff the gozleme in so many ways. In her section, Midweek Cheats, she offers two different kinds of sauce (Chunky Herb Oil and Citrus Tahini) that will transform any roasted or raw vegetables into something spectacular. Because, she totally understands that sauce is that "transformative element" taking a mundane meal and making it so cravable! McKinnon has such a way with sauces -- take the Roast Potatoes w/ Lentils, Capers, and Lemon-Parsley Pistou. The Pistou (south of France) enrobes the warm, roast potatoes and meaty lentils with such a delicate lemon and parsley flavour. Lively and fresh, yet completely comforting. Then there's the sauce, what I'll call the inadvertent sauce, that's created as the tomatoes and mushrooms bake as you make the Polenta w/ Baked Tomato Mushrooms. As I carefully spooned the thick and lush polenta into bowls and added the baked tomatoes and mushrooms there was pan juices leftover to drizzle over the polenta-filled bowls. As a vegetarian, this might be the closest I'll come to using the term "au jus" as the pan juices reminded me of such. Her comfort food classics don’t stop with dinner as she carries us on through to the sweetest ending: dessert. Last week, on one of the gloomiest days this spring, my friend dropped by for a coffee and a visit. Wanting to serve a treat and envelop the house in the scents of baking that would surely ward off the gloom I settled on McKinnon's Orange and Rosemary Olive Oil Cake to make. A sturdy cake with a delicate crumb and so much flavour. It was just the thing to accompany a lovely morning coffee and chat. Through Family I've come to adore another Australian comfort food: golden syrup dumplings. Looking for a quick and easy dessert recipe one day when I didn't plan for dessert, I tried the recipe for Banana Golden Syrup Dumplings. Golden syrup, cousin to corn syrup and molasses, is used with butter, brown sugar, and water to create a glorious saucy, caramel bath in which the pillowy dumplings cook. Yet another example of the transformative powers of a good sauce, these cloud-like balls are served in the sauce with ice cream and an extra little drizzle of syrup. They make such a wonderful and memorable treat! With almost a dozen recipes made and enjoyed, Family is one book that will continue to be a source of delicious inspiration in my kitchen. This cookbook is full of recipes you'll want to make again and again. Something McKinnon said in a preview to Family has really stuck with me: "Sharing food with your family and friends, and the act of sitting around a table, is more than about physical sustenance – it is also good for your brain, spirit and health." Mealtime is so much more than a plate on a table! Regardless of what is on the plate the time you spend connecting with family is invaluable and I really love that these are the messages that McKinnon is supporting with her books. Please note that this is an excerpt of a review posted to www.shipshapeeatworthy.wordpress.com I would like to take this opportunity to thank Hetty McKinnon and Prestel for providing me with a free, review copy of this book. I did not receive monetary compensation for my post, and all thoughts and opinions expressed are my own.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Brona's Books

    Recipes to try - Cacio e pepe broccolini with crispy white beans (pg 50) Sweet and sour cauliflower with ramen noodle (pg 60) Grilled peach salad with mozzarella, basil and honey (pg 79) Tomato and walnut pesto (pg 119) Herbed tahini (with snow peas) (pg 125) Jacket sweet potatoes with lentils and chilli-coriander sauce (pg 155)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tessa Hayes

    Stated tagging recipes to make... and then realised I had basically tagged every page. Cannot wait to work my way through this book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cherie

    This was a total impulse buy; I liked "Neighborhood" okay, and I began flipping through this at the register of Archestratus. Hey, this looked good, so did this, so did...so okay, I bought it. I don't always buy cookbooks impulsively (I usually check them out of the library, decide it looks good, and THEN buy it). But ZERO REGRETS. This cookbook is incredible. I flag recipes I want to make; nearly every page is flagged. So many creative and wonderful recipes and I cannot wait to make some of the This was a total impulse buy; I liked "Neighborhood" okay, and I began flipping through this at the register of Archestratus. Hey, this looked good, so did this, so did...so okay, I bought it. I don't always buy cookbooks impulsively (I usually check them out of the library, decide it looks good, and THEN buy it). But ZERO REGRETS. This cookbook is incredible. I flag recipes I want to make; nearly every page is flagged. So many creative and wonderful recipes and I cannot wait to make some of these. Lots of great recipes, ideas, and just so beautifully placed on the page.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    I saw this cookbook on a best of list and bought it on a whim. What a luck purchase it turned out to be. We aren’t vegetarian but I try to cook a that way a few times a week. My family (2 teen boys, husband & me) have enjoyed every recipe I’ve made from it. Most the recipes are made with easy to find ingredients or McKinnon gives substitutes for things that are. I love not having to buy unique ingredients the first time I make a dish. Now that I know we loved it, I’ll seek out the special ingred I saw this cookbook on a best of list and bought it on a whim. What a luck purchase it turned out to be. We aren’t vegetarian but I try to cook a that way a few times a week. My family (2 teen boys, husband & me) have enjoyed every recipe I’ve made from it. Most the recipes are made with easy to find ingredients or McKinnon gives substitutes for things that are. I love not having to buy unique ingredients the first time I make a dish. Now that I know we loved it, I’ll seek out the special ingredients to use instead of the substitute.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kelli

    This is hands down the best vegetarian cookbook I have come across. The book has gorgeous photos, easy to follow directions and recipes without too many ingredients. I book marked almost every page to make. I had checked this out from the library but will be purchasing it to enjoy!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lesley Looper

    I borrowed this lovely cookbook from my library (it's currently part of the New & Noteworthy collection), and I enjoyed looking through it. Several recipes look especially yummy, and the photos are big and colorful. I borrowed this lovely cookbook from my library (it's currently part of the New & Noteworthy collection), and I enjoyed looking through it. Several recipes look especially yummy, and the photos are big and colorful.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    All the warm and cozy feels with this book filled with comfort food created from the brilliant mind of Chef McKinnon and her loved ones. I adore the storytelling and recipes!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tina Wright

    DNF.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kate W

    This has become a favorite go-to cookbook for easy, healthful weeknight dishes. Love the design and family stories.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Betty

    Fabulous recipes, all with interesting contrasting vegetables and flavours.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kathy I

    Not as good as the first 2, but still lovely

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

    The recipes in this book seem fine, but as a vegetarian, I wasn't super-thrilled to read the "charming" anecdotes sprinkled throughout about preparing pig's lungs or eating other decidedly not-vegetarian foods. The recipes in this book seem fine, but as a vegetarian, I wasn't super-thrilled to read the "charming" anecdotes sprinkled throughout about preparing pig's lungs or eating other decidedly not-vegetarian foods.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jay Gabler

    If you’re a meat-eater who thinks vegetarian food can’t provide satisfaction, read Hetty McKinnon on coconut. “For me,” she writes in her new cookbook, “coconut is such an indulgent flavor. It is so richly intense, eating it feels like a sinful experience. I transgress often with coconut.” That’s the introduction to a recipe for a hot soup, after which you might just need a cold shower. I reviewed Family for The Tangential. If you’re a meat-eater who thinks vegetarian food can’t provide satisfaction, read Hetty McKinnon on coconut. “For me,” she writes in her new cookbook, “coconut is such an indulgent flavor. It is so richly intense, eating it feels like a sinful experience. I transgress often with coconut.” That’s the introduction to a recipe for a hot soup, after which you might just need a cold shower. I reviewed Family for The Tangential.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lizzy G

  18. 5 out of 5

    Christine

  19. 4 out of 5

    Amelia

  20. 5 out of 5

    Philippa

  21. 4 out of 5

    Shane

  22. 5 out of 5

    Torrie

  23. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  24. 4 out of 5

    Molly Auman

  25. 4 out of 5

    Richard Urquhart

  26. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  27. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bella

  29. 4 out of 5

    Macushla Myles

  30. 4 out of 5

    Karen Wrenbeck

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