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How to Write a Dynamite Scene Using the Snowflake Method (Advanced Fiction Writing Book 2)

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Want to Write a Dynamite Novel? The secret to writing a dynamite novel is to first write a dynamite scene. Because if you can write one terrific scene, you can write a hundred. And that’s a novel. This is a short book, with just one goal—to teach you the simple principles you can use right now to design a powerful scene before you write it. If you’ve already written your Want to Write a Dynamite Novel? The secret to writing a dynamite novel is to first write a dynamite scene. Because if you can write one terrific scene, you can write a hundred. And that’s a novel. This is a short book, with just one goal—to teach you the simple principles you can use right now to design a powerful scene before you write it. If you’ve already written your novel, you can use these same principles to make each scene better. About the Book How to Write a Dynamite Scene Using the Snowflake Method will give you the power tools you need to write scenes that move your reader’s emotions. You’ll learn: The one thing your reader most desperately wants. And why. How to decide which character should have the point of view. The 2 kinds of scenes designed to give your reader a powerful emotional experience—and how to know which to use. 5 ways to test that your lead character’s goal in each scene is perfect. How to end every scene so it leaves your reader wanting more. Why dilemmas are good, and how to know when they’re ruining your story. 4 ways to know that your character’s decision will drive your story forward. How to know when a scene is broken—and how to fix it. Excerpt from Chapter 1: Your reader desperately wants one thing. You have it in your power to give your reader that one thing. And what is that one thing? I could tell you what that one thing is, and you would nod and agree that yes, that one thing is clearly something all readers want. But telling you that one thing wouldn’t make it stick in your mind forever. I want it to stick. I’d rather show you that one thing. Once you’ve seen it, once you’ve lived it, you’ll never forget it. That one thing will be inside you, fueling everything you write. So let me tell you a quick story about one of our ancestors who lived many thousands of years ago in a small village on this planet we call home. When I say he’s our ancestor, I mean it literally—he’s your ancestor and he’s my ancestor and he’s every human’s ancestor. That ancestor of ours was once a thirteen-year-old boy, the newest man in the village, and the smallest. Imagine you’re that boy on the day when word comes to the village that there’s a killer tiger ravaging the village’s herd of goats. The Tale of the Tiger You’re furious. A drought has been burning the land for many months. That herd of goats is all that keeps your village from starvation. You’re also terrified. There’s only one way to get rid of a killer tiger. The village has to organize a hunt, find the tiger, and kill it. But that won’t be easy, because there’s nothing more dangerous in your world than a killer tiger. The village headman sends word around to the whole village. All men meet in the village square, and bring your spear. When the messenger comes to your hut, he shakes his head and frowns. He thinks you’re too young to go. In your heart, you’re afraid he’s right.


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Want to Write a Dynamite Novel? The secret to writing a dynamite novel is to first write a dynamite scene. Because if you can write one terrific scene, you can write a hundred. And that’s a novel. This is a short book, with just one goal—to teach you the simple principles you can use right now to design a powerful scene before you write it. If you’ve already written your Want to Write a Dynamite Novel? The secret to writing a dynamite novel is to first write a dynamite scene. Because if you can write one terrific scene, you can write a hundred. And that’s a novel. This is a short book, with just one goal—to teach you the simple principles you can use right now to design a powerful scene before you write it. If you’ve already written your novel, you can use these same principles to make each scene better. About the Book How to Write a Dynamite Scene Using the Snowflake Method will give you the power tools you need to write scenes that move your reader’s emotions. You’ll learn: The one thing your reader most desperately wants. And why. How to decide which character should have the point of view. The 2 kinds of scenes designed to give your reader a powerful emotional experience—and how to know which to use. 5 ways to test that your lead character’s goal in each scene is perfect. How to end every scene so it leaves your reader wanting more. Why dilemmas are good, and how to know when they’re ruining your story. 4 ways to know that your character’s decision will drive your story forward. How to know when a scene is broken—and how to fix it. Excerpt from Chapter 1: Your reader desperately wants one thing. You have it in your power to give your reader that one thing. And what is that one thing? I could tell you what that one thing is, and you would nod and agree that yes, that one thing is clearly something all readers want. But telling you that one thing wouldn’t make it stick in your mind forever. I want it to stick. I’d rather show you that one thing. Once you’ve seen it, once you’ve lived it, you’ll never forget it. That one thing will be inside you, fueling everything you write. So let me tell you a quick story about one of our ancestors who lived many thousands of years ago in a small village on this planet we call home. When I say he’s our ancestor, I mean it literally—he’s your ancestor and he’s my ancestor and he’s every human’s ancestor. That ancestor of ours was once a thirteen-year-old boy, the newest man in the village, and the smallest. Imagine you’re that boy on the day when word comes to the village that there’s a killer tiger ravaging the village’s herd of goats. The Tale of the Tiger You’re furious. A drought has been burning the land for many months. That herd of goats is all that keeps your village from starvation. You’re also terrified. There’s only one way to get rid of a killer tiger. The village has to organize a hunt, find the tiger, and kill it. But that won’t be easy, because there’s nothing more dangerous in your world than a killer tiger. The village headman sends word around to the whole village. All men meet in the village square, and bring your spear. When the messenger comes to your hut, he shakes his head and frowns. He thinks you’re too young to go. In your heart, you’re afraid he’s right.

30 review for How to Write a Dynamite Scene Using the Snowflake Method (Advanced Fiction Writing Book 2)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Holly Davis

    I wish I read this book sooner! This was incredibly helpful to me in ensuring my readers keep the pages turning. I learned so much about writing an emotionally powerful scene, the different kinds of scenes, and what they entail. I will be using what I've learned to edit my novel and will use this method going forward when outlining future works. I wish I read this book sooner! This was incredibly helpful to me in ensuring my readers keep the pages turning. I learned so much about writing an emotionally powerful scene, the different kinds of scenes, and what they entail. I will be using what I've learned to edit my novel and will use this method going forward when outlining future works.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cage Dunn

    I always enjoy the style Randy uses to impress the information into manageable chunks. If I could get every writer to at read at least one of his books, I'm sure they'd see how it frees them to be exceptionally creative without having to worry about 'how it all fits together' - because it's clearly explained. And the boundaries it gives enables limitless access to creativity within those bounds. I love it. I always enjoy the style Randy uses to impress the information into manageable chunks. If I could get every writer to at read at least one of his books, I'm sure they'd see how it frees them to be exceptionally creative without having to worry about 'how it all fits together' - because it's clearly explained. And the boundaries it gives enables limitless access to creativity within those bounds. I love it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Emily Lo

    Excellent short book on the structure of a scene. Get a hard copy of this book and you will not be disappointed.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    I've benefited from Ingermanson's How To Write A Novel Using The Snowflake Method for years, so when I saw this new title on writing scenes, I grabbed it. It's good information, presented in a readable and useful manner. Ingermanson illuminates his instruction using examples from 3 well-known novels, making his points crystal-clear. Overall, it's a good resource for those who need help with the challenge of writing compelling scenes. The title is a bit misleading, as the book doesn't seem to use I've benefited from Ingermanson's How To Write A Novel Using The Snowflake Method for years, so when I saw this new title on writing scenes, I grabbed it. It's good information, presented in a readable and useful manner. Ingermanson illuminates his instruction using examples from 3 well-known novels, making his points crystal-clear. Overall, it's a good resource for those who need help with the challenge of writing compelling scenes. The title is a bit misleading, as the book doesn't seem to use the Snowflake Method. Rather, Ingermanson deftly explains what many other books on writing scenes present about proactive vs. reactive scenes. This is another good scene-writing manual, though if you've read other good books about writing scenes, this may not present anything new. I like Ingermanson's approach, and I felt good buying the book because, as I mentioned, I've benefited for so long from his Snowflake Method concept. If you're struggling with writing scenes that keep a reader interested, I recommend this book. If you're already a seasoned fiction writer of at least intermediate-level skill, I suggest moving on to Damon Knight's Creating Short Fiction, Ursula LeGuin's Steering the Craft, Stephen King's On Writing, Anne Lamott's Bird by Bird, Josip Novakovich's Fiction Writer's Workshop, and if you really think you know what you're doing, try John Gardner's The Art of Fiction or James Wood's How Fiction Works. Friendly Advice for 2 Types of Writer: 1. If you don't absolutely have to write fiction, by all means, do something else. 2. If you're irresistibly compelled to write fiction, KEEP WRITING, and never, ever give up.

  5. 4 out of 5

    P.T. Hunt

    After four half finished projects, it's official - discovery writing is not for me. I've been sifting through various outlining methods over the past few months, and Randy's snowflake method is by far the best I've come across (for me that is). Not only does Randy's snowflake method feel like it was designed with my ADHD brain in mind, the way he breaks down the creative process really drove home scene structure for me. There's nothing particularly new in here I didn't already 'know', but I found After four half finished projects, it's official - discovery writing is not for me. I've been sifting through various outlining methods over the past few months, and Randy's snowflake method is by far the best I've come across (for me that is). Not only does Randy's snowflake method feel like it was designed with my ADHD brain in mind, the way he breaks down the creative process really drove home scene structure for me. There's nothing particularly new in here I didn't already 'know', but I found the way he describes the active/reactive, scene/sequel process to be far more digestible than in other fiction writing books I've read. If you're looking to understand the science of scene writing, this book is worth your time. If you have trouble discovery writing or using traditional outlining, I recommend looking into the snowflake method (Advanced Fiction Writing Book 1). The book is worth the purchase, but you can just as easily look up the method online.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan H. LATER

    We all understand that Chapters run the novel, but those are of little importance. The important part of your novel will be those small scenes that make up your chapters. Scenes are a must and chapters are more of a writer's preference of pacing and style. This book is extremely detailed on the subject of forming and building scenes that capture your reader's attention. If anything, I would say this is the best book to grab to study the structure of scene building. Some of the rules do seem to b We all understand that Chapters run the novel, but those are of little importance. The important part of your novel will be those small scenes that make up your chapters. Scenes are a must and chapters are more of a writer's preference of pacing and style. This book is extremely detailed on the subject of forming and building scenes that capture your reader's attention. If anything, I would say this is the best book to grab to study the structure of scene building. Some of the rules do seem to be pushed on you; and I can see some people having problems or arguing against this method of story telling, but the truth is that this is what creates fast works and causes you to produce more stories. Randy Ingermanson has another book that covers the snowflake method, but that is a more general course, and this is a focused course on scenes. If you need help with that particular element of writing, I would recommend this one!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Henry

    Praise for the clear, engaging writing style. Have read other books on the topic of scene-writing, and they feel floppy and loose. Ingermanson's approach provides a platform, not a prescription. Only missing the fifth star because of the fundamental premise: that Story is about delivering emotional impact to the reader. Not a universal, as many great novels operate under a different fundamental attitude towards storytelling (e.g. The Great Gatsby). Also, non-standard terminology to describe the Praise for the clear, engaging writing style. Have read other books on the topic of scene-writing, and they feel floppy and loose. Ingermanson's approach provides a platform, not a prescription. Only missing the fifth star because of the fundamental premise: that Story is about delivering emotional impact to the reader. Not a universal, as many great novels operate under a different fundamental attitude towards storytelling (e.g. The Great Gatsby). Also, non-standard terminology to describe the same element creates a lack of coherency in writing systems (Ingermanson's Character & Crucible is Aaron Sorkin's Intention & Obstacle; Ingermanson's Proactive and Reactive scenes are Dwight Swain's Scene and Sequel) which reduces effectiveness. Still, many of his insights are philosophy-independent, strategically sound. Would recommend.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Marie Pinkham

    Randy Ingermanson breaks the scene-writing process down in a clear and concise manner and has some fun doing it. He continues the theme from his "How to Write a Novel Using the Snowflake Method", honing in on individual scenes. He then shows how each "mini story" contributes to the big picture. Using some well-known examples, he points out how the process plays out to create stories that satisfy readers, and keep them turning pages. I loved the first book and I think I liked this one even more. Randy Ingermanson breaks the scene-writing process down in a clear and concise manner and has some fun doing it. He continues the theme from his "How to Write a Novel Using the Snowflake Method", honing in on individual scenes. He then shows how each "mini story" contributes to the big picture. Using some well-known examples, he points out how the process plays out to create stories that satisfy readers, and keep them turning pages. I loved the first book and I think I liked this one even more. A must-read, especially for new writers.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Matthew T

    Answers a ton of questions I find i'm really appreciative of Randy's books. I read the Snowflake book in one day and bought this one immediately after. What he does that's different is he anticipates your questions. He already knows what you'll experience as a writer, and he provides concrete empathy and solutions to guide you along. I have an idea for a second novel in my mind. After reading his books, he's made things so much clearer. I will follow the snowflake method for my next novel. Thank Answers a ton of questions I find i'm really appreciative of Randy's books. I read the Snowflake book in one day and bought this one immediately after. What he does that's different is he anticipates your questions. He already knows what you'll experience as a writer, and he provides concrete empathy and solutions to guide you along. I have an idea for a second novel in my mind. After reading his books, he's made things so much clearer. I will follow the snowflake method for my next novel. Thank you, Randy, for 2 excellent books!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tristen Ashchi

    Avery informative book, but... It's just tough to live up to the original snowflake method. I really wish you would have dreamed up a story for this, maybe even Goldilocks again with a different teacher. I learned, but there are more informative books on scene writing out there. Consider this a "how to scenes: pocket edition" It does use a lot of common language that snowflakers will easily digest, making this a good book for those who haven't studied scenes very hard but have studied the snowflak Avery informative book, but... It's just tough to live up to the original snowflake method. I really wish you would have dreamed up a story for this, maybe even Goldilocks again with a different teacher. I learned, but there are more informative books on scene writing out there. Consider this a "how to scenes: pocket edition" It does use a lot of common language that snowflakers will easily digest, making this a good book for those who haven't studied scenes very hard but have studied the snowflake method.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Randy Tramp

    As a writer and author, I live by the Snowflake Method. It's a great program that helps me organize my book. I absolutely love it. How to Write a Dynamite Scene went into the nuts and bolts of writing a book. Each scene must be a mini story. I read this book slowly in order to get as much from it as possible. There was so much to glean and a lot to learn. I know I'll be returning to this book many times. As a writer and author, I live by the Snowflake Method. It's a great program that helps me organize my book. I absolutely love it. How to Write a Dynamite Scene went into the nuts and bolts of writing a book. Each scene must be a mini story. I read this book slowly in order to get as much from it as possible. There was so much to glean and a lot to learn. I know I'll be returning to this book many times.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    I really like this how-to book. It provides you with a lot of valuable knowledge on what makes a good scene, and explains what makes a bad scene and gives you the tools and information to help fix scenes or ideas on when you need to just give up on a scene and move onto the next. He also gives solid examples of novels showing his information working for them. This is a great book if you're stuck on how to actually develop a scene. I really like this how-to book. It provides you with a lot of valuable knowledge on what makes a good scene, and explains what makes a bad scene and gives you the tools and information to help fix scenes or ideas on when you need to just give up on a scene and move onto the next. He also gives solid examples of novels showing his information working for them. This is a great book if you're stuck on how to actually develop a scene.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Andrew D Flynn

    As with Ingermanson’s other “Snowflake Method” book, these exercises are quite useful. I’m finding it’s giving me more thought as to how I can organize my writing and make it flow better to the reader. Highly recommend this book and his other “Snowflake Method” book on writing novels. I’m going to give this one five stars if for no other reason that other writers should see these and give these books a chance, especially if you are a “pantser” in need of some structure.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    This was an intensely satisfying read. The principles presented are so clean and useful and...just perfect. But at the same time they are rooted in deep truths about people and how they relate to stories. The elegance of the system makes me want to do a little happy dance in my bedroom. Highly recommended to story nerds and basically anyone who enjoys figuring things out.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Karlyn

    Definitely a staple for the beginning writer I am SO happy I read this book before getting too far into my first draft. I already have all my notes and structure in place, and the guidance this book has offered in terms of building out and tightening up scenes has saved me a ton of time and unnecessary re-writing. Thank you!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Levi Borba

    This is the second book I read from Randy Ingermanson. For me, the best signal that a Book about writing is worth reading is when it is well written itself. And that is the case! The examples used (Godfather, Hunger Games, Outlander, etc) are ideal for what Ingermanson wants to demonstrate. It is a good addition to read this book after the previous one, "The Snowflake Method" This is the second book I read from Randy Ingermanson. For me, the best signal that a Book about writing is worth reading is when it is well written itself. And that is the case! The examples used (Godfather, Hunger Games, Outlander, etc) are ideal for what Ingermanson wants to demonstrate. It is a good addition to read this book after the previous one, "The Snowflake Method"

  17. 4 out of 5

    Erik Richvoldsen

    I liked how the book broke down novel writing into a series of scenes. Made the task seem less daunting. Nothing new if you have read a few books on writing, but summing up scenes with goals and crucibles seems like a good idea.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Peggy Miller

    Scene writing. This book has really taught me how to look at a scene and break it down to what kind of scene it is, how to fix a broken scene and how to greatly improve it. This is a must read for writers.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dante

    Randy Ingermanson goes in depth into the psychology of storytelling and why it's worked for eons. This book is a must-read for anyone seeking to make their writing more gripping, or simply interested in learning about the art of telling a story. Randy Ingermanson goes in depth into the psychology of storytelling and why it's worked for eons. This book is a must-read for anyone seeking to make their writing more gripping, or simply interested in learning about the art of telling a story.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Carl E Stubblefield

    Good tips overall This had some good points, reminded me a bit of a summarized version of Story Grid, which is a bit beefier. Reminded me of some good points I need to focus on more when crafting scenes from the start.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dick Lowry

    I've read a lot of books on writing and Ingermanson's book is one of the best. I recommend it to all writers - from novices to experts. It's full of useful, easy-to-implement advice and techniques. Don't miss it! I've read a lot of books on writing and Ingermanson's book is one of the best. I recommend it to all writers - from novices to experts. It's full of useful, easy-to-implement advice and techniques. Don't miss it!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Erica

    Gives great insight into what makes a scene work and how to save scenes that can be saved. I didn't care for the examples he used. Not books that would appeal to me. But they proved the points he was making. Gives great insight into what makes a scene work and how to save scenes that can be saved. I didn't care for the examples he used. Not books that would appeal to me. But they proved the points he was making.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Christina King-Talley

    The plot and scene development presented by Randy allows the author to think and create intuitively while maintaining the organization and structure required. The best of both worlds: pantser and planner!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    Excellent guide to scene structure and editing This is the single best guide to scene structure and editing I’ve ever read. It’s clear and logical, with excellent examples from 3 famous novels to illustrate the points made and a checklist at the end to facilitate revision.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Very helpful for writing better scenes. Very helpful as a "starting" writer. easy to read and understand. He also has a book on the Snowflake Method for writing a Novel. I saw a YouTube video on it and not so sure that is for me yet, but I do like this book and it has a lot of very good points. Very helpful for writing better scenes. Very helpful as a "starting" writer. easy to read and understand. He also has a book on the Snowflake Method for writing a Novel. I saw a YouTube video on it and not so sure that is for me yet, but I do like this book and it has a lot of very good points.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    I’d like to say this book was better than the first one in the series; the book actually isn’t told in a story format, rather a help book. Secondly, I think any writer should pick this book up for help. It has helped me so far and I’m glad to own it to always go back to when I am stuck.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Watson Davis

    There was some good things in here, but it didn't speak to me as much as the original Snowflake Method book which now forms the foundation of how I write novels. There was some good things in here, but it didn't speak to me as much as the original Snowflake Method book which now forms the foundation of how I write novels.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Capps

    An easy to understand book that shows you how to improve your scenes. A must read for authors. Fantastic advice.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Steven Vincent

    Brilliant book, I went back and read it twice more. So much easy to understand information that was easy to apply to my writing.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Marian

    I have this program among many, and I get a little something from each one. This book is clear in its instructions and ideas.

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