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The Swineherd

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Who is the most foolish? The prince who turns himself into a swineherd to go courting the emperor's daughter? The princess who hates the sweet red rose because it's not artificial? Or perhaps the emperor who throws his slipper at them both when he finds them kissing. Classic Hans Christian Andersen tale about human nature. Full-color illustrations. Who is the most foolish? The prince who turns himself into a swineherd to go courting the emperor's daughter? The princess who hates the sweet red rose because it's not artificial? Or perhaps the emperor who throws his slipper at them both when he finds them kissing. Classic Hans Christian Andersen tale about human nature. Full-color illustrations.


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Who is the most foolish? The prince who turns himself into a swineherd to go courting the emperor's daughter? The princess who hates the sweet red rose because it's not artificial? Or perhaps the emperor who throws his slipper at them both when he finds them kissing. Classic Hans Christian Andersen tale about human nature. Full-color illustrations. Who is the most foolish? The prince who turns himself into a swineherd to go courting the emperor's daughter? The princess who hates the sweet red rose because it's not artificial? Or perhaps the emperor who throws his slipper at them both when he finds them kissing. Classic Hans Christian Andersen tale about human nature. Full-color illustrations.

30 review for The Swineherd

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

    The Swineherd is one of the Danish author Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tales, with a heavily moral and melancholy feel. It is about about an arrogant princess, and the price she eventually pays for her pride. The story was first published as "Svinedrengen", in December 1841. Here is one of the first illustrations, by Vilhelm Pedersen, The story begins, "There was once a prince who didn't have any money. But he had a kingdom, and though it was small, it was enough for two." The prince loved the E The Swineherd is one of the Danish author Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tales, with a heavily moral and melancholy feel. It is about about an arrogant princess, and the price she eventually pays for her pride. The story was first published as "Svinedrengen", in December 1841. Here is one of the first illustrations, by Vilhelm Pedersen, The story begins, "There was once a prince who didn't have any money. But he had a kingdom, and though it was small, it was enough for two." The prince loved the Emperor's daughter and dearly wanted to marry her. He had just two beautiful things he could give; a rose tree which only flowered once every five years, producing one bloom, and a nightingale with a most beautiful song. These were presents fit for any princess, thought the prince, so he sent them to the Emperor's daughter. However, the Emperor's daughter wanted something manufactured instead, such as a clockwork kitten. She impatiently rejected the humble offerings. But the prince was not to be deterred. He disguised himself and applied for the position of swineherd at the palace. Once there, he constructed a cooking pot, with bells hanging all around the edge, so that it would cleverly play a tune as it boiled. The princess was delighted when she saw the pot, and wanted it for her very own. She insisted on knowing what the price was. The prince, disguised of course as the swineherd, demanded ten kisses - and he got them. The princess spent the next few days playing with her new trinket, but meanwhile the prince, as the swineherd, was creating a new gimmick to entice her. It was a musical rattle. Of course the princess wanted this for herself too, and tried to persuade the swineherd to accept kisses from her ladies-in-waiting. But the prince would have none of it, and demanded one hundred kisses for the musical rattle. The princess obliged, but asked her ladies-in-waiting to shield her from view. The Emperor, hearing a commotion in the pigsty, made his way through the mud, to see what was going on with the ladies-in-waiting. Nobody noticed him, as they were all so engrossed with counting the kisses.(view spoiler)[ When the Emperor saw what his daughter was actually doing - kissing a swineherd for a toy - he became so angry that he instantly turned them both out of his kingdom in disgust. The princess now felt very sorry for herself indeed, and cried bitterly, wailing that she wished she had married the handsome prince when she had had the chance. In the meantime, the prince washed his face, threw away his filthy clothes, and donned his princely robes. "Don't expect me to be sorry for you," he said, "You would not marry an honest prince. You did not value the rose or the nightingale. But you were ready to kiss a swineherd for the sake of a jingling toy. You have got what you deserve." The story ends with the prince going back to his own little kingdom, and never thinking of her again. (hide spoiler)] The punishing of proud princesses seems to be a stock theme in folk and fairy tales. The brothers Grimm wrote a similar story called, "King Thrushbeard", in which a royal figure disguises himself, in order to court an arrogant princess. Most of the traditional tales, however, end happily, with the chastened princess having learnt her lesson; now sorry and humbled, and continuing to love the man once he is revealed to be royalty. (view spoiler)[In Hans Christian Andersen's story the princess is cast off and left alone, still arrogant, merely grieving for the loss of love and status. (hide spoiler)] Hans Christian Andersen is typically less sentimental in his story, and far more downbeat. The Swineherd comes across as a harsh cautionary tale.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Chelsey Connor

    Enjoyed this one. What a humble prince

  3. 4 out of 5

    Angela Randall

    Project Gutenberg has a free ebook and audiobook of a Hans Christian Andersen book with 18 fairy tales in it. These are the stories in the Project Gutenberg files: -- The emperor's new clothes -- The swineherd -- The real princess -- The shoes of fortune -- The fir tree -- The snow queen -- The leap-frog -- The elderbush -- The bell -- The old house -- The happy family -- The story of a mother -- The false collar -- The shadow -- The little match girl -- The dream of little Tuk -- The naughty bo Project Gutenberg has a free ebook and audiobook of a Hans Christian Andersen book with 18 fairy tales in it. These are the stories in the Project Gutenberg files: -- The emperor's new clothes -- The swineherd -- The real princess -- The shoes of fortune -- The fir tree -- The snow queen -- The leap-frog -- The elderbush -- The bell -- The old house -- The happy family -- The story of a mother -- The false collar -- The shadow -- The little match girl -- The dream of little Tuk -- The naughty boy -- The red shoes.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    The Swineherd, illustrated and retold by Deborah Hahn. This revisionist retelling of Hans Christian Andersen's original fairy-tale, The Swineherd, misses the mark entirely, inserting a bizarrely inappropriate "happy" ending that demonstrates a fundamental misunderstanding of the story on Deborah Hahn's part. Andersen himself plays a role in this adaptation, reading his fairy-tale "play" to a boisterous crowd of animals and children, who simultaneously enact the story. When he reaches his (traditi The Swineherd, illustrated and retold by Deborah Hahn. This revisionist retelling of Hans Christian Andersen's original fairy-tale, The Swineherd, misses the mark entirely, inserting a bizarrely inappropriate "happy" ending that demonstrates a fundamental misunderstanding of the story on Deborah Hahn's part. Andersen himself plays a role in this adaptation, reading his fairy-tale "play" to a boisterous crowd of animals and children, who simultaneously enact the story. When he reaches his (traditional) conclusion, there is an outcry from his audience, who declare that it is "Unjust...Fierce...Cruel," and set out to provide an alternative ending... The problem with this scenario, and with the entire project, is that The Swineherd is not a tale meant to have a happy ending. The disillusionment of the lover, who discovers that his idol has feet of clay, is the entire point of the story. Not only does Hahn seem to have missed that fact, she also appears to be suffering under the misapprehension that it is the prince who is at fault. Her cast of characters produce a happy ending by reforming him, having him declare that he has been "arrogant and revengeful," "foolish and greedy." This is a rather curious inversion, as it places the blame for the princess' exile on the prince, rather than her own shallow insincerity, and takes as its assumption that he is somehow obligated to continue desiring her, even after a closer acquaintance has demonstrated her lack of both discernment and principle. A very odd misinterpretation indeed, and one I do not recommend to any Andersen lover.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    The Swineherd, illustrated by Dorothée Duntze. First published as Svinedrengen in 1841, this original fairy-tale from Hans Christian Andersen follows the story of a prince from a fairly modest kingdom, who attempts to court the daughter of the emperor. When his initial gifts - a sweet-singing nightingale and a beautiful rose - are rejected because they are too "natural," the prince disguises himself and assumes the role of the Imperial Swineherd. Now close to his love, he creates a number of cunn The Swineherd, illustrated by Dorothée Duntze. First published as Svinedrengen in 1841, this original fairy-tale from Hans Christian Andersen follows the story of a prince from a fairly modest kingdom, who attempts to court the daughter of the emperor. When his initial gifts - a sweet-singing nightingale and a beautiful rose - are rejected because they are too "natural," the prince disguises himself and assumes the role of the Imperial Swineherd. Now close to his love, he creates a number of cunning treasures, which he barters for her kisses. But will they bring him happiness...? This edition of The Swineherd features the charming artwork of Dorothée Duntze, who has also illustrated Andersen's The Princess and the Pea and The Emperor's New Clothes . With adorable pig-strewn end-papers - Duntze's endpapers are always so entertainingly decorated! - an appealing palette, and many lovely details, this volume is a pleasure to peruse, from beginning to end. I particularly liked the pretty clothing Duntze created for her characters! Of the three versions of this tale I have read, this probably ranks as my favorite, and I would recommend it to any reader who appreciates beautiful fairy-tale artwork.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    The Swineherd, illustrated by Lisbeth Zwerger. The tale of an impoverished prince who attempts to woo a proud (and very foolish) emperor's daughter, only to discover that the object of his desire is not so desirable after all, The Swineherd displays a number of the recurring themes to be found in Hans Christian Andersen's work. From an unhappy and unfulfilled love, to the oppositional relationship of nature and artifice, the sentiments which inform this tale will be quite familiar to the Andersen The Swineherd, illustrated by Lisbeth Zwerger. The tale of an impoverished prince who attempts to woo a proud (and very foolish) emperor's daughter, only to discover that the object of his desire is not so desirable after all, The Swineherd displays a number of the recurring themes to be found in Hans Christian Andersen's work. From an unhappy and unfulfilled love, to the oppositional relationship of nature and artifice, the sentiments which inform this tale will be quite familiar to the Andersen reader. Translated by Anthea Bell, and illustrated by the talented Lisbeth Zwerger - who has also worked on Andersen's Thumbeline , The Nightingale , and The Little Mermaid - this edition of The Swineherd reads well, and has great visual appeal. Zwerger's fans will recognize her unique sense of humor and fun in these pages, enjoying the many spot-on depictions, from the pompous emperor to the prancing ladies-in-waiting.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Prashant

    It'd be indeed difficult to make a child understand it. May the ending be twisted to "and then they lived happily ever after". Stopgap eh?! It'd be indeed difficult to make a child understand it. May the ending be twisted to "and then they lived happily ever after". Stopgap eh?!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Vaishali

    Beautiful, magical, moral ... and comical. " 'Superb! Charmant!', exclaimed the ladies, for they all used to chatter French, each one worse than her neighbor." Lol... Beautiful, magical, moral ... and comical. " 'Superb! Charmant!', exclaimed the ladies, for they all used to chatter French, each one worse than her neighbor." Lol...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alejandra

    Nice fairy tale.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Angelina Kerner

    Book Title: The Swineherd Book Author: Hans Christian Andersen Source: Free for Kindle on Amazon Rating: 5 stars It is free for download, beautiful illustrations by Heinrich Lefler. Sometimes, it's good to go back to the 'good old days' of story telling, back to when things were less complicated and great authors roamed the land, adding life lessons into their works of art. I have read this story in Russian long ago when I was a child so it was nice to read it again, in English. I highly recommend f Book Title: The Swineherd Book Author: Hans Christian Andersen Source: Free for Kindle on Amazon Rating: 5 stars It is free for download, beautiful illustrations by Heinrich Lefler. Sometimes, it's good to go back to the 'good old days' of story telling, back to when things were less complicated and great authors roamed the land, adding life lessons into their works of art. I have read this story in Russian long ago when I was a child so it was nice to read it again, in English. I highly recommend for book lovers to go back in time with Hand Christian Anderson. It's not always a good thing reading the next big thing.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    A prince wants to marry a princess, and gives her a rose and a nightingale from his father's grave. The rose is from a tree that only bloom every fifth year, and the nightingale can sing every song. When the princess doesn't like the presents, he disguises himself as a swineherd. It is about appreciating what is real. The rose and the nightingale were wonderful presents, and the princess was arrogant, but it is even more arrogant to expect that a girl would want to marry you even though you don't A prince wants to marry a princess, and gives her a rose and a nightingale from his father's grave. The rose is from a tree that only bloom every fifth year, and the nightingale can sing every song. When the princess doesn't like the presents, he disguises himself as a swineherd. It is about appreciating what is real. The rose and the nightingale were wonderful presents, and the princess was arrogant, but it is even more arrogant to expect that a girl would want to marry you even though you don't know each other, and not accept that people are different. Not appreciating the presents should only show the prince that the princess was not right for him. Instead, he wants revenge.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nohely

    This story is amazing! Most of you may know that I love Hans Christian Andersen and I must admit that this story is at my top 5 favorites. This beign number 4. The story centers around this spoiled princess and a humble prince who wants to marry her. The princess rejects him because his presents are natural. The prince actually pretends to be a swine herd so that he could be close to the princess. Quite romantic don't you think? But of course the ending itself was not predictable at all and th This story is amazing! Most of you may know that I love Hans Christian Andersen and I must admit that this story is at my top 5 favorites. This beign number 4. The story centers around this spoiled princess and a humble prince who wants to marry her. The princess rejects him because his presents are natural. The prince actually pretends to be a swine herd so that he could be close to the princess. Quite romantic don't you think? But of course the ending itself was not predictable at all and that is the reason why I loved this story. I recommend it to everyone.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Louise

    ^_^ Hehe

  14. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    A very funny story, and strange so few people know about it. It's ludicrous! A swineherd going behind a tree to transform into a Prince! It's like something you'd expect in a comic book! A very funny story, and strange so few people know about it. It's ludicrous! A swineherd going behind a tree to transform into a Prince! It's like something you'd expect in a comic book!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I loved this fairy tale at first I though it was going to be one of those fairy tales that made a prince buy his love but the ending was just perfect and so different to other fairy tales.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Edwina Callan

    Beautiful illustrations accompany this delightful re-telling of a very old fable. I miss the days of books that had a moral to the story.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    It ended better than I thought it would! It was moral, as fairytales should be, and I loved it! thinking about it now, it is actually rather funny.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kiwim0n

    Reminded me of the Paper Bag Princess, but with the roles reversed. What a great story!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    This book teaches that you can never judge someone before you get to know them.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Shelly

    Beautifully illustrated version of Hans Christian Andersen's story. Beautifully illustrated version of Hans Christian Andersen's story.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Annelisa

    I love the original fairy tale; the illustrations in this edition just aren't working for me. Also, as has been mentioned, the moral of the story is a difficult one for younger children to grasp. Older children might be able to catch it, however. I love the original fairy tale; the illustrations in this edition just aren't working for me. Also, as has been mentioned, the moral of the story is a difficult one for younger children to grasp. Older children might be able to catch it, however.

  22. 5 out of 5

    JJ Stevens

    This was my first time both reading and hearing about this fairy tale and I have to say it is not a story that will stick with me, it was very generic as story tales go but I can understand how some people might like it but unfortunately it was not for me.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bec

    what a gripping story with heafty ending that i did not expect. woW!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Gabrielle

    A refreshingly unexpected ending!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Morgan Sandquist

    Heavy-handed and not detailed enough where it counts to sell the moral wedged in.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kookie

    Talking about actantial models and narrative structures is pure wordiness and loss of time. (Mr. Greimas, I absolutely loved your schemata when I had stumbled upon them, kudos for that!). Although verbalizing about the art of the storyteller is central to criticism, nonverbal culinary activities must also be considered. Especially when one of Europe’s finest authors is concocting sweet soup sød Suppe. A trademark of a master. p.s. I’m glad I didn’t consider Suppe paa en Pølsepind (Soup on a Saus Talking about actantial models and narrative structures is pure wordiness and loss of time. (Mr. Greimas, I absolutely loved your schemata when I had stumbled upon them, kudos for that!). Although verbalizing about the art of the storyteller is central to criticism, nonverbal culinary activities must also be considered. Especially when one of Europe’s finest authors is concocting sweet soup sød Suppe. A trademark of a master. p.s. I’m glad I didn’t consider Suppe paa en Pølsepind (Soup on a Sausage-Peg)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    A prince and princess story with a difference. The princess rejects the gifts of natural beauty and pays a dear price.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Anastasia

    This classic is thought-provoking and has an interesting and thoughtful lesson that children should learn. Without revealing it, suffice it to say that it begins with a prince who wants to marry the emperor’s daughter. He gives her a beautiful magical rose that has a smell that causes people to forget sorrow, a nightingale that sings sweet songs, a magic pot, and a magic rattle, but she rejects him. He stays disguised working for the emperor as a swineherd. The ending of the tale is a surprise.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tessa

    Lisbeth's illustrations deserve a five star rating but this is just such a dumb story that I couldn't make myself do it. I loved the prince telling off the stupid princess at the end, but otherwise, Andersen memorialized a story about nothing, really. Just look at the pictures and don't bother with the text. Lisbeth's illustrations deserve a five star rating but this is just such a dumb story that I couldn't make myself do it. I loved the prince telling off the stupid princess at the end, but otherwise, Andersen memorialized a story about nothing, really. Just look at the pictures and don't bother with the text.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ninglu

    I'd call it a fairytale, or a fun story to read! I'd call it a fairytale, or a fun story to read!

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