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On Yom Kippur, Jews of antiquity would sacrifice two goats: one killed as an offering to a harsh and judging god, the other taken to the wilderness and turned loose, a carrier of the sins of the group. Throughout history, argues brilliant feminist critic Andrea Dworkin, women and Jews have been stigmatized as society's scapegoats. In this stunning and provocative book, Dwo On Yom Kippur, Jews of antiquity would sacrifice two goats: one killed as an offering to a harsh and judging god, the other taken to the wilderness and turned loose, a carrier of the sins of the group. Throughout history, argues brilliant feminist critic Andrea Dworkin, women and Jews have been stigmatized as society's scapegoats. In this stunning and provocative book, Dworkin brings her rigorous intellect to bear on the dynamics of scapegoating. Drawing upon history, philosophy, literature, and politics, she creates a terrifying picture of the workings of misogyny and anti-Semitism in the last millennium. With examples that range from the Inquisition, when women were targeted as witches and Jews as heretics, to the terror of the Nazis, whose aggression was both race- and gender-motivated, Dworkin illustrates how and why women and Jews have been scapegoated and compares the civil inequality, prejudices, and stereotypes that have framed identity for both groups. Taking the state of Israel as a paradigm, Dworkin traces the growth of male dominance in societies both old and new -- resulting in the subordination of women and a racial or ethnic "other." In Israel today, Palestinians and prostitutes are the new scapegoats: degraded, inferior, abject. Although the gentle Jewish martyrs of old have become modern Israeli warriors, women retain the stigmatized status of "weak Jews" who, when attacked, never fight back. This leads Dworkin to imagine a world in which women betray men of their own kind in order to develop and defend their own sovereignty. Ultimately, her book forces us to ask profound questions: Why do women continue to value their own lives less than those of themen they love? Where is the line between justifiable self-defense and violence? Both an impassioned plea for women to challenge and destroy the author- ity of the men in their own group and a startling work of history, "Scapegoat" will forever change how we think about the patterns of behavior and belief that give rise to domination and oppression.


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On Yom Kippur, Jews of antiquity would sacrifice two goats: one killed as an offering to a harsh and judging god, the other taken to the wilderness and turned loose, a carrier of the sins of the group. Throughout history, argues brilliant feminist critic Andrea Dworkin, women and Jews have been stigmatized as society's scapegoats. In this stunning and provocative book, Dwo On Yom Kippur, Jews of antiquity would sacrifice two goats: one killed as an offering to a harsh and judging god, the other taken to the wilderness and turned loose, a carrier of the sins of the group. Throughout history, argues brilliant feminist critic Andrea Dworkin, women and Jews have been stigmatized as society's scapegoats. In this stunning and provocative book, Dworkin brings her rigorous intellect to bear on the dynamics of scapegoating. Drawing upon history, philosophy, literature, and politics, she creates a terrifying picture of the workings of misogyny and anti-Semitism in the last millennium. With examples that range from the Inquisition, when women were targeted as witches and Jews as heretics, to the terror of the Nazis, whose aggression was both race- and gender-motivated, Dworkin illustrates how and why women and Jews have been scapegoated and compares the civil inequality, prejudices, and stereotypes that have framed identity for both groups. Taking the state of Israel as a paradigm, Dworkin traces the growth of male dominance in societies both old and new -- resulting in the subordination of women and a racial or ethnic "other." In Israel today, Palestinians and prostitutes are the new scapegoats: degraded, inferior, abject. Although the gentle Jewish martyrs of old have become modern Israeli warriors, women retain the stigmatized status of "weak Jews" who, when attacked, never fight back. This leads Dworkin to imagine a world in which women betray men of their own kind in order to develop and defend their own sovereignty. Ultimately, her book forces us to ask profound questions: Why do women continue to value their own lives less than those of themen they love? Where is the line between justifiable self-defense and violence? Both an impassioned plea for women to challenge and destroy the author- ity of the men in their own group and a startling work of history, "Scapegoat" will forever change how we think about the patterns of behavior and belief that give rise to domination and oppression.

30 review for Scapegoat: The Jews, Israel, and Women's Liberation

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rita

    The Goodreads summary of this book of 2000 is accurate; one's views on rape, sexism, racism will be altered. It is certainly a disturbing book to read. Every page has new and provocative insights, draws unusual parallels. Enough food for thought for a lifetime, I would say. This view of humans as having an almost universal need to denigrate and humiliate groups of people 'inferior' to them is alarming and depressing, and I have to say it voices what have become my views [and much more]. I'm at a The Goodreads summary of this book of 2000 is accurate; one's views on rape, sexism, racism will be altered. It is certainly a disturbing book to read. Every page has new and provocative insights, draws unusual parallels. Enough food for thought for a lifetime, I would say. This view of humans as having an almost universal need to denigrate and humiliate groups of people 'inferior' to them is alarming and depressing, and I have to say it voices what have become my views [and much more]. I'm at a loss to select just one topic out of the hundreds Dworkin [1947-2005] raises.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Momina Makin

    Compelling book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Amy Layton

    Before anyone freaks out over Andrea Dworkin comparing women and Jewish folks, I’ll just use this first sentence to remind everyone that Andrea Dworkin is also Jewish, and thusly definitely has a voice in this discussion. The points that she brings up–historical oppression, lack of space and place, their scapegoat status, how they are viewed in media–are eloquent and divided into chapters, and further divided into a section that discusses Jewish folks, women, and then the two together for a furt Before anyone freaks out over Andrea Dworkin comparing women and Jewish folks, I’ll just use this first sentence to remind everyone that Andrea Dworkin is also Jewish, and thusly definitely has a voice in this discussion. The points that she brings up–historical oppression, lack of space and place, their scapegoat status, how they are viewed in media–are eloquent and divided into chapters, and further divided into a section that discusses Jewish folks, women, and then the two together for a further comparison and analysis. This is such an important read, I think, especially as we are in the midst of the fight over Palestine and Zionism. It shows us a real history, and where tensions were 20 years ago, and how they may have even been a precursor to what’s happening currently. With her usual punchy tone and piercing word choice, Andrea Dworkin makes a convincing argument as to why Jewish folks and women have been society’s scapegoats, and the horrors that have come from such a designation. Her analysis is steadfast, and definitely thought-provoking (as Dworkin often, if not always, is). Review cross-listed here!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Neo

    Dense, hard to read at times, but this will change your view of how the world sees women, of the pros and cons of the establishment of Israel and brutality of men. Dworkin is Jewish and grew up around Holocaust survivors. She was also a survive of sexual assault. She would have first hand experience of the analogies she offers. Now that anti-feminism and anti-Zionism are at all time high, if you are an ally (feminist or Jewish or both) please read this book. It's still 100% relevent.

  5. 5 out of 5

    fausto

    Is a very intense reading, overwhelming, Andrea compile a huge ammount of information of jewish-hating and misoginy and the relation between them. Is a highly scholarly and well-research book, I found very clarifying her analysis on the sexual politics of hate and the creation of the scapegoat. My inconvenient with the book is the (truly amazing) erasure of jewish-womyn perspectives, when Andrea write about jews she seem to be speaking of jewish men, jewish women are addressed in a distinctive wa Is a very intense reading, overwhelming, Andrea compile a huge ammount of information of jewish-hating and misoginy and the relation between them. Is a highly scholarly and well-research book, I found very clarifying her analysis on the sexual politics of hate and the creation of the scapegoat. My inconvenient with the book is the (truly amazing) erasure of jewish-womyn perspectives, when Andrea write about jews she seem to be speaking of jewish men, jewish women are addressed in a distinctive way throughout the book, but only sporadically (specially when she speaks abou rape) the role of jewish womyn in the feminist and lesbian movements is virtually never addressed, I think that her main analysis of the sexual politics of violence and scapegoating could be more meticulous with an emphasis on jewish womyn and jewish feminist activism and herstory.

  6. 5 out of 5

    βαβυλών

    andrea dworkin is, uh, challenging to read for like a whole slew of reasons. graphically blunt presentation of horrifying statistics and anecdotes, an aggressively second-wave feminist (i don't believe the movement should be completely disregarded in light of newer, more intersectional conceptions of feminism [por que no los dos?]), and wildly disorganized ideas, quotes, and citations. that said, i find her ideas worth parsing and all of those points just add up to the visceral urgency that she andrea dworkin is, uh, challenging to read for like a whole slew of reasons. graphically blunt presentation of horrifying statistics and anecdotes, an aggressively second-wave feminist (i don't believe the movement should be completely disregarded in light of newer, more intersectional conceptions of feminism [por que no los dos?]), and wildly disorganized ideas, quotes, and citations. that said, i find her ideas worth parsing and all of those points just add up to the visceral urgency that she felt writing this book and indeed we should all feel as misogyny, anti-semitism, islamophobia, colonialism and militant zionism gain more footing every day!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Stéphane Robert

    One of the most difficult books I have read. Not due to its use of complex words but due to its harsh, truthful and honest depiction of tragedies that highlight the complete disregard of humanity toward women and the Jewish people throughout history. I learnt a lot by exploring this book and it has certainly left a mark. A dark tone indeed but it also allows the reader to focus on the light that the World needs to show the way out of this evil.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jim

  9. 5 out of 5

    Maya

  10. 5 out of 5

  11. 4 out of 5

    Caroline Moor

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jay Z

  13. 4 out of 5

    Elenka

  14. 5 out of 5

    Martha

  15. 4 out of 5

    Adam Casciaro

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alexa

  18. 5 out of 5

    aubri

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alex

  20. 4 out of 5

    Gudrun

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sonia Allison

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jq

  23. 4 out of 5

    Natasha

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tigbench

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rhalee

  26. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  27. 5 out of 5

    David Komaromy

  28. 4 out of 5

    Andre Applewhite

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dennis

  30. 4 out of 5

    Shayla

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