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30 review for The Complete Adventures and Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie

    Oh, Holmes. I know you can be a miserable bastard but I love you so. Even though the actual crimes and solutions are not overly interesting, your nonchalant badassness and cutting wit when solving crimes keeps me coming back. Also, you're best in short stories. Novels allow Doyle too much time to write long, boring descriptions. I love you the most when you're short and snappy. And you're so much better than all the derivative brilliant but flawed (and often misanthropic) investigators on TV now Oh, Holmes. I know you can be a miserable bastard but I love you so. Even though the actual crimes and solutions are not overly interesting, your nonchalant badassness and cutting wit when solving crimes keeps me coming back. Also, you're best in short stories. Novels allow Doyle too much time to write long, boring descriptions. I love you the most when you're short and snappy. And you're so much better than all the derivative brilliant but flawed (and often misanthropic) investigators on TV nowadays. Also, you are played by Hugh Laurie in my head, as is only right.

  2. 4 out of 5

    LP

    After watching two series of the unmissable BBC drama ‘Sherlock’, and having fallen slightly in love with Sherlock Holmes (or was that just Benedict Cumberbatch?) I decided it was about time I read some of the original stories for myself. Not being a huge fan of crime fiction or a big reader of Victorian literature, I wondered if they would really be my cup of tea but once I began reading any doubts quickly evaporated. I was completely hooked! I loved reading Dr Watson’s accounts of Holmes’ case After watching two series of the unmissable BBC drama ‘Sherlock’, and having fallen slightly in love with Sherlock Holmes (or was that just Benedict Cumberbatch?) I decided it was about time I read some of the original stories for myself. Not being a huge fan of crime fiction or a big reader of Victorian literature, I wondered if they would really be my cup of tea but once I began reading any doubts quickly evaporated. I was completely hooked! I loved reading Dr Watson’s accounts of Holmes’ cases and each story left me wanting more. I can certainly understand the public outcry after The Final Problem (included in this volume) was published (I admit I got a bit emotional reading that one!) and why Conan Doyle eventually bowed to pressure and brought Holmes back. With their intriguing set ups, plot twists and often surprising denouement, it’s easy to see why these clever and entertaining stories and the unique friendship between the world’s only consulting detective and his loyal companion John Watson are still inspiring TV series, films, books and stage shows over a hundred years after they were originally published.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Paul Secor

    This was probably my third reading of these tales and I enjoyed reading them as much as I did the first time, even though I remembered most of the solutions to the mysteries. The solutions weren't all that important. When I read the Holmes tales, I'm taken on an adventure and am fascinated by the details of the narration. I know I'll be reading them again in the future. Holmes and Watson will live forever. This was probably my third reading of these tales and I enjoyed reading them as much as I did the first time, even though I remembered most of the solutions to the mysteries. The solutions weren't all that important. When I read the Holmes tales, I'm taken on an adventure and am fascinated by the details of the narration. I know I'll be reading them again in the future. Holmes and Watson will live forever.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Hayley

    3.5 stars. Sherlock Holmes is such a flamboyant and vivid character. He is iconic and beloved by many. I myself have fallen in love with his personae. He is easily identified by his pipe and magnifying glass and wonderful skills of deduction. His character gets four stars from me. This book is a collection of short stories featuring Sherlock Holmes and although the perfect length, the stories flail a little for my liking. Entertaining, but the format is the same for each story. A crime, some sle 3.5 stars. Sherlock Holmes is such a flamboyant and vivid character. He is iconic and beloved by many. I myself have fallen in love with his personae. He is easily identified by his pipe and magnifying glass and wonderful skills of deduction. His character gets four stars from me. This book is a collection of short stories featuring Sherlock Holmes and although the perfect length, the stories flail a little for my liking. Entertaining, but the format is the same for each story. A crime, some sleuthing and a resolution. It all felt a bit like an episode “Of Murder She Wrote” which starred Angela Lansbury and would probably be deemed as cosy mysteries. So only 3 stars for the stories. I will read one of the novels as a comparison to the short stories to see if the plot varies more.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rachael

    "My dear fellow, life is infinitely stranger than anything which the mind of man could invent." -p47, Sherlock to Watson (The Adventure of a Case of Identity) I finally got round to reading this collection! Some of the adventures I’d read before at high school, but not since then (so we’re talking around 10 years ago) and it was fun to whizz through both the Adventures and Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. "My dear fellow, life is infinitely stranger than anything which the mind of man could invent." -p47, Sherlock to Watson (The Adventure of a Case of Identity) I finally got round to reading this collection! Some of the adventures I’d read before at high school, but not since then (so we’re talking around 10 years ago) and it was fun to whizz through both the Adventures and Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kate Pierson

    We all know of my major crush on one Mr. Holmes. And, after reading the first two collections of the original Doyle mysteries, the crush remains. The Holmes I love, though, is Laurie R. King's, where he is an older man in Sussex, dealing with WWI and the changes of the 1920s, as well as falling in love with his young assistant. I also know Holmes as the much older brother of Enola, in Nancy Springer's brilliant Enola Holmes mystery series. Because I've read so much King and Springer, I was appreh We all know of my major crush on one Mr. Holmes. And, after reading the first two collections of the original Doyle mysteries, the crush remains. The Holmes I love, though, is Laurie R. King's, where he is an older man in Sussex, dealing with WWI and the changes of the 1920s, as well as falling in love with his young assistant. I also know Holmes as the much older brother of Enola, in Nancy Springer's brilliant Enola Holmes mystery series. Because I've read so much King and Springer, I was apprehensive about reading the "originals." What if I didn't like them? What if I found them dry? Well, I'm happy to report that they are not dry at all. They're terrific. The world is a better place with Sherlock Holmes in it. At the end of "The Final Problem," Watson describes Holmes as, ". . . the best and the wisest man whom I have ever known." I'm most impressed with Holmes's sense of right and wrong and how he always carries the day. Everything you hear about the Holmes stories is here: hansom cabs, London, fog, cozy Baker Street rooms. Ah, love it! My favorite story is "The Speckled Band." Creepy stuff. Definitely gothic. All in all, excellent reading. Terrific plots, classic characters, and an all-time great setting. What makes it interesting, and in its way, better than King or Springer is that the Holmes stories were written in "real time." That was real life back then. Ah, back then. Just so.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Twana Biram

    I had just seen the newest take on Holmes starring Robert Downing, Jr and Jude Law and began to wonder if the plot resembled the canon do Doyle' cranky detective. I have read and loved "Hound of the Baskervilles" For many years.As I began to read the earlier novels and short stories, I have been thoroughly enthralled by the characterizations, the plots, and the historical backgrounds. I seldom find myself in tears over a read, but at the climax of "Valley of Fear"', I wept for the gallant Birdie I had just seen the newest take on Holmes starring Robert Downing, Jr and Jude Law and began to wonder if the plot resembled the canon do Doyle' cranky detective. I have read and loved "Hound of the Baskervilles" For many years.As I began to read the earlier novels and short stories, I have been thoroughly enthralled by the characterizations, the plots, and the historical backgrounds. I seldom find myself in tears over a read, but at the climax of "Valley of Fear"', I wept for the gallant Birdie Edwards' death. Doyle has captivated my imagination as well as inspiring my own writing endeavors. What a joy to find such a wonderful canon at this time in life when I needed clever ideas and good writing to keep me interested. Really good stuff here and none of it "elementary" in the least.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

    Apparently I'm just not a Sherlock Holmes fan. I found most of the stories boring (blasphemy, I know). I also don't particularly like mysteries where you can't join in on the solving; for example, Holmes solves cases by noticing details that we're not aware of until he tells us about them as he's explaining how he solved the mystery. I want to be able to formulate my own hypotheses, not just hear how someone else solved a case. Apparently I'm just not a Sherlock Holmes fan. I found most of the stories boring (blasphemy, I know). I also don't particularly like mysteries where you can't join in on the solving; for example, Holmes solves cases by noticing details that we're not aware of until he tells us about them as he's explaining how he solved the mystery. I want to be able to formulate my own hypotheses, not just hear how someone else solved a case.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    The book was amazing! it was amazingly written and one of my favorite all time books! i could not put it down!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mia

    While I don't think this is the exact same book that I read, it's the closest I could find. Mine is also an exact facsimile with the original illustrations and a foreword about "The Magic of Sherlock Holmes". I picked it up not too long ago after being led into the bowels of the Morristown Library by a gang of elderly annoyed librarians in search of a "book sale" my father and I saw a small cardboard sign for. There wasn't much to choose from- they were mostly selling romances that people had do While I don't think this is the exact same book that I read, it's the closest I could find. Mine is also an exact facsimile with the original illustrations and a foreword about "The Magic of Sherlock Holmes". I picked it up not too long ago after being led into the bowels of the Morristown Library by a gang of elderly annoyed librarians in search of a "book sale" my father and I saw a small cardboard sign for. There wasn't much to choose from- they were mostly selling romances that people had donated to the library (further supporting my belief that romance novels are, for the most part, disposable). I wanted to get something, though, since everything was incredibly cheap and I had nothing to read. I saw a paperback version of this book tossed in a dusty corner and it seemed as good a choice as any- plus it was $2, and there aren't a whole lot of books I wouldn't buy for that price. So I went to the scowling cashier with the beehive hairdo and paid for it, then tried to find my way out of the labyrinthine library basement. It took a while. Seriously, you would not even believe the books that some libraries have in their basement. Rooms and rooms of them, some with leather covers and clasps that looked older than the United States. Once I started reading the book, I couldn't stop. I read as we walked, I read during lunch, I read the entire time during the drive back, then stayed up till some obscene hour finishing one last short story. Hence my placement on the "who-needs-sleep-anyway?" shelf. I love short stories. When they're bad, you don't feel like you wasted as much time as you would have reading a bad novel. But when they're good, they can pack even more of a punch than the lengthiest of epics. They are a true lesson in how much an author can say in so few words. To me, they are like the gourmet bite-sized appetisers of the books world, the pigs in a blanket, the curry puffs, the potato skins, the strange crunchy things at a foreign restaurant that you're not even sure what they are but they're so damn good you scoop a dozen of them onto your plate and have at it. This is compilation of the first 12 short stories in which Sherlock Holmes and John Watson first appeared. They are the perfect length, not to mention illustrated- I love any book for adults that gives me an excuse to look at pictures. In reading this, I gained a new appreciation for the character of Sherlock Holmes, and I truly believe that until you've read at least one of Doyle's stories you don't know what you're missing. The true Sherlock Holmes is not very much like he is portrayed in popular movies and TV shows (none that I've seen, at least) and, in fact, neither is Watson. Before reading this book, I pictured Holmes as a bitter, condescending genius with a fondness for deerstalker hats. While that's right to some extent, the actual character profile is far more layered. He's a restless cocaine and opium addict, often does chemistry in his own little lab, plays the fiddle quite frequently, is very moody, and while he is often difficult and gruff, he's not like the sour, world-weary old man I thought he would be. (Also, he only wears a deerstalker hat once in all of the stories in here. Sometimes he opts for a top hat or bowler but more often than not, he goes bare-headed.) I was surprised at how much I liked Dr. Watson. He isn't as accustomed to bizarre adventures as Holmes is and he is more easily flummoxed, but it is implied that he's actually a real badass. I mean, he's often armed, he's got a military background, he's the only friend of the greatest detective in Victorian London, and he's got a bullet in his arm that he calls a relic of his Afghan campaign. Much cooler than you thought, eh? Also, he's got a killer moustache. The dynamic between the good doctor and the detective is great as they help people from all walks of life and solve a spectrum of crimes from murders to people getting their thumbs chopped off with axes as they hang out of windows*. The setting and illustrations serve wonderfully as world-builders and you truly feel like you're in the stagecoach with Holmes and Watson as they roll along the London cobblestones in the dead of a stormy night. I really must read the rest of Doyle's short stories, and I'll probably read the novels too if I ever get around to it. If you're a chronic skimmer, my favourite stories in this volume were The Engineer's Thumb, The Blue Carbuncle, The Speckled Band, A Scandal in Bohemia, and The Man with the Twisted Lip. So there you have it. A review of what are considered the first great detective stories and an ode to what $2 can buy you. If you haven't read this yet, what are you waiting for? If you've watched any of the movies or series and yet refuse to read any of the books... ...really? *Not even kidding.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lina

    Giving this one four stars because of two major points: one, it is at some points in the story horribly slow, and two, there are some stories I simply did not like. I'm not going to talk too much about those though. There are two stories in particular which I absolutely loved, and one that I liked a great deal. This sounds so formal. A Scandal in Bohemia This might be because I started reading this book right after I watched the show, and still had the distinct image of the actors in mind when I r Giving this one four stars because of two major points: one, it is at some points in the story horribly slow, and two, there are some stories I simply did not like. I'm not going to talk too much about those though. There are two stories in particular which I absolutely loved, and one that I liked a great deal. This sounds so formal. A Scandal in Bohemia This might be because I started reading this book right after I watched the show, and still had the distinct image of the actors in mind when I read this, but I absolutely loved this. It had intrigue, it had action and it was very mysterious. I love how I had no idea how Bohemia used to actually be a country until I read this, and how the story resolved itself. The Silver Blaze This story has got to be my favourite Sherlock Holmes story so far. It was fast paced, funny, and contains one of the most well-known quotes of the whole canon: "Is there any point to which you would wish to draw my attention?" "To the curious incident of the dog in the night-time." "The dog did nothing in the night-time." "That was the curious incident," remarked Sherlock Holmes. The Final Problem At this point Conan Doyle was tired of writing Sherlock Holmes so he kills him off. Sorry for not spoiler-proofing this, but the book is a hundred years old. I thought this particular story should be a lot more fleshed out, at the length of A Study in Scarlet for example (which is incredibly long, with a lot of shortcomings). The whole 20-something pages felt a bit rushed, but were certainly exciting. I see from my review of A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four that I was happy not to have seen the Cumberbatch adaptation of Sherlock. Oh, what a sweet summer child I was cackles manically about Johnlock in the background

  12. 4 out of 5

    Raj

    Sherlock Holmes is possibly the greatest of literary detectives. He is certainly the one who has penetrated deepest into the public consciousness, a position in which he has been firmly lodged for over a century now, with no sign of departing any time soon. This volume is a compendium of two collections of short stories and one that I thoroughly enjoyed. Holmes fits the short story genre perfectly, with setup, analysis and denouement all coming swiftly, one after the other. It's been many years s Sherlock Holmes is possibly the greatest of literary detectives. He is certainly the one who has penetrated deepest into the public consciousness, a position in which he has been firmly lodged for over a century now, with no sign of departing any time soon. This volume is a compendium of two collections of short stories and one that I thoroughly enjoyed. Holmes fits the short story genre perfectly, with setup, analysis and denouement all coming swiftly, one after the other. It's been many years since I read any Holmes, and I was drawn to this volume, sitting on my shelves after an impulse buy some time ago, after the conclusion of an RPG that had Holmes-ian aspects to it. I find Holmes to be a fascinating character, and one whom it's a pleasure to follow. Despite my best efforts I still often couldn't follow the clues that he sees to the logical conclusions, so seeing his reveals were always pleasurable. This volume takes us to Conan Doyle's intended end for Holmes, grappling with his nemesis at Reichenbach Falls. Of course, it's well known now that public demand ensured that Holmes survived his fall and Baker Street's finest didn't get to retire to the Sussex Downs for some time. I'm certainly glad of that and will be looking up more of adventures.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Allie

    This book grabbed hold of me during the first chapter. This book makes me want to look at the little details of life and find there importance that maybe no one else noticed. I know this is not the end of Sherlock Holmes and there are many books of his left to read. This is a classic which I will forever cherish.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Pamster

    "It was a confession," I ejaculated. I'm only 67 pages in and this is the second time Watson has "ejaculated" some statement. Yours. Okay, read the Adventures and will read the Memoirs another time. So totally satisfying. A bunch more uses of "ejaculated." "It was a confession," I ejaculated. I'm only 67 pages in and this is the second time Watson has "ejaculated" some statement. Yours. Okay, read the Adventures and will read the Memoirs another time. So totally satisfying. A bunch more uses of "ejaculated."

  15. 5 out of 5

    Caleb Robinson

    I feel awful giving these stories such a harsh review but they're just terrible. I thought, having read the longer Sherlock Holmes novels/novellas that the short stories would be a guaranteed success but Holmes is intolerable and the stories are all too pat when reduced to 10-20 pages. I feel awful giving these stories such a harsh review but they're just terrible. I thought, having read the longer Sherlock Holmes novels/novellas that the short stories would be a guaranteed success but Holmes is intolerable and the stories are all too pat when reduced to 10-20 pages.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    A highly enjoyable collection of short stories. Arthur Conan Doyle has here found the perfect length for detailing the thrilling adventures of Holmes and Watson. Witty, charming and an escapist bit of fun.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    totally fun and fast fluff read -- but with that air of looking as if you're reading actual "lit" totally fun and fast fluff read -- but with that air of looking as if you're reading actual "lit"

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ewa

    Crime is common. Logic is rare. Therefore is upon the logic rather than upon the crime that you should dwell. I've never been a true fan of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle prose. I've read it rather as an obligation of a diligent reader. Then again, I rarely read crime stories in general, because I can't predict the outcome, which makes me feel like a half-wit (who I probably am, but who'd like to be reminded of such a thing?). Nevertheless, there's something neat and methodical about A.C.Doyle's writ Crime is common. Logic is rare. Therefore is upon the logic rather than upon the crime that you should dwell. I've never been a true fan of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle prose. I've read it rather as an obligation of a diligent reader. Then again, I rarely read crime stories in general, because I can't predict the outcome, which makes me feel like a half-wit (who I probably am, but who'd like to be reminded of such a thing?). Nevertheless, there's something neat and methodical about A.C.Doyle's writing that - in my opinion - makes Sherlock Holmes stories an essential read for whomever wish to write themselves. What amazes me most, it's the attention for details; everything has a date which perfectly imitates reality. When it comes to this reality factor, I also find of the utmost importance this trick of mentioning from time to time other cases which are not treated in this particular collection, but has happened. As for cases presented, I'll never crack the art of deduction of Sherlock Holmes. I gave it up some time ago, and after prolonged reading experience with the Sherlock universe, it frustrates me only a little now. All in all, I'll always consider the solutions of Sherlock in termes of fantasy more than pure logic and observation. As they're always unpredictable and the action is dampened by the fact it's presented by a story-telling type narration, I'll never fully enjoy them, I suppose. On the other hand, I observed that the more adventures I read, the more dragged into the narration I fell ; result being finishing the book after midnight on Monday, with the heavy heart as I got to "The Final Problem. Last but not least, I've forged an opinion that John Watson is an archetype for all the sidekicks, and as far as my reading experience is concerned, no one has created better one. He's a narrator of all stories, even if it's sometimes "second plan" narration as it was in "The Musgrave Ritual". Also, Watson always has time to join Sherlock Holmes on the case, and neither his practice nor wife suffers from it. It could be annoying if it hadn't been logically explained : Mary is away visiting some family or herself encourage Watson to assist his friend (which, by the way, makes her a saint because let's face it - who'd like to marry a grown man who jumps at every occasion of being in danger, wherever his old roommate asks him to?). Moreover, those explanations appear in perfect timing, the second you get to get suspicious of Watson being an actual person. Finally, all these are short stories. There's just one plot ; closed composition. The murder or at least a mystery have to be solved and the explanation provided in less than forty pages. You can't leave loose ends. You can't give too much or too little background to the characters. A.C.Doyle worked it out ; on the level of the technique I find it amazing. Specially in times of literature where the breakfast description takes a half of a page one the ten-paged chapter. Don't get me wrong, I really like breakfasts (and any other meal, come to that). But I'd like to read about things having the importance to the plot, and the French toasts are rarely that, I daresay. So, at this point: Arthur Conan Doyle 1 - 0 XXI century.

  19. 5 out of 5

    DiNKi Reads

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. In his consulting room at 221B Baker Street, Sherlock Holmes, the master sleuth receives a stream of clients all presenting him with baffling and bizarre mysteries to unravel. With his trusty companion John Watson by his side, Holmes proves equal to the challenge in this splendid collection amassed by one of the great literary minds of the 19th and 20th century, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. In this 500 page tome, Holmes and Watson star as a crime fighting duo, tearing through the English countryside In his consulting room at 221B Baker Street, Sherlock Holmes, the master sleuth receives a stream of clients all presenting him with baffling and bizarre mysteries to unravel. With his trusty companion John Watson by his side, Holmes proves equal to the challenge in this splendid collection amassed by one of the great literary minds of the 19th and 20th century, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. In this 500 page tome, Holmes and Watson star as a crime fighting duo, tearing through the English countryside and London streets in their pursuits of knowledge and truth. And although some of the actual crimes and subsequent solving of these crimes were not very interesting and for me at times lacked a satisfactory conclusion (as in the case of the five orange pips) I found myself wholly unable to put the book down. The sheer charm and comfort of following Watson and Holmes tales as they battled the corruption of their fellow men and women glued me to the words, as I leapt through the pages. Though I have been a fan of the many films and TV adaptations of Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes, I had not until recently given over any time to read any of his original works, and though at times the Sherlock that filled the page varied widely from the one I had come to know and love from the silver screen, I found myself growing to love and appreciate the ingenuity of Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes even more. The depth to this seemingly simple private detective like character is extraordinary. The steep slumps into depression, his nervous habits when bored with what he feels are the trivial pursuits of life, his obvious addictions to cocaine and tobacco help to remind the reader that for all wonderful talents of observation, Sherlock Holmes is just as flawed and human as everybody else. Making him infinitely more relatable. The lasting friendship between Holmes and Watson, spanning months at a time with no interaction on either parties, captures the very heart of the human ability to love infallibly. I enjoyed this book immensely, partly due to the fact that it is broken up into individual stories, making them short, easy reads that I personally could fit in on a night as a settled down to sleep as well as around my hectic work schedule. However, it only constitutes a ⅘ stars for me as it is riddled with character inaccuracies with regard to their mannerisms and physical appearances that differ from Doyle’s earlier works such as The Sign of Four and A Study In Scarlet, which I am afraid at times distracted me from the stories themselves and jarred me out of the narrative disrupting the amiable rapport I had built with this novel. Overall this is a book I would happily recommend but perhaps not to someone under the age of 10 as although not overly graphic in nature, I can imagine some of the scenes in which the victims were murdered could possibly startle a child. It can be read in short bursts and set aside for later reading without massively disturbing the flow of the overall narrative.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Keith Davis

    The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and the Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes are the first two collections of Doyle's detective stories, often published together as they are in this volume. The combined collections are kind of peak Holmes as they include many the most famous stories, as well as the first appearances of Sherlock's brother Mycroft and his nemesis Professor Moriarty. There is also indications that Doyle was already getting tired of writing his most popular character, and in fact he tried t The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and the Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes are the first two collections of Doyle's detective stories, often published together as they are in this volume. The combined collections are kind of peak Holmes as they include many the most famous stories, as well as the first appearances of Sherlock's brother Mycroft and his nemesis Professor Moriarty. There is also indications that Doyle was already getting tired of writing his most popular character, and in fact he tried to kill him off (spoilers for a story from the 1890's). A typical Holmes story involves a character contacting either Holmes or Watson and then taking up about half the story with a narration of their bizarre or complex problem. Holmes then quickly resolves the case. He sometimes pretends the case has him baffled only to reveal later he solved it before the character finished their story. At least three stories involve people taking strange pointless jobs that turn out to be frauds intended to cover up a crime. Often a character will report inexplicable behavior from a family member, which again turns out to be covering up a past crime or a plot for a future crime. Doyle's stories are genuinely entertaining, and the short story format keeps the pacing quick and prevents long digressions. My favorites are when Doyle goes a bit creepy and Gothic, such as in The Speckled Band and The Engineer's Thumb. I especially enjoy it when Doyle gives the reader enough information to figure out the mystery, such as in The Man with the Twisted Lip. Occasionally Doyle even dips into humor as in The Red-Headed League and The Blue Carbuncle. The humor tends to dry up in the later stories as writing Holmes seems to become less fun for Doyle and more of a chore. For anyone interested in trying the original Sherlock Holmes material for the first time, this collection is the best place to start.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie

    The book is a collection of eleven stories of the most famous detective to ever walk the streets of London. Included are: The Red-headed League, The Five Orange Pips, The Man with the Twisted Lip, The Noble Bachelor, and my all-time favorite, The Speckled Band. Holmes himself thought it was his best. It was first published in 1892 in the Strand Magazine. Holmes and Watson rise up early and go visit Helen Stoner. She tells them she fears for her life from her stepfather, Dr. Roylott, the last sur The book is a collection of eleven stories of the most famous detective to ever walk the streets of London. Included are: The Red-headed League, The Five Orange Pips, The Man with the Twisted Lip, The Noble Bachelor, and my all-time favorite, The Speckled Band. Holmes himself thought it was his best. It was first published in 1892 in the Strand Magazine. Holmes and Watson rise up early and go visit Helen Stoner. She tells them she fears for her life from her stepfather, Dr. Roylott, the last survivor of a once wealthy family. He had served a prison sentence for flying into a rage and killing his Indian butler. Helen's sister had died earlier. Helen hears Helen's last words: "The Speckled Band." Holmes takes the case and he and Watson spend the night in the house. They hear a metallic noise and see a dim light shine through on a bell cord that has a venomous snake. The stepfather had placed milk on the cord and the snake had crawled down on the cord and bitten and killed Helen's sister. This story sends shivers down my back. There is remarkable reading in this volume of Sherlock stories.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ruby

    Ok obviously this was pretty good if you like that sort of thing, we’ve all read Sherlock Holmes blah blah. I had a fine time reading these, most of which I had actually read before (this book has been in my bedroom since I was a wee lass) but I think it would be better for anyone to read the stories one or two at a time not all at once. But I’ve never been that good at “short stories”. Just give me a whole book!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Chrissy

    It was composed of short stories and normally, I wouldn't mind but it didn't fit with my time frame and became draggy for me. But, when I was really into a story it was lovely read before bedtime. It was composed of short stories and normally, I wouldn't mind but it didn't fit with my time frame and became draggy for me. But, when I was really into a story it was lovely read before bedtime.

  24. 5 out of 5

    J.B.

    Great book, this is a perfect book by you need one time of relaxing

  25. 5 out of 5

    Maxine

    I liked all those stories about Holmes’ and Watson’s adventures. The last one was so sad though. I can’t wait to read other books from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Londono

    These were stories about the great detective, Sherlock Holmes, who solved crimes swiftly and intelligently. There are 12 short stories and 11 memoirs, all of which are about Holmes solving mysteries. I only read the first 6 of the short stories, so I will be reviewing those. There is a complete collection of the Sherlock Holmes stories - this is just some of them. What I particularly liked about these stories is that each story is a new adventure, new plot, but the same characters. Sherlock an These were stories about the great detective, Sherlock Holmes, who solved crimes swiftly and intelligently. There are 12 short stories and 11 memoirs, all of which are about Holmes solving mysteries. I only read the first 6 of the short stories, so I will be reviewing those. There is a complete collection of the Sherlock Holmes stories - this is just some of them. What I particularly liked about these stories is that each story is a new adventure, new plot, but the same characters. Sherlock and Watson are still here, solving mysteries but different ones each time. My favorite short story of the ones I read was The Man With The Twisted Lip. This short story was about a man who was constantly away doing drugs at an opium den, but was found to be dead. His clothes were found in the opium den by a beggar with a twisted lip. Turns out, (view spoiler)[ the man who had died was the same one that had the twisted lip - he was only wearing a bit of makeup on his face and created a twisted lip with plaster. (hide spoiler)] What I particularly disliked was nothing at all. The stories were exciting and captivating, and wasn't slow at all. If I had to mention one thing about it, it's that the stories were somewhat complex. For the rating I give this book a 5 out of 5. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's works were beautifully written, and he wove together some perfectly enthralling stories. I recommend this book to fans of mystery and crime, and also anyone who loves the BBC TV series, Sherlock.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Akane Inoue

    There was never a greater detective than Sherlock Holmes, and never a better mystery than the ones solved by him, no matter how big or small. A few of my favourite stories in the book were “A Scandal In Bohemia”, “The Yellow Face”, “The Speckled Band”, “The Man with the Twisted Lip”, “The Boscombe Valley Mystery” and “The Beryl Coronet”. The first two stories were examples where Sherlock Holmes could not entirely succeed, making him seem more human and showing readers that not all mysteries or cr There was never a greater detective than Sherlock Holmes, and never a better mystery than the ones solved by him, no matter how big or small. A few of my favourite stories in the book were “A Scandal In Bohemia”, “The Yellow Face”, “The Speckled Band”, “The Man with the Twisted Lip”, “The Boscombe Valley Mystery” and “The Beryl Coronet”. The first two stories were examples where Sherlock Holmes could not entirely succeed, making him seem more human and showing readers that not all mysteries or crimes can be solved, even by the best mind in London. The third and fourth stories mentioned were both mysteries where the answer was an unpredictable one, each unique in how the crime was committed, if there was one at all. The last two mysteries are examples of where Sherlock Holmes saves innocent people being suspected. Where others overlooked clues which showed the suspect was innocent and only focused on the ones proving him guilty, Sherlock Holmes investigated thoroughly. This demonstrates how not all things are as obvious as they seem to be, so I should first investigate to know about the matter before judging it. By reading these mysteries, I learnt a lot of important things. Each of the mysteries were written as short stories, making it easy to read since they were concise, but still had suspense and were very thrilling, keeping me interested the whole time I was reading. There was rich vocabulary, especially in descriptions of people and places as can be seen every time Holmes deduces things about his clients from their clothes or from their belongings. For example, he deduces by just looking at the pipe left by a client that he was strong, left handed and even more. This, I think, is amazing but once explained, I realize that it was actually pure logic. I was very impressed by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s imagination and dedication to writing all of these different stories. He was compelled to come up with different stories, each time with a different solution that was reasonable yet simple to understand. That, I believe, must be very challenging and require talent. I also think that writing from Dr.Watson’s point of view is very appealing, as it is the point of view of an ordinary person, making us relate to him and feeling closer to the characters. When I was clueless on how Holmes knew the suspect, I realized Watson was as puzzled as I was. Overall, “The Adventures and Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes” is an intriguing and absorbing book which gave an insight on what kind of problems were common in the past, where things were much simpler. I must wonder how the author would have written these stories had he been living in the modern world. I believe that it would have been much more difficult than in the past, due to all the possibilities of crime using technology. This is why I find that the Sherlock Holmes series are one of the best mysteries that have ever been written.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Leskey

    A very fine collection of short stories was this. I fear, however, that I shall never again be able to enjoy fully any mystery, save for A Case of Poisons (as reviewed here), unless if the author of the same produces another book in the series which should prove to be its better. That being said, note that these were most extraordinary stories! I immensely enjoyed Sherlock Holmes' famed skill of deduction. Dr. Watson was also quite the agreeable sort, "enduring" through Sherlock Holmes' "strangen A very fine collection of short stories was this. I fear, however, that I shall never again be able to enjoy fully any mystery, save for A Case of Poisons (as reviewed here), unless if the author of the same produces another book in the series which should prove to be its better. That being said, note that these were most extraordinary stories! I immensely enjoyed Sherlock Holmes' famed skill of deduction. Dr. Watson was also quite the agreeable sort, "enduring" through Sherlock Holmes' "strangeness." The writing style was most captivating, allowing the reader to enjoy the story to its highest potential, a fact said reader should appreciate greatly. It was at a nice easy pace, allowing the reader any speed he should desire. The many plots (hence the many stories) were all well thought out and realistic. Each plot point made for want of more and then twists could throw a person right into the thick of things. Most excellent, indeed. In conclusion, well… everything I said above already says everything, so a conclusion is not required, is it? But to give you an idea how much I liked this book, and indeed all Sherlock Holmes' tales, I had a few minutes debate between it and A Case of Poisons. A Case of Poisons did win, of course, but still… that's minutes!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Martijn Vsho

    I loved reading Sherlock's adventures as told through he eyes of Dr. Watson! They are intriguing stories, although I certainly did not expect them to be like this. They are short stories and I mean extremely short, about 25 pages in length, and have been quickly and masterfully solved by Holmes. This was a surprise to me as mystery stories (in my mind) usually are more complex and take a lot longer to solve. Yet Holmes is a genius with an eye for the little details which reveal far more informati I loved reading Sherlock's adventures as told through he eyes of Dr. Watson! They are intriguing stories, although I certainly did not expect them to be like this. They are short stories and I mean extremely short, about 25 pages in length, and have been quickly and masterfully solved by Holmes. This was a surprise to me as mystery stories (in my mind) usually are more complex and take a lot longer to solve. Yet Holmes is a genius with an eye for the little details which reveal far more information, as he tells Watson: "It has long been an axiom of mine that the little things are infinitely the most important;" (39) and referring to Watson's inability to make the same deductions: "You see, but you do not observe. The distinction is clear" (8). His way of thinking is contagious. I began to pay attention to the little details as well, both in the stories to see if I could figure out the mystery before Holmes and after I put the book down and went about my day. He is an intriguing and peculiar character, whose personalities and idiosyncrasies are slowly disclosed throughout the various short stories. It seems that one of the overarching mysteries of these short stories is figuring out who Sherlock Holmes is. Watson certainly tries to do so as he narrates the book, yet are there parts where he merely "sees" and fails to "observe"? Only the reader who has let Sherlock be their mentor can answer that question.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    this book is wonderfull i love Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson they are what true mysterys are about. Sherlock is a peculiar fellow he sees the smallest details in every case he takes on. He dosent work for scotland yard he is a consulting private detective people come to him and he helps them always beter then the police because the police have to go off facts and evidence Mr. Holmes goes off his instinct and like i said the smallest details maby it would be the ash of a pipe or the tobacco smel this book is wonderfull i love Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson they are what true mysterys are about. Sherlock is a peculiar fellow he sees the smallest details in every case he takes on. He dosent work for scotland yard he is a consulting private detective people come to him and he helps them always beter then the police because the police have to go off facts and evidence Mr. Holmes goes off his instinct and like i said the smallest details maby it would be the ash of a pipe or the tobacco smell in a room or even the way a man looks toward a room or at a book shelf hes verry smart and most of the time to cocky for his own good witch is why he dosent really have many friends . Dr. Watson is his roomate and comes with him to document the crimes as the storys progress he (Dr. Watson) forams a friend ship with Holmes and also begins to write of the cases Holmes have solved and in doing so holmes becomes a bit of a celebrity . this like all of the Sherlock Holmes books is a wonderfull book for the mystery buff and good for young adults because there is not the kind of content that would be bad for older children if full of wonderfull storys i love Sherlock Holmes and enjoy reading them over and over again i hope you enjoyed this review Paul

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