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Unabridged CD Audiobook 12 CDs / 13.5 hours long... Narrated by Barbara Rosenblat


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Unabridged CD Audiobook 12 CDs / 13.5 hours long... Narrated by Barbara Rosenblat

30 review for Blind Sight by Carol O'Connell Unabridged CD Audiobook

  1. 4 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    Long before there was a Lisbeth from the Dragon Tattoo, there was Mallory from the NYPD special crime unit. When four bodies are found on the front lawn of Gracie Mansion, one an ex-prostitute who became a cloistered sister, the special crimes unit is called to action. A missing blind boy, no body yet, makes the case all the more urgent. One of my top five crime series and top five characters. Mallory's back story, which is refereed to and dispersed thought the book in this series, is endlessly f Long before there was a Lisbeth from the Dragon Tattoo, there was Mallory from the NYPD special crime unit. When four bodies are found on the front lawn of Gracie Mansion, one an ex-prostitute who became a cloistered sister, the special crimes unit is called to action. A missing blind boy, no body yet, makes the case all the more urgent. One of my top five crime series and top five characters. Mallory's back story, which is refereed to and dispersed thought the book in this series, is endlessly fascinating, as os the character she portrays. She has her own way of doing things, is quick to make conscript others cannot see. Her supporting characters, many, including her partner knew her when she was young and know to, stay put of her way. This was written in the third person, and it took a while to get used to, but the story, the case itself the stuff of headlines. Corrupt politicians, people wielding power they should not have, here in Illinois it has become a common occurrence. This is a very biased review, not because I have an advanced reading copy but because I cannot envision ever giving this series less than a four star rating. But if I am biased so is Book Pages because this is their top mystery of the month. Seems like we have the same taste, something to ponder. ARC from Putnam.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Blind Sight by Carol O’Connell is a 2016 Headline publication. ‘Mallory the Machine’ might be the most interesting female protagonist in crime fiction. This twelfth installment in the Kathy Mallory series showcases Mallory’s .., er… unique personality as she plows through a grisly crime scene in which several bodies have been dumped at the mayor’s residence, with their hearts removed. To make matters even more perplexing, a nun with a very colorful past and her blind nephew disappear, possibly k Blind Sight by Carol O’Connell is a 2016 Headline publication. ‘Mallory the Machine’ might be the most interesting female protagonist in crime fiction. This twelfth installment in the Kathy Mallory series showcases Mallory’s .., er… unique personality as she plows through a grisly crime scene in which several bodies have been dumped at the mayor’s residence, with their hearts removed. To make matters even more perplexing, a nun with a very colorful past and her blind nephew disappear, possibly kidnap victims, who could be in the clutches of a cold blooded killer. This dark crime story, told with O’Connell’s razor sharp dark humor, compliments Malloy’s odd investigative techniques, as a lurid and political crime story unfolds. There is certainly a human element to the story with a young blind boy at risk, and the race against time is palpable. Mallory is in a particularly nasty mood this time around, toying with people for fun, exhibiting a level of rudeness that went beyond her usual impatience and stoicism. Newcomers to the series may not know what to make of her, so reading this one as a stand alone might not be the best idea. I liked the realistic portrayal of a blind person, which did not fall back on stereotypes, and following Jonah’s thoughts as he duels it out with his captor was intense, but made him the star of the show. The ironies are thick, but the plot was not as tight as in previous installments and even got a little sloppy on occasion, but everything did manage to fit together by the conclusion of the book. I enjoyed catching up with Mallory, after what has seemed like a pretty long pause between releases, but this addition might not be the best representation of this series. Don’t get me wrong, this is a solid enough story, it’s just not up the usual standards I have come to expect from this series. So, if you are thinking of trying this novel without having read at least a couple of the previous chapters in the series, I would suggest waiting until you can catch up a bit before tackling this one. If you are following the series, or at least familiar enough with it to understand the characterizations, and so forth, then, you will not want to pass up the chance to see what Mallory is up to and what kind of mood she mind be in this time around. Overall -3.5 stars

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

    A nun with a colourful past. A blind boy playing hooky from school. A fragile homeless man. On a sunny day in one of New York’s historic neighbourhoods, the lives of these 3 characters intersect thanks to one man on a mission. Only one will survive. Detective (don’t call me Kathy) Mallory is approached by a priest who fears for the missing Sister Michael. It doesn’t take her long to dig up the good nun’s past & her connection to blind 12 year old Jonah. But how did the mayor know the nun was missing A nun with a colourful past. A blind boy playing hooky from school. A fragile homeless man. On a sunny day in one of New York’s historic neighbourhoods, the lives of these 3 characters intersect thanks to one man on a mission. Only one will survive. Detective (don’t call me Kathy) Mallory is approached by a priest who fears for the missing Sister Michael. It doesn’t take her long to dig up the good nun’s past & her connection to blind 12 year old Jonah. But how did the mayor know the nun was missing before the police? And speaking of the mayor….um….has he noticed the 4 bodies on his lawn? The opening sequence grabs your attention immediately. It’s obvious this is going to be a complex story with many threads that initially run parallel to each other. The fun part is sitting back & watching as Mallory & long suffering partner Riker begin to tie them together. Along the way, they deal with smarmy politicians, Jonah’s family members & some of the city’s wealthiest citizens. In alternate chapters, we spend time with Jonah & his captor. They’re both compelling characters whose lives were altered by Angie Quill, AKA Sister Michael. Jonah’s character in particular packs an emotional punch & gives a fascinating “look” into the mind of a boy blind from birth. He’s smart & resourceful and there’s an almost mystical element to his story. This is book # 12 & it’s hard to believe the series has been around since 1994. Mallory is a complex character & the author surrounds her with a diverse cast & rich history. It’s a series that rewards faithful fans as the relationships between regular characters continue to evolve. Most of the gang is back including all the poker buddies she inherited from her late adoptive father. There’s no shortage of twists & turns before the book reaches a literal race to the finish. Great read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    Blind sight by Carol O'Connell. This was an excellently written spell binding mystery and a good reason why I barely have the desire to read any cozies. Kathy Mallory is not your ordinary detective. She's not your ordinary independent woman. She is a tough cookie with a past that sometimes helps her get to the bottom of a case and more often than not gets her into hot water. Right now Mallory seems to be up to her ears in hot water...but that's just another obstacle temporarily in her way. No prob Blind sight by Carol O'Connell. This was an excellently written spell binding mystery and a good reason why I barely have the desire to read any cozies. Kathy Mallory is not your ordinary detective. She's not your ordinary independent woman. She is a tough cookie with a past that sometimes helps her get to the bottom of a case and more often than not gets her into hot water. Right now Mallory seems to be up to her ears in hot water...but that's just another obstacle temporarily in her way. No problem for Mallory. This time four corpses have been dumped in front Gracie Mansion. These apparent murders hold a secret to a sick and devious mind. A stone cold killer that gives the orders. In the midst of these killings is a 12 year old child...a blind child that's gone missing. Is he related in some way to any of these victims? If so why wasn't he the 5th victim? Carol O'Connell has come through with this latest in her Detective Mallory series. Serious minded mystery lovers consider yourselves alerted!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Melliott

    I'm giving it 3.5 stars, but...it's the last of these I'm going to read. I'm so conflicted about this book. The characters unique to this novel--Jonah the blind boy, Angie (Sister Michael) the nun, and Iggy the hit man--are amazingly developed, realistic, and compelling. The side characters--Mallory's partner, Riker, her boss Coffey, my favorite cop Janos--are likewise still interesting in their familiarity, like old uncles you enjoy reminiscing about with your cousins. But the rest of the cast- I'm giving it 3.5 stars, but...it's the last of these I'm going to read. I'm so conflicted about this book. The characters unique to this novel--Jonah the blind boy, Angie (Sister Michael) the nun, and Iggy the hit man--are amazingly developed, realistic, and compelling. The side characters--Mallory's partner, Riker, her boss Coffey, my favorite cop Janos--are likewise still interesting in their familiarity, like old uncles you enjoy reminiscing about with your cousins. But the rest of the cast--Charles Butler, the rabbi, the pathologist, and Mallory herself--have turned into cliches of themselves--irritating ones. O'Connell might as well have lifted their descriptions, their dialogue, and their actions off the pages of book #1 in this series for all they have changed and grown. The first book was written in 1995--when does Mallory get any older? When do people start seeing or understanding her differently? When does she learn something--anything--from her actions? The central characters of this series are cardboard cutouts. It's depressing and frustrating from an author with so much talent. The plot in this one is so labyrinthine and weird, the "characters of the week" so wonderful. I had hopes, a few books back when she wrote about Mallory's personal life, that we were about to see a renaissance, but then she went back to the formula and the hopes died. In my opinion, she needs to dump her series and start over from scratch so she can really shine again.

  6. 4 out of 5

    LJ

    First Sentence: If they knew why he had come here, all these men would turn away. A Catholic nun and a young blind boy, Jonah Quill, have gone missing; vanished in front of a sidewalk full of people. The nun’s body, along with three others, turn up on the front lawn of Gracie Mansion, home to the mayor of New York City. But where is the boy; a boy who is the younger brother to the nun. Mallory will dig through all the lies, including those of the mayor, in order to find this lost child. Carol O First Sentence: If they knew why he had come here, all these men would turn away. A Catholic nun and a young blind boy, Jonah Quill, have gone missing; vanished in front of a sidewalk full of people. The nun’s body, along with three others, turn up on the front lawn of Gracie Mansion, home to the mayor of New York City. But where is the boy; a boy who is the younger brother to the nun. Mallory will dig through all the lies, including those of the mayor, in order to find this lost child. Carol O’Connell’s use of imagery never fails to impress—“The stall was shallow, sized to fit a narrow sidewalk that was choked with sneakers and sandals as the walking tour walked on.” Her descriptions of people are immediately recognizable—“The mayor’s aide, Samuel Tucker, was puffed up with all the importance of an entitled far boy from some college of fastidious twits.” Part of what makes Mallory such a captivating character is her complete distain for artifice. Mallory truly is one of those rare, completely unique characters who makes one extremely uncomfortable, but fascinating. It is the “humanness” of those around her who make her acceptable, even though she forces the world to deal with her on her terms. It’s not out of cruelty, but because it is the way she can control her world. Yet, one should not overlook the tiny “easter egg” O’Connell provides. And then there are those around her who, in a sense, inherited her. Her partner Riker, her superior Coffee, and all the others; particularly Charles, who is the antithesis is of Mallory. Although readers would really need to go back to the beginning of the series in order to fully understand these relationships, O’Connell does a good job of allowing new readers to step in and have a good sense of who they all are The plot is as complex and unique as are the characters, which is what makes this such a strong and compelling read. The times away from Mallory, and through Jonah, are where one really sees O’Connell’s ability to convey emotion. With O’Connell, it’s not the crime or the investigation that holds you, although it has suspense that peaks, then levels, then peaks again. It truly is the characters; both those who are continuing throughout the series, and those who are part only of this story. But most of all, it has the incomparable Mallory. “Blind Sight” is an excellent read. But above all, it is the writing and O’Connell’s ability to create something truly individual that draws one in and keeps one there to the very last word. BLIND SIGHT (Pol Proc-Det. Mallory-New York City-Contemp) - Ex O’Connell, Carol – 12th in series G.P. Putnam’s Sons – Sept 2016

  7. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Davies

    Disjointed writing style, unsympathetic characters and convoluted plot put this detective novel at the midway mark in my ratings of good cop thrillers. While there were moments of lucidity that kept me turning the pages, there were other moments when I had to go back and re-read pages to figure out what I missed. "Blind Sight" left me groping in the dark as I tried to follow the psychological make-up of the characters and the logical point of the plot. I think O'Connell has real talent, but this Disjointed writing style, unsympathetic characters and convoluted plot put this detective novel at the midway mark in my ratings of good cop thrillers. While there were moments of lucidity that kept me turning the pages, there were other moments when I had to go back and re-read pages to figure out what I missed. "Blind Sight" left me groping in the dark as I tried to follow the psychological make-up of the characters and the logical point of the plot. I think O'Connell has real talent, but this novel needed a more cohesive path to the light at the end of the tunnel.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I think I have burned out on Mallory. She's too predictable and the books too full of how she mesmerizes everyone by jerking them around, but they still love her, because she's well, herself. She gives them a reason to live, by jerking them around. She solves every crime by being one step ahead of everyone, even everyone all put together. Oh, well. I loved the first few. I think I have burned out on Mallory. She's too predictable and the books too full of how she mesmerizes everyone by jerking them around, but they still love her, because she's well, herself. She gives them a reason to live, by jerking them around. She solves every crime by being one step ahead of everyone, even everyone all put together. Oh, well. I loved the first few.

  9. 4 out of 5

    One Girl Collecting

    3.5 stars Even on her worst days, Carol O'Connell is an exceptional writer. She's a master at creating tension and twists. The characters she's created in and around Kathleen Mallory are compelling, flawed, and captivating. Unlike her other books, the mystery here is not who is killing people, but to what end? O'Connell very clearly lays out who the bad, unlikable characters are and easily lets you figure out who's behind the killings. Less clear is the ever dangling "brilliant," "fail proof" pla 3.5 stars Even on her worst days, Carol O'Connell is an exceptional writer. She's a master at creating tension and twists. The characters she's created in and around Kathleen Mallory are compelling, flawed, and captivating. Unlike her other books, the mystery here is not who is killing people, but to what end? O'Connell very clearly lays out who the bad, unlikable characters are and easily lets you figure out who's behind the killings. Less clear is the ever dangling "brilliant," "fail proof" plan behind the killings. O'Connell, via Mallory, spells it out at the end but like everything else in this novel it felt rather superficial. Mallory and her companions felt like caricatures of their earlier incarnations with constant reminders of their key characteristics: Riker's frumpy suits, love of alcohol, and suicidal leanings or Janos, the quiet spoken "gorilla," who could break a man in half if he wasn't so nice; Lt. Coffey the young, jaded captain with thinning hair.... The rest of the supporting cast came off equally flat or stereotyped, even Mallory, who acted more like a petulant child than the single-minded, sociopathic, truth-fighting machine we've come to admire. And for those interested in the Charles Butler character, just know that he doesn't play a huge role in this story. His character shows up about 1/3rd of the way through the book and is relegated to small, predictable scenes. Even though the returning characters felt flat, the story of Jonah (the blind child) and Iggy (his captor) was compelling and kept me reading. In fact, I finished this book in a day and a half. I just wish all of the characters had as much depth in this story as she gave to these two. Honestly, this book felt more like a carrier—something to get us to the next book (or books). Something in which O'Connell could start dropping hints of things to come. Of particular interest: • A flashback conversation between Lou Markowitz (Mallory's foster father) and his then partner Riker: "Lou Markowitz had known that his kid would surely die young. While sitting side by side on bar stools late one night, the man had said to Riker, 'When it happens, don't hold it against her. It won't be her fault.'" • A flash-forward moment of a 90-year old Charles remembering Mallory • A moment when Mallory returned to Iggy's house thought she heard the footstep of a ghost, before her logic explained it away. • And an epilogue, of sorts, in which we flash-forward & the author guides us through Mallory's sterile apartment pointing out clues to Mallory's humanity. Is it possible that O'Connell is preparing us for the inevitable? Will she kill Mallory? I know a lot of people felt as if her last 2 novels were just eh, and that this book marks O'Connell's return to Mallory—I'm just not sure. I will be very curious to see where the next book goes. Take away: The book is definitely worth a read, just don't expect deep backstory. It reads more like a stand-alone novel.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Megalion

    3.5 stars This is a hard book for me to review. It's the 12th book of a series I've not yet read. Overall, I enjoyed the story which had a variety of different crime elements that was an interesting mix! So please keep that in mind for the following comments. The book was about a third too long. With quite a few bizarre sentences such as the one about a door slam communicating a complex message. Those usually knocked me out of the story a bit. It was passable as a stand alone but I'd recommend a 3.5 stars This is a hard book for me to review. It's the 12th book of a series I've not yet read. Overall, I enjoyed the story which had a variety of different crime elements that was an interesting mix! So please keep that in mind for the following comments. The book was about a third too long. With quite a few bizarre sentences such as the one about a door slam communicating a complex message. Those usually knocked me out of the story a bit. It was passable as a stand alone but I'd recommend against it. It was daunting how much all the characters had contempt for each other. Very few were peaceable. This made it harder to get a sense of the different characters as individuals when all they thought about was how to slam each other. Mallory was especially vicious but this might have been tempered with a deeper understanding of the character from previous books. From other reviews, I get the impression that there was a decent amount of new back story for her. I'm intrigued by the writer's plot enough to consider going to book 1. My concern is whether or not the other books in the series are also overlong and full of one dimensional negative characters. I give 3 stars to okay books. I've added a half star for the intricacies of the plot. Yet due to the two major issues I had with the book, I've decided not to round up. Thank you to the publisher for the advanced copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Oh, I love Kathleen Mallory! These books are always complex, morbid puzzles of intrigue. When I discover a new volume is about to be published, I make sure to put my order in at the library for my place in line. This volume did not disappoint. The (fictional) mayor of New York is at the center of a complicated payback from the days when he was an investor who was responsible for some high-powered people losing big money. A 12-year old blind boy accidentally gets involved in a professional hit man Oh, I love Kathleen Mallory! These books are always complex, morbid puzzles of intrigue. When I discover a new volume is about to be published, I make sure to put my order in at the library for my place in line. This volume did not disappoint. The (fictional) mayor of New York is at the center of a complicated payback from the days when he was an investor who was responsible for some high-powered people losing big money. A 12-year old blind boy accidentally gets involved in a professional hit man's elimination of witnesses. Will Mallory and her colleagues rescue him in time? Why does the hit man kidnap before killing? What is at the heart of this story? The pages wouldn't turn fast enough.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Viccy

    A nun is murdered and a young blind boy is abducted. What do these two have in common with four other dead bodies thrown on the lawn of Gracie Mansion, the home of the mayor of New York, Andrew Polk, all missing their hearts? Kathy Mallory and her partner, Riker, and the rest of the Special Crimes Unit are stymied until Mallory starts putting the pieces together. A little computer hacking here, a little legal fraud there, a few hints dropped in the ear of the slimeball who acts as Polk's chief o A nun is murdered and a young blind boy is abducted. What do these two have in common with four other dead bodies thrown on the lawn of Gracie Mansion, the home of the mayor of New York, Andrew Polk, all missing their hearts? Kathy Mallory and her partner, Riker, and the rest of the Special Crimes Unit are stymied until Mallory starts putting the pieces together. A little computer hacking here, a little legal fraud there, a few hints dropped in the ear of the slimeball who acts as Polk's chief of staff, and soon, Mallory and Riker are on the trail of a professional hitman. Iggy Conway was a pro, but killing Sister Michael was the only thing he could do. Taking her nephew, Jonah Quill, will turn out to be the worst decision he ever made. How many other people will die?

  13. 5 out of 5

    Fabitha

    I'm really not sure how to rate this book. I read all of Mallory's series, in which this is the 12th book, and I'm a fan. I love her and all her inherited, grudgingly caring for her late-father's friends. I understand many don't consider a sociopath cop a likeable character, but I fell for her almost immediately. I love the always present hint of supernatural, the complex plots and the relationships between the main characters. Somehow I feel all of this lacking in this latest installment. There we I'm really not sure how to rate this book. I read all of Mallory's series, in which this is the 12th book, and I'm a fan. I love her and all her inherited, grudgingly caring for her late-father's friends. I understand many don't consider a sociopath cop a likeable character, but I fell for her almost immediately. I love the always present hint of supernatural, the complex plots and the relationships between the main characters. Somehow I feel all of this lacking in this latest installment. There were only glimpses of them, enough to make me care, but not enough to satisfy me. They all felt kind of dimmed to me, like they were acting at half of their potential. That said, I really liked the child, Jonah. His storyline was compelling and I think the author tried her best to render him credible. I don't want to spoil anything but that was the part that really made me go on. I also liked the backstory of the nun, sister Michael, the late Angel Quill. It was far fetched at times, but still held my attention and left me wanting to know more, as often happens with O'Connell victims. It's not just morbid curiosity, it's a real need to understand them better and try to give them justice. I'll never stop to love this books, and I'll sure keep reading them as they come. But maybe I won't re-read this one as I did for others (Stone Angel and Winter House over all).

  14. 5 out of 5

    Deborah

    3.5 stars Ordinarily, I insist on reading a series in order, but when I received an ARC of Carol O'Connell's Blind Sight, the twelfth book in her Kathleen Mallory series, with a September 20 review deadline, I had no other option but to dive right in. I am quite pleased to report that Blind Sight functions very nicely as a standalone novel. The plot is self-contained, with no connections or references to prior cases, and Mallory's relationships with the other characters are straightforward enough 3.5 stars Ordinarily, I insist on reading a series in order, but when I received an ARC of Carol O'Connell's Blind Sight, the twelfth book in her Kathleen Mallory series, with a September 20 review deadline, I had no other option but to dive right in. I am quite pleased to report that Blind Sight functions very nicely as a standalone novel. The plot is self-contained, with no connections or references to prior cases, and Mallory's relationships with the other characters are straightforward enough for a first-time reader. This is not to say that Mallory and O'Connell's other characters lack depth; in fact, I am anxious to learn more about Mallory, her partner Riker, and her psychologist friend Charles. Mallory is such a strong and intriguing person, however, that she is fully capable of carrying the book on her own. In this regard, she reminds me of Taylor Stevens's Vanessa Michael Munroe, another heroine whose dysfunctional, if not downright horrific, childhood has produced a psychologically fascinating adult. My only complaint, and the reason I gave Blind Sight 3.5 stars instead of 4, was that the plot was overly convoluted. The kidnappings and murders kept my attention, but the associated financial shenanigans almost lost me completely. Many thanks to Penguin Random House for introducing me to Kathleen Mallory (and for adding her 11 previous adventures to my already overburdened TBR shelf). I received a free copy of Blind Sight from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Quite a disappointment. I don't even know why she bothered to write this tbh. There's nothing special about it, and if O'Connell just loved the (unexciting) storyline she should have done it as a standalone with new characters a la Judas Child/Bone by Bone. The characterization is basically composed of bare-bones minimal sketches of the Mallory series stars - Charles Butler is a good guy who loves Mallory, Mallory is really cold and brilliant, Riker is a drunk - plus those directly involved with Quite a disappointment. I don't even know why she bothered to write this tbh. There's nothing special about it, and if O'Connell just loved the (unexciting) storyline she should have done it as a standalone with new characters a la Judas Child/Bone by Bone. The characterization is basically composed of bare-bones minimal sketches of the Mallory series stars - Charles Butler is a good guy who loves Mallory, Mallory is really cold and brilliant, Riker is a drunk - plus those directly involved with the main mystery who are all on the boring side. The dead nun is the only one with potential, but...well, her being dead is a big obstacle to her presence having layers. Theoretically surmountable, but in practice, not really. And of course the star should be Mallory, but like the last book there's almost zero of her POV. Annoying. The prose is still good, but everything else could have been outlined and ghostwritten by pretty much any mystery author out there. Plus...I'm still convinced that the 9th book was a perfect series finale, even if I loved the 10th book. Perhaps I can retcon things and choose to believe that the 9th book while published before the last couple is in fact set after them.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Laurel

    Carol O’Connell’s Mallory series has been a favorite of mine since I read the first in the series, Mallory’s Oracle, in the mid-90s. Kathy Mallory, or Mallory as she threatens she be called, fascinates. Is she a machine? Does she have a heart? A sociopath? And the plots to what I call “Mallory books” are equally fascinating. Dark, layered, always with a peek into her past, with a supporting cast that lends just a touch of humor where otherwise there would be none. That said Blind Sight disappoin Carol O’Connell’s Mallory series has been a favorite of mine since I read the first in the series, Mallory’s Oracle, in the mid-90s. Kathy Mallory, or Mallory as she threatens she be called, fascinates. Is she a machine? Does she have a heart? A sociopath? And the plots to what I call “Mallory books” are equally fascinating. Dark, layered, always with a peek into her past, with a supporting cast that lends just a touch of humor where otherwise there would be none. That said Blind Sight disappoints. The storyline or lines were never totally cleaned up for me and had me confused most of the time. I’ll be waiting for the next in the series in hopes this is a one-time occurrence.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Daisy

    I received this ebook from First to Read for an honest review. This is the first book by this author that I have read. The story was okay but felt a little predictable to me. There were several twists that I didn't see coming. I felt the character development could have been a little better. There were parts that just felt as though they were rushed and didn't really give enough information. I received this ebook from First to Read for an honest review. This is the first book by this author that I have read. The story was okay but felt a little predictable to me. There were several twists that I didn't see coming. I felt the character development could have been a little better. There were parts that just felt as though they were rushed and didn't really give enough information.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Inken

    I can't believe I'm saying this but this book was BORING. What happened?! Has Ms O'Connell simply run out of ideas? There was no suspense, no chemistry between the characters, everyone felt flat and one-dimensional. Even the murderer was dull. After struggling through half the book I eventually got to the point where I realized I simply didn't care what happened to anyone (except Charles who I just want to see get married so he can finally be let off the hook). I'm so disappointed. I can't believe I'm saying this but this book was BORING. What happened?! Has Ms O'Connell simply run out of ideas? There was no suspense, no chemistry between the characters, everyone felt flat and one-dimensional. Even the murderer was dull. After struggling through half the book I eventually got to the point where I realized I simply didn't care what happened to anyone (except Charles who I just want to see get married so he can finally be let off the hook). I'm so disappointed.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Linda Branham Greenwell

    Unlike past novels this one didn't repeat endlessly Mallory's quirks like the reader had forgotten her stunning looks, her way with computers, her driving or her people skills but instead showed them more than just stating them. There were fun references to her baby thief days but just the right amount and not overly mentioned. The usual cast of characters was back to support Mallory - but again their past is not overly referred to Good story Unlike past novels this one didn't repeat endlessly Mallory's quirks like the reader had forgotten her stunning looks, her way with computers, her driving or her people skills but instead showed them more than just stating them. There were fun references to her baby thief days but just the right amount and not overly mentioned. The usual cast of characters was back to support Mallory - but again their past is not overly referred to Good story

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sasha

    Like reading Law and Order, but more satisfying because you're reading instead of watching, filling in all the visual details yourself. A quick and delicious read. I will be seeking out the other novels in this series. Like reading Law and Order, but more satisfying because you're reading instead of watching, filling in all the visual details yourself. A quick and delicious read. I will be seeking out the other novels in this series.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Carl

    One of the greatest fictional creations in crime fiction, Kathy Mallory , is the highlight if this novel. Barbara Daniels recommended Carol O’Connell’ novels several years ago and I have never been disappointed in a Mallory novel.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dianne Retzlaff

    Lots of characters. Good story line.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    Mallory is one of the most interesting characters in mystery fiction. I have read them all and am already waiting for the next one. Mallory has been described as a sociopath - and maybe she is - she has her own sense of fairness, right and wrong, and has nothing but walls between her and the men who love her. And by men I mean her foster father (who is now dead) and his friends -aside from Charles, all these men love her like a daughter and worry over her. She is also the smartest in the room, a Mallory is one of the most interesting characters in mystery fiction. I have read them all and am already waiting for the next one. Mallory has been described as a sociopath - and maybe she is - she has her own sense of fairness, right and wrong, and has nothing but walls between her and the men who love her. And by men I mean her foster father (who is now dead) and his friends -aside from Charles, all these men love her like a daughter and worry over her. She is also the smartest in the room, a computer genius, and the best detective in the squad. What I liked about this story is how the entire squad - even to patrolmen - no longer fight Mallory- they know she is odd but that she's going to be right. I also like the boy, Jonah. I found the financial reasons for the crime to be a bit confusing and the plan by the bad guy to be a bit over the top but it's a small quibble for spending another few hours with Mallory. And at the end of each story, I always feel sorry for Charles.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Peggy Jaeger

    The murder of a cloistered nun; the kidnapping of a blind boy; a corrupt Mayor; a thoroughly fascinating and intelligent hitman. All join one of crime fiction's most engaging, brilliant police detectives, Kathy Mallory, in the new Mallory book, Blind Sight. On a typical day in Manhattan, NY ( -the city is another of the great characters in the O'Connell books-) a nun with the Christian name Angela Quill is kidnapped, her dead body and those of 3 other victims dumped at Gracie Mansion a few days l The murder of a cloistered nun; the kidnapping of a blind boy; a corrupt Mayor; a thoroughly fascinating and intelligent hitman. All join one of crime fiction's most engaging, brilliant police detectives, Kathy Mallory, in the new Mallory book, Blind Sight. On a typical day in Manhattan, NY ( -the city is another of the great characters in the O'Connell books-) a nun with the Christian name Angela Quill is kidnapped, her dead body and those of 3 other victims dumped at Gracie Mansion a few days later. The same day Angie goes missing, her blind eleven year old nephew is kidnapped. It takes days for anyone in law enforcement to make the connection because Angie is now known by her taken name Sr. Michael. Once the connection is made by Kathy Mallory, the hunt is on for the -hopefully-still alive boy. Mallory's quest to find Jonah Quill has her taking on the mayor, the Catholic church, the SEC and some of the society elite of NYC. All are part of an elaborate scheme of blackmail, murder, and greed. All of my favorite Mallory cohorts play roles in Blind Sight. From her much-maligned partner, Riker, to psychologist, genius, and Mallory's true love ( although she doesn't know it), Charles Butler, Mallory's harried superior Jack Coffey, and old friends of her now deceased foster father Lou Markowitz. Every male in the book loves Kathy in his own way, and every one is at the same time terrified of her amazing insights into the criminal mind, and terrified for her that every case will be her last. Iggy Conroy, the hitman/kidnapper, is a character that, if he were on the side of the angels instead of the devil's spawn, would merit his own series of crime books. He is intelligent, cunning, on-the-edge of a breakdown, and demonstrates a real heart several times thoughout the book. I have been a fan of the Kathy Mallory books since the very first one ever hit the shelves. Carol O'Connell's mastery of language, description, and in-your-face-true-to-life-characters is unparalleled.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    Blind Sight, the 12th book in Carol O'Connell's Kathy Mallory mystery series, begins with the disappearance of a nun and former child prostitute, the kidnapping of her blind nephew, and the appearance of four heartless bodies on the lawn of the mayor. As usual in this excellent crime fiction series, we see the often-described-as-a-sociopath Detective Kathy Mallory through the eyes of her various associates as she follows the case with her usual intuitive leaps. New York City and its underworld is Blind Sight, the 12th book in Carol O'Connell's Kathy Mallory mystery series, begins with the disappearance of a nun and former child prostitute, the kidnapping of her blind nephew, and the appearance of four heartless bodies on the lawn of the mayor. As usual in this excellent crime fiction series, we see the often-described-as-a-sociopath Detective Kathy Mallory through the eyes of her various associates as she follows the case with her usual intuitive leaps. New York City and its underworld is a supporting character in this series, and is populated with Ms. O'Connell's signature cast of the fabulously wealthy and the destitute, prostitutes and their clients, cops and sociopaths (and a cop who also happens to be a sociopath). The NYPD and their most unusual detective investigate a series of random murders and search for the blind boy Jonah as they follow the trail from the mayor of New York city to members of the Catholic church. For fans of the Kathy Mallory series, there are still bits and pieces to savor in this 12th outing. To be honest, the resolution of the mystery was still incomprehensible even after it was explained, but the unraveling of the mystery is entertaining to follow, mainly due to the vivid supporting characters - Mallory's partner and "garden variety drunk" Riker; brilliant, clownish, and soft-hearted Charles Butler, the man who loves Mallory; and others, like Rabbi Kaplan and chief medical examiner Dr. Slope, who have watched Mallory grow from baby sociopath to adult with varying degrees of despair. As sociopathic and irredeemable as Mallory might seem, the author unveils just enough small but telling details to show not that Mallory is growing, but that there was always something there, just enough to know that all these people who continually break their hearts over her are justified in doing so. https://upallnightbookreviews.wordpre...

  26. 5 out of 5

    Barb in Maryland

    3.5 stars One thing you can always count on in a Mallory book is a really twisted plot that somehow makes sense at the end of the book. You can also count on well-developed secondary characters: Jonah (the blind boy) is a darling and the hit man is wonderfully scary. The writing is smart, with a sly humor. What keeps me from marking this higher is my belief that Mallory, Riker, Charles and the other continuing characters have lost their spark. To me they seem like cardboard versions of their earli 3.5 stars One thing you can always count on in a Mallory book is a really twisted plot that somehow makes sense at the end of the book. You can also count on well-developed secondary characters: Jonah (the blind boy) is a darling and the hit man is wonderfully scary. The writing is smart, with a sly humor. What keeps me from marking this higher is my belief that Mallory, Riker, Charles and the other continuing characters have lost their spark. To me they seem like cardboard versions of their earlier selves. Their emotion seems to be missing, IMHO. (I have read all of the Mallory books, the first 9 several times each. Quite frankly, I thought the series came to a beautiful end with 'Find Me'.) New readers can jump right in with this one; it totally stands alone--no references to prior cases and adequate backstory on the main characters. Long time readers will notice that Mallory and company have not aged a bit from the very first book ('Mallory's Oracle'/1995). The tech has kept up with the passage of the years, but Mallory is forever young.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    This is #12 in a series for the protagonist but the first that I've read. I admit that I just didn't enjoy the writer's style. O'Connell liked to leave ideas hanging, as though they had been figured out by someone without our protagonist clearly stating the 'obvious.' The problem was that I had no idea what the obvious conclusion was. Or the author would change the reference name of a character from his last name to his first without necessarily giving a reason or suggesting a change in intimacy This is #12 in a series for the protagonist but the first that I've read. I admit that I just didn't enjoy the writer's style. O'Connell liked to leave ideas hanging, as though they had been figured out by someone without our protagonist clearly stating the 'obvious.' The problem was that I had no idea what the obvious conclusion was. Or the author would change the reference name of a character from his last name to his first without necessarily giving a reason or suggesting a change in intimacy. Layered on top of a confusing mystery, this was all just extra muddle. The prescient narrator was tiresome in the way it played with the reader. Beyond that, was it a good mystery? I'm not sure. All of the characters, with the exception of the boy, were loathsome, some more so than others. Finishing the book didn't make me any happier than not finishing it would have. That's the best summary I can provide. I received my copy from Penguin's First to Read program.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jaime

    For a story in a series about a certain detective (my first -- the cover caught my eye amid some new releases), I kept wondering when the detective would have something to add. She was the least interesting character. The parts with the blind kid and hitman were the best. I never quite bought the reality of the characters in the mayor's office, or the rich people who come into the story for a few pages. Could the author mention "tailoring" a few dozen more times? I guess that's her challenge for For a story in a series about a certain detective (my first -- the cover caught my eye amid some new releases), I kept wondering when the detective would have something to add. She was the least interesting character. The parts with the blind kid and hitman were the best. I never quite bought the reality of the characters in the mayor's office, or the rich people who come into the story for a few pages. Could the author mention "tailoring" a few dozen more times? I guess that's her challenge for the next book. Clever scheme that falls flat in the end. Show me Mallory being the weird deviant, rather than telling me (even if it's through the author's creative technique of making her supporting cast's eyes most important). Maybe then, I'll buy it.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Michele

    I am always happy to read another installment in the Mallory series by Carol O’Connell. While the mystery and the motivation of the villain barely made any sense (four random bodies?), it is always good to see the members of the Louis Markowitz Floating Poker Game. Instead of allowing Mallory to exhibit unique behavior, the author seemed content to repeatedly tell the reader how afraid everyone was of her. The most interesting part of the book was Jonah’s descriptions of being blind. I appreciat I am always happy to read another installment in the Mallory series by Carol O’Connell. While the mystery and the motivation of the villain barely made any sense (four random bodies?), it is always good to see the members of the Louis Markowitz Floating Poker Game. Instead of allowing Mallory to exhibit unique behavior, the author seemed content to repeatedly tell the reader how afraid everyone was of her. The most interesting part of the book was Jonah’s descriptions of being blind. I appreciate being a Goodreads Giveaways winner and thank G.P. Putnam's Sons for the advance reading copy.

  30. 5 out of 5

    KimWin

    Defective Mallory is an incredible character I have read all of the other books in this series and I as very excited to be able to read this advance copy from Penguin's First to Read program. Some authors lose the freshness of a series when they have written several books. That is not true for Ms. McConnell. Each of the books in this series is fresh and incredibly well plotted. I couldn't wait for the resolution but then I was sad that it was over. You will want to read the rest of the series af Defective Mallory is an incredible character I have read all of the other books in this series and I as very excited to be able to read this advance copy from Penguin's First to Read program. Some authors lose the freshness of a series when they have written several books. That is not true for Ms. McConnell. Each of the books in this series is fresh and incredibly well plotted. I couldn't wait for the resolution but then I was sad that it was over. You will want to read the rest of the series after this one, so be prepared to binge read the rest. Don't miss out on this book or the series!

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