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On the shores of Yeflam, Ayae struggles to keep her people together. She acts as liaison between the camp leaders and the immortals who could save them. Zaifyr's immortal siblings have arrived—but they have their own unfathomable agendas and Ayae is caught in their power games. Heast has returned to his role as Captain of Refuge, a mercenary unit that answers the call of l On the shores of Yeflam, Ayae struggles to keep her people together. She acts as liaison between the camp leaders and the immortals who could save them. Zaifyr's immortal siblings have arrived—but they have their own unfathomable agendas and Ayae is caught in their power games. Heast has returned to his role as Captain of Refuge, a mercenary unit that answers the call of lost causes. With help from an unexpected source, Heast and his band of mercenaries could turn the tide of war—if they live long enough. Bueralan Le is trapped in the company of the new god child. Though he fights to prevent her from unleashing her forces on the world, he is bound by blood to her darkest creation. The future of the world may depend on his choices.


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On the shores of Yeflam, Ayae struggles to keep her people together. She acts as liaison between the camp leaders and the immortals who could save them. Zaifyr's immortal siblings have arrived—but they have their own unfathomable agendas and Ayae is caught in their power games. Heast has returned to his role as Captain of Refuge, a mercenary unit that answers the call of l On the shores of Yeflam, Ayae struggles to keep her people together. She acts as liaison between the camp leaders and the immortals who could save them. Zaifyr's immortal siblings have arrived—but they have their own unfathomable agendas and Ayae is caught in their power games. Heast has returned to his role as Captain of Refuge, a mercenary unit that answers the call of lost causes. With help from an unexpected source, Heast and his band of mercenaries could turn the tide of war—if they live long enough. Bueralan Le is trapped in the company of the new god child. Though he fights to prevent her from unleashing her forces on the world, he is bound by blood to her darkest creation. The future of the world may depend on his choices.

30 review for The Eternal Kingdom

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bookwraiths

    Originally reviewed at Bookwraiths. Ben Peek shines in The Eternal Kingdom, the final installment of The Children Trilogy. This story a complex, detailed and imaginative narrative which challenges its readers to keep up, but rewards those who do so. For those not up-to-date with this series, suffice it to say that the preceding two books have chronicled the birth of a new god and the havoc such an event has unleashed across the world. Wars, untold destruction, and the displacement of whole people Originally reviewed at Bookwraiths. Ben Peek shines in The Eternal Kingdom, the final installment of The Children Trilogy. This story a complex, detailed and imaginative narrative which challenges its readers to keep up, but rewards those who do so. For those not up-to-date with this series, suffice it to say that the preceding two books have chronicled the birth of a new god and the havoc such an event has unleashed across the world. Wars, untold destruction, and the displacement of whole people merely a few of the consequences of the arrival of this unlooked-for deity. Caught up in the cascading crash of events has been a cast of very different characters. Some have survived up to this point, while others have lost their lives. The returning faces this time around are Bueralan Le, Ayae and Heast, who strive to deal with the newest phase of chaos. Ayae has become the unwilling liaison between the war refugees and the immortals who are attempting to decided what to do about the new divinity. Heast has fallen in with a band of mercenaries as they decide to take up a lost cause. And Bueralan has the unenviable task of being caught up with the new god, Se’Saera, forced to make choices which might determine the fate of the world. From these various point-of-view characters Ben Peek weaves a story focused on Se’Saera’s attempt to claim the status of supreme god of the world and what that would actually mean for the world itself. People are hurt; bad things happen to beloved characters; and no one – I mean, no one – is safe from the executioner’s axe. While I have grown fond of all the characters in this epic tale, what I continued to view as the strength of Ben Peek’s work is the world building. The author having crafted a breathtakingly fantasy setting, filled with history, lore, and all the trapping of civilization. It is a place any reader who loves exotic vistas will adore, because it is just so damn complex, filled to the brim with diversity, and realistic to a fault. As for any weakness in The Eternal Kingdom, if pressed, I’d point to the irregular pacing. Many times, the narrative just seemed to creep along when a reader would expect it to be traveling rapidly. At other points it whizzed by like a roller coaster when a slower, more methodical approach seemed warranted. And this failure to set a pace, maintain it, and modulate it did bother me at times. An emotional series with grey characters, a majestic world, deadly magic, and real consequences, The Children Trilogy has been a wild ride for me as a reader, causing me to ponder some interesting questions and find myself surprised at the answers the story provided me. Certainly, there has been times I was overwhelmed by all the concepts and information thrown at me, but after completing the journey with The Eternal Kingdom, I find it was time well spent, and I’d encourage other fantasy lovers to give Ben Peek’s series a try. I received this book from the author in exchange for a fair and honest review. I’d like to thank him for allowing me to receive this review copy and inform everyone that the review you have read is my opinion alone.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ben Peek

    I totally, 100% look forward to seeing this book published. It'll be the end of my first ever fantasy trilogy. Publication date is expected to be June 2017. If you have any questions, please feel free to ask them, and thank you all who have enjoyed the series, and come this far. Be sure to tell your friends about it - all the things you all say means more than all the words I can say about it. I totally, 100% look forward to seeing this book published. It'll be the end of my first ever fantasy trilogy. Publication date is expected to be June 2017. If you have any questions, please feel free to ask them, and thank you all who have enjoyed the series, and come this far. Be sure to tell your friends about it - all the things you all say means more than all the words I can say about it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    THE BIBLIOPHILE (Rituranjan)

    A most befitting, satisfying, yet poignant end to an amazing trilogy I have read in the fantasy genre. Ben Peek brings his conclusion to the story in such a elegant way that I was reminded of the ending of LOTR. The Eternal Kingdom isn't a light read though, because it swerves betwixt light and grim-dark, and is epic in scale with tons of worldbuilding that progresses around the plot. It is a slow burner, but don't let that disappoint you...for it is slow in the sense of slow-roasting meat dripp A most befitting, satisfying, yet poignant end to an amazing trilogy I have read in the fantasy genre. Ben Peek brings his conclusion to the story in such a elegant way that I was reminded of the ending of LOTR. The Eternal Kingdom isn't a light read though, because it swerves betwixt light and grim-dark, and is epic in scale with tons of worldbuilding that progresses around the plot. It is a slow burner, but don't let that disappoint you...for it is slow in the sense of slow-roasting meat dripping in fat, and at the end you will feel deliciously rewarded. I will give one high praise to the author - 'Mr. Ben Peek, Tolkien would have been proud if he read your fantastic trilogy!' The story unfolds right after the destruction of Yeflam and death of Zaifyr in Leviathan's Blood. Lady Wagan is trying to provide her people a stable home, while the threat of the Leeran god Saesera looms in the minds of people. Every ancient Immortal comes into the war against the new god, and the politics of mortals are caught in between the conflict. Peek here gives us a detailed character delineation on the nature of Gods and their war, and also provides us with keen insight into Saesera who wants to remake the world in her image. All the plotlines converge in this final story, but the reader will have to concentrate hard if he is to follow the vast panorama of events unfolding as myth, legend, and history mingle into this godless world. I liked every bit of this book. The most difficult aspect for me was to understand the journey that Zaifyr takes to the 'City of the Dead'. The events almost seemed beyond the comprehension of my perceptive skills, as the things happens seem almost on a surrealistic level. But, it was nicely done bordering with abstract metaphysical conceit. However, the most exciting thing about this book is the brilliant battle scenes which Peek renders with simple clarity. The gore, chaos, destruction is gut-wrenchingly described. I liked the confrontations with the Innocent. However, I have a niggle here, the author neglected the 'blade prince of Saan' in his fight with Aela Ren. I knew he was going to die, but the author must have given him a few moments to prove his fighting skills with the Innocent rather than killing him abruptly. And, I also liked and enjoyed the stone giants of Eidan creating havoc. The Refuge of Captain Heast was a sight to read in the battle scenes, and Ayae, she shines in the end with a dazzling fire. Most of all, the action in this book is awesome. The Eternal Kingdom is the most strong book in the trilogy. I got no loose ends in the story as of my notice. The excellent worldbuilding, complex and interesting characters, amazing action sequences and the subtle politics makes this book a worthy read. I realize that the 'Children Trilogy' isn't as well known as the big names in the genre, but given time I feel it would create a niche among the great. All fantasy readers should give it a try. Plunge into the world of gods and Immortals, and, believe me, its magic will find its winding way into your very being!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Erika

    This was a tremendously well written ending to an Epic trilogy. I am thrilled that Ben Peek shared his talent with us. The Eternal Kingdom held up to and improved upon the vastness of his story. There is a richness in the writing that hold true for the entire fully formed trilogy. The depth to the philosophies discussed, and those behind the battles fought and won or lost is breathtaking. I recommend this book and his previous two in the series The Children Trilogy to anyone who desires their fic This was a tremendously well written ending to an Epic trilogy. I am thrilled that Ben Peek shared his talent with us. The Eternal Kingdom held up to and improved upon the vastness of his story. There is a richness in the writing that hold true for the entire fully formed trilogy. The depth to the philosophies discussed, and those behind the battles fought and won or lost is breathtaking. I recommend this book and his previous two in the series The Children Trilogy to anyone who desires their fiction to be fraught with the question "why?" in regards to life, death, and the myriad beliefs in all sorts of God.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

    I received this as a review copy from the author, at no cost.  This is the third and last book in the Children trilogy by Ben Peek. It does not stand on its own because it is building on, drawing together, exploding, and generally messing with ideas and characters from the previous two books. If you enjoy epic fantasy with rather grim repercussions for its characters, detailed world building and surprising twists, then just stop reading now and go grab the earlier books. Seriously, it's worth it; I received this as a review copy from the author, at no cost.  This is the third and last book in the Children trilogy by Ben Peek. It does not stand on its own because it is building on, drawing together, exploding, and generally messing with ideas and characters from the previous two books. If you enjoy epic fantasy with rather grim repercussions for its characters, detailed world building and surprising twists, then just stop reading now and go grab the earlier books. Seriously, it's worth it; this is the sort of trilogy to read when you really want to get your teeth into a set of characters and be thrown completely into their lives. And look - the series is finished! So you don't have to worry about being left in the lurch!  So, when we left the series last time the new god had just broken through properly and was causing some havoc. Where 'some' is 'a significant amount'. And following through with our newly-named god, as she tries to claim paramount status in a world that's not really sure if it wants her and what that would actually mean for the world, is the focus of the whole book. The looks different for different characters of course: Bueralan has his very personal struggles as well as being caught up in the politics of a new god, while Ayae isn't particularly happy about being an intermediary between different groups and the other immortals are largely unknowable and definitely have their own agenda. And then there's Heast, and the other characters we've come to appreciate over the earlier two books... the ones who aren't dead yet, anyway. Well, mostly the ones who aren't dead. Death has a somewhat... permeable... nature here.  I'm not going to lie, there are some unpleasant things that happen to characters throughout this  book, and I was never sure who was going to survive and who wasn't. It's a measure of the books, though, that I cared about that fact. And I did. I really did. When the Innocent, murdering sunuva that he is, appeared on any page I was worried (and he appears quite a lot in this book, so I spent a lot of time chewing my [metaphorical] nails). And the new god, who has definitely shown herself to be largely reprehensible... well, continues on that track but of course maybe she's not all that bad and ARGH how do I figure out what to actually think? Curse you Peek and your morally grey characters and novels!  You will probably find that this series plays on your emotions. You may find yourself yelling at Peek (I'm sure he can handle it) and various characters (most of them deserve it). If you buy just the first one... well, I am not to blame if you have to go and buy the next two in short order. 

  6. 5 out of 5

    Scott Belisle

    I could not imagine a more fitting ending to this trilogy. Sometimes slow, sometimes confusing, but always thoughtful. The book engages with some weighty questions, and though not all of them are answered satisfactorily (or at all), I don't think you could expect them all to be answered. Probably my biggest complaint is the addition of Eilona, the daughter of Muriel Wagan, as a perspective character. I understand that Ben Peek wanted a character to provide an outside perspective on the events go I could not imagine a more fitting ending to this trilogy. Sometimes slow, sometimes confusing, but always thoughtful. The book engages with some weighty questions, and though not all of them are answered satisfactorily (or at all), I don't think you could expect them all to be answered. Probably my biggest complaint is the addition of Eilona, the daughter of Muriel Wagan, as a perspective character. I understand that Ben Peek wanted a character to provide an outside perspective on the events going on in the remnants of Yeflam, but adding an additional character so late in the series means I didn't spend enough time getting to know them or their perspectives. On the other hand, the climax in her plot thread is very satisfying.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    An excellent end to a great series. Funnily enough I was never enthralled, rushing through the books, but the series kept me interested and reading and didn't disappoint at any point. It's a more mature and thoughtful version of the Divine Cities. What is the nature of the gods, do they deserve our respect, should we control our own destiny? Plus interesting characters both good and bad, male and female who all have their own believable arcs. Definitely worth a read. An excellent end to a great series. Funnily enough I was never enthralled, rushing through the books, but the series kept me interested and reading and didn't disappoint at any point. It's a more mature and thoughtful version of the Divine Cities. What is the nature of the gods, do they deserve our respect, should we control our own destiny? Plus interesting characters both good and bad, male and female who all have their own believable arcs. Definitely worth a read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cory

    3.5/5--While at times tedious, the series overall was different and had some compelling elements. I would have liked more in-depth character development on some of the main players, and perhaps some extended action sequences. Recommended overall though.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Steve Herrley

    Definitely the best in the series. It’s been a while since I’ve read a book with such a satisfying ending. I was prepared to be underwhelmed but instead found that the characters’ motives and feelings were expertly fleshed out and entirely believable.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Stuart Reed

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nick

  12. 5 out of 5

    Simon Ellberger

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mark Keal

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dan

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chris Copley

  16. 5 out of 5

    Miguel Fernandes

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ricardo Guerrero

  18. 4 out of 5

    Emma

  19. 4 out of 5

    Thyas6

  20. 5 out of 5

    Daithi-Benji

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bernice

  22. 5 out of 5

    CalPerkins

  23. 5 out of 5

    Cyber

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alina Dinu

  25. 4 out of 5

    Arijit Sarkar

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kalon

  27. 5 out of 5

    The Elven Ascendent

    the previous books in this trilogy were good paced and seemed to be leading up to a climax ending - however this book failed to deliver. a character dies and I had to re-read the paragraph a few times as it seemed to of been an after thought disappointing end to what could of been a good series

  28. 5 out of 5

    Drew Perry

  29. 5 out of 5

    Robert

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brian D. Johnson

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