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Dorothy Day is remembered as one of the great women of our age. Her admirers want to make her a saint, though she often protested. What hidden strength did this woman possess that continues to inspire people today? In clear, simple reflections, this little spiritual guidebook offers insights and wisdom Dorothy Day gained during many decades of seeking to know Jesus and to f Dorothy Day is remembered as one of the great women of our age. Her admirers want to make her a saint, though she often protested. What hidden strength did this woman possess that continues to inspire people today? In clear, simple reflections, this little spiritual guidebook offers insights and wisdom Dorothy Day gained during many decades of seeking to know Jesus and to follow his example and teachings in her own life. Unlike larger collections and biographies, which cover her radical views, exceptional deeds, and amazing life story, this book focuses on an intensely personal dimension of Dorothy Day’s life: Where did she receive strength to stay true to her God-given calling? What was the wellspring of her deep faith and her love for all humanity? “The solution proposed in the Gospels is that of voluntary poverty and the works of mercy. It is the little way. It is within the power of all. Everybody can begin here and now. . . . We have the greatest weapons in the world, greater than any hydrogen or atom bomb, and they are the weapons of poverty and prayer, fasting and alms, the reckless spending of ourselves in God’s service and for his poor. Without poverty we will not have learned love, and love, at the end, is the measure by which we shall be judged.” Dorothy Day, The Catholic Worker, April 1950


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Dorothy Day is remembered as one of the great women of our age. Her admirers want to make her a saint, though she often protested. What hidden strength did this woman possess that continues to inspire people today? In clear, simple reflections, this little spiritual guidebook offers insights and wisdom Dorothy Day gained during many decades of seeking to know Jesus and to f Dorothy Day is remembered as one of the great women of our age. Her admirers want to make her a saint, though she often protested. What hidden strength did this woman possess that continues to inspire people today? In clear, simple reflections, this little spiritual guidebook offers insights and wisdom Dorothy Day gained during many decades of seeking to know Jesus and to follow his example and teachings in her own life. Unlike larger collections and biographies, which cover her radical views, exceptional deeds, and amazing life story, this book focuses on an intensely personal dimension of Dorothy Day’s life: Where did she receive strength to stay true to her God-given calling? What was the wellspring of her deep faith and her love for all humanity? “The solution proposed in the Gospels is that of voluntary poverty and the works of mercy. It is the little way. It is within the power of all. Everybody can begin here and now. . . . We have the greatest weapons in the world, greater than any hydrogen or atom bomb, and they are the weapons of poverty and prayer, fasting and alms, the reckless spending of ourselves in God’s service and for his poor. Without poverty we will not have learned love, and love, at the end, is the measure by which we shall be judged.” Dorothy Day, The Catholic Worker, April 1950

30 review for The Reckless Way of Love: Notes on Following Jesus (Plough Spiritual Guides: Backpack Classics)

  1. 4 out of 5

    David

    A Chicken Soup for the Soul for those who find the real Chicken Soup for the Soul too sweet to stomach. This one has a lot more vinegar in it. I like vinegar. The affirmations, when they come, sound like this: “Why should we try to see results? It is enough to keep on in the face of defeat” (p. 76). If sentiments like that don't keep the lights on for you, I can't blame you, but it's reassuring for me to know that people who did a truckload of good in this world spent a great deal of time wrestli A Chicken Soup for the Soul for those who find the real Chicken Soup for the Soul too sweet to stomach. This one has a lot more vinegar in it. I like vinegar. The affirmations, when they come, sound like this: “Why should we try to see results? It is enough to keep on in the face of defeat” (p. 76). If sentiments like that don't keep the lights on for you, I can't blame you, but it's reassuring for me to know that people who did a truckload of good in this world spent a great deal of time wrestling with the suspicion that it all really didn't make any difference. Some of the most enjoyable bits to read are short passages when she writes about ordinary life, like the joy she gets from a park or an infuriating (for me, not Day) episode when a bitter old alcoholic whom Day had previously helped calls the police on her. Each episode seems to have a little point to it, but it's not too overbearingly preachy. I also liked the passage when she talked about the spontaneous displays of friendliness and generosity she saw as a child when living just outside San Francisco at the time of 1906 earthquake, which broke down barriers between neighbors. Why can't we just act like that all the time? Day seems to be asking. Day appeals to me because I often find it difficult to maintain interest in more conventional books about spirituality, which frequently contain dull but worthy ideas from some still-living professor of theology. Day's go-to quotes about her spiritual experience come not from somebody's sermon, but from The Stranger, The Brothers Karamazov, or The Screwtape Letters. I guess I like this partly due to intellectual vanity, but any spiritual lesson I get should have stunning turn of phrase from great wordsmith, because I have a tiny attention span and also forget things easily. Day not only wants to down on your knees praying regularly with sincerity and enthusiasm, but she also wants you – especially when you feel exhausted – stick around in the office after you had planned to go home and clean two rooms, so the maid won't have to work so hard that evening. This is not Sunday-only faith for dilettantes. If you're not pushing yourself to do the dullest and least rewarding act for people whom, if they find out what you are doing, are likely to be ungrateful, then you're doing it wrong. This book is also 130 pages and in a little square format. This is, I guess, to encourage you – even in the age of smart phones – to stuff it into the pocket of your sport jacket, or perhaps your purse. Of course, where I live it's usually too hot to wear a sport jacket and I am much, MUCH too manly to carry a purse. (This? It's a “messenger bag”, dammit, and wipe that smirk off your head.) The book is also mentioned at the end of an entertaining article in the March 2017 edition of The Atlantic here. The article is mainly a review of a new biography written by Day's granddaughter Kate Hennessey, Dorothy Day; The World Will Be Saved By Beauty: An Intimate Portrait of Dorothy Day. Won in a Goodreads giveaway – thanks for the free stuff!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Cassondra Windwalker

    An intimate glimpse into Dorothy Day's stream of consciousness, this book is a collection of often random sentences and paragraphs on a variety of ideas and questions that informed Day's devotion to God and her daily choices. It took me perhaps an hour or a little more to read through the book, including its introduction and biographical notes. As someone unfamiliar with Day, footnotes with information pertaining to particular people, places, and events to which she refers would have been helpfu An intimate glimpse into Dorothy Day's stream of consciousness, this book is a collection of often random sentences and paragraphs on a variety of ideas and questions that informed Day's devotion to God and her daily choices. It took me perhaps an hour or a little more to read through the book, including its introduction and biographical notes. As someone unfamiliar with Day, footnotes with information pertaining to particular people, places, and events to which she refers would have been helpful, as I was scanning Google at the same time as I attempted to decipher her meaning. If these are all of her writings, that is unfortunate. Her radical willingness to devote herself entirely to her beliefs is intriguing and encouraging, and more of her inner mind would be fascinating to explore. If these are not all of her writings, then I would rather have read a more complete collection. Regardless of these caveats, the brief incursion into her philosophy was powerful and engaging, well worth the hour it took. I would best recommend this as an addition to other, more in-depth works on Dorothy Day. This book was received as a Goodreads Giveaway.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jackie St Hilaire

    Are we not our brother's and sister's keeper? One never knows when he/she will be in need of support from another. Often times it is easier for us to give than to receive. It takes humility to ask for help, to ask for prayers, to ask forgiveness. Dorothy Day gives us insights of her own spiritual journey of giving and receiving. Of letting go of unnecessary attachments.and giving from her substance. Dorothy shares her own vulnerabilities in following Jesus' path. Dorothy embraced her humanity, her g Are we not our brother's and sister's keeper? One never knows when he/she will be in need of support from another. Often times it is easier for us to give than to receive. It takes humility to ask for help, to ask for prayers, to ask forgiveness. Dorothy Day gives us insights of her own spiritual journey of giving and receiving. Of letting go of unnecessary attachments.and giving from her substance. Dorothy shares her own vulnerabilities in following Jesus' path. Dorothy embraced her humanity, her goodness along with her faults. Removing the log from her own eyes, enabled her to see the soul of the other reflected back to her. No easy task to strip yourself naked and become vulnerable. "We are all here with each other because we need each other, Those who help and those who are helped". Kiran Yocom.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ally

    I love reading Dorothy Day's thoughts and spiritual musings on various parts of following after Jesus. Although I read this book in bite size pieces--and enjoyed it--I felt like the general flow was a little off. Highly recommend The Long Loneliness first, this book would be best for someone who is already familiar with her story and the Catholic Worker. I love reading Dorothy Day's thoughts and spiritual musings on various parts of following after Jesus. Although I read this book in bite size pieces--and enjoyed it--I felt like the general flow was a little off. Highly recommend The Long Loneliness first, this book would be best for someone who is already familiar with her story and the Catholic Worker.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Northpapers

    Sabbath Book #16 for 2018. I aspire to poverty, but it crushes me so easily. The anxiety and despair and weakness overwhelm me, so I make concessions. How can one love God enough to be poor, to really be among the poor and to experience faith, hope, and love? I have not found the answer, at least not in a very thorough way yet. But there is some thought in this book that points in the right direction. I was grateful for Day's wisdom, for her rich reflection on community, for her rejection of super Sabbath Book #16 for 2018. I aspire to poverty, but it crushes me so easily. The anxiety and despair and weakness overwhelm me, so I make concessions. How can one love God enough to be poor, to really be among the poor and to experience faith, hope, and love? I have not found the answer, at least not in a very thorough way yet. But there is some thought in this book that points in the right direction. I was grateful for Day's wisdom, for her rich reflection on community, for her rejection of superficial answers like self-love and material security. This collection of her thoughts feels both promising and scattered. It is a collection of excerpts from her work across a fascinating life and journey. It contains tastes of her wisdom, but does not set the table or invite me to the feast. I'm eager to read her other work, which might be the point of this collection.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Coleen

    When I indicate that I am 'finished' with this book, that is really not the case. I will continue to go back to excerpts and chapters that I found inspirational. This is a short book containing 'notes' mostly taken from other writings that Dorothy Day produced throughout her life. I was not [still am not] that familiar with her or her life, but what she has written that has been selected for this book has heartened me and impressed me. I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway. When I indicate that I am 'finished' with this book, that is really not the case. I will continue to go back to excerpts and chapters that I found inspirational. This is a short book containing 'notes' mostly taken from other writings that Dorothy Day produced throughout her life. I was not [still am not] that familiar with her or her life, but what she has written that has been selected for this book has heartened me and impressed me. I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gilbert

    Wow. What a great book that put together only some of Dorothy Day's writings in a thematic way. I have only read about her in another book, "The Life You Save May Be Your Own," but this was a great little summary about how she thought. I highly recommend this book to anyone wanting some inspiration to be a great Christian, a great person, a courageous light in bleak scenarios. I found this a great daily reading companion rather than speed read through it. Wow. What a great book that put together only some of Dorothy Day's writings in a thematic way. I have only read about her in another book, "The Life You Save May Be Your Own," but this was a great little summary about how she thought. I highly recommend this book to anyone wanting some inspiration to be a great Christian, a great person, a courageous light in bleak scenarios. I found this a great daily reading companion rather than speed read through it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Luke Hillier

    This is my third literary encounter with Day, and by far the most affective and moving. A few years ago, I read her autobiography, The Long Loneliness and then a biography about her called All Is Grace: A Biography of Dorothy Day. Despite being left with deep respect for Dorothy's life and legacy, I have to admit both readings left me a bit underwhelmed. I remember both making for quite slow reads, bogged down with an overflow of mundane details that I didn't necessarily find edifying or intrigu This is my third literary encounter with Day, and by far the most affective and moving. A few years ago, I read her autobiography, The Long Loneliness and then a biography about her called All Is Grace: A Biography of Dorothy Day. Despite being left with deep respect for Dorothy's life and legacy, I have to admit both readings left me a bit underwhelmed. I remember both making for quite slow reads, bogged down with an overflow of mundane details that I didn't necessarily find edifying or intriguing. However, in both, there were these glimmering fragments woven throughout that were so compelling. Brilliantly, this small book has compiled Day's writing at its most profound, offering an impressively cohesive distillation of her tremendous wisdom, convicting devotion to justice, and inspiring faith. Much of Day's writing here is particularly striking in modern times, as our culture has become increasingly polarized and we see reflections of that division within the Church. Though I find it largely untrue, there's a common narrative that contemporary Christians fall into camps and those who are committed to justice are prone to worship that at the expense of prioritizing Jesus. Day's testimony is a striking rebuke to that claim and, more than anything else, inspiration for those looking to find grounding in Christianity as a bedrock of ministries of justice and mercy. It is so beautifully clear that Jesus was the center and root of Day's life and her ardent devotion to Scripture, prayer, communion, and the Church are indisputable. At one point, she writes that, "If an outsider who comes to visit doesn't pay attention to our praying and what that means, then he'll miss the whole point of things," which seems to encapsulate all I've said here. Something else that stood out while considering the ways her wisdom feels distinct to me as a millennial reader is her almost relentless emphasis on suffering and failure. While I don't want to paint with broad strokes, these certainly don't feel "in vogue" right now, and to some they're almost anathema. I want to be careful not to knock the zeitgeist too hard as I see critical wisdom and value in it, but in an era that's emphasizing the necessity of self-care and pleasure as the sustaining necessity for ongoing justice work, it's fascinating to see how utterly irrelevant Day seemed to regard those and know she endured in the work for so long. At times she confesses to indulging in the perverse joy of martyrdom, but beneath that I think she also articulates a mystical embrace of suffering as an inevitable reality that unites her with both the poor she wants to love and the Jesus she wants to love more wholly. Similar to my feelings when reading Mother Teresa: Come Be My Light: The Private Writings of the Saint of Calcutta, there's a part of me that wants to ask why Dorothy doesn't feel able to pursue the flourishing for her own life she surely wants for others, but I also notice something freeing in the soft fatalism that she exhibits. When suffering is necessary and failure is an inevitable constant reality, one's freed to carry on in the work without regard for the ups and downs of the day to day, and there's something really significant there. In fact, that's one of the things most striking about Dorothy's theology and convictions. The destination is far less critical than the steps taken to get there; the present moment seems to matter much more than the future one. This is expressed briefly when she writes, "Patience means suffering and suffering is spiritual work, and it is accomplishing something though we don't realize it till later. It is part of our education, or pilgrimage to heaven. By it we keep in mind that all the way to heaven is heaven." A bit later on, describing the sense of community she witnessed after an earthquake struck her hometown, she writes, "I wanted life and I wanted the abundant life. I wanted it for others, too. ... I wanted everyone to be kind. I wanted every home to be open to the lame, the halt, and the blind, the way it had been after the San Francisco earthquake. Only then did people really live, really love their brothers. In such love was the abundant life..." I haven't stopped thinking of that since I read it: For Day, the abundant life wasn't on-hold until after everything had been rebuilt and restored, but rather it was made manifest because of the crisis at hand and the sense of compassionate, solidaristic community it inspired. And in modern times, where it often feels like there's more urgency than ever to see progress and social change (with good reason...), it seems to me that Day's encouragement to open ourselves up to suffering rather than flee from it and even embrace what arises from it as a doorway into abundance is more critical than ever.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Wren-hardin

    "We cannot love God unless we love each other, and to love we must know each other." My mother-in-law gave this book- perfect for Lent. I loved it and know that I will re read parts of it over and over gain. "We cannot love God unless we love each other, and to love we must know each other." My mother-in-law gave this book- perfect for Lent. I loved it and know that I will re read parts of it over and over gain.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    Summary: A collection of Dorothy Day's writings on following Jesus in the ways of faith, love, prayer, life, and community. One thinks of Dorothy Day as an activist writer and advocate for the poor, running homes of hospitality, communes, and getting arrested even in her seventies. What is less apparent is the deep spirituality that sustained her activism. This book, one of Plough's Spiritual Guides, distills writings from her different books that cumulatively describe the ordinary life of follow Summary: A collection of Dorothy Day's writings on following Jesus in the ways of faith, love, prayer, life, and community. One thinks of Dorothy Day as an activist writer and advocate for the poor, running homes of hospitality, communes, and getting arrested even in her seventies. What is less apparent is the deep spirituality that sustained her activism. This book, one of Plough's Spiritual Guides, distills writings from her different books that cumulatively describe the ordinary life of following Jesus among the poor. The excerpts are organized around five "ways" or themes: of faith, of love, of prayer, of life, and of community. In the chapters on faith, we encounter both her implicit belief in the mysteries of the faith and the sacraments, and yet her struggle to trust and depend in the welter of daily interactions and work. She writes, "I suppose it is a grace not to be able to have time to take or derive satisfaction in the work we are doing. In what time I have, my impulse is to self-criticism and examination of conscience, and I am constantly humiliated at my own imperfections and at my halting progress. Perhaps I deceive myself here, too, and excuse my lack of recollection. But I do know how small I am and how little I can do and I beg you, Lord, to help me, for I cannot help myself" (pp. 14-15). Often, Day's reflections come with pithy challenges. We see the intensity of her love for God and the wonder that God sets his love on the likes of us and then observes, "It is a terrible thought--'we love God as much as the one we love the least' " (p.36). Or she surprises us with her breaks with convention such as when she writes on prayer: "I do not have to retire to my room to pray. It is enough to get out and walk in the wilderness of the streets" (p. 44). "The way of life" reminds us "never to get discouraged at the slowness of people or results" (p. 63). She writes of deepening perceptions of unworldly justice that does not seek its own, that for a Christian social order, "we must first have Christians" (p.66), and how, apart from the light of Christ, we often do not know ourselves or our secret sins. She writes at length on the indispensable role of suffering in our lives. The final portion focuses on life in community. Day writes of efforts in community with grittiness and realism. Disappointments. Betrayals. Plain hard work and long hours. Yet even so, she longs for bigger houses, more room for discussions, a library, "a Christ room." She recognizes desperately her need for the presence of God in all the ordinary places. In the end, it is community that addresses our desolation. She concludes, "We have all known the long loneliness and we have learned that the only solution is love and that love comes with community" (p. 120). This is the second book in the Spiritual Guides series I've reviewed, the earlier being The Scandal of Redemption by Oscar Romero. These are small books only in size. Each is well-edited by Carolyn Kurtz. This, in particular, required culling passages from a number of Day's works along each of the themes into coherent chapters. Eye-catching cover art, end papers, and typography make these delightful books to hold and read. I found myself often mulling over a single line, such as this one: "We have the greatest weapons in the world, greater than any hydrogen or atom bomb, and they are the weapons of poverty and prayer, fasting and alms, the reckless spending of ourselves in God's service and for his poor" (p.69). I mused again and again what a different face Christians would present to the world if we lived as Day did rather than jockeying for positions and influence and concealing our flawed character rather than exposing it to the grace of God. Reading Day gives me hope that ordinary Christians with all our flaws and struggles may yet walk the ways of faith, hope, and love, offering something beautiful for God and to the world. ____________________________ Disclosure of Material Connection: I received a complimentary review copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dan Salerno

    In the first place, you really can't go wrong reading a book about or by Dorothy Day. And this one happens to be a hybrid of both - but mainly a collection of Dorothy's musings on love. In the second place, D.L. Mayfield's introduction is a really good one. Mayfield is herself an accomplished writer (ASSIMILATE OR GO HOME) who, like Dorothy, writes from experience. Here's a great bit from Mayfield's introduction: "Robert Coles remembers how, the first time he met Dorothy, she was chatting with an In the first place, you really can't go wrong reading a book about or by Dorothy Day. And this one happens to be a hybrid of both - but mainly a collection of Dorothy's musings on love. In the second place, D.L. Mayfield's introduction is a really good one. Mayfield is herself an accomplished writer (ASSIMILATE OR GO HOME) who, like Dorothy, writes from experience. Here's a great bit from Mayfield's introduction: "Robert Coles remembers how, the first time he met Dorothy, she was chatting with an intoxicated older woman. She looked up and saw Coles waiting and asked him, 'Were you waiting to talk to one of us?' Already quite famous, she didn't assume Coles wanted to talk to her more than he might want to talk to her neighbor. With that simple question, Coles says, 'she cut through layers of self-importance, a lifetime of bourgeois privilege, and scraped the hard bone of pride.'" In her lifetime Dorothy Day was intensely focused on showing love while engaged in radical acts of social justice. She was just as intensely honest. Here's a sample: "It would be better still to love rather than to write about it. It would be more convincing." Thinking back on her pre-Catholic Worker life, amongst the bohemians of her day, she wrote: "The longer I live, the more I see God at work in people who don't have the slightest interest in religion and never read the Bible and wouldn't know what to do if they were persuaded to go inside a church. I always knew how much I admired certain men and women (my "radical friends") who were giving up their lives to help others get a better break; but now I realize how spiritual some of them were, and I'm ashamed of myself for not realizing that long ago, when I was with them, talking and having supper and making our plans, as we did." Finally, kudos must go out to Carolyn Kurtz of Plough Publishing House, for her magnificent editing of this collection.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Leigh Anne

    Portable inspiration for radical Catholics. This is a collection of assorted writings and musings from the Catholic Church's most bad-ass, underappreciated woman. Much like Mother Theresa, she gave over her entire life to the poor. Unlike her colleague, however, Day had a wild past, and committed some "sins" that "nice" people would rather not bring up. Thus, if you're Catholic, you either discover Day by accident or not at all. If you're a leftist, however, her name has probably come up once or Portable inspiration for radical Catholics. This is a collection of assorted writings and musings from the Catholic Church's most bad-ass, underappreciated woman. Much like Mother Theresa, she gave over her entire life to the poor. Unlike her colleague, however, Day had a wild past, and committed some "sins" that "nice" people would rather not bring up. Thus, if you're Catholic, you either discover Day by accident or not at all. If you're a leftist, however, her name has probably come up once or twice, and with no "sin" baggage attached either, leaving you free to explore these writings without judgment, if you choose. Though seemingly a paradox, Day saw no conflict between her faith and her politics, and saw the practice of mutual aid as the natural fulfillment of gospel commands. So, basically, you have to be a Catholic leftist to really appreciate this, or at least a leftist who hasn't been so traumatized by organized religion that you can't handle any talk of the divine. Its pocket-size makes it a better personal gift than a library pick, but if you've already got it, you don't have to weed it; it's sure to offend somebody, and a great library, as we often say around here, has something in it to offend everyone. Like Day, I'm pretty much a neither-nor / both-and kind of person, so I took a great deal of comfort from these words, even while disagreeing heartily with many of them. Had somebody told me about her sooner, I might very well still be Catholic; as it is, however, I was happy to spend a few quiet hours with a woman who practiced what she preached, took joy in this world, and tried to make it a better place, even as she hoped for something better beyond it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jaci

    This collection of short snippets from Dorothy Day's work provides insight into her spiritual life and a starting point for discussion and thought. Each thematic section can be read separately. Good for Lent. p.xiv: "We have all known the long loneliness and we have learned that the only solution is love and that love comes with community." p.58: January and February are those months when winter seems interminable and vitality low. In the face of world events, in the face of the mystery of sufferi This collection of short snippets from Dorothy Day's work provides insight into her spiritual life and a starting point for discussion and thought. Each thematic section can be read separately. Good for Lent. p.xiv: "We have all known the long loneliness and we have learned that the only solution is love and that love comes with community." p.58: January and February are those months when winter seems interminable and vitality low. In the face of world events, in the face of the mystery of suffering, of evil in the world, it is a good time to read the book of Job, and then to go on reading the Psalms, looking for comfort--that is, strength to endure. p.67: ...it says somewhere that God's grace comes and goes, with no fault of ours, and when we do not have it, we wait patiently and it returns. I do think manual labor of one kind or another is of help and when I get in states which last, I get to housecleaning, and there is always plenty of that around...and that is some relief.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Julius

    Dorothy Day's The Reckless Way of Love is a little, appropriately inexpensive book from Plough Publishing that showcases snippets from a wide variety of Day's writings: 141 brief passages, most less than a page long, grouped thematically in sections entitled "A Way of Faith", "A Way of Love", and so on for Prayer, Life, and Community. Day's writings are normally scattered across a number of publications. That makes the accessibility of this collection even more significant. Day's vision of Chri Dorothy Day's The Reckless Way of Love is a little, appropriately inexpensive book from Plough Publishing that showcases snippets from a wide variety of Day's writings: 141 brief passages, most less than a page long, grouped thematically in sections entitled "A Way of Faith", "A Way of Love", and so on for Prayer, Life, and Community. Day's writings are normally scattered across a number of publications. That makes the accessibility of this collection even more significant. Day's vision of Christian simplicity is a vision that needs a wider hearing. And Plough has given the Church a beautiful gift in this little collection, so that that voice may be widely heard. _________________ I received a free copy of this book from Plough Publishing in exchange for my honest review here.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Kidwell

    The Reckless Way of Love Notes on Following Jesus by Dorothy Day Plough Publishing Plough Publishing House Christian , Religion & Spirituality Pub Date 01 Mar 2017 I am reviewing a copy of The Reckless Way of Love through Plough Publishing and Netgalley: This book covers a more personal dimension of her life and faith while larger collections and biographies which cover radical views and exceptional deeds. Where did she receive the strength to stay true to her calling despite her own doubts and feelings The Reckless Way of Love Notes on Following Jesus by Dorothy Day Plough Publishing Plough Publishing House Christian , Religion & Spirituality Pub Date 01 Mar 2017 I am reviewing a copy of The Reckless Way of Love through Plough Publishing and Netgalley: This book covers a more personal dimension of her life and faith while larger collections and biographies which cover radical views and exceptional deeds. Where did she receive the strength to stay true to her calling despite her own doubts and feelings of inadequacy as well as the demands of an activists life? In this book we learn how she took the examples of Jesus and applied them in our own lives. I give The Reckless Way of Love five out of five stars! Happy Reading

  16. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    For me this was an inspiring, although brief, introduction to the work, faith and life of social activist Dorothy Day. It is a loosely arranged compilation of her writings on faith, work, love, and compassion. I was inspired by her dedication and selflessness and took away many profound insights about our role in reaching out with friendship and patience to those around us. I am looking forward to reading "The Long Loneliness" and reading about Day's life more deeply. For me this was an inspiring, although brief, introduction to the work, faith and life of social activist Dorothy Day. It is a loosely arranged compilation of her writings on faith, work, love, and compassion. I was inspired by her dedication and selflessness and took away many profound insights about our role in reaching out with friendship and patience to those around us. I am looking forward to reading "The Long Loneliness" and reading about Day's life more deeply.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ella

    I had never read any of Dorothy Day's writing before this and this was a lovely, simple introduction to her life of faith. Full of beautiful, short passages, the one thing I wished is that there had been some longer excepts included or that each quote came with a source (they were listed in the back, but not on each page). I had never read any of Dorothy Day's writing before this and this was a lovely, simple introduction to her life of faith. Full of beautiful, short passages, the one thing I wished is that there had been some longer excepts included or that each quote came with a source (they were listed in the back, but not on each page).

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tamara Murphy

    Promoted in a line of "Backpack Classics" in Plough's Spiritual guides, this little book provided the perfect introduction for me to become better acquainted with Dorothy Day's personal reflections on faith and ministry. I also appreciated D.L. Mayfield's helpful introduction. Promoted in a line of "Backpack Classics" in Plough's Spiritual guides, this little book provided the perfect introduction for me to become better acquainted with Dorothy Day's personal reflections on faith and ministry. I also appreciated D.L. Mayfield's helpful introduction.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Svendsen

    This was a sweet and encouraging read made up of excepts and selections from the writings and letters of Dorothy Day. There were some beautiful words of wisdom inside this book. It was a lovely uplifting and inspiring short read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    Yet another window on her world.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

    Love comes from community. There’s still many things I don’t know about Dorothy Day, but I have surmised a few things. She was feisty, faithful, and full of grace to others. And she loved the poor.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rev. Deb

    Easy to read. Hard to do! I know I will need to go back and reflect and read this book again. Timeless in its challenges to follow the radical way of Christ.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Paul Jellinek

    A collection of brief but well-chosen personal and spiritual reflections from Dorothy Day, which help to explain the source of her inspiration and where she found the strength to carry on as one of the leaders of the Catholic worker movement. There is much food for thought and reflection in this excellent little book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    The Reckless Way of Love delivers snippets of thoughts and stories from the writings of Dorothy Day. The small book (a "backpack classic") is divided into five "ways:" A Way of Faith, Love, Prayer, Life, and Community. The back cover asks: "Where did she receive strength to stay true to her God-given calling despite her own doubts and inadequacies and the demands of an activist life? What was the unquenchable wellspring of her deep faith and her love for humanity?" The answers are provided as yo The Reckless Way of Love delivers snippets of thoughts and stories from the writings of Dorothy Day. The small book (a "backpack classic") is divided into five "ways:" A Way of Faith, Love, Prayer, Life, and Community. The back cover asks: "Where did she receive strength to stay true to her God-given calling despite her own doubts and inadequacies and the demands of an activist life? What was the unquenchable wellspring of her deep faith and her love for humanity?" The answers are provided as you trace her honest reflections from both the struggles and joys of her life. Dorothy Day was deeply dependent upon God and open about her inaptness for the challenges she faced. Her love for God and all people is clearly evident. Practical wisdom is dispersed throughout the book: "The main thing is never to get discouraged at the slowness of people or results...We can only go ahead and work with happiness at what God sends us to do." My favorite part of the book is how often she repeats the prayer, "Lord, I believe, help thou my unbelief." As someone who prayers this prayer quite often, this was an encouragement. As someone who has not read one of Day's biographies I would have liked more stories from her life but that is not the purpose of this book. I would have appreciated her reflections even more, perhaps, if I was more familiar with what she faced and accomplished in life. Those who are more acquainted with her story will have an even greater appreciation for what she shares in this book, no doubt. This is a book best read like a "devotional" in short sections rather than cover to cover so as to let the impact of her thought soak in. This is a good book at a fair price. I enjoyed reading it and recommend it to both Catholics and Protestants and all who desire to see God in the face of all people as Dorothy Day did.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Joseph J.

    As I reviewed Plough Spiritual Classics' Love in The Void: Where God Finds Us, Simone Weil and Dorothy Day cannot be read and put away like many books. Dorothy Day's radical embrace of poverty and rejection of riches and power as defined in the world are to be read and absorbed and thought and prayed over. Dorothy's experience and reflection and faith will not make many feel self-assured and glib in their own practice. Unlike current pop-religion celebrities, Dorothy calls us to love God by lovi As I reviewed Plough Spiritual Classics' Love in The Void: Where God Finds Us, Simone Weil and Dorothy Day cannot be read and put away like many books. Dorothy Day's radical embrace of poverty and rejection of riches and power as defined in the world are to be read and absorbed and thought and prayed over. Dorothy's experience and reflection and faith will not make many feel self-assured and glib in their own practice. Unlike current pop-religion celebrities, Dorothy calls us to love God by loving our enemy and placing ourselves eye-to eye with the poor and the forgotten. Radical stuff especially in the current political and consumer culture. As a Paulist novice at the time Dorothy died, I was introduced to her through a novitiate classmate; other classmates ventured to her Catholic Worker House in New York City, and community members visited us; It was not an easy assignment.(I chose hospital work.) As I read her thoughts today I went back to those times; her need for prayer and the sacraments of the Catholic Church were as basic to her life as water and food to us all. And as I read her words I reflected on the scandals within her beloved church, and her caution about the seduction of power in earthly terms rings true. Indeed, she writes that trials visited upon us are perhaps meant to prune us, and remove our human weakness. Dorothy's is a voice needed today within her Church and within our nation-world. A rejection of outward wealth and power and an embrace of God through love and care for the most vulnerable.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Pam Cipkowski

    This is a collection of passages from the journals, letters, and other writings of Dorothy Day. I couldn't quite get into it at the start, perhaps because I was reading it on a Kindle, and it lacked some formatting, spacing, and fonts that the printed version may have. At times, I couldn't quite tell what was simply a new paragraph, and what was a new passage altogether. But soon it started to flow for me, and I became immersed in the beauty in the power of Dorothy Day's words and writing. We see This is a collection of passages from the journals, letters, and other writings of Dorothy Day. I couldn't quite get into it at the start, perhaps because I was reading it on a Kindle, and it lacked some formatting, spacing, and fonts that the printed version may have. At times, I couldn't quite tell what was simply a new paragraph, and what was a new passage altogether. But soon it started to flow for me, and I became immersed in the beauty in the power of Dorothy Day's words and writing. We see bits of her loneliness and sadness in these passages, but we also see the positive energy she radiated. This is by no means a biography or autobiography about her, but you see her philosophy and beliefs coming out here in her thoughts and musings. The power of Dorothy Day lay in her humbleness and humility. Times of desolation turned to consolation and strength for her. And her faith led her to do great things though the works of mercy. As she explains, "Young people say, 'What good can one person do? What is the sense of our small effort?' They cannot see that we must lay one brick at a time, take one step at a time, we can be responsible only for the one action of the present moment." It is only a matter of time before this humble yet powerful woman becomes a saint.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Abell

    I received this book as a First Reads Giveaway. It really is a thought-provoking book which caused me to reflect on the choices that I make in my own life and the interactions I have with those around me. It also helped me to see that there are small changes I can make that will have a ripple effect on those with whom I encounter day to day. There were quotes in the book that opened my eyes to some of my own shortcomings. I don't think that I will ever be as generous as the example given in the I received this book as a First Reads Giveaway. It really is a thought-provoking book which caused me to reflect on the choices that I make in my own life and the interactions I have with those around me. It also helped me to see that there are small changes I can make that will have a ripple effect on those with whom I encounter day to day. There were quotes in the book that opened my eyes to some of my own shortcomings. I don't think that I will ever be as generous as the example given in the opening pages of the book, but I hope that I continue to be conscious of the choices that I make. I had honestly never thought of myself as selfish before reading this book, but afterward I realize that I have so much more than the majority of the world, and it has made me take a much closer look at the daily choices I make, and I believe that anytime someone changes for the good in any small way, it's worth it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lee

    This was a slim book, a sampler of Dorothy Day's writings on love and how it animated her life - her personal life and relationships, her life in God, and her life in service of the poor at the Catholic Worker. And while it is a slim volume, it is inspiring and captures her spiritual depth. I highlighted many portions of this book and will return to it for study and inspiration. I recommend this book to anyone who aspires to work with disenfranchised people and to those who want to learn more fr This was a slim book, a sampler of Dorothy Day's writings on love and how it animated her life - her personal life and relationships, her life in God, and her life in service of the poor at the Catholic Worker. And while it is a slim volume, it is inspiring and captures her spiritual depth. I highlighted many portions of this book and will return to it for study and inspiration. I recommend this book to anyone who aspires to work with disenfranchised people and to those who want to learn more from a modern American saint who was earthy and not 'perfect.'

  29. 5 out of 5

    GG

    This book is a collection of excerpts from the writing of Dorothy Day. A Benedictine Oblate, social activist, co-founder of the Catholic Worker movement, and journalist, Dorthy Day has much to say on a variety of topics. The selections are brief but insightful. Each excerpt has a citation so interested readers may engage in a more in depth manner should they wish. This book is a good addition to topical meditations, and the compiler, Carolyn Kurtz, did an excellent job in gathering a wide selectio This book is a collection of excerpts from the writing of Dorothy Day. A Benedictine Oblate, social activist, co-founder of the Catholic Worker movement, and journalist, Dorthy Day has much to say on a variety of topics. The selections are brief but insightful. Each excerpt has a citation so interested readers may engage in a more in depth manner should they wish. This book is a good addition to topical meditations, and the compiler, Carolyn Kurtz, did an excellent job in gathering a wide selection.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bill Roth

    A stunning and challenginig book. Less a book with a narrative than a collection of writings found in a drawer, loosely organized. That said, it is like peering into the mind of Dorothy Day. The book is challenging. At some times if feels like an impossible task. He bar seems impossibly high. At other times, it appears like a spiritual roadmap. At still others, like a diary. We hear her in high school. We hear her in New York, and in Mexico. We hear her on good days and bad. We hear her joy, and A stunning and challenginig book. Less a book with a narrative than a collection of writings found in a drawer, loosely organized. That said, it is like peering into the mind of Dorothy Day. The book is challenging. At some times if feels like an impossible task. He bar seems impossibly high. At other times, it appears like a spiritual roadmap. At still others, like a diary. We hear her in high school. We hear her in New York, and in Mexico. We hear her on good days and bad. We hear her joy, and we hear when she is exhausted. A striking reminder for me how much more there is to do.

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