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Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd (Reading Edition): (Rock and Roll Book, Biography of Pink Floyd, Music Book)

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The definitive history of Pink Floyd by founding member Nick Mason, this reading edition brings up-to-date the band's incredible story as told uniquely from the inside out. Including the complete text of the original in an easy-toread format, a new chapter covering the passing of Rick Wright and the release of the group's final album, and 80 pages of images from Mason's ar The definitive history of Pink Floyd by founding member Nick Mason, this reading edition brings up-to-date the band's incredible story as told uniquely from the inside out. Including the complete text of the original in an easy-toread format, a new chapter covering the passing of Rick Wright and the release of the group's final album, and 80 pages of images from Mason's archives plus new photos, Inside Out is a masterly rock memoir and an eye opener for both veteran fans and those just discovering the group.


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The definitive history of Pink Floyd by founding member Nick Mason, this reading edition brings up-to-date the band's incredible story as told uniquely from the inside out. Including the complete text of the original in an easy-toread format, a new chapter covering the passing of Rick Wright and the release of the group's final album, and 80 pages of images from Mason's ar The definitive history of Pink Floyd by founding member Nick Mason, this reading edition brings up-to-date the band's incredible story as told uniquely from the inside out. Including the complete text of the original in an easy-toread format, a new chapter covering the passing of Rick Wright and the release of the group's final album, and 80 pages of images from Mason's archives plus new photos, Inside Out is a masterly rock memoir and an eye opener for both veteran fans and those just discovering the group.

30 review for Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd (Reading Edition): (Rock and Roll Book, Biography of Pink Floyd, Music Book)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Inside out: a personal history of Pink Floyd, Nick Mason, 2005. Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd is Nick Mason's personal memoir of Pink Floyd, published on 7 October 2004, in the United Kingdom. Initially a hardback release, it has since appeared in at least two different paperback editions. The book marks the first time that a group member has written a recollection of his experiences of life in the band. Mason – the only member of the band to have been a part of it in all incarnati Inside out: a personal history of Pink Floyd, Nick Mason, 2005. Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd is Nick Mason's personal memoir of Pink Floyd, published on 7 October 2004, in the United Kingdom. Initially a hardback release, it has since appeared in at least two different paperback editions. The book marks the first time that a group member has written a recollection of his experiences of life in the band. Mason – the only member of the band to have been a part of it in all incarnations and line-ups – covers Floyd's entire career, from the initial coming together and the Syd Barrett–led psychedelic era of the late 1960s through their success in the 1970s to the present day, via the acrimonious splits of the 1980s. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: بیست و ششم ماه می سال 2010 میلادی عنوان: پشت و رو، نوشته: نیک میسون؛ برگردان: بردیا بهنیافر؛ مشخصات نشر: تهران، کتاب مس، 1389، در 380 ص، بخشی رنگی، شابک: 9789647380454، یادداشت: تاریخچه خصوصی پینک فلوید؛ موضوع: موسیقی راک، انگلستان، موسیقیدانان، سرگذشتنامه - سده 20 م پشت و رو: تاریخچه شخصی پینک فلوید. تاریخچهٔ شخصی نیک میسن از گروه پینک فلوید است که در اکتبر سال 2004 میلادی در بریتانیا منتشر شد. این کتاب نخست به صورت جلد ضخیم منتشر می‌شد اما پس از آن در دو نسخه با جلد معمولی هم پخش شد. نخستین کتابی است که توسط یکی از اعضای گروه پینک فلوید نوشته شده و یکی از اعضای گروه به بیان تجربیات و مشاهدات خود از گروه می‌پردازد. در سال 2005 میلادی و پس از اجرای زنده (لایو 8) که اعضای گروه دوباره با هم اجرا داشتند، یک نسخهٔ جلد نازک از این کتاب با تصویری از اعضای گروه در آن اجرا منتشر شد. پس از درگذشت «سید برت» هم نسخه‌ ای از کتاب با ذکر درگذشت «برت» انتشار یافت. در سال 2011 میلادی نیز نسخه‌ ای با اشاره به درگذشت «ریچارد رایت»، کیبوردیست گروه، انتشار یافت. یک نسخهٔ صوتی نیز در قالب سه لوح فشرده منتشر شده که توسط «نیک میسن» خوانده شد. این کتاب در ایران توسط «بردیا بهنیافر» در سال 1389 هجری خورشیدی در 380 ص. به فارسی ترجمه و نشر کتاب مس، آن را منتشر کرده است. ا. شربیانی

  2. 5 out of 5

    Karl

    Unlike the previous books about the band, Mason's "Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd" book takes on a more personal and light-hearted approach to the history of the band. Mason states "It's hopefully a rather funny book about a serious band.". Working on the book for ten years, Mason drew from his personal observations and memorabilia, as well as the recollections of band members, associates and friends. "When I started it," he recalls, "I thought this was going to be the official band Unlike the previous books about the band, Mason's "Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd" book takes on a more personal and light-hearted approach to the history of the band. Mason states "It's hopefully a rather funny book about a serious band.". Working on the book for ten years, Mason drew from his personal observations and memorabilia, as well as the recollections of band members, associates and friends. "When I started it," he recalls, "I thought this was going to be the official band history, and it just became apparent that whatever I wrote was never going to be acceptable to everyone in the band. It was resolved by calling it 'a personal history.' With the publication of the book I didn't lose the friendship of Roger, David or Richard Wright." In the book, Mason writes candidly of the moment when the other band members decided not to pick up their singer Syd Barrett, who had a drug-induced breakdown, en route to a gig in 1968, thus effectively kicking him out of the band. Mason describes how "Dark Side Of The Moon" and it's phenomenal success, the 1973 album is the longest charting album in history, made for strained relationships in the band. Mason sais "It wasn't so much that Roger took over. It was more of a sense that the songwriters had more control of their individual songs." Mason also has a fair depiction of the band's former creative force, Roger Waters, who tried unsuccessfully in 1986 to dissolve the band and to prevent Mason and Gilmour from using the "Pink Floyd" name. This is an interesting book for those who seek information and history of the band.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Semjon

    Drummer Nick Mason is Pink Floyd's only member from the beginning to the present. The band has experienced many ups and downs, so there's plenty to tell for Mason in this personal story of the band, which was published after many corrections by the other three musicians in 2004. My interest in Nick Mason raised, when I saw him with his band A Saucerful of Secrets last autumn. They played all the psychodelic music from beginning of the band. It was amazing, how powerful this kind of rock music st Drummer Nick Mason is Pink Floyd's only member from the beginning to the present. The band has experienced many ups and downs, so there's plenty to tell for Mason in this personal story of the band, which was published after many corrections by the other three musicians in 2004. My interest in Nick Mason raised, when I saw him with his band A Saucerful of Secrets last autumn. They played all the psychodelic music from beginning of the band. It was amazing, how powerful this kind of rock music still is, when you see the old men live on stage. Mason has no literary ambitions, his retrospective is strictly chronological and he likes to tell anecdotes on important events. This unnecessarily lengthens the book in some chapters, especially when Mason has to tell all the names of crewmembers, fellow musicians, and producers. The first half of the book, the founding, the creative phase of Syd Barrett and the enormous success at the beginning of the 70's with Dark Side and Wish You Were Here were very interesting. A great chronicle of one of the best rock bands with a lot of information for nerds and nice pictures. Shine On.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sean Peters

    Firstly I grew up as a teenager listening to Pink Floyd. I remember to this day playing "Dark Side Of The Moon" to my mum and Dad, they said well not sure about this music, but it grew on them as well. I was a 70's teenager, love glam rock. I love my music, and great to read about their lives, the work involved in making an album, the difficulty of working with some large egos, the finances, the arguments, the travelling, the disagreements. The sad ending of two members of Pink Floyd, it makes me Firstly I grew up as a teenager listening to Pink Floyd. I remember to this day playing "Dark Side Of The Moon" to my mum and Dad, they said well not sure about this music, but it grew on them as well. I was a 70's teenager, love glam rock. I love my music, and great to read about their lives, the work involved in making an album, the difficulty of working with some large egos, the finances, the arguments, the travelling, the disagreements. The sad ending of two members of Pink Floyd, it makes me realise I am getting older. So you may ask why only three stars for a book/group I loved and to still listen too. The book sometimes becomes a little heavy, especially with names, names of every crew member, manager, agent, lightning and all sorts of team members including Tom, Dick and Harry.... Nick Mason does give an interesting semi-independent opinion of the battles within the group, the egos, the finance set up. How much travelling is involved every time you release an album. Part of this book is that due to the respect of other members of the group, the manuscript for this book was passed and approved by all members of Pink Floyd but their is an open honesty from Nick Mason. Nick also loved motor racing, cars, and has four children who supported his role in Pink Floyd. So interesting but sometimes a bit slow and heavy, but love Pink Floyd you will still enjoy this book I do think Nick Masons comes across as a true English gentleman with wit, who does border on the safe side. Three stars

  5. 4 out of 5

    Adam Light

    Enjoyable and quite humorous history of Pink Floyd. One of my favorite bands, so I was really pleased with it. Well done and recommended, if this kind of thing is your cup of tea.

  6. 5 out of 5

    M. Sarki

    Nick Mason has written an appropriately exhaustive memoir of his experience as a lifetime member of Pink Floyd. Though a bit too self-deprecating and to a fault unpretentious, this historical accounting of one of the great British rock bands of all-time will prove to be foremost as biographical standard. Well-written and informative, persons interested in all things Pink Floyd will not be disappointed.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sandra Harvey

    A likeable account of the rise and rise of Pink Floyd. Nick Mason is a master raconteur, but I came away wishing I knew more about the band members themselves. Very enjoyable, though and Mason's contribution of the roadies, is somewhat gracious. For a rock and roll drummer, Nick Mason tells a good story. He does talk about Syd Barret leaving the band and some of their concerts and rigging. The making of Dark Side of the Moon was interesting.

  8. 4 out of 5

    arterialturns

    Admittedly I'm a very biased Pink Floyd fan since 1971 or so (!), but this is a very well written book. A humorous, thoughtful, self-deprecating and not-at-all-pretentious inside look at a band with an interesting history. Nick Mason comes across better than probably anyone else in the band could, given the divisive feelings between the rest of them. Also, it's a fan's dream: an unbelievable amount of great photos and graphics, behind-the-scenes anecdotes, candid recollections-all around great s Admittedly I'm a very biased Pink Floyd fan since 1971 or so (!), but this is a very well written book. A humorous, thoughtful, self-deprecating and not-at-all-pretentious inside look at a band with an interesting history. Nick Mason comes across better than probably anyone else in the band could, given the divisive feelings between the rest of them. Also, it's a fan's dream: an unbelievable amount of great photos and graphics, behind-the-scenes anecdotes, candid recollections-all around great stuff.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ted Cross

    I have loved Pink Floyd for decades, and I'm proud that I got to see one of their very last shows in 1994 in London. It was gorgeous. This book is competently written and gives an interesting history of the group. I only wish it could have had more character depth between the main members. I would have loved to hear more of the details that went on between them all as they were creating their spectacular albums.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Vilmos Kondor

    I generally dislike and distrust books about my favorite bands, artists and writers. Therefore I read only a couple of them with my view being: the creation (the music, the text, the picture) should speak for itself. Nevertheless I found myself once again listening to Pink Floyd and somehow I caught glimpse of this book. I gave it a perfunctory try but then realized that I couldn't put it down. Nick Mason is a great storyteller who tries to speak for the band and the members and does this with h I generally dislike and distrust books about my favorite bands, artists and writers. Therefore I read only a couple of them with my view being: the creation (the music, the text, the picture) should speak for itself. Nevertheless I found myself once again listening to Pink Floyd and somehow I caught glimpse of this book. I gave it a perfunctory try but then realized that I couldn't put it down. Nick Mason is a great storyteller who tries to speak for the band and the members and does this with huge amounts of irony and humor. A great book about a fantastic band. It made me listen again with "new ears" to the almost forgotten items in their catalog and for this only I am grateful. He also put the feud between David Gilmour and Roger Waters in perspective and I needed to hear a sober version of the story. All in all, either you are a fan or are about to become one, this is the one and only book about Pink Floyd that is worth reading. Kudos to Mr. Mason for achieving the impossible.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rjurik Davidson

    As a teenager, I was very much into Pink Floyd. There were a number of reasons. First that they had, pretty much, ended their careers by the time I discovered them and so had the exotic feel of a band from more interesting times. Band leader and bassist Roger Waters' particular brand of alienation - 'we don't need no education' - appealed to my anarchist tendencies. Dave Gilmour seemed like a magical guitarist. At a certain point that changed, partly from overlistening, partly because I outgrew As a teenager, I was very much into Pink Floyd. There were a number of reasons. First that they had, pretty much, ended their careers by the time I discovered them and so had the exotic feel of a band from more interesting times. Band leader and bassist Roger Waters' particular brand of alienation - 'we don't need no education' - appealed to my anarchist tendencies. Dave Gilmour seemed like a magical guitarist. At a certain point that changed, partly from overlistening, partly because I outgrew them. Nowadays I can only really listen to their earlier albums - Meddle most of all - before they get too ponderous, and some might say pretentious. Luckily, Mason's memoir isn't ponderous at all, and he has that breezy type of wry English humour one associates with someone like Michael Palin. Mason seems like a nice chap, the kind you might have been friends with had you known him. Like a good middle class boy, he's a pretty good writer too. The writing is lively and full of illuminating detail. The history of the band, like the music itself, tends to become less interesting as time passes. Really, it's the early years, when they are at the head of a particular zeitgeist that is most interesting. Still, rather than any of Mason's observations, it was my own reflections that tended to dominate the experience of reading the book, and I may as well record those here. To begin with, I was struck by just how young they were when they made it 'big'. Their first album, 'Piper at the Gates of Dawn,' was mostly composed by their first lead man - Syd Barrett - who was probably their only true genius, at the age of of 20-21. Youth is par for the course for popular music, but that's still young to produce something so unique. Had Barrett not suffered a breakdown under the influence of industry pressure and drugs, and subsequently been ejected from the band, one can only imagine the work they might have produced a decade later. On the subject of youth, the band were all about 28-29 when they recorded their next big hit, Dark Side of the Moon. That's about right for bands, but there are plenty of people who at 28 still don't know what they want to do with their life, let alone go about producing one of the greatest albums of all time. This had me reflecting on the vicissitudes of fate. Being in the right place at the right time -- this seems to be a crucial factor in any success. Release an album (or book) too early or too late and it may sink. Collaborate with the right person, and they might drag you - as in this case - into the big-time. In this sense, Mason seems to have led a charmed life. Neither he nor Waters were really very good musicians, though Waters did later become an excellent songwriter. They just happened to have been lucky enough to be friends with Barrett. Barrett essentially gifted the other three (and then four when Dave Gilmour replaced him) a career. As Mason and Waters have said themselves, there would have been no Pink floyd without Barrett. But once they had their start - and this was another of my ruminations - they gripped on for dear life. They toured incessantly, recorded a lot. Waters taught himself to become a great songwriter almost by force of will, but more importantly, the band seemed to bring out the best in each other. Each member had their own particular skills that they brought. The whole was more than the sum of the parts. I would have liked more of Mason's reflections on the musical side of things, but as he was mostly an 'active passenger' in this, maybe he isn't the right person for this. You don't get much reflection really on any of these larger questions - fame, genius, luck - from Mason in the book, which has more of an everyday approach to it. But you do get a sense of the dynamics of the band, their demanding schedule, the later acrimonious split, and their final reunion for Live 8. Mason is a genial guide to all of the events, and that makes it one of the better rock memoirs.

  12. 5 out of 5

    George Moore

    I enjoyed the book a lot. Nick has a sense of humor that comes through in the writing. Though I wasn't overly interested in the Syd days, the remainder of the book was a fun read. I loved reading his remembrances of tours and albums while recalling what I was doing during that same time. Nick covered the friction of Roger's departure diplomatically. Frankly, I land squarely in David's camp on that issue. Nick's words regarding Rick Wright's passing were wonderful. I'm glad to see Rick get credit fo I enjoyed the book a lot. Nick has a sense of humor that comes through in the writing. Though I wasn't overly interested in the Syd days, the remainder of the book was a fun read. I loved reading his remembrances of tours and albums while recalling what I was doing during that same time. Nick covered the friction of Roger's departure diplomatically. Frankly, I land squarely in David's camp on that issue. Nick's words regarding Rick Wright's passing were wonderful. I'm glad to see Rick get credit for his contributions, even if it's posthumously. If you're a Pink Floyd fan, I heartily recommend reading this book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brian Ferguson

    "Dark Side of the Moon" was, at one time, owned by one in seven households making it perhaps one of the biggest selling entertainment enigmas of all time (outside of Bowie). Most casual listeners probably assumed this inscrutability was all a shtick, if a very cultivated one, nevertheless for the dedicated fan, many questions lingered over the years. I'd always thought, or maybe had a premonition, that Nick Mason would eventually provide the answers. Some of them come as a surprise. They didn't "Dark Side of the Moon" was, at one time, owned by one in seven households making it perhaps one of the biggest selling entertainment enigmas of all time (outside of Bowie). Most casual listeners probably assumed this inscrutability was all a shtick, if a very cultivated one, nevertheless for the dedicated fan, many questions lingered over the years. I'd always thought, or maybe had a premonition, that Nick Mason would eventually provide the answers. Some of them come as a surprise. They didn't really consider rock music seriously as a career until they were almost at the cusp of success (they were already well on their way to success, Roger and Nick already on track to become young architects, Syd an accomplished writer, visual artist and, no, his mental illness was not solely due to acid). Devoted followers of their albums prior to "Darkside" wondering if the exploratory and egalitarian nature of those years weren't those of a band still in its formative stages would be proven right. The fact that they were still considering an avant-garde direction after "Darkside" does come as a surprise. I'd always thought it was a sardonic joke (from what I read here, not really in their character). Another surprise is that they acknowledged and were aware of the punk-rock movement. Astoundingly Captain Sensible wanted Syd to produce the first Damned album over Nick! It goes, unflinchingly (it is apparent that Nick cares very much for his friends) into the rift with Roger and the marginalization of Rick Wright. The latter part of the story is very-much involved with big-business, preserving and in Roger's case continuing, the vitality of their legacy. This part of the book is also very interesting and insightful. I'm more inclined to revisit these years now. Though it is a few years since this was originally published it has been recently revised and I can say old Nick came through for us and left us a nice cumulative summary in the medium of prose.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Utkarsh Sinha

    Fantastic book for a Pink Floyd fan. There are tons of interesting tidbits about the band and their lives. Pink Floyd have been one of the most influential bands in rock history, and the lives they led match up to whatever impressions I had about them. Nick Mason's writing is also laudable. It was witty, a very British sense of humour, obviously. And it should very well qualify as a page turner.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Karen

    Was great. But could’ve been better

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cole Whetstone

    Type: Autobiography/History Unity: Pink Floyd’s rise and fall was a combination of talent, luck, teamwork, and ego. The same forces that brought the band together tore it apart, but they still made a lot of meaningful music. such is the life of a rockstar. 3 Prompts: 1. What do external biographies miss about Pink Floyd’s rise and fall? 1. In large part, the money and the ego. Nick Mason has few illusions about what being a Rockstar is like. Although he acknowledges the momentary transcendence of Type: Autobiography/History Unity: Pink Floyd’s rise and fall was a combination of talent, luck, teamwork, and ego. The same forces that brought the band together tore it apart, but they still made a lot of meaningful music. such is the life of a rockstar. 3 Prompts: 1. What do external biographies miss about Pink Floyd’s rise and fall? 1. In large part, the money and the ego. Nick Mason has few illusions about what being a Rockstar is like. Although he acknowledges the momentary transcendence of playing in shows and being showered with success, he focuses much more on the day-to-day interpersonal relationships that moved the band through each of its successive phases. 2. What was it like to be a member of Pink Floyd? 1. Honestly Mason makes it out as if he were simply there for a good time, smelled the trappings of success, and then held on for dear life. It is a bit of a Shame that he, rather than Waters, Gilmour, or Wright, wrote the documentary, because he seems to have been less imbued with the Muse than those 3, but despite (or perhaps because of) this, Nick Mason was probably the only band member capable of any kind of objective glimpse into the band’s inner world. 3. Who does not get the recognition that they should for PF’s development and success. 1. Mason is faithful to the many ex-bandmates (esp. Syd Barett), managers (esp. Steve O’Rourke), and general crew (esp. Storm Thurgeson and various lighting directors) who would not otherwise be recognized, and this expands one’s view of the band to that of an almost political community. Only Waters, Wright, Gilmour, and Mason perform, but behind their every performance is a village’s worth of people on the outside, silently striving to make it work. Rating: 3.5/5 * This book offers a bona fide in-depth look at Pink Floyd from the “inside out.” The view can be somewhat disenchanting — you begin to see how profit-and-ego-driven Pink Floyd really were — and Nick Mason’s prose, though seemingly brimming with wit and verve at first, tires out towards the end.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jt

    do we really deserve a reunion of classic rock quartet Pink Floyd? this memoir does not solve that probing query but it does enlighten us on the history of a seminal, iconic group named Pink Floyd. Nick Mason, the laconic storyteller and co-founder of Pink Floyd demonstrates an efficiency for words within these pages. He offers a glimpse into the madness & genius of Syd Barrett which is so reverential. His best friend Roger Waters is under the laser microscope. It is not a scathing review but yo do we really deserve a reunion of classic rock quartet Pink Floyd? this memoir does not solve that probing query but it does enlighten us on the history of a seminal, iconic group named Pink Floyd. Nick Mason, the laconic storyteller and co-founder of Pink Floyd demonstrates an efficiency for words within these pages. He offers a glimpse into the madness & genius of Syd Barrett which is so reverential. His best friend Roger Waters is under the laser microscope. It is not a scathing review but you can infer that Roger's control schemes of the other band members caused undue damage. For us to understand this classic rock group, let's first revert to the past. the name Pink Floyd refers to 2 blues musicians named Pink Anderson and Floyd Council. their origins with Syd Barrett's "Piper at the Gates of Dawn" is described with imagination and assorted colours. Nick Mason was studying to be an architect. Music became his salvation as did University of Cambridge students Roger Waters & David Gilmour. the group experimented with light filters and Daleks. Daleks were influential for their association to Doctor Who. the group was very much immersed into science fiction, bebop jazz, r & b, and progressive music of their era - the Who, Genesis, Procol Harum. Anyhow, i wish i could be more detailed with my descriptions. i have issues with a Momentary Lapse of Reason. you have to experience the Floyd. i was fortunate enough to witness their final tour in 1994. the Division Bell stadium tour (the album is credited to Douglas Adams) was quite the spectacle. there were motifs to the Dark Side of the Moon, the Wall, Wish You Were Here, etc. there were flying pigs and fighter aeroplanes (a nod to co-pilots Nick & David)) and a circular light on the stage. lasers circulated around the main floor. it was a multi-media saturation point. i highly recommend Pulse, the live dvd and cd. Also, consider Live at Pompeii.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mitch

    "Breezy" is, I think, the best word for this book, and it gets a nudge up from two to three stars simply on the basis of readability. That said, I came away from Inside Out still wishing I'd learned a bit more about the inner workings of the Floyd. But it respectively glosses over a) what actually happened with Syd Barrett and b) the creative processes and tensions that powered the band's development. Perhaps these expectations were too higher for the band's drummer, seemingly the individual who "Breezy" is, I think, the best word for this book, and it gets a nudge up from two to three stars simply on the basis of readability. That said, I came away from Inside Out still wishing I'd learned a bit more about the inner workings of the Floyd. But it respectively glosses over a) what actually happened with Syd Barrett and b) the creative processes and tensions that powered the band's development. Perhaps these expectations were too higher for the band's drummer, seemingly the individual who contributed least to the band and who represented the closest thing to a bridge across the Waters-Gilmour divide were strongest (he knew Roger Waters from before the band started but stayed with David Gilmour after the split). The text is peppered with phrases like "My recollection is that..." as well as explicit acknowledgements that Waters, Gilmour, and Rick Wright vetted the text (which were actually nice reminders that perspectives on history will vary). Did I come away with anything I couldn't read in Wikipedia? Not really, and less in some cases. But it was a pleasant way to while away a couple of sunny afternoons.

  19. 4 out of 5

    James

    For someone with really only a passing interest in Pink Floyd, I would say this seemed kind of an odd choice of reading material. However, what started as somewhat of a mounting chore (the book is rather large and cumbersome), ended up being pretty pleasant. While a lot of the story of the band itself is told straightforwardly and workman-like, it's saved by the dry English humor that runs rampant (as rampant as dry humor can be) throughout. The text is also augmented by a boatload (am I being cle For someone with really only a passing interest in Pink Floyd, I would say this seemed kind of an odd choice of reading material. However, what started as somewhat of a mounting chore (the book is rather large and cumbersome), ended up being pretty pleasant. While a lot of the story of the band itself is told straightforwardly and workman-like, it's saved by the dry English humor that runs rampant (as rampant as dry humor can be) throughout. The text is also augmented by a boatload (am I being clever because Floyd guitarist David Gilmour has a houseboat-based recording studio? No, probably not, I just couldn't think of a better word) of photos: live, promotional, and candid. I'd really more likely give this book a 3.5 given the chance, but, since that's not an option here, I'd much rather give it the benefit of the doubt at 4. And this is also coming from someone not necessarily a fan of the band (though I do want to go listen to Dark Side of the Moon right about now) -- for a fan, past or present, this actually provides some interesting insight into the inter-personal strife that has apparently plagued the band from the outset.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Suri Thomas

    I recently purchased this book and returned it in four days. I was disappointed. This was my first Pink Floyd book and I felt that the only think I learned from this book was that Roger Water's girlfriend's name is Laurie. This book talked about Syd Barrett but I felt Nick really didn't know him. The incident when Roger spit on the fan was addressed in one sentence but Nick could not tell anything about it so why mention it. I could care less about his family and pictures of his children. What's w I recently purchased this book and returned it in four days. I was disappointed. This was my first Pink Floyd book and I felt that the only think I learned from this book was that Roger Water's girlfriend's name is Laurie. This book talked about Syd Barrett but I felt Nick really didn't know him. The incident when Roger spit on the fan was addressed in one sentence but Nick could not tell anything about it so why mention it. I could care less about his family and pictures of his children. What's wrong with this book is it does not tell you anything you didn't already know. Nick is telling about things but it seem he was not really on the inside track. Let's ask ourselves, should the drummer from Pink Floyd be writing this book? We don't really want to hear about Nick Mason. We want to hear about Syd Barrett and mainly Roger Waters. Which ones Pink? Roger Waters is and until he writes a book we will never get the Pink Floyd story. Nick should have named the book On the Outside not Able to see In. Save your money. Buy The Wall and listen to that instead.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Serge Pierro

    Having recently read the excellent Pink Floyd biography, "Comfortably Numb: The Inside Story of Pink Floyd", I thought that it would be an interesting followup to see what an actual member of the band had to say. Drummer Nick Mason presents and interesting and amusing look at the inner workings of Pink Floyd, as well as presenting a plethora of personal photos covering the history of the band and it's entourage. While it is informative, it is the witty humor of Mason that really makes this a pl Having recently read the excellent Pink Floyd biography, "Comfortably Numb: The Inside Story of Pink Floyd", I thought that it would be an interesting followup to see what an actual member of the band had to say. Drummer Nick Mason presents and interesting and amusing look at the inner workings of Pink Floyd, as well as presenting a plethora of personal photos covering the history of the band and it's entourage. While it is informative, it is the witty humor of Mason that really makes this a pleasure to read. I feel that after reading this and the aforementioned bio that I have a much clearer/deeper understanding of the band's success and problems. Fascinating insights into one of Rock's greatest bands.

  22. 4 out of 5

    John

    Why only 2 stars? Maybe because I had already read a Pink Floyd biography years ago. Maybe because the music here seemed to take a back seat to cars, set designs, vacations, and...everything else. Maybe because the writing just wasn't to my taste. Maybe because I'd unknowingly read most of Nick Mason's account of life with Pink Floyd through Wikipedia citations before I picked up this book. Sometimes it's best to just listen to the music.

  23. 5 out of 5

    David White

    Readable, likeable account of the rise and rise of Pink Floyd, but which seems a little thin after Keith Richards's excellent Life. Nick Mason is a master raconteur, but I came away wishing I knew more about the boys in the band themselves. Very enjoyable, though and Mason's acknowledgement of the contribution of the roadies, sound engineers, etc is gracious.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Glenn Portman

    An okay bio on Pink Floyd but not the one we really want to read. It was neutered by Nick allowing both Roger and David to delete any sections they felt they didn't like, so what remains is a watered down mediocre book. I also found myself becoming disinterested once we reach the part in the narrative where they initially split up.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Florin Pitea

    As a life-long fan of Pink Floyd, I was interested in reading this book. I enjoyed the author's fine sense of humour and understatement. Please visit my blog for an extended review here: http://tesatorul.blogspot.ro/2009/01/.... As a life-long fan of Pink Floyd, I was interested in reading this book. I enjoyed the author's fine sense of humour and understatement. Please visit my blog for an extended review here: http://tesatorul.blogspot.ro/2009/01/....

  26. 5 out of 5

    fourtriplezed

    An Ok read from Nick. He had a great time of it but if anything came out of this for me it was that Roger is a bit of a twat at times. For the fan.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dan Pavelescu

    Unexpectedly witty :)

  28. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    interesting, but the mark blake biography is more intense and more insightful...

  29. 5 out of 5

    Darryl

    It took me 10 years to read, but I finally finished. For a rock and roll drummer, Nick Mason tells a good story.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jan Toth

    Must read for any Pink Floyd fan.

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