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The 9 Types of Leadership: Mastering the Art of People in the 21st Century Workplace

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The 9 Types of Leadership demonstrates how to solve people problems on the job in a quick, efficient and satisfying way through understanding personality patterns and motivations. In the past few years, mindfulness and other approaches to self-awareness have begun to transform the American workplace. But while it is increasingly widely accepted in the business world that The 9 Types of Leadership demonstrates how to solve people problems on the job in a quick, efficient and satisfying way through understanding personality patterns and motivations. In the past few years, mindfulness and other approaches to self-awareness have begun to transform the American workplace. But while it is increasingly widely accepted in the business world that the most direct route to success lies in adopting practices that actively promote a leader’s self-awareness, social skill, and emotional intelligence, the best and most efficient path to developing a more conscious workforce often remains unclear. The 9 Types of Leadership provides a pathway to greater self-awareness and social skillfulness. It will help you orient yourself when you get caught up in people problems that you don’t know how to work your way out of. By providing extremely detailed and accurate descriptions of nine recognizable personalities, The 9 Types of Leadership is an unmatched tool for business people to use to decode the mysteries involved in understanding why people do what they do, why we have conflicts with some people but not others and how we can become aware of our blind spots. Most importantly, it can help leaders know themselves in a deeper way so they can more effectively lead others.


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The 9 Types of Leadership demonstrates how to solve people problems on the job in a quick, efficient and satisfying way through understanding personality patterns and motivations. In the past few years, mindfulness and other approaches to self-awareness have begun to transform the American workplace. But while it is increasingly widely accepted in the business world that The 9 Types of Leadership demonstrates how to solve people problems on the job in a quick, efficient and satisfying way through understanding personality patterns and motivations. In the past few years, mindfulness and other approaches to self-awareness have begun to transform the American workplace. But while it is increasingly widely accepted in the business world that the most direct route to success lies in adopting practices that actively promote a leader’s self-awareness, social skill, and emotional intelligence, the best and most efficient path to developing a more conscious workforce often remains unclear. The 9 Types of Leadership provides a pathway to greater self-awareness and social skillfulness. It will help you orient yourself when you get caught up in people problems that you don’t know how to work your way out of. By providing extremely detailed and accurate descriptions of nine recognizable personalities, The 9 Types of Leadership is an unmatched tool for business people to use to decode the mysteries involved in understanding why people do what they do, why we have conflicts with some people but not others and how we can become aware of our blind spots. Most importantly, it can help leaders know themselves in a deeper way so they can more effectively lead others.

30 review for The 9 Types of Leadership: Mastering the Art of People in the 21st Century Workplace

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ashik Uzzaman

    Today I finished "The 9 Types of Leadership: Mastering the Art of People in the 21st Century Workplace" by Beatrice Chestnut. In this book, the author talks about Enneagram and how it is relevant to leadership styles. The Enneagram is a system of nine personality types combining traditional wisdom with modern psychology - a powerful tool for understanding ourselves and the people in our lives - with three major applications: * Personal and spiritual growth * Successful relationships at home and a Today I finished "The 9 Types of Leadership: Mastering the Art of People in the 21st Century Workplace" by Beatrice Chestnut. In this book, the author talks about Enneagram and how it is relevant to leadership styles. The Enneagram is a system of nine personality types combining traditional wisdom with modern psychology - a powerful tool for understanding ourselves and the people in our lives - with three major applications: * Personal and spiritual growth * Successful relationships at home and at work * Leadership development, team building and communication skills for business This nine-pointed diagram (Ennea is Greek for nine) has apparently been used for centuries in esoteric Christian and Sufi traditions as a map of human consciousness and archetypes. The other alternatives to Enneagram model are Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), Big 5 and DiSC. I first came to know about Enneagram a decade ago when Todd Pierce joined Salesforce as an EVP and introduced it to all of us. In this book, the author talks about how he learned it from an Executive Coach while he was at Genentech and subsequently carried it to Salesforce and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. My personality style looks to be Type 3 based on a few tests I went through. The Enneagram describes three centers of intelligence and perception: Head, Heart and Body. While every individual has all three of these centers, each of the nine personality types has a particular strength in one of them. * The Intellectual Center: using the mind for language and rational thinking, ideas and images, plans and strategies. Located in the head. Type 5, 6 and 7 predominantly use this. * The Emotional Center: using the heart for positive and negative feelings, empathy and concern for others, romance and devotion. Located in the area of the chest and diaphragm. Type 2, 3 and 4 predominantly use this. * The Instinctual Center: using the body for movement, sensate awareness, gut-level knowing, personal security and social belonging. Type 1, 8 and 9 predominantly use this. In this book, the author not only talks about these 9 personality types but also goes in detail about how each of these types has 3 different inclinations - self-preservation, social and one-to-one. That makes the total number of Enneagram subtypes to 27. However, she doesn't touch on the concept of wings in this book. * Enneagram Type 1 – The Perfectionist Core Desire: To be right / to be good Core Fear: Being wrong / being bad Wounding Message: “It’s not ok to make mistakes” Possible wings: 9 and/or 2 Stress Number: In stress, 1’s take on the negative traits of type 4 Growth Number: In growth, 1’s take on the positive traits of type 7 Center of Intelligence: Gut / Instinctual Triad Description: Type 1’s are honest, dedicated, self-disciplined, responsible, and ethical when at their best and living in healthy levels. When 1’s are in unhealthy levels, stressed, or not at their best they can be critical, rigid, judgmental, resentful, and inflexible. * Enneagram Type 2 – The Helper Core Desire: To be loved / to be wanted Core Fear: Being unloved / being unwanted Wounding Message: “It’s not ok to have your own needs.” Possible wings: 1 and/or 3 Stress Number: In stress, 2’s take on the negative traits of type 8 Growth Number: In growth, 2’s take on the positive traits of type 4 Center of Intelligence: Heart / Feeling Triad Description: Type 2’s are selfless, warm, friendly, generous, intuitive, and giving when at their best and living in healthy levels. When 2’s are in unhealthy levels, stressed, or not at their best they can be prideful, martyr-ish, insecure, possessive, flattering, and demanding. * Enneagram Type 3 – The Achiever Core Desire: To be valuable / to be admired Core Fear: Not being valuable / not being admired / failing Wounding Message: “It’s not ok to have your own feelings or identity” Possible wings: 2 and/or 4 Stress Number: In stress, 3’s take on the negative traits of type 9 Growth Number: In growth, 3’s take on the positive traits of type 6 Center of Intelligence: Heart / Feeling Triad Description: Type 3’s are confident, efficient, energetic, hard-working, and optimistic when at their best and living in healthy levels. When 3’s are in unhealthy levels, stressed, or not at their best they can be inauthentic, workaholics, self-promoting, impatient, validation needy, and vain. * Enneagram Type 4 – The Individualist Core Desire: To be authentic / to be uniquely themselves Core Fear: Not having an identity / having no significance Wounding Message: “It’s not ok to be too much (or too little)” Possible wings: 3 and/or 5 Stress Number: In stress, 4’s take on the negative traits of type 2 Growth Number: In growth, 4’s take on the positive traits of type 1 Center of Intelligence: Heart / Feeling Triad Description: Type 4’s are authentic, creative, expressive, introspective, and compassionate when at their best and living in healthy levels. When 4’s are in unhealthy levels, stressed, or not at their best they can be moody, stubborn, temperamental, withdrawn, and depressed. * Enneagram Type 5 – The Observer Core Desire: To be capable / to be competent Core Fear: Being incapable / being incompetent Wounding Message: “It’s not ok to be comfortable in the world” Possible wings: 4 and/or 6 Stress Number: In stress, 5’s take on the negative traits of 7 Growth Number: In growth, 5’s take on the positive traits of 8 Center of Intelligence: Head / Thinking Triad Description: Type 5’s are observant, objective, insightful, independent, and calm when at their best and living in healthy levels. When 5’s are in unhealthy levels, stressed, or not at their best they can be withdrawing, arrogant, cynical, indifferent, and distant. * Enneagram Type 6 – The Loyalist Core Desire: To be secure / to be supported Core Fear: Being without support / being without guidance / insecurity Wounding Message: “It’s not ok to trust yourself.” Possible wings: 5 and/or 7 Stress Number: In stress, 6’s take on the negative traits of 3 Growth Number: In growth, 6’s take on the positive traits of 9 Center of Intelligence: Head / Thinking Triad Description: Type 6’s are loyal, witty, committed, prepared, responsible, trouble-shooters, and supportive when at their best and living in healthy levels. When 6’s are in unhealthy levels, stressed, or not at their best they can be anxious, rigid, paranoid, pessimistic, and hyper-vigilant. * Enneagram Type 7 – The Enthusiast Core Desire: To be content / to be satisfied Core Fear: Being deprived / being trapped in pain (typically emotional) Wounding Message: “It’s not ok to depend on anyone for anything.” Possible wings: 6 and/or 8 Stress Number: In stress, 7’s take on the negative traits of 1 Growth Number: In growth, 7’s take on the positive traits of 5 Center of Intelligence: Head / Thinking Triad Description: Type 7’s are adventurous, imaginative, enthusiastic, spontaneous, and positive when at their best and living in healthy levels. When 7’s are in unhealthy levels, stressed, or not at their best they can be unfocused, superficial, restless, impulsive, escapist, and self-absorbed. * Enneagram Type 8 – The Challenger Core Desire: To be independent / to protect themselves Core Fear: Being controlled / being harmed Wounding Message: “It’s not ok to be vulnerable.” Possible wings: 7 and/or 9 Stress Number: In stress, 8’s take on the negative traits of 5 Growth Number: In growth, 8’s take on the positive traits of 2 Center of Intelligence: Gut / Instinctual Triad Description: Type 8’s are protective, energetic, decisive, loyal, resilient, and direct when at their best and living in healthy levels. When 8’s are in unhealthy levels, stressed, or not at their best they can be insensitive, manipulative, controlling, intimidating, rebellious, and confrontational. * Enneagram Type 9 – The Peacekeeper Core Desire: To be at peace / to be harmonious Core Fear: separation / loss of conflict / conflict Wounding Message: “It’s not ok to assert yourself.” Possible wings: 8 and/or 1 Stress Number: In stress, 9’s take on the negative traits of 6 Growth Number: In growth, 9’s take on the positive traits of 3 Center of Intelligence: Gut / Instinctual Triad Description: Type 9’s are amiable, open-minded, optimistic, nonjudgmental, supportive, and peaceful when at their best and living in healthy levels. When 9’s are in unhealthy levels, stressed, or not at their best they can be conflict-avoidant, indecisive, unassertive, passive-aggressive, stubborn, and insecure. Source: http://www.dragon-bishop.com/2021/01/...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Ronk

    Loved her other enneagram book. This was a helpful business/corporate read, I’d recommend it. Even my 9 husband (who’s not terribly into all things enneagram) was highly interested to read it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jenai Hamilton

    I love The 9 Types of Leadership , and I love the ways in which Beatrice Chestnut addresses the Enneagram as a tool. This particular book is chockful of information, but it may not cover every aspect of the theories of the Enneagram. For that, I believe Chestnut's other book, The Complete Enneagram is a great book to keep alongside this one. I understand the aversion people have to any form of labeling. It can be an excuse for dismissiveness and minimizing at best and, it is dehumanizing at wors I love The 9 Types of Leadership , and I love the ways in which Beatrice Chestnut addresses the Enneagram as a tool. This particular book is chockful of information, but it may not cover every aspect of the theories of the Enneagram. For that, I believe Chestnut's other book, The Complete Enneagram is a great book to keep alongside this one. I understand the aversion people have to any form of labeling. It can be an excuse for dismissiveness and minimizing at best and, it is dehumanizing at worst. I really appreciate that Chestnut addresses the ethics of the Enneagram, discouraging others from wielding this newly found information as a weapon with ammunition to attack or blame others, but instead, encouraging individuals on how they perceive the world differently through the development of their life and their experiences. It gives us the language we need to appreciate the journeys and perspectives of others as well, though they may be markedly different from our own. This book in particular addresses how the Enneagram can be utilized when engaging with others in the workplace. It helps people to become self-aware and more mindful when engaging in collaborative work. Whether you are interested in either organizational psychology or in increasing the value and quality of work and workplace relations, this book is well worth your time.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Connor

    This book is an Enneagram primer for the workplace, so it reads like the transcript of a professional workshop. I've found the Enneagram itself to be very helpful, and this book would be a great introduction to the tool in a more corporate setting. But I could've predicted many of the principles espoused in the book (Sevens look on the bright side of obstacles!) and some of the personal stories read like testimonials to bring in an Enneagram workshop into the reader's own business. If you are new This book is an Enneagram primer for the workplace, so it reads like the transcript of a professional workshop. I've found the Enneagram itself to be very helpful, and this book would be a great introduction to the tool in a more corporate setting. But I could've predicted many of the principles espoused in the book (Sevens look on the bright side of obstacles!) and some of the personal stories read like testimonials to bring in an Enneagram workshop into the reader's own business. If you are new to the Enneagram, and you want to see results in your interpersonal business relationships, this is the book for you. If you are familiar with the Enneagram already, much of this book will reinforce what you might discover elsewhere.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    A practical, workplace addition to the Enneagram canon of self-help guides. This edition by Chestnut has all the well-structured advice and analysis of her previous work, with the added benefit of providing a few practicable strategies for getting along with colleagues based on Enneagram principles. I did notice that in the epilogue all of the people quoted were type 8s, 3s, 9s, or 4s - and some referred to other 7s. It just goes to show that leadership really is the domain of particular personal A practical, workplace addition to the Enneagram canon of self-help guides. This edition by Chestnut has all the well-structured advice and analysis of her previous work, with the added benefit of providing a few practicable strategies for getting along with colleagues based on Enneagram principles. I did notice that in the epilogue all of the people quoted were type 8s, 3s, 9s, or 4s - and some referred to other 7s. It just goes to show that leadership really is the domain of particular personality types.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alex Bulankou

    I would recommend to only read (or listen to) this book if you like personality psychology and somehow haven't heard about Enneagram before. I didn't and it was a great introduction and given the Enneagram connection with antiquity, Odysseus' journey and Christian deadly sins, I became very curious and immediately proceeded to classify everyone I know into one of Enneagram types. If you are familiar with Enneagram already, don't bother with this book, it reads like a work seminar manual and ther I would recommend to only read (or listen to) this book if you like personality psychology and somehow haven't heard about Enneagram before. I didn't and it was a great introduction and given the Enneagram connection with antiquity, Odysseus' journey and Christian deadly sins, I became very curious and immediately proceeded to classify everyone I know into one of Enneagram types. If you are familiar with Enneagram already, don't bother with this book, it reads like a work seminar manual and there's nothing more than what many website already provide on the subject.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    It’s not very often you find a book that has a chapter that can describe your better than you can describe yourself. It turns out I’m a Type 1 on the Enneagram of Personality chart, who knew? I recommend this to anyone who is not familiar with the Enneagram model and enjoys psychology or learning more about their self.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    This is the best "enneagram for business" book I've read so far. There's great information about how each style shows up as a leader and points out blind spots. The bullet lists of how to work with each style and what to do when your manager or direct reports are a certain type opens the way to more effective communications and overall healthy organizational development. This is the best "enneagram for business" book I've read so far. There's great information about how each style shows up as a leader and points out blind spots. The bullet lists of how to work with each style and what to do when your manager or direct reports are a certain type opens the way to more effective communications and overall healthy organizational development.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Justin Heap

    Absolutely brilliant application of the Enneagram from one of the very best, articulated folks in the entire field. Applicable to a variety of environments, too! Note: this book doesn't aim to discuss Wings and/or much of the therapeutic tangents normally related to the tool –it's just not within the scope. Absolutely brilliant application of the Enneagram from one of the very best, articulated folks in the entire field. Applicable to a variety of environments, too! Note: this book doesn't aim to discuss Wings and/or much of the therapeutic tangents normally related to the tool –it's just not within the scope.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Terry

    It explains the Endogram of leadership styles. The Perfectionist The Helper The Achiever The Romantic The Observer The Questioner The Adventurer The Asserter The Peacemaker It takes all times to make a Team in the work place run proficiently.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    A solid enneagram resource to better learn how to lead from your own number. Chestnut also gives practical advise on how to empower and work alongside people of other numbers.

  12. 4 out of 5

    John Fletcher

    I was a little disappointed in this one. Maybe the print version would be better. Didn’t feel like I got Much additional insight but maybe I need a concrete example to apply the concepts to.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Pablo Gómez

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. NA

  14. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Decent observations 25% content 75% repetition

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jon Groves

    Great for business This is not the best book I have read about the enneagram. however this was a great fresh perspective from a business point of view.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kenny

    The best Enneagram book I've read so far dealing with work and vocational contexts and issues. The best Enneagram book I've read so far dealing with work and vocational contexts and issues.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Smith

    One of the better resources on the Enneagram. I would have given the book 4 stars, but it (unnecessarily) throws shade at the Myers-Briggs. I feel those two models can co-exist quite happily. :)

  18. 5 out of 5

    Taryn Nergaard

  19. 5 out of 5

    Yong Kang Chan

  20. 5 out of 5

    Anton

  21. 5 out of 5

    Paul Copeland

  22. 4 out of 5

    Anne

  23. 4 out of 5

    Johanna

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rob Moll

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kip

  26. 4 out of 5

    Laura Fan

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kara Poe Alexander

  28. 5 out of 5

    Brynn

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lowell

  30. 4 out of 5

    Marc

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