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Age of Enlightenment: A History From Beginning to End

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Age of Enlightenment * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. From its beginnings as a loosely definable group of philosophical ideas to the culmination of its revolutionary effect on public life in Europe, the Age of Enlightenment is the defining intellectual and cultur Age of Enlightenment * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. From its beginnings as a loosely definable group of philosophical ideas to the culmination of its revolutionary effect on public life in Europe, the Age of Enlightenment is the defining intellectual and cultural movement of the modern world. Using reason as its core value, the Enlightenment believed that progress and the betterment of the human condition was inevitable. Inside you will read about… ✓ The Great Thinkers of the Enlightenment ✓ Engaging With Religion ✓ Morality in the Age of Enlightenment ✓ Society in the Age of Enlightenment ✓ Science and Political Economy ✓ The Enlightenment and the Public ✓ Print Culture and the Press Philosophies of the Enlightenment gave birth to the disciplines of political science, economic theory, sociology and anthropology, the disciplines that still form the basis of how we understand life in the 21st century. A bold attack on the Church, the State and the Monarchy, the Age of Enlightenment was a direct challenge to the status quo that sought freedom for all.


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Age of Enlightenment * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. From its beginnings as a loosely definable group of philosophical ideas to the culmination of its revolutionary effect on public life in Europe, the Age of Enlightenment is the defining intellectual and cultur Age of Enlightenment * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. From its beginnings as a loosely definable group of philosophical ideas to the culmination of its revolutionary effect on public life in Europe, the Age of Enlightenment is the defining intellectual and cultural movement of the modern world. Using reason as its core value, the Enlightenment believed that progress and the betterment of the human condition was inevitable. Inside you will read about… ✓ The Great Thinkers of the Enlightenment ✓ Engaging With Religion ✓ Morality in the Age of Enlightenment ✓ Society in the Age of Enlightenment ✓ Science and Political Economy ✓ The Enlightenment and the Public ✓ Print Culture and the Press Philosophies of the Enlightenment gave birth to the disciplines of political science, economic theory, sociology and anthropology, the disciplines that still form the basis of how we understand life in the 21st century. A bold attack on the Church, the State and the Monarchy, the Age of Enlightenment was a direct challenge to the status quo that sought freedom for all.

30 review for Age of Enlightenment: A History From Beginning to End

  1. 5 out of 5

    M

    This free ebook could be very useful to someone getting ready to do research but hasn't picked a subject yet. It's fact filled, spilt up into quite small chunks, and talks about the women as well as the men who were involved. Everyone discussed in this book are European, since it was basically a European movement. My criticism of the book is that all discussion about the negatives were pretty much relegated to a short conclusion section. It had a global impact, but that was only briefly noted. I This free ebook could be very useful to someone getting ready to do research but hasn't picked a subject yet. It's fact filled, spilt up into quite small chunks, and talks about the women as well as the men who were involved. Everyone discussed in this book are European, since it was basically a European movement. My criticism of the book is that all discussion about the negatives were pretty much relegated to a short conclusion section. It had a global impact, but that was only briefly noted. It's definitely only a jumping off point, to introduce you to the names and some of the events.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sayr Olivares

    Good brief little book

  3. 4 out of 5

    Husain Necklace

    Good enough for a short introduction into the age of enlightenment but not comprehensive enough.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dave Courtney

    A breif but excellent summary of the age of the enlightenment, one of the most defining moments in Western history. This is more of a summary than an exposition, but as a sumarry it hits on the most important points of reference in terms of what the enlightenment was and how it changed the way the Western world functioned in the realm of politics, philosophy and of course religion. As it writes, "the Enlightenment can be understood as a direct challenge to the status quo at a time when intoleran A breif but excellent summary of the age of the enlightenment, one of the most defining moments in Western history. This is more of a summary than an exposition, but as a sumarry it hits on the most important points of reference in terms of what the enlightenment was and how it changed the way the Western world functioned in the realm of politics, philosophy and of course religion. As it writes, "the Enlightenment can be understood as a direct challenge to the status quo at a time when intolerant and superstious beliefs dominated most people's lives." The fact that it emerged at least in part as an answer to the dominant religious power of the day (Catholicism) suggests that one cannot understand the enlightenment without understand religion, and specifically its offshoot or direct child, the Reformation. One of the reasons I personally wanted to read this book was to refamiliarize myself with the impact of the Enlightenment on religious thought, especially because so much of the dialogue and division that exists today revolves around these particular influences. If the history of this era begins by setting the stage for much of what motivated what largely began as philosphical movement, then this shift from old world belief to new world rationalism become the necessary stepping stone to seeing how the Protestant Reformation also emerged as the defining voice of Western Christianity and the odd mix of new world religion and secularism that defines this part of the world today. As the final concluding chapter points out, the Enlightenment is far from a universal idea. Not only is it defined by a wide diversity of philosophers and eventually a wide diversity of science in the subsequent scientific revolution, it is also defined by a wide diversity of theologians and Christian movements. In contest since its emergence is this seeming tension between reason as our salvation and the idea of limited knowledge which has led to a confusing emergence of competing ideas of liberation. The Enlightenment has both broadened and narrowed our world view while also failing to achieve the kind of utopian ideas it lays claim to. This is true whether we are speaking of the new political economy it ushered in, the scientific revolution, and even its ability to answer the questions raised by its increasing knowledge of space, humanity, history, medicine and culture (including the rise of things like the printing press). What Enlightenment idealists often like to believe is that these ideas, which are seen as fundamental to human function and participation in the world, are integral for things like anti-racist policies and women's liberation and autonomy and individual freedom to take hold. What they often do in the process of this percieved sweeping change of old world function and values is both neglect and ignore history in the wider sense while reinterpreting it according to Enlightenment ideals. In the process it not only brought in new types of discrimination, but it began to cripple its ability to actually ask and explore questions of morality and certainly spirituality in the process. It essentially categorized history into two parts, narrowing in on the present as a demonstration of "progress" dependent on consistant forward movement. This is the idea that who we are today is better and more advanced and closer to perfection than we were yesterday, and the reason we can know this is by trusting the power of human ingenuity, conquest and reason. The excellent chapter on morality reveals how contested this was even with the early philosophers. If "the enlightenment began as a philsophical group of ideas witih the common themes of reason and progress", there is great debate over where it ends and whether reason and progress are in fact the saviors they were promised to be. This gets even more pertinant for people of faith as we look at how these same Enlightenment values were a smiliar driving force for the Reformation. It is not hard to see how this developed to use similar language and similar kinds of reasoning to make its case, becoming similarly devoted to indivdiualism, rationalism, and forms of knowledge in the process. There is a sense in which the Reformers, and the Christendom that came to define the modern Western world in its wake, left behind the basic tenants of its faith much in the same way that Enlightenment thinkers eventually grew to abandon the basic tenants of humanity. What emerged, both in religion and society, is this notion that by doing away with given or revealed knowledge we can create this knowledge and essentially save ourselves. A reasoned faith replaces a spiritual faith all while "reason" has failed to show that it can function apart from old world values and alturism. And for all the progress that came from the Enlightenment, the devastating impact this had on numerous elements of our Western world, and the world at large, looms equally large.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Thom Swennes

    “Sapere aude! ‘Have courage to use your own reason!’ That is the motto of enlightenment.” Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) Europe has gone through different social, religious, political, and scientific phases of time, starting with the renaissance and reformation (14th to 17th century) and then continuing into the age of enlightenment (1680-1800). During this time, individuals were breaking away from the past and tradition and beginning to ask questions of topics that were forbidden a couple of centuries “Sapere aude! ‘Have courage to use your own reason!’ That is the motto of enlightenment.” Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) Europe has gone through different social, religious, political, and scientific phases of time, starting with the renaissance and reformation (14th to 17th century) and then continuing into the age of enlightenment (1680-1800). During this time, individuals were breaking away from the past and tradition and beginning to ask questions of topics that were forbidden a couple of centuries earlier. New discoveries were made and new revolutionary ideas were being formed. Great thinkers, writers, and especially philosophers as John Locke (1632-1704), Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727), Charles Louis de Secondat (1689-1755), and Pierre Bayle (1647-1706) made a name for themselves and in a very personal way changed the world around them. A multitude of names that are familiar even today, as Voltaire, Rene Descartes (“I think, therefore I am.”), Christian Wolff, and Immanuel Kant served to change the way people thought and acted. These people combined to eventually spur the public into action. This resulted in the Revolutionary War in North America and later the French Revolution. I must confess that I enjoy reading about the results, but I find the path followed rather tedious. The world is made up of thinkers and doers and they are both necessary to incite change. I suppose I identify more with the latter than the former. This book offers a bird’s eye view of this period of change and can serve as an inspiration to delve further into this fascinating period.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Crawford

    This was a time when knowledge was considered valuable and new areas popped up such as economic theory, anthropology, sociology, anthropology and modern philosophy. The basic order of things was the Renaissance which led to the Reformation which led to the Scientific Revolution. The book notes that this time period is generally from the 1680's through the early 1800s. This was also a multi-nation event. Some examples it gives includes Francis Bacon (English), Adam Smith (Scotland) and Kant (Germa This was a time when knowledge was considered valuable and new areas popped up such as economic theory, anthropology, sociology, anthropology and modern philosophy. The basic order of things was the Renaissance which led to the Reformation which led to the Scientific Revolution. The book notes that this time period is generally from the 1680's through the early 1800s. This was also a multi-nation event. Some examples it gives includes Francis Bacon (English), Adam Smith (Scotland) and Kant (Germany). The book notes it was also a time of warfare. The book goes into details about all of this but the thing that stood out to me most is this from Voltaire: Civilized beauty could only flourish if its members were respectful of each other's differences. Very excellent advice but something that nations and people both seem to avoid.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Upendra Awasthi

    Very interesting and enlighting giving a better perspective of today's world. With internet giving access to treasure of unlimited knowledge at little expense and spread of education such books would accelerate change to make world a global village with peace, prosperity, equality and tolerance generating consensus and harmony world over without need of a war or violence. I would have given 5 stars but felt need of more details. Very interesting and enlighting giving a better perspective of today's world. With internet giving access to treasure of unlimited knowledge at little expense and spread of education such books would accelerate change to make world a global village with peace, prosperity, equality and tolerance generating consensus and harmony world over without need of a war or violence. I would have given 5 stars but felt need of more details.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lyle Radke

    This is a very brief overview of the history and main characters of the Enlightenment. The concepts and vocabulary are too advanced for most children while the treatment of the subject matter is too superficial for a serious adult. It could serve as an introduction for someone unfamiliar with the Enlightenment, but with no references, citations, or bibliography, it doesn’t offer much in the way of guidance on next steps. Still, I found it to be somehow satisfying.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie (Bookfever)

    I really enjoyed this book. Honestly I wish it was a little longer because I could keep on reading about the Englightenmen for ages. It was really interesting. This was such an important time in our history. Obviously we wouldn't be where we are now without it. Also, I really liked the quotes at the start of each chapter. I really enjoyed this book. Honestly I wish it was a little longer because I could keep on reading about the Englightenmen for ages. It was really interesting. This was such an important time in our history. Obviously we wouldn't be where we are now without it. Also, I really liked the quotes at the start of each chapter.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ed Barton

    Great Brief Look at the Enlightenment One of the better in the Hourly History series. A good look at the Enlightenment and many of the major philosophies and philosophers. Covering Religion, economy, politics, feminism and philosophical development, the book provides a good overview of major items in a very quick and easy read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ashwin

    Yet anoth classic by hourly history. Great 👍👍👍 Great book on enlightment. Hourly history gives you very detailed yet concised interpretation of the topic researched. Here the author clearly mentions different philosophers who were responsible for the age of enlightment. Great going😊

  12. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Staats

    Interesting As all of the books in this series, this book is a rough overview and a short. Hopefully, the reader will be inspired to more reading and dig deeper into the age and its legacy. This is a broad field and the book barely scratches the surface. However, the author gives a good introduction. Enjoyable and quick read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Clark

    Fascinating A quick look at The Age of Enlightenment by comparing the various writers of the time in England, France, Germany and Scotland speaks of their influence on religion, economics, science, politics and social reforms.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tom Sells

    Thinkers versus doers. Life and history produces doers and philosophers. At certain times it was acceptable to write your thoughts and continue to live. However other times produced similar thoughts not accepted by the power.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Anil Swarup

    Age of Enlightenment marked a watershed in the history of mankind. It transformed understanding of objective conditions. Hourly History brings forth how it all came about and what were the consequences of this enlightenment.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Katja

    3 stars & 3/10 hearts. Obviously, I don’t agree with everything in here, but I was impressed. The book was well-written, well-researched, well-formatted, well-edited, & basically really well done. The only thing I disliked was that there was a strong anti-religion/anti-God feeling. 

  17. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Scholes

    Quick synopsis A very quick and light synopsis of the enlightenment. It might give a couple thoughts of the enlightenment’s place in history but really does not delve very deeply into its place in historical context.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bruce

    This is a perfect survey; it hits on many key ideas that made the Age of Enlightenment the age of enlightenment. It would be a great book even if it was limited to the quotes that head each chapter!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    I've just found these quickie history books and they are delightful, bite-sized morsels of the basics of historical events and people. I've just found these quickie history books and they are delightful, bite-sized morsels of the basics of historical events and people.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    Good introduction Introducing the subject with short informative chapters made further reading more beneficial. I would recommend this to anyone curious about this age.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Igor

    Short, still provoking.

  22. 5 out of 5

    CRG

    This audible book grasps in sixty minutes some of the relevant intellectual figures that helped the Enlightenment movement as Voltaire, Montesquieu, Descartes, Hegel, & others.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Janet Cooke

    Wanting More I will decide that this is a good thing in the end. Right now it simply seems inadequate, I have to track down a bit more.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Amit Acharya

    A quick primer on the enlightenment age in Europe. Great to refresh the historical facts.

  25. 4 out of 5

    mandy rowley

    Very interesting - makes you think about our current crisis with Coronavirus- will this lead to a major rethink on social structures and government policies?

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rosa Löfman

    Catherine II’s name was spelled ”Caroline II” for some reason. There was also a few spelling mistakes.

  27. 5 out of 5

    A gin and orange, a lemon squash, and a scotch and water, please!

    A great overview and nicely written too.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Robin Dix

    What a snooze fest. A hard pass.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    This is well written, but I question some of the facts or the opinions that are presented as facts without any argument in favour - for example, Christianity and Judaism grew out of Islam?

  30. 4 out of 5

    David Parker

    The age of slavery During this period we would see the French and American Revolutions and the expansion of colonialism and slavery for non-whites.

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