counter February: Selected Poetry - Free Download Books
Hot Best Seller

February: Selected Poetry

Availability: Ready to download

One of the greatest poets of the Silver Age, Boris Pasternak (February 10, 1890 - May 30, 1960) became known in the west after he was awarded the 1958 Nobel Laureate in Literature and was forced by the Russian authorities to decline the prize. This scandal won him a large audience in the west and his novel, Dr. Zhivago became an instant success. However, contrary to popula One of the greatest poets of the Silver Age, Boris Pasternak (February 10, 1890 - May 30, 1960) became known in the west after he was awarded the 1958 Nobel Laureate in Literature and was forced by the Russian authorities to decline the prize. This scandal won him a large audience in the west and his novel, Dr. Zhivago became an instant success. However, contrary to popular belief, Boris Pasternak has never actively rebelled against the Soviet regime. His poetry has always reflected his inner self and was not dictated by the atmosphere of the epoch. In Russia, where the novel, Dr, Zhivago, had been banned until the late 1980's, Boris Pasternak was primarily known for his work as a poet. Boris Pasternak, whose first true love was music, brings a unique sense of melody to his poetry. Barely a whisper, one almost needs to overhear the subtle song in his words. It is this quality of his poetry that sets him apart from his contemporaries and makes his work moving and unforgettable. Nearly all of the poems from Dr. Zhivago (with the exceptions of "Wedding," "Star of Nativity," and "The Miracle," which proved to be too difficult to translate adequately) are included in this dual-language edition, as well as some other poetry written throughout his life. Great emphasis has been placed on retaining the musical quality of the work, without sacrificing the content.


Compare

One of the greatest poets of the Silver Age, Boris Pasternak (February 10, 1890 - May 30, 1960) became known in the west after he was awarded the 1958 Nobel Laureate in Literature and was forced by the Russian authorities to decline the prize. This scandal won him a large audience in the west and his novel, Dr. Zhivago became an instant success. However, contrary to popula One of the greatest poets of the Silver Age, Boris Pasternak (February 10, 1890 - May 30, 1960) became known in the west after he was awarded the 1958 Nobel Laureate in Literature and was forced by the Russian authorities to decline the prize. This scandal won him a large audience in the west and his novel, Dr. Zhivago became an instant success. However, contrary to popular belief, Boris Pasternak has never actively rebelled against the Soviet regime. His poetry has always reflected his inner self and was not dictated by the atmosphere of the epoch. In Russia, where the novel, Dr, Zhivago, had been banned until the late 1980's, Boris Pasternak was primarily known for his work as a poet. Boris Pasternak, whose first true love was music, brings a unique sense of melody to his poetry. Barely a whisper, one almost needs to overhear the subtle song in his words. It is this quality of his poetry that sets him apart from his contemporaries and makes his work moving and unforgettable. Nearly all of the poems from Dr. Zhivago (with the exceptions of "Wedding," "Star of Nativity," and "The Miracle," which proved to be too difficult to translate adequately) are included in this dual-language edition, as well as some other poetry written throughout his life. Great emphasis has been placed on retaining the musical quality of the work, without sacrificing the content.

30 review for February: Selected Poetry

  1. 5 out of 5

    Atri

    New poems are composed in tears - The more unplanned, the more compelling. *** The hands of time are growing tired Of always turning in a daze And decades in a day transpire, And nothing breaks up the embrace. *** The plot is predetermined to proceed, The outcome of my destiny is marked. Alone, amidst the Pharisees and greed. *** There's still the twilight of the night. It's far too early. It appears That fields eternally subside Across the crossroad to the side And till the sunrise and the light, There's still New poems are composed in tears - The more unplanned, the more compelling. *** The hands of time are growing tired Of always turning in a daze And decades in a day transpire, And nothing breaks up the embrace. *** The plot is predetermined to proceed, The outcome of my destiny is marked. Alone, amidst the Pharisees and greed. *** There's still the twilight of the night. It's far too early. It appears That fields eternally subside Across the crossroad to the side And till the sunrise and the light, There's still a thousand years. *** Life has suddenly returned again, Just as once it strangely went away. On this ancient street, once more I stand, Just as then, that distant summer day. *** A man out of the courtyard gapes, Not knowing what to say. Her leave was much like an escape. The house is disarrayed. ... When icy windows block the light And one can barely see, The suffocating grief is like The deserts of the sea. He dearly loved all of her traits And he and she were close, Like shores are intimate with waves Along the whole wide coast. ... The parting will consume them both, By grief they will be devoured. Ths man now overlooks the place. Before she left, she tossed Out of the cupboard in a haste Her dresses and her clothes. He wanders and until the night, He folds the things she scattered. *** No boundaries between us And closer still we grow. But who are we, from where, If all those years are gone, Just rumours are to spare, And we have long passed on?

  2. 4 out of 5

    Armin

    Formal gelungene, ebenso anschauliche wie klangprächtige Lyrik mit absolut schlüssiger Methaphorik, aber wenig inhaltlicher Substanz, alles in allem eher wehleidig, melancholisch, rührselig. Die Lyrik Schiwagos ließ mich als junger Mann ziemlich kalt, daran hat sich gut 30 Jahre später wenig geändert, auch wenn formales Gelingen inzwischen an Bedeutung gewonnen hat. Nach dem Majakowski-Schock blieb Pasternak nur bei der Lyrik, weil er als Komponist und Philosoph schon zwei mal vor der endgültige Formal gelungene, ebenso anschauliche wie klangprächtige Lyrik mit absolut schlüssiger Methaphorik, aber wenig inhaltlicher Substanz, alles in allem eher wehleidig, melancholisch, rührselig. Die Lyrik Schiwagos ließ mich als junger Mann ziemlich kalt, daran hat sich gut 30 Jahre später wenig geändert, auch wenn formales Gelingen inzwischen an Bedeutung gewonnen hat. Nach dem Majakowski-Schock blieb Pasternak nur bei der Lyrik, weil er als Komponist und Philosoph schon zwei mal vor der endgültigen Entscheidung für eine Laufbahn zurück geschreckt war, weil die Selbstzweifel zu groß wurden. Als Neukantianer wäre er sogar als Musterschüler von Cohen längst auf dem Müllhaufen der Zunft gelandet, ich habe auch so meine Zweifel daran, ob er als Komponist nicht immer im Schatten seines Lehrmeisters Skrjabin geblieben wäre oder später substanzielle Musik komponiert hätte. Allenfalls ein weiterer Kabalevsky. Vielleicht war eine gewisse Substanzlosigkeit auch das Geheimnis, das Pasternak die Stalinischen Säuberungswellen überstehen ließ, der alle anderen großen Lyriker seiner Generation zum Opfer fielen, falls sie sich nicht in den Selbstmord treiben ließen.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cirtnecce

    Boris Pasternak, the 1958 Nobel Prize winner who declined the honor under pressure from the Soviet Government, and whose work, Doctor Zhivago has been immortalized in every possible form of media, was born in a well to do Jewish family (though the Pasternaks had assimilated into the Russian Orthodox Church for years) and had lived through the most turbulent years of Russian History – World War I, Russian Revolution, World War II and the Great Purge, had captured all this changing history of the Boris Pasternak, the 1958 Nobel Prize winner who declined the honor under pressure from the Soviet Government, and whose work, Doctor Zhivago has been immortalized in every possible form of media, was born in a well to do Jewish family (though the Pasternaks had assimilated into the Russian Orthodox Church for years) and had lived through the most turbulent years of Russian History – World War I, Russian Revolution, World War II and the Great Purge, had captured all this changing history of the land and her people and thought about it and then poured it into words of great beauty and resonance, in an act of making a private world, public! ebruary is a slim volume of only 110 pages but within it, are 27 pieces of powerful poetry, that touch upon a variety of subjects ranging from politics, the faith of Pasternak’s beloved Russia, Nature, Christianity and Love! The compilation begins with the said poem February, first published in 1912, and in sparse, terse words, Pasternak manages to blend in the pathos of the last dregs of winter, with mankind and poetry. I fell in love with the simple but powerful opening lines of the poem – Oh, February, To get ink & Sob! To weep about it, spilling ink One poem that especially was singed into my imagination, is apparently nameless, and powerfully captures the rule of Stalin and its destructive forces on a person and his soul! The cult of personality is stained, But after forty years, the cult Of gray monotony and disdain Persists like the day of old Each coming day appears lackluster Until, it’s truly hard to bear It brings but photographic clusters, Of pig like and inhuman stares. The cult of narrow minded thinking Is likewise cherished and extolled. Men shoot themselves from over drinking, unable to sustain it all. There is a soul searing piece called Noble Prize, written, after he declined the honor which captures the raw anguish and pain of Pasternak on the stands he was being forced to take, by the very same country and government, he did not choose to abandon or flee, while all his family and friends left, believing in the ultimate good of Lenin led Socialist society! And here in lies the greatness of the poet, that despite all the angst and heartbreak, he ended the poem in hope and faith – Even now as I am nearing the tomb I believe in the virtuous fate And the spirit of goodness will soon Overcame all the malice and hate Yet another poem titled Hamlet, captures the need to walk away from a predestined plot, to address something more urgent and ephemeral!There are lovely play of words in his poems about nature, from White Nights to the one called Spring Flood, to yet another work called Easter. His love for Olga Ivinskaya comes through in all the glory of meeting, falling in love and then when Ivinskaya was sentenced to Siberia, of longing, guilt and memories, in the poems titled as Meeting and then, Parting. The fact that Pasternak was a student of philosophy is a fact that is never really far off in his poetry and in many of his writings, he touches upon ideas of what is tangible and what is transcendental, especially in his poetry of nature. In Autumn, he says, The Lodge’s wooden walls now gaze At us with grief and hopelessness. We never vowed to break the restrains’ We will decline with openness. There are many powerful and moving things in this collection that shines like a beacon of what poetry is all about! Pasternak in this collection of 27 poems brought the Russia that he knew, with all its beauty and tragedy to life, painting on a vast canvass, touching upon the key notes of everything that constitutes mankind. And while I am wary of all translated works, simply because one does not know exactly what is lost is translation, even in essence, there is enough in this work to enrich your soul and your mind!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    A whispering of birches The soul of Russia murmurs through these poems like wind whispering through a forest of birches. The magic is not just in the words themselves but in the unspoken stirring of memories and dreams they evoke. The translations are wonderful. There is an occasional jarring note in awkward rhyming schemes, though I cannot say if this just reflects the Russian original.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sandi Barnes

    I enjoyed reading the poems included in this compilation of Boris Pasternak's work encompassing many years of his writing career. It is a shame that Pasternak's own country forbid the publication of these works. There are beauty in these words. I would believe it to be challenge to translate poetry and maintain the prose and beauty. I commend Andrey Kneller on achieving just that. I enjoyed reading the poems included in this compilation of Boris Pasternak's work encompassing many years of his writing career. It is a shame that Pasternak's own country forbid the publication of these works. There are beauty in these words. I would believe it to be challenge to translate poetry and maintain the prose and beauty. I commend Andrey Kneller on achieving just that.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Julie McIntyre

    Very moving I had forgotten how evocative poems were. Loved this book especially the shorter poems shuddered to flow much better than the longer ones.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    What i liked about this was that it had both the original and the translation together. I've never claimed to truly understand poetry. And I know there are several facets that make up a composition other than pretty words that sometimes rhyme. Lord knows I couldn't do better when it comes to translation, but there were times when I could envision my Russian translation professor's bushy grey eyebrows disappearing into his hairline at some of the translations. I even compared these translations t What i liked about this was that it had both the original and the translation together. I've never claimed to truly understand poetry. And I know there are several facets that make up a composition other than pretty words that sometimes rhyme. Lord knows I couldn't do better when it comes to translation, but there were times when I could envision my Russian translation professor's bushy grey eyebrows disappearing into his hairline at some of the translations. I even compared these translations to a couple other versions and they weren't necessarily any better.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Carol Ann

    I think the poems suffered from clunky translation. I feel it might have been better not to try to conserve the rhyme schemes, and rather to keep to the language choices.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Mixed Feelings I've read several of Mr. Keller's translations and have no doubt that they are superb. However, I found myself less drawn e this collection than those of Anna Akhmatova and Marina Tsvetaeva. Mixed Feelings I've read several of Mr. Keller's translations and have no doubt that they are superb. However, I found myself less drawn e this collection than those of Anna Akhmatova and Marina Tsvetaeva.

  10. 5 out of 5

    James

    The poetry did nothing for me - probably just too far removed in time, place, culture, and language to relate well.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ivan

  12. 4 out of 5

    Simon Mohr

  13. 5 out of 5

    Reem Al-Shammari

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  15. 4 out of 5

    Veronika

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alexandre

  17. 4 out of 5

    Craig Bergland

  18. 5 out of 5

    Natarez

  19. 4 out of 5

    Seth

  20. 5 out of 5

    David Anthony Sam

  21. 4 out of 5

    Shaimaa Hawas

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tatiana Danina

  23. 5 out of 5

    Robert C.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Noel Charchuk

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jakob Bork

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bd

  27. 4 out of 5

    Will Jaramillo

  28. 4 out of 5

    Maya

  29. 4 out of 5

    Qurratulain

  30. 5 out of 5

    Janice

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.