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Aztecs: A History From Beginning to End

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Aztec History The Aztec Empire did not recoil from the face of an impending doom, they struggled faithfully. Destined to emerge from their humble beginnings, it grew into a highly-complex devoted civilization refusing to live at the mercy of more neighboring powerful rulers. Their powerful pocheca combed the valley for luxury items while markets dotted their lands. Ins Aztec History The Aztec Empire did not recoil from the face of an impending doom, they struggled faithfully. Destined to emerge from their humble beginnings, it grew into a highly-complex devoted civilization refusing to live at the mercy of more neighboring powerful rulers. Their powerful pocheca combed the valley for luxury items while markets dotted their lands. Inside you will find... ✓ Introduction ✓ How the Aztecs Are Portrayed and How Their History Survives ✓ Defining Moments and their Search to Expand and Save the World ✓ Their Philosophy: its Impact on Social Life and How it Served the Kings ✓ Conclusion Isolated from the Old World until the devastating Spanish conquest, the Aztec mācēhualtin (commoners) and nobles enhanced their positions while kings and relentless warriors dealt with the political realities of powerful dynasties and rivaling kingdoms. They developed a philosophy, an order and a society built on loyalty, stoic honor and sacrifice as they embraced the temporary nature of things. Investigate the era of the Fifth Sun and what defined the Aztecs and their relationship with the divine.


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Aztec History The Aztec Empire did not recoil from the face of an impending doom, they struggled faithfully. Destined to emerge from their humble beginnings, it grew into a highly-complex devoted civilization refusing to live at the mercy of more neighboring powerful rulers. Their powerful pocheca combed the valley for luxury items while markets dotted their lands. Ins Aztec History The Aztec Empire did not recoil from the face of an impending doom, they struggled faithfully. Destined to emerge from their humble beginnings, it grew into a highly-complex devoted civilization refusing to live at the mercy of more neighboring powerful rulers. Their powerful pocheca combed the valley for luxury items while markets dotted their lands. Inside you will find... ✓ Introduction ✓ How the Aztecs Are Portrayed and How Their History Survives ✓ Defining Moments and their Search to Expand and Save the World ✓ Their Philosophy: its Impact on Social Life and How it Served the Kings ✓ Conclusion Isolated from the Old World until the devastating Spanish conquest, the Aztec mācēhualtin (commoners) and nobles enhanced their positions while kings and relentless warriors dealt with the political realities of powerful dynasties and rivaling kingdoms. They developed a philosophy, an order and a society built on loyalty, stoic honor and sacrifice as they embraced the temporary nature of things. Investigate the era of the Fifth Sun and what defined the Aztecs and their relationship with the divine.

58 review for Aztecs: A History From Beginning to End

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    My god this book was hard work. It’s a really short book but took me ages. It was hard to follow and to be honest pretty dull. This book was so slow to get started. There wasn’t very much about the Aztecs at all for the first 15% or so, we had several pages which seemed to be a preemptive don’t judge them for being brutal or what you might see as blood thirsty, which in itself came across as a bit judgey and made me wonder - how bad are things going to get if you feel the need to write that cavea My god this book was hard work. It’s a really short book but took me ages. It was hard to follow and to be honest pretty dull. This book was so slow to get started. There wasn’t very much about the Aztecs at all for the first 15% or so, we had several pages which seemed to be a preemptive don’t judge them for being brutal or what you might see as blood thirsty, which in itself came across as a bit judgey and made me wonder - how bad are things going to get if you feel the need to write that caveat at the start? (but also it did make me think oh good this could be interesting! Bring on the human sacrifices!) It was disappointing though, yes human sacrifices were mentioned but only briefly and it was never really explained. We then read about how Mexican people view their history and relate to it through Lucha Underground, all of which sounded like he is trying to be totally non racist but kinda racist at the same time - apparently “people who view the show who have latin roots feel like the show speaks to them on a cultural level”. Does it really? All of them? All in all, a lot of preamble for such a short book! I got to 25% in and he was still saying “as we will explore further” and “as we will learn later”, stop saying that and get on with it, I wanted to cry. The writer who I usually find to be pretty decent at this was so understanding of the religion mentioned herein and their beliefs and customs to the point where I found it slightly patronizing. He was also a little vague and unclear, it is not as well set out and explained as his other books which is a real shame. I think part of the problem is not the authors fault as such but that this is such a big and complex subject (I learnt that much) that I don’t think it can be covered in a short book like this. Too much packed into a few pages so we don’t get any detail at all to help the people or the places or the events stick in your mind. There are also a LOT of references in this book from various sources, I think it would have been helpful to have them all at the end or in footnotes, so many within the text was a pain and took up a lot of the book itself. Overall not a terrible effort but the author would have benefited from making this a longer book, I know that is not the point of these short history books but in this case the Aztecs can’t be done in 50 or so pages. I have a very vague understanding of the Aztecs now, admittedly more than when I started so that’s something but it was painful getting there.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    There was no cohesion. Everything was all jumbled together. I love reading about the history of the Aztecs, but this was a mess.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie (Bookfever)

    This book wasn't my all time favorite Hourly History book but I still enjoyed reading about the Aztec Empire. I've always been very interested in the Aztecs. I just love their complexity as an empire and all the mystery that still surrounds them. Just like with the Mayan civilization a lot about the Aztecs has been lost to history, which is such a shame. Who knows what else we could've found out about them. This was a good and solid read but I just felt there was something more missing. I can't q This book wasn't my all time favorite Hourly History book but I still enjoyed reading about the Aztec Empire. I've always been very interested in the Aztecs. I just love their complexity as an empire and all the mystery that still surrounds them. Just like with the Mayan civilization a lot about the Aztecs has been lost to history, which is such a shame. Who knows what else we could've found out about them. This was a good and solid read but I just felt there was something more missing. I can't quite put my finger on it but that's how I felt. Aside from all that it was still interesting and enjoyable to me.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Thom Swennes

    In this day and age, when distances and international borders have become shorter and more easily crossed, ancestral misconceptions are common. They have taken on a nationalistic form rather than a cultural structure. Cultural anthropology does much to understand the separation of the roots from the political and nationalistic mantles. To put Americans collectively in a group distracts from the diversity as a whole. The Aztecs were comprised of many individual segments or tribes, with differing In this day and age, when distances and international borders have become shorter and more easily crossed, ancestral misconceptions are common. They have taken on a nationalistic form rather than a cultural structure. Cultural anthropology does much to understand the separation of the roots from the political and nationalistic mantles. To put Americans collectively in a group distracts from the diversity as a whole. The Aztecs were comprised of many individual segments or tribes, with differing traditions and beliefs. Among the social groups were the Olmec, Mayan, Toltec, Aztec, and various other indigenous people. These groups could be subdivided into tribes such as the Chalcas, Alcolhuas, Tepanecs, Tlahuicas, Tlascaltecs, and Xochimilcas. Ethnoastronomy has provided much of the knowledge we now have of the Aztec peoples, prior to the arrival of the Spanish conquistadors. As one delves into the past of these fascinating peoples, one is struck with the magnitude of the story. All of the works appearing in this series have an inherent flaw as the allotted space often fails to do the subject true justice. The story of the Aztecs, perhaps more than any other, is too long and complicated to be relayed justly. This book provides a mere essence of a civilization full of wonder, mystique, and sorrow. It can only be seen and used as a springboard to bigger and far better publications that can provide a better attempt at bringing this ancient civilization out of the shadows and into the light.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mark Laufenberg

    The book that I read was actually titled "Aztec Civilization: A History From Beginning to End," but from the cover, it looks as though it was the same book. The author presented the information in a way that held my interest for most of the book. However, it seems as though the vast majority of the book was spent on analysis and opinions of the Aztec philosophy on life and the concepts of their culture. I found myself getting just a bit bored with that part of it by the end of the book. As I said, The book that I read was actually titled "Aztec Civilization: A History From Beginning to End," but from the cover, it looks as though it was the same book. The author presented the information in a way that held my interest for most of the book. However, it seems as though the vast majority of the book was spent on analysis and opinions of the Aztec philosophy on life and the concepts of their culture. I found myself getting just a bit bored with that part of it by the end of the book. As I said, the author's writing was good, but I expected to read a little more about their temples, other architectural accomplishments and excavated items that came from their guilds. I realize that the Spanish conquistadors caused a lot of the Aztecs' manuscripts to be destroyed and also a change to their culture, but I still expected to read a little bit more about the conquering and the changes that came about because of it. All of these things were barely touched upon.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Gian Andrea

    I purchased and read many other books from Hourly History, and although I'm well conscious they're meant to be quick read on various historical topics, I'm afraid to say this one left me a bit disappointed. There's some content, mostly references to other publications, but all in all it feels a bit disjointed and doesn't live up to the promise of going in dept into the sacrifice-culture. Too bad. I purchased and read many other books from Hourly History, and although I'm well conscious they're meant to be quick read on various historical topics, I'm afraid to say this one left me a bit disappointed. There's some content, mostly references to other publications, but all in all it feels a bit disjointed and doesn't live up to the promise of going in dept into the sacrifice-culture. Too bad.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Libby

    This is the second Hourly History book I’ve read, and two things I very much appreciate about them are their efforts to tie history in with the presence, and the way it feels as if the author(s) are talking to me. Also, the easy language & concise explanations of things—as well as a clean layout of topics to research further. I would have appreciated pronunciation guides, but otherwise!! This was a lovely introduction to Aztec culture.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ken Brooks

    A theosorus of ancient middle American history Really gives nothing of interest to the history of the Aztecs, continually making reference to other publications. Where's the history in that? And so short. I feel cheated in having actually purchased this "pamphlet" - I'd not call it a book. A theosorus of ancient middle American history Really gives nothing of interest to the history of the Aztecs, continually making reference to other publications. Where's the history in that? And so short. I feel cheated in having actually purchased this "pamphlet" - I'd not call it a book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Julian Orozco, Jr.

    Aztec life I really enjoyed this book. Very informative and educational. I learned a few new things about Aztec life, physically and mentally. Like their sciences and religion merging into a day by day living. Constant worry about their lives in this fifth sun and thereafter. I would recommend this read for any one.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    Wow Reading this was a bit difficult. The names were horrifying to pronounce and the author repeated them often. While I was impressed by all the research they had done, citing all the books and examples to back up their point was distracting. I do recommend it, but with caution.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    Quick education It was an enjoyable and brief read in the culture and history of the Aztecs. The author offers the sources for the information given, if one ever wants to discover more. I would recommend it for anyone that is curious about the Aztecs and their history, but that would want it in a short read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    Really creepy. I didn't get very far in this book, as it started with pages of very waffly excuses and minimisations for the Aztecs' brutal human sacrifices and other atrocities. I suppose if you love moral relativism, or human sacrifice, it'd be the book for you. Really creepy. I didn't get very far in this book, as it started with pages of very waffly excuses and minimisations for the Aztecs' brutal human sacrifices and other atrocities. I suppose if you love moral relativism, or human sacrifice, it'd be the book for you.

  13. 4 out of 5

    DOUGLAS J BERRY

    Henry freemans most important work?. I got this as a freebie. A large amount of information for only fifty pages. I have read several books on Aztec and Mayan culture. It is difficult to understand their complexities?

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    Could have done without all of the waxing poetic about time and the meaning of life. I enjoyed the two main chapters that actually discussed the Aztec civilization, though I thought the organization could have been better- lots of "we will discuss this later" in a 30ish page book. Could have done without all of the waxing poetic about time and the meaning of life. I enjoyed the two main chapters that actually discussed the Aztec civilization, though I thought the organization could have been better- lots of "we will discuss this later" in a 30ish page book.

  15. 4 out of 5

    George Luft

    A guide to where to look A tremendous amount of research material is referenced. I am continually shocked at how the history of this nation was disregarded by the Spanish. (Not covered in this book much).

  16. 4 out of 5

    Abrar

    Good precis of the empire neither from conquistadors' nor Toltec's perspective. It did not dive too much into detail especially during the last period of the empire e.g. Cortes' alliance with Tlaxcala, La Noche Triste, The Cholula massacre etc. Nice "pamphlet" to kill 2 hours. Good precis of the empire neither from conquistadors' nor Toltec's perspective. It did not dive too much into detail especially during the last period of the empire e.g. Cortes' alliance with Tlaxcala, La Noche Triste, The Cholula massacre etc. Nice "pamphlet" to kill 2 hours.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Aimee

    Nice brief look at the aztecs. A nice short but still rich look at the aztecs. Its a break-neck tour of their timeline, but gives you plenty of other sources throughout to look up if you want to look in more detail.

  18. 4 out of 5

    A. Terry Shearin

    Too clinical Had some interesting facts but was constantly interrupted by James of books and authors. You Should have used footnotes. To broad on history.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Emma Que

    Great! A brief and brisk intro to the Aztec civilization. I feel I learned a lot and wish to learn more.

  20. 5 out of 5

    DWIGHT WALLER

    Not very interesting and incorrect information about Tenochtitlan, made me not trust any of it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    laura

    Interesting I originally thought this would be about the sacrifices at but is quiet in depth about the history of Aztec civilization, an interesting read non the less .Recommend

  22. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    This book has a condescending tone, geared to the 4th grade level.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    This book read mostly like a confused long-winded high school essay. It seemed repetitive and was very dull with a lot of unnecessary words, sentences, and paragraphs. It took all my strength to read it. On the plus side, I learned few things.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    This reads like an academic essay. I found the constant references to other material distracting and annoying. I would have preferred footnotes.

  25. 5 out of 5

    George Polansky

    A excellent introduction.

  26. 4 out of 5

    robert keehn

  27. 5 out of 5

    albert ripani, jr.

  28. 5 out of 5

    SADIK BAYDERE

  29. 4 out of 5

    Paul Marriott

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mani

  31. 4 out of 5

    Valerie

  32. 4 out of 5

    Jay

  33. 4 out of 5

    Joe

  34. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Mailund

  35. 5 out of 5

    Mardi Gorham

  36. 4 out of 5

    Susan

  37. 5 out of 5

    Gregg W Petticord

  38. 4 out of 5

    Diana Blick

  39. 5 out of 5

    Karin

  40. 4 out of 5

    Maya

  41. 5 out of 5

    jim inlow

  42. 5 out of 5

    Steve Martinson

  43. 5 out of 5

    Chris Bridges

  44. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra Thompson

  45. 5 out of 5

    Robert Druce

  46. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Bennett

  47. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  48. 5 out of 5

    Arlenis Pena

  49. 5 out of 5

    Fernando Castellano

  50. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Hilliger

  51. 5 out of 5

    Janet Branley

  52. 5 out of 5

    Alice (Astell)

  53. 4 out of 5

    Brett

  54. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

  55. 5 out of 5

    Rage Funk

  56. 5 out of 5

    Carol Mclamb

  57. 4 out of 5

    Veronica

  58. 4 out of 5

    Paul

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