counter Beyond Respectability: The Intellectual Thought of Race Women - Free Download Books
Hot Best Seller

Beyond Respectability: The Intellectual Thought of Race Women

Availability: Ready to download

Beyond Respectability charts the development of African American women as public intellectuals and the evolution of their thought from the end of the 1800s through the Black Power era of the 1970s. Eschewing the Great Race Man paradigm so prominent in contemporary discourse, Brittney C. Cooper looks at the far-reaching intellectual achievements of female thinkers and activ Beyond Respectability charts the development of African American women as public intellectuals and the evolution of their thought from the end of the 1800s through the Black Power era of the 1970s. Eschewing the Great Race Man paradigm so prominent in contemporary discourse, Brittney C. Cooper looks at the far-reaching intellectual achievements of female thinkers and activists like Anna Julia Cooper, Mary Church Terrell, Fannie Barrier Williams, Pauli Murray, and Toni Cade Bambara. Cooper delves into the processes that transformed these women and others into racial leadership figures, including long-overdue discussions of their theoretical output and personal experiences. As Cooper shows, their body of work critically reshaped our understandings of race and gender discourse. It also confronted entrenched ideas of how--and who--produced racial knowledge.


Compare

Beyond Respectability charts the development of African American women as public intellectuals and the evolution of their thought from the end of the 1800s through the Black Power era of the 1970s. Eschewing the Great Race Man paradigm so prominent in contemporary discourse, Brittney C. Cooper looks at the far-reaching intellectual achievements of female thinkers and activ Beyond Respectability charts the development of African American women as public intellectuals and the evolution of their thought from the end of the 1800s through the Black Power era of the 1970s. Eschewing the Great Race Man paradigm so prominent in contemporary discourse, Brittney C. Cooper looks at the far-reaching intellectual achievements of female thinkers and activists like Anna Julia Cooper, Mary Church Terrell, Fannie Barrier Williams, Pauli Murray, and Toni Cade Bambara. Cooper delves into the processes that transformed these women and others into racial leadership figures, including long-overdue discussions of their theoretical output and personal experiences. As Cooper shows, their body of work critically reshaped our understandings of race and gender discourse. It also confronted entrenched ideas of how--and who--produced racial knowledge.

30 review for Beyond Respectability: The Intellectual Thought of Race Women

  1. 5 out of 5

    Cherisse

    I love this book because it reaffirmed what I have always known to be true, that black women were thinkers and activists. Brittany Cooper expertly centers black women as intellectuals and knowledge producers in a history that dates back to the nineteenth century. I especially loved the last line of the book, "Black women are serious thinkers, and it's our scholarly duty to take them seriously." I took my time reading Cooper's work because I wanted to "sit with it" and absorb every ounce of this I love this book because it reaffirmed what I have always known to be true, that black women were thinkers and activists. Brittany Cooper expertly centers black women as intellectuals and knowledge producers in a history that dates back to the nineteenth century. I especially loved the last line of the book, "Black women are serious thinkers, and it's our scholarly duty to take them seriously." I took my time reading Cooper's work because I wanted to "sit with it" and absorb every ounce of this masterful contribution to intellectual history.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Gabrielle

    In Beyond Respectability, Dr. Brittney Cooper affirms Black women's intellectual thought by tracing it's lineage beginning with figures like Pauline Hopkins, Anna Julia Cooper, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Pauli Murray, and Frances Barrier Williams. This work is not a biographical undertaking, but a reckoning that situates the history of Black women's intellectual thought as long, deep, and far reaching. She takes extreme care not to compare these women's theories against that of promeninent race men, In Beyond Respectability, Dr. Brittney Cooper affirms Black women's intellectual thought by tracing it's lineage beginning with figures like Pauline Hopkins, Anna Julia Cooper, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Pauli Murray, and Frances Barrier Williams. This work is not a biographical undertaking, but a reckoning that situates the history of Black women's intellectual thought as long, deep, and far reaching. She takes extreme care not to compare these women's theories against that of promeninent race men, or even to one another, but instead demonstratea how these theories, considered fully, give birth to feminist conception of race, class, and gender. I wish that this book has been around when I was in college to help shape and challenge my nascent understandings of Black intellectualism which at the time mostly centered race men. Highly recommended read.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Matt Sautman

    Brittney Cooper's genealogy of black American female intellectuals fills in the margins that Hazel Carby left open at the end of Reconstructing Womanhood. Cooper focuses principally on a genealogy that begins with Frances Williams and the start of the National Association of Colored Women and carries forward to Patricia Hill Collins and Alice Walker. Cooper's writing is easily accessible and thought provoking as she challenges both the need to keep these women authors in critical circulation and Brittney Cooper's genealogy of black American female intellectuals fills in the margins that Hazel Carby left open at the end of Reconstructing Womanhood. Cooper focuses principally on a genealogy that begins with Frances Williams and the start of the National Association of Colored Women and carries forward to Patricia Hill Collins and Alice Walker. Cooper's writing is easily accessible and thought provoking as she challenges both the need to keep these women authors in critical circulation and how these women defy much of what has been generally accepted about the Civil Rights Movement (that it was principally a man's movement) and the evolution of ideas (such as Mary Church Terrell's own ideas that would anticipate what Kimberlé Crenshaw would call intersectionality). This book has value for historians and those fascinated by black feminist studies alike.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    The content was really interesting, and it may be because of my own headspace right now or that I'm getting too old for the tiny font, but I had up and down responses to some of the arguments made. Or maybe it was a mixed reaction to how they were presented. Like chapter 4 was a delight and I was really engaged with the discussion about political theory (Black power and Black feminism) but chapter 3's treatment of Pauli Murray's personal life made me really uncomfortable. The content was really interesting, and it may be because of my own headspace right now or that I'm getting too old for the tiny font, but I had up and down responses to some of the arguments made. Or maybe it was a mixed reaction to how they were presented. Like chapter 4 was a delight and I was really engaged with the discussion about political theory (Black power and Black feminism) but chapter 3's treatment of Pauli Murray's personal life made me really uncomfortable.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    4.5/5 Review to come

  6. 5 out of 5

    Krystal

    This book deconstructs the scholarship of black women about their existence, challenging such layers as race, class, and gender, with attention to detail, spanning historical thought to present.

  7. 5 out of 5

    April

    First of all, I wholeheartedly appreciate what this book sets out to do: it’s meant to treat the intellectual work of Black women, from Reconstruction on, as intellectual work, fully realizing that Black women’s thought work has been (and continues to be) unforgivably undertheorized and underrecognized. So in that sense, I am totally with Cooper on the importance of this work. That being said, it says it goes “Beyond Respectability” in diving into the work of our forebears, but for me, it just.. First of all, I wholeheartedly appreciate what this book sets out to do: it’s meant to treat the intellectual work of Black women, from Reconstruction on, as intellectual work, fully realizing that Black women’s thought work has been (and continues to be) unforgivably undertheorized and underrecognized. So in that sense, I am totally with Cooper on the importance of this work. That being said, it says it goes “Beyond Respectability” in diving into the work of our forebears, but for me, it just...didn’t. It got stuck in respectability and stayed there. There was a ton of apologetics for the classism inherent in respectability politics and its use as a coping strategy for Black women through the ages. Cool. I get that. But then it didn’t go much farther in its treatment of the women’s work it addresses. I feel like if we’re going to surface Black women’s thought as the intellectual work it is—as opposed to just treating it as community care work, as important as that function also is—then that means we really need to tangle with it. Get in there and tussle with what our forbears said and thought and theorized. In many respects, it felt like Cooper was enacting her own version of respectability politics in her treatment of folks like Cooper, Terrell, Murray, Bambara. She handled their robust intellectual work with kid gloves and heightened respectability, when real intellectual treatment means we struggle and critique and accept and adapt and pull apart. Critique is not dismissal. hooks teaches us that. So get in there! Finally, as has been pointed out otherwise, the chapter on Murray was absolutely problematic. The way Cooper ascribed femme gender identity to Murray uncritically and relied so heavily on the pseudoscientific social construct of “biological sex” to do so—when Murray’s own words and work demonstrate that their relationship to gender identity was so much more fluid—was absolutely cringeworthy. That chapter did not do justice to Murray’s legacy in the least. So, overall, I appreciate the existence of this work, but it didn’t do much for me. Nevertheless, it is so heartening to see Black women’s intellectual work being foregrounded.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jay Michelle Williams

    Put some respect on my mind! I am a race woman, and I want my mind to be honored. In Cooper's book, she elegantly reminds us of the women who marked the world with their thoughts (i.e., we have intellectuals like, Fannie Williams, Mary Terrell, Pauli Murry, Toni Bambara, and Anna Cooper who have aroused the public sphere.) Gender roles and society's norms apropos of the sexes torment women today (although it is done covertly.) Cooper shared with me the Black intellectual history vis-a-vis to femi Put some respect on my mind! I am a race woman, and I want my mind to be honored. In Cooper's book, she elegantly reminds us of the women who marked the world with their thoughts (i.e., we have intellectuals like, Fannie Williams, Mary Terrell, Pauli Murry, Toni Bambara, and Anna Cooper who have aroused the public sphere.) Gender roles and society's norms apropos of the sexes torment women today (although it is done covertly.) Cooper shared with me the Black intellectual history vis-a-vis to feminism. And, it allowed my mind to formulate extraordinary thoughts. Just as we discovered that Caucasians could not accurately define and analyze our thoughts and identity as people of color, we can apply this thought on a micro level concerning the sexes. Could Black intellectual men faithfully transmit their ideas to understand women of color? It is evident that women should study themselves. Our mission, as women, is to assert to the Universe and all who thrive on this plane of life, that we are WOMEN as well as intellectuals. We deserve credit when analyzing our people. Today, women of color are still at the bottom of the socioeconomic scale, and something must be done. We have to battle with racism in this white supremacist society, as well as endure the consequences of male superiority. We are creators, and our ancestors would be displeased with our docileness. It's time to wake up from our dreams ladies.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lana Mitchell

    "Beyond Respectability: The Intellectual Thought of Race Women" by Brittney Cooper was an interesting read. It has taken me some time to complete it because I initially found it to be dense and academic and put it aside for a while. When I returned, I found it much more enjoyable. I like the title, which is why I bought the book., and the information, research, and Cooper's perspective is new and refreshing in this time of works by and about African American women in history. Her work of "Puttin "Beyond Respectability: The Intellectual Thought of Race Women" by Brittney Cooper was an interesting read. It has taken me some time to complete it because I initially found it to be dense and academic and put it aside for a while. When I returned, I found it much more enjoyable. I like the title, which is why I bought the book., and the information, research, and Cooper's perspective is new and refreshing in this time of works by and about African American women in history. Her work of "Putting Black Women on the List' is important because it reconstituted Black women's historic practice of listing through the form of the literary anthology." Cooper deals with a number of issues that are currently and historically have been important to African American women, intellectuals, including those of race, gender, and respectability. I recommend her book for women who are interested in understanding the development of the aforementioned issues in the lives of African American women.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Phi Beta Kappa Authors

    Brittney Cooper ΦBK, Howard University, 2002 Author From the publisher: Beyond Respectability charts the development of African American women as public intellectuals and the evolution of their thought from the end of the 1800s through the Black Power era of the 1970s. Eschewing the Great Race Man paradigm so prominent in contemporary discourse, Brittney C. Cooper looks at the far-reaching intellectual achievements of female thinkers and activists like Anna Julia Cooper, Mary Church Terrell, Fannie Brittney Cooper ΦBK, Howard University, 2002 Author From the publisher: Beyond Respectability charts the development of African American women as public intellectuals and the evolution of their thought from the end of the 1800s through the Black Power era of the 1970s. Eschewing the Great Race Man paradigm so prominent in contemporary discourse, Brittney C. Cooper looks at the far-reaching intellectual achievements of female thinkers and activists like Anna Julia Cooper, Mary Church Terrell, Fannie Barrier Williams, Pauli Murray, and Toni Cade Bambara. Cooper delves into the processes that transformed these women and others into racial leadership figures, including long-overdue discussions of their theoretical output and personal experiences. As Cooper shows, their body of work critically reshaped our understandings of race and gender discourse. It also confronted entrenched ideas of how--and who--produced racial knowledge.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Camara Hudson

    So far, my favorite book of this year. The seriousness with which Cooper takes Black women intellectuals is refreshing and affirming. Despite the complexity of the language, this book is written accessibly. Without a doubt, this book should be included the syllabi of anyone teaching American/Modern Political Philosophy and Thought.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Madeleine

    Cooper's work is necessary! She busts through the wall silencing and erasing Black Women's intellectual timeline through the 19th-20th century and beckons more work be done! Beyond Respectability is a book for anyone open to learning more about great Black Female intellectuals whose stories have gone unheard for too long. A required reading for anyone committed to anti-racist activism! Cooper's work is necessary! She busts through the wall silencing and erasing Black Women's intellectual timeline through the 19th-20th century and beckons more work be done! Beyond Respectability is a book for anyone open to learning more about great Black Female intellectuals whose stories have gone unheard for too long. A required reading for anyone committed to anti-racist activism!

  13. 4 out of 5

    gnarlyhiker

    “Beyond Respectability: The Intellectual Thought of Race Women” is well-argued, well-written and informative. It is a perfect read for those readers who are not familiar with Black women intellectuals and activist from the 19th and 20th century, as well as to the present. 3.5 good luck **ARC/publisher/Netgalley

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    I made it through this book and learned a lot, but personally am not fond of highly academic language and using technical words when simpler ones would do. That aside, this was a fascinating travel through Black women intellectual thought from the late 1800s to the present.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sonya

    This is an academic read; but I powered through gaining important understanding. I will read Black feminist literature through a different lens as a result of Ms. Cooper's book; she gives a framework for interrogation of these works. This is an academic read; but I powered through gaining important understanding. I will read Black feminist literature through a different lens as a result of Ms. Cooper's book; she gives a framework for interrogation of these works.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    More academic than I was expecting because I didn't read any information about it before I picked it up. I still loved the book. Cooper's writing is clear and precise and her arguments are compelling. Beyond Respectability introduced me to public intellectuals who I had previously known nothing. More academic than I was expecting because I didn't read any information about it before I picked it up. I still loved the book. Cooper's writing is clear and precise and her arguments are compelling. Beyond Respectability introduced me to public intellectuals who I had previously known nothing.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ida Carey

    Exceptional read This book presented a different perspective on the Race Woman. There is an abundance amount of information on past and present Intellectual black women. This is a great read for scholars, students and historians.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ari

    IQ "Anti respectable in its rejection of traditional gender roles, Blackhood as a form of revolutionary, queer, Black racial sociality, had the potential-and indeed even the intrinsic demand-to formulate new ideas about the performance of Black gender identities." (137) BEYOND RESPECTABILITY is an engaging academic take on the contribution to feminism and history of these 'race women'. These women had to tackle class, gender and race issues as critics told them to keep quiet given their status as IQ "Anti respectable in its rejection of traditional gender roles, Blackhood as a form of revolutionary, queer, Black racial sociality, had the potential-and indeed even the intrinsic demand-to formulate new ideas about the performance of Black gender identities." (137) BEYOND RESPECTABILITY is an engaging academic take on the contribution to feminism and history of these 'race women'. These women had to tackle class, gender and race issues as critics told them to keep quiet given their status as middle/upper class Black women, their refusal to back down results in an inspiring history lesson. A little more dense than I was expecting but a much needed read on some formidable Black women who served as public intellectuals throughout our country's history. And my love for Mary Church Terrell has continued to grow. "Black women's leadership memoirs have been a critical site for the articulation of their intellectual and political goals. Less concerned with the interiority of their subjects, this genre afforded Black women, particularly those who emerged during the 1890s, the opportunity to theorize about race and gender politics in ways that their lack of access to producing more formal academic texts did not." (68)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Skincare For Introverts

    A dense and worthwhile read - would definitely recommend.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Liliyana Shadowlyn

    As someone who is completely unfamiliar with black women in the public sphere and activism, I found this to be extremely enlightening. It's very well written and informative. As someone who is completely unfamiliar with black women in the public sphere and activism, I found this to be extremely enlightening. It's very well written and informative.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alma Agustin

  22. 4 out of 5

    Roveyu

  23. 5 out of 5

    M

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kristyn Scorsone

  25. 5 out of 5

    Spenser Gwozdzik

  26. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  27. 5 out of 5

    Marcellus

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cadie

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ellie Bouboussis

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.