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The vicious Marauders have been employed to wipe out the underground mutant community known as the Morlocks, whose only hope of salvation rests in the hands of the X-Men. Collects Uncanny X-Men #210-213, X-Factor #9-11, New Mutants #46, Thor #373-374, and Power Pack #27.


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The vicious Marauders have been employed to wipe out the underground mutant community known as the Morlocks, whose only hope of salvation rests in the hands of the X-Men. Collects Uncanny X-Men #210-213, X-Factor #9-11, New Mutants #46, Thor #373-374, and Power Pack #27.

30 review for X-Men: Mutant Massacre

  1. 5 out of 5

    Gianfranco Mancini

    First mutant crossover ever and still one of the best ones, a "death & despair" storyline changing the squad rooster (almost untouched since Wein's deadly origin of the new international X-Men) into the badass "X-Girls" one, the fall of Angel, the arrive of Psylocke and Dazzler, Wolvie vs Sabretooth first clawfest fights and much more. Sadly the Power Pack/X-Factor issues aged not much well at all. First mutant crossover ever and still one of the best ones, a "death & despair" storyline changing the squad rooster (almost untouched since Wein's deadly origin of the new international X-Men) into the badass "X-Girls" one, the fall of Angel, the arrive of Psylocke and Dazzler, Wolvie vs Sabretooth first clawfest fights and much more. Sadly the Power Pack/X-Factor issues aged not much well at all.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nicolo

    Mutant Massacre was the first of crossover events that occurred in the X-Men line of titles annually. It started as a sales initiative to push sales of its books during traditionally sluggish months. The storyline has several key moments, like the X-Men & Marauders slugfest, scores of mutant death, Psylocke’s debut with the X-Men and the first Wolverine and Sabretooth all out brawl. It has a great artistic line-up, featuring contributions from John Romita, Jr., Walter Simonson, Alan Davis and Sal Mutant Massacre was the first of crossover events that occurred in the X-Men line of titles annually. It started as a sales initiative to push sales of its books during traditionally sluggish months. The storyline has several key moments, like the X-Men & Marauders slugfest, scores of mutant death, Psylocke’s debut with the X-Men and the first Wolverine and Sabretooth all out brawl. It has a great artistic line-up, featuring contributions from John Romita, Jr., Walter Simonson, Alan Davis and Sal Buscema. It had a lot going for it, but it was two issues of a mainstream Marvel book that was folded into the event that I remember fondly. Appreciating these two issues of Thor require reading it in context with the other titles of the crossover since it sets up the situation Thor finds himself involved. The first issue starts with Thor taking time off from Asgard to re-establish a human identity as a construction worker. The story takes on a domestic tone with Thor spending the night with his foreman’s family and just doing household tasks like cleaning dishes and telling a nighttime story to his host’s children. This is a Thor that is down to earth it is almost ungodly. He gets involved in Mutant Massacre when his frog friends from an earlier adventure alert him to a pitched battle down in the sewers of New York. He sets off to see what he can do to help. This is just one of many stories that spring out from this storyline and this is the one that has impressed on me the most. I admit I am a big fan of Simonson’s Thor and perhaps that shaped my preference and fondness for these chapters of the crossover. But Simonson has really done a good job and giving the Thunder God a human heart. Simonson has done much to move the character beyond its initial need to learn humility within the frail shell of Donald Blake. He has already proven he learned his lesson when the enchantment was removed by Odin. But still he saw the need to be with the people he protects in Midgard by assuming a civilian identity. It was really moving when he gave a Viking funeral to the fallen Morlocks, assuring them of a better afterlife than the downtrodden ones they had in life. Thor has learned empathize with the people of MIdgard. These two chapters really make this collected edition a meaningful read for me.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Himanshu Karmacharya

    Although Chris Claremont's writing can seem verbose, I had always enjoyed it (In Days of the Future Past, God Loves Man Kills), but Mutant Massacre is where I couldn't stand it at all. Neither could I stand the writing style of the other writers. Mutant Massacre, overall, feels like an overwritten comic book event that ties on to way too many comic books and characters than it really should. Although Chris Claremont's writing can seem verbose, I had always enjoyed it (In Days of the Future Past, God Loves Man Kills), but Mutant Massacre is where I couldn't stand it at all. Neither could I stand the writing style of the other writers. Mutant Massacre, overall, feels like an overwritten comic book event that ties on to way too many comic books and characters than it really should.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    3.0 stars. I remember reading these when they first came out in the 80's so it has been a while. Good solid story about a group of evil mutants (including Wolverine's nemesis Sabretooth) hired to kill a group of underground mutants called the Morlocks. Whole plot orchestrated by one of my favorite villains growing up, Mr. Sinister. 3.0 stars. I remember reading these when they first came out in the 80's so it has been a while. Good solid story about a group of evil mutants (including Wolverine's nemesis Sabretooth) hired to kill a group of underground mutants called the Morlocks. Whole plot orchestrated by one of my favorite villains growing up, Mr. Sinister.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    Apparently the below wasn’t enough, I had to write several more words. The comparison between the two reviews paint at an interesting evolution. https://aedontor.blogspot.com/2020/08... Older review: I was pretty interested in reading this again. I had heard many people cite it as an important event for them in their comic readings since I had read it the first time. When I read it, I was... underwhelmed isn't the right word... It just seemed to need some polish. But my experience is far removed fr Apparently the below wasn’t enough, I had to write several more words. The comparison between the two reviews paint at an interesting evolution. https://aedontor.blogspot.com/2020/08... Older review: I was pretty interested in reading this again. I had heard many people cite it as an important event for them in their comic readings since I had read it the first time. When I read it, I was... underwhelmed isn't the right word... It just seemed to need some polish. But my experience is far removed from when it released. The people who spoke of its impact were probably far more connected with it happening in the moment. This story created something of a monster for either good or bad. The big X-Men crossover events would become a staple of the X-Titles after this. Some people would say this led to the eventual downfall of the line. Others would say these are some of the best ways to push the epic. I personally think the events are often good for the short term, potentially bad for the long term. When you have a collision of titles it can hijack the momentum of an individual series. Also forcing someone who isn't reading a line to suddenly pick up and buy another book can be devastating either financially or it can pull someone entirely out of the story. As this was the first big go at a crossover event it really suffered from inexperience. And the choices of titles to include were a bit odd. Not perhaps when you saw the writers names, but when you saw the character list. Most notably was the inclusion of Thor in these events. You could pull him out and replace his participation with just about any other character and it wouldn't make much difference. And he is far from an intuitive pick. However, the writer is a fellow by the name of Walt Simonson. X-Factor is written by Louise Simonson. And Power Pack is written by Louise Simonson. Claremont, the creator of the event, was the only person on the writing staff that didn't share the same bed. Now, if this book works right, it kicks you in the gut. My initial read of this, I don't remember any gut-kicking. It occurred a little bit more so on this read through. The thing that was necessary which the writer's bypassed was for more important Morlocks to die. That sounds heartless, but it is much harder to grasp the consequences when you don't know the slain. They also were tempered on the violence and mayhem, probably by the Comic Code thingie. I am not saying I desire that this book be showing blood and guts. But they are showing the characters reacting to blood and guts of their friends and family and are hoping the reader can understand it without seeing it. That is a hard road to walk. If you don't know who Power Pack is, it is a group of children super heroes. Like say ages 5-10... maybe. Now can you think of a better group to include in a story about the senseless murders of a hundred or so people than a group of children? I don't know what the audience was for that book. I have actually heard good things about it, and will shyly admit that the small amounts I have witnessed them, they've been more interesting and dynamic than I'd expect. But they would have been one of my last picks to throw into the sewers of Manhattan while a troop of psychopaths marched through them and killed everyone they could. However the Power Pack was a reason that the book is able to execute a bit of a kick. Their innocence is exactly what the reader needs to see the massacre through. They also have preconstructed connections to the Morlocks. Leech and Artie also served a similar role for sympathy, being the eyes and the helplessness of the reader. Then again Leech and Artie make everything better. It would be interesting to hear if Claremont felt Watchmen at all affected this story. This is not to say they share similar themes. But it is definitely a turning in the X-Men books. All I could find via the all-knowing wikipedia was Claremont had grown tired of the Morlock underground society idea so he wanted to kill 'em off. Which is odd, because the survivors just return right back to the sewers, another reason the crossover doesn't feel it has a lasting effect. (It is also a funny stepping point for a conversation on a writer's moral obligations to their creations but that's probably just my mad mind, heh.) All in all it is a worthwhile story, if not stupendous in its execution. It is an interesting study in trying to draw sympathy and emotional connection out of a reader. And the dos and don'ts of a crossover event.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

    An important collection as it is the first major X-men crossover event, but not a very enjoyable event. Many, MANY, mutants die, as implied by the title, and the tensions between mutant factions builds to a crescendo, testing individual allegiances. The political landscape of the X-men universe is broadened, but only just slightly. The best parts are the all-out battle scenes, including, what I think is, the first Wolverine vs. Sabertooth confrontation. However, the artwork is not very clean or cr An important collection as it is the first major X-men crossover event, but not a very enjoyable event. Many, MANY, mutants die, as implied by the title, and the tensions between mutant factions builds to a crescendo, testing individual allegiances. The political landscape of the X-men universe is broadened, but only just slightly. The best parts are the all-out battle scenes, including, what I think is, the first Wolverine vs. Sabertooth confrontation. However, the artwork is not very clean or creative with very typical, 80's style panels and transitions, so even though the battles could have been epic, they are held back and contained too much by the artwork. The dialogue isn't too bad, but at times it feels forced; there is a lot of reiteration and repetition as the writers are trying to tell a story simultaneously across several titles and so they stick strictly to an episodic formula.... Which is too bad because all that page space that is used to establish plot points again and again could have been used for character development. Character development is what is most lacking in this volume. Overall, I'm surprised how this crossover has stood up to the test of time, it doesn't feel too dated, other than the costumes and a few slang terms. It's a very slow-moving collection with very little suspenseful action, and so I found it slightly boring, but still worth picking up and slugging through it. 3.5/5

  7. 5 out of 5

    Clint Davis

    Some of the sharpest writing ever seen in Marvel comics. The writers, most notably Chris Claremont, juggle dozens of characters across several storylines in telling a story of mutants under siege by humans and other mutants bent on wiping them out. It's tough to keep up with all of it but the presentation of this collection is fantastic and the art is top shelf. Many of these panels are downright gorgeous. The biggest bummer is that the story doesn't have anything resembling an ending. If you're Some of the sharpest writing ever seen in Marvel comics. The writers, most notably Chris Claremont, juggle dozens of characters across several storylines in telling a story of mutants under siege by humans and other mutants bent on wiping them out. It's tough to keep up with all of it but the presentation of this collection is fantastic and the art is top shelf. Many of these panels are downright gorgeous. The biggest bummer is that the story doesn't have anything resembling an ending. If you're expecting a dramatic climax, you'll be disappointed, as I was. When you read a massive comic event series you expect a few things: most notably important character deaths and a bit of closure but neither of those is found here. Great adventure though with some of Marvel's best characters, including Thor, whose two stories I thought were the highlight of the entire collection!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    Oof, was this a slog. Claremont gets a bit of criticism over his verbose style(Sometimes rightly, sometimes not) but he ain't got nothing on Louise Simonson. Simonson tries for serious drama but never rises above tortured soap opera dialogue. Especially bad is Scott'and Warren's pathetic pining over Jean Grey when one's got a wife and kid and they've both been lying to Jean about it. The Massacre itself lacks emotional weight and that's because its 200 pages of separate super teams going in and o Oof, was this a slog. Claremont gets a bit of criticism over his verbose style(Sometimes rightly, sometimes not) but he ain't got nothing on Louise Simonson. Simonson tries for serious drama but never rises above tortured soap opera dialogue. Especially bad is Scott'and Warren's pathetic pining over Jean Grey when one's got a wife and kid and they've both been lying to Jean about it. The Massacre itself lacks emotional weight and that's because its 200 pages of separate super teams going in and out of tunnels and always juuust missing each other--like a Scooby Doo chase scene.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Budd

    the first crossover, it was pretty good. My favorite panel is Colossus breaking the marauders neck. seems overly brutal, but really shows the weightiness of the situation and the book. most of the massacre takes place off panel, probably a product of the times, but you get a feeling for it through the characters.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mike Keskeys

    The first X-Men crossover event is one of the best. A little disjointed at times due to no communication between the writers of the different books in the series but nonetheless a dark tale that examines the need for violence and how far do you go in retaliation when violence and tragedy is met upon you?

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rav Sav

    Classic.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Pawan Rai

    This series has some great moments in it, but a lot of the issues feel like filler where characters are catching up with what happened in the last issue.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kurt

    In outline form, this story should be amazing. By 1986 or so, the X-Men had developed a couple of spin-off titles (X-Factor, New Mutants) and a variety of supporting and recurring characters (medical staff working at the school, Morlocks wandering the tunnels beneath Manhattan, etc.). In this grim storyline, some unknown villains are on a clear mission from a shadowy figure to wipe out as many Morlocks as possible, and they're pretty good at it (except when it comes to Morlocks who readers actua In outline form, this story should be amazing. By 1986 or so, the X-Men had developed a couple of spin-off titles (X-Factor, New Mutants) and a variety of supporting and recurring characters (medical staff working at the school, Morlocks wandering the tunnels beneath Manhattan, etc.). In this grim storyline, some unknown villains are on a clear mission from a shadowy figure to wipe out as many Morlocks as possible, and they're pretty good at it (except when it comes to Morlocks who readers actually like). Many characters are wounded at physical and/or emotional/spiritual/moral levels by the widespread carnage, and there is lots of fighting in cramped and dark tunnels, so the story should be intense on its own even without considering the long-term impact that it would ultimately have on Marvel's mutants. In execution, though, this story hasn't aged well. Even though characters keep talking about how dark the tunnels are, none of the many artists is able to actually make them look dark (in an X-Men issue, Blevins even gives two characters intense shadows like they're standing in front of the sun), and the Marauders are given skintight off-the-shoulder outfits regardless of gender (Scalphunter is, and I'm not kidding, in a lavender unitard accessorized with metal cylinders and high-heeled boots). Power Pack makes an appearance that works better than it should, given the clash of tones for the books, but Thor's connection to the story is nearly inexplicable, and his are the issues with the huge development of Angel losing his wings (which one might have expected would occur in X-Factor, the book for which Angel was a primary cast member). To top it all off, Claremont's writing shows all of his most annoying tics that stop him from being able to successfully execute his great basic ideas - action scenes are always less important than long monologues, and timing is completely inexplicable (a Morlock tunnels his way to the mansion, gasps a plea for help, then dies, and the X-Men wait for a full autopsy before deciding they can't waste any time helping their now-dead friends? and Thor makes a "thorough" search of the tunnels before granting a Viking funeral to the dead, except the books that reference this act all show that their characters have barely even carried their wounded to within sight of the tunnel exits before Dumb Thor nearly ignites them). This story could have been much worse - on its own terms, it holds together alright, and it basically resists the impulse to bring in every possible title to try to give the crossover more weight, and it's impossible to deny the impact that it had on the X-Men for the next twenty years or more. But it suffers from poor execution in almost every step beyond the basic story concept, and I don't recommend it to anyone who isn't already a fan of the X-Men and/or comics of that time period.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kevruzz

    X-MEN: MUTANT MASSACRE is the first major crossover event after X-Men branched out into multiple spin-off titles (New Mutants & X-Factor). Also along for the ride is Thor and the underage upstarts of Power Pack. It's a surprise then that this story doesn't have more going on. The 11-issue trade has no shortage of action, and all of it is well-staged by the various artists involved. The writers also have fun showing the same events from different perspectives in each title. The new mercenary mutan X-MEN: MUTANT MASSACRE is the first major crossover event after X-Men branched out into multiple spin-off titles (New Mutants & X-Factor). Also along for the ride is Thor and the underage upstarts of Power Pack. It's a surprise then that this story doesn't have more going on. The 11-issue trade has no shortage of action, and all of it is well-staged by the various artists involved. The writers also have fun showing the same events from different perspectives in each title. The new mercenary mutants the Marauders are the most effectively intimidating bad guys that the series has seen in awhile, the growing number of characters remains consistent, as there are plenty of moments for our heroes to ruminate on the devastation before them while continuing to deal with their own demons (sometimes literally). What the story lacks, however, is a coherent beginning, middle, and end, as well as a degree of forward momentum. This is probably to be expected, as the "Mutant Massacre" title seems to have come in after the fact, as well as the exact issues that comprise the story and the ideal reading order. Most of the crucial action is in the first half, while the rest feels strangely repetitive; various X-teams and related heroes venture into the ravaged Morlock tunnels, engage the Marauders once or twice, round up whatever survivors they can, and return to their home bases to regroup and lick their wounds, rinse, lather, repeat. Almost every title enters the fray with several plates already spinning, with a number of scenes and tertiary characters that set up for later (most notably Apocalypse, who pops in randomly to recruit his Horsemen). The various factions of mutants still remain largely segregated, which surprised the hell out of me, as I would've expected this story to be the perfect time for the current X-Men roster to finally run into the newly reformed original team now comprising X-Factor. All in all, MUTANT MASSACRE is still a fun ride, and essential for X-completists, as the events within lead to some long-term repercussions as well as a number of characters stepping into new roles in the larger story.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    X-Men - Mutant Massacre is a Marvel comics crossover published in 1986 featuring the X-Men, X-Factor, Power Pack, Daredevil and Thor. The (11) part story arc focuses on the actions and fallout of the Marauders’ attack on the Morlocks, a group of ostracized mutants living in the tunnels under New York City. Writers Chris Claremont, along with Louise and Walter Simonson, weave a loosely connected plotline between the various titles. The primary focus are the X-Books, specifically Uncanny X-men and X-Men - Mutant Massacre is a Marvel comics crossover published in 1986 featuring the X-Men, X-Factor, Power Pack, Daredevil and Thor. The (11) part story arc focuses on the actions and fallout of the Marauders’ attack on the Morlocks, a group of ostracized mutants living in the tunnels under New York City. Writers Chris Claremont, along with Louise and Walter Simonson, weave a loosely connected plotline between the various titles. The primary focus are the X-Books, specifically Uncanny X-men and X-Factor. These characters suffer the most consequences, and the series sets up future crossovers (e.g. Fall of the Mutants) and roster changes to both teams. The event itself is decidedly non-linear; Marvel published a flow chart to guide readers through the series. The trade paperback follows the unofficial reading order and does an admirable job of keeping things moving. The problem is there isn’t enough narrative substance to support a story of this size. Similar to other Marvel crossovers of the time (e.g. Secret Wars), Massacre throws popular characters together under mysterious circumstances and has them do battle without pausing to ask why. The Marauders attack without provocation, and their motivations remain ambiguous throughout the story. Our heroes spend most of the series reacting to the chaos. There are a number of battles, most notably between fan favorites Sabretooth and Wolverine. Sabretooth also does battle with the New Mutants, Power Pack and Thor, the latter of which serves as deus ex machina for the proceedings. The strongest entries are Claremont’s X-Men and Simonson’s Thor. Both writers were at the top of the game and could weather the storm. The artwork of Sal Buscema and John Romita Jr. also deserve special mention. That said, the series remains a product of the times and should be read with measured expectations. It’s fast, frenetic and likely to leave you confused (and unsatisfied).

  16. 5 out of 5

    Maurice Jr.

    This was a turning point in the X-Men's storied history. Just like the death of Phoenix threw the team in a whole new direction, so did the appearance of the Marauders. At this point, the team (all the X-teams actually) needed a break. Between an unexpected trip to Asgard, losing Professor X and getting Magneto as their new headmaster, dealing with the Beyonder and the Secret Wars 2, losing Phoenix (Rachel Summers) and getting their butts kicked by Nimrod, they needed time to recover. So naturall This was a turning point in the X-Men's storied history. Just like the death of Phoenix threw the team in a whole new direction, so did the appearance of the Marauders. At this point, the team (all the X-teams actually) needed a break. Between an unexpected trip to Asgard, losing Professor X and getting Magneto as their new headmaster, dealing with the Beyonder and the Secret Wars 2, losing Phoenix (Rachel Summers) and getting their butts kicked by Nimrod, they needed time to recover. So naturally their friends fell under attack and forced them, tired and bruised, into action. The Marauders were a team of mutants who for reasons not yet known, entered the Morlock tunnels and killed everyone they could. One of them escaped and came to the X-mansion asking for help. Storm led her tired team into the tunnels to help their friends, but they got more than they bargained for. Scalphunter, Riptide, Harpoon, Vertigo, Arclight and Scrambler met them first, and the X-Men took heavy casualties. Sabertooth, Prism and Blockbuster showed up in different segments of the action, involving X-Factor, the New Mutants, Thor and even Power Pack as they ventured into the tunnels for different reasons. Nobody came out of that killing ground the same. Colossus, Nightcrawler and Shadowcat were badly wounded, as was the Angel, but before he fell, Colossus killed Riptide (for maiming Nightcrawler). Most of the Morlocks were killed by the Marauders' cowardly attack; the survivors (Calisto, Sunder, Masque, Caliban, Leech and a few others) took refuge in the X-Mansion. In the aftermath, the wounded started to recover, and Psylocke and the Dazzler joined the team to help offset the temporary loss of three staunch members. The team started moving toward its next incarnation, with other new members yet to come.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Silas

    As graphic novels go, this is very long, and involves a fairly large cast of characters in some events that weirdly tie together with the continuity of the day. It requires you to have some knowledge of what is going on with Thor, Daredevil, the New Mutants, the X-Men, and the whole X-Factor/X-Terminators thing. I had some grounding in those things, but found that the little notes were pretty helpful on certain other things. These are definitely old-style comics, with a lot of exposition and ton As graphic novels go, this is very long, and involves a fairly large cast of characters in some events that weirdly tie together with the continuity of the day. It requires you to have some knowledge of what is going on with Thor, Daredevil, the New Mutants, the X-Men, and the whole X-Factor/X-Terminators thing. I had some grounding in those things, but found that the little notes were pretty helpful on certain other things. These are definitely old-style comics, with a lot of exposition and tons of text as compared to current comics. I have read some later stories that revisit the Mutant Massacre, and it seemed to be a bigger thing than it is here. I suppose that has to do with the comics code not letting you show quite so many people being killed, and there are corpses all over, and you actually see some pretty intense violence for these characters. Colossus actually kills someone, and I wasn't expecting that. Overall, this was pretty well done, and it lays the groundwork for the horsemen of Apocalypse that comes up soon, and I have read some of the issues from that time (when they first came out, as it turns out). I think you need to want to read it for the historical factor at this point, but if you have that interest, it's worth the read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Melinda Crouchley

    As someone who joined the comic industry as a reader in the early 90's - I missed much of the golden age of comics, as well as the cringe-worthy 80s...but now have enough disposable income to re-discover those story and pot-lines that I was never able to fully enjoy. What makes these past stories so cringe-worthy is the writing. Not neccesarily the plot-lines, but the dated dialogue, costumes, and narration style that are all appallingly BAD. In the X-Men mythos, this story is pretty pivotal, so As someone who joined the comic industry as a reader in the early 90's - I missed much of the golden age of comics, as well as the cringe-worthy 80s...but now have enough disposable income to re-discover those story and pot-lines that I was never able to fully enjoy. What makes these past stories so cringe-worthy is the writing. Not neccesarily the plot-lines, but the dated dialogue, costumes, and narration style that are all appallingly BAD. In the X-Men mythos, this story is pretty pivotal, so it was worth the read to become more accustomed to the back story. I would suggest this for anyone who is actually interested in X-Men backstory, but not on the merit of great dialogue, etc. :) Much Love, Mindy C

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Munroe

    The first really massive X-Family crossover storyline of the franchise, and reading it over it's not a surprise that it wound up being the first of many. Spreading it over three series (five if you count the non-X tie-ins) allowed greater scale and scope, which in turn heightened the drama of what was happening. And A LOT was happening! Plot threads starting here inform the involved series' for years to come, some are still colouring how the X-Universe runs, and characters introduced continue to The first really massive X-Family crossover storyline of the franchise, and reading it over it's not a surprise that it wound up being the first of many. Spreading it over three series (five if you count the non-X tie-ins) allowed greater scale and scope, which in turn heightened the drama of what was happening. And A LOT was happening! Plot threads starting here inform the involved series' for years to come, some are still colouring how the X-Universe runs, and characters introduced continue to be important within X-Men continuity to this day. An important piece to keep track of if you're an X-Obsessive (which I obviously am) and a gripping read in and of itself. Also: Sabertooth gets taken down by five year olds, like a punk. So that's hilarious too.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    X-Men: Mutant Massacre was one of the first non Spider-Man comics I ever read. I've never forgotten it, and been an X-Men fan ever since, and my re-read just confirmed all of my warm fuzzies about it. The story line initially ramps up a little slow, especially if you don't remember the stuff going on at the time, and the art seems a little dated, but well, it is. But it soon hits a peak that runs for most of the book. It gives you everything you're looking for in a good book; suspense, heartbreak X-Men: Mutant Massacre was one of the first non Spider-Man comics I ever read. I've never forgotten it, and been an X-Men fan ever since, and my re-read just confirmed all of my warm fuzzies about it. The story line initially ramps up a little slow, especially if you don't remember the stuff going on at the time, and the art seems a little dated, but well, it is. But it soon hits a peak that runs for most of the book. It gives you everything you're looking for in a good book; suspense, heartbreak, and the eventual joy at the good guys fighting off the bad guys for now. Anyone interested in Marvel or X-Men canon should read this one. 4.5/5 stars.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    I'm not sure how much of my enjoyment of this book is colored by my enjoyment of it when the individual issues came out over twenty years ago. Some sections, particularly those written by Chris Claremont hold up quite well. Some sections, particularly those issues from Thor and Power Pack (a group of super-powered children) seem quite out of place (both tonally and plot-wise). Some bits still have the power to give me chills, even after all these years. I'm not sure how much of my enjoyment of this book is colored by my enjoyment of it when the individual issues came out over twenty years ago. Some sections, particularly those written by Chris Claremont hold up quite well. Some sections, particularly those issues from Thor and Power Pack (a group of super-powered children) seem quite out of place (both tonally and plot-wise). Some bits still have the power to give me chills, even after all these years.

  22. 5 out of 5

    syrin

    Ahhh, there’s nothing better than taking a trip down nostalgia lane and reading some classic X-Men. I missed you, my friends, I really really did. Mohawk Storm, pre-ninja Psylocke, kick-ass Rogue, pre-Liefeld New Mutants, hell, even Dazzler and the Power Pack have cameos. Now if only Thor hadn’t showed up this would have been a perfect TPB, but alas, the powers that be demanded a crossover, and a crossover we had. Still, this is one of my favorite x-storylines. Here’s hoping no one ever decides Ahhh, there’s nothing better than taking a trip down nostalgia lane and reading some classic X-Men. I missed you, my friends, I really really did. Mohawk Storm, pre-ninja Psylocke, kick-ass Rogue, pre-Liefeld New Mutants, hell, even Dazzler and the Power Pack have cameos. Now if only Thor hadn’t showed up this would have been a perfect TPB, but alas, the powers that be demanded a crossover, and a crossover we had. Still, this is one of my favorite x-storylines. Here’s hoping no one ever decides to make a movie out of it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Fanning

    A timeless classic of course. 5 stars from 12 year old me, 4 with the benefit of hindsight. Thor feels pretty plunked, right? And there are some continuity errors that bespeak the importance of cross-team communication. And that the series ends with a focus on Psylocke is weird, because, you know, who cares about Psylocke. No offense, Psylocke/Xavier shippers.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Earl

    Absolutely impressed by this '80s 12-issue special. However, I still had to check Marvel Wiki now and then to check on character histories. Nevertheless, what makes this fantastic is the way the conflict was weaved by Clairemont together between the X-Factor, the Marauders, and the X-Men, while putting in clashes between Wolverine and Sabretooth. Absolutely impressed by this '80s 12-issue special. However, I still had to check Marvel Wiki now and then to check on character histories. Nevertheless, what makes this fantastic is the way the conflict was weaved by Clairemont together between the X-Factor, the Marauders, and the X-Men, while putting in clashes between Wolverine and Sabretooth.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin

    I love this storyline arc. If you realize that muntants are the minority and that it is the sci fi abstration of civil rights of different individuals it make better sense. I read X-men comics to feel normal has an adolescent. With any of the X-men storylines there is a moral in the subtext.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Geoff Mclennan

    Not the best collection. There is no real ending which is not the fault of the story so much as the way it was collected. Overall, it was a fun read if you can get past the very dated storytelling style and the pointless tie in issues.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lucas Brown

    Were it not for the Thor and Power Pack issues, this would have been two stars. Grim, brutal and over-written, in that talking-as-a-free-action, narrating-what-I'm-doing way. Not a patch on the Brood Saga or Dark Phoenix. Were it not for the Thor and Power Pack issues, this would have been two stars. Grim, brutal and over-written, in that talking-as-a-free-action, narrating-what-I'm-doing way. Not a patch on the Brood Saga or Dark Phoenix.

  28. 4 out of 5

    C.

    Bad shit happens, semi-important characters and slaughtered, and major characters get really hurt. But you have to read a few issues of The Mighty Thor, and that's just lame. Bad shit happens, semi-important characters and slaughtered, and major characters get really hurt. But you have to read a few issues of The Mighty Thor, and that's just lame.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Frank Taranto

    Some good art, many of my favorite characters in a story written after I had stopped reading comics.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Joel Gomes

    Undoubtedly one of the most character defining, well-plotted and influential sagas ever. Another peak of Claremont's X-Men writing. Undoubtedly one of the most character defining, well-plotted and influential sagas ever. Another peak of Claremont's X-Men writing.

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