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These Are Not Sweet Girls: Poetry by Latin American Women

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This reprint of a White Pine Press classic brings together an astonishing range of work from the turn of the century to the present. Despite cultural maxims encouraging them to be silent, women continue to speak, often through the language of poetry, where there is an abundance of intuition and the possibility of reclaiming power through language. In the work included here This reprint of a White Pine Press classic brings together an astonishing range of work from the turn of the century to the present. Despite cultural maxims encouraging them to be silent, women continue to speak, often through the language of poetry, where there is an abundance of intuition and the possibility of reclaiming power through language. In the work included here, we see how the common threads of courage and inventiveness can be woven into a bright tapestry of women’s voices that presents a true picture of a culture that must create its own history. Over fifty poets, including those well-known, such as Gabriela Mistral, Alfonsina Storni, and Cristina Peri Rossi, and those just emerging are included. Marjorie Agosín, editor of the Secret Weavers series, is well-known as a poet, writer, and human rights activist. She is a professor at Wellesley College in Massachusetts.


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This reprint of a White Pine Press classic brings together an astonishing range of work from the turn of the century to the present. Despite cultural maxims encouraging them to be silent, women continue to speak, often through the language of poetry, where there is an abundance of intuition and the possibility of reclaiming power through language. In the work included here This reprint of a White Pine Press classic brings together an astonishing range of work from the turn of the century to the present. Despite cultural maxims encouraging them to be silent, women continue to speak, often through the language of poetry, where there is an abundance of intuition and the possibility of reclaiming power through language. In the work included here, we see how the common threads of courage and inventiveness can be woven into a bright tapestry of women’s voices that presents a true picture of a culture that must create its own history. Over fifty poets, including those well-known, such as Gabriela Mistral, Alfonsina Storni, and Cristina Peri Rossi, and those just emerging are included. Marjorie Agosín, editor of the Secret Weavers series, is well-known as a poet, writer, and human rights activist. She is a professor at Wellesley College in Massachusetts.

30 review for These Are Not Sweet Girls: Poetry by Latin American Women

  1. 4 out of 5

    Krista Stevens

    Lots of sex, violence, grief and living, dreaming and hoping. Meditation on the Threshold by Rosario Castellanos No, throwing yourself under a train like Tolstoy's Anna is not the answer, not hastening Maddame Bovary's arsenic nor waiting for the angel with the javelin to reach the parapets of Avila before you tie the kerchief to your head and begin to act. Nor intuiting the laws of geometry, counting the beams in your cell like Sor Juana. The answer is not to write while visitors arrive in the Austen livin Lots of sex, violence, grief and living, dreaming and hoping. Meditation on the Threshold by Rosario Castellanos No, throwing yourself under a train like Tolstoy's Anna is not the answer, not hastening Maddame Bovary's arsenic nor waiting for the angel with the javelin to reach the parapets of Avila before you tie the kerchief to your head and begin to act. Nor intuiting the laws of geometry, counting the beams in your cell like Sor Juana. The answer is not to write while visitors arrive in the Austen living room nor to lock yourself in the attic of some New England house and dream, the Dickinson family Bible beneath your spinster's pillow. There must be some other way whose name is not Sappho or Mesaline or Mary of Egypt or Magdalene or Clemencia Isaura... Another way of being free and human. Another way of being.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Prince

    Amazing collection of poetry. It gives a good scope and breadth for an introduction to Latin American women poets.

  3. 4 out of 5

    elise amaryllis

    4.5/5 this book was wonderful. some poetry i wasn’t a fan of, but it introduced me to so many amazing poets that i plan on reading more of. poets & poems by then I enjoyed: Dulce Maria Loynaz - Last Days of Home - XXX (!!!) Delmira Augustini - The Ineffable (!!!) Idea Vilarino - There is no hope (!!!) - No (!!!) - A Visitor - Each afternoon - How to shrug off - How awful (!!!) Cleminta Suarez - Now that I have grown up, Mother Adelia Prado - Age Alicia Galaz Vivar - The Manifest Gioconda Belli - The Blood of Oth 4.5/5 this book was wonderful. some poetry i wasn’t a fan of, but it introduced me to so many amazing poets that i plan on reading more of. poets & poems by then I enjoyed: Dulce Maria Loynaz - Last Days of Home - XXX (!!!) Delmira Augustini - The Ineffable (!!!) Idea Vilarino - There is no hope (!!!) - No (!!!) - A Visitor - Each afternoon - How to shrug off - How awful (!!!) Cleminta Suarez - Now that I have grown up, Mother Adelia Prado - Age Alicia Galaz Vivar - The Manifest Gioconda Belli - The Blood of Others Ana Maria Rodas - Poems from the Erotic Left Teresa Calderon - Exile - Perspectives Maejorie Agosin - When she showed me her photograph Belinda Zubicueta Carmona - Tenderness Giannina Braschi - A letter comes and visits me Alejandra Piznarnick - XIV Romelia Alarcon de Folgar - Irreverent Epistle to Jesus Christ - Nocturnal Eunice Odio - from Creation Rosaria Ferre - Ballerina Violeta Parra - I curse in the highest sky - Song for a seed really happy about learning all of these names. especially idea vilarino—i love her poems so much.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Casey

    Amazing. Not something you will find in many bookstores but the translations, marvelous and the variety of poetry, outstanding. My favorite poem of the book is written by Marjorie Agosin a Chilean writer: Memorial Memory, like a piece of beautiful and imprecise canvas accumulating the embers of wrath, the beauties of an expansive tenderness that is stretched to the very base of a sword of faith which expands to become a table where everyone writes what he wants or does not want to remember: a blade Amazing. Not something you will find in many bookstores but the translations, marvelous and the variety of poetry, outstanding. My favorite poem of the book is written by Marjorie Agosin a Chilean writer: Memorial Memory, like a piece of beautiful and imprecise canvas accumulating the embers of wrath, the beauties of an expansive tenderness that is stretched to the very base of a sword of faith which expands to become a table where everyone writes what he wants or does not want to remember: a blade of smooth wood where we can invent maps of our most cherished possessions, memory flying opposite the sky, dark and luminous, folded and always transforming itself into a necklace of words strung between the captive stones that cannot say anything.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    I had really high expectations for this anthology, and ended up not enjoying it nearly as much as I'd hoped. My real rating is a 2.5 but I rounded up. Overall, this anthology was well put together, with so many poets included from all over Latin America. I enjoyed some of the poems that are included written by Dulce Maria Loynaz, Anabel Torres, Emma Sepulveda-Pulvirenti, Claribel Alegria, and Violeta Parra (her political poems). I had really high expectations for this anthology, and ended up not enjoying it nearly as much as I'd hoped. My real rating is a 2.5 but I rounded up. Overall, this anthology was well put together, with so many poets included from all over Latin America. I enjoyed some of the poems that are included written by Dulce Maria Loynaz, Anabel Torres, Emma Sepulveda-Pulvirenti, Claribel Alegria, and Violeta Parra (her political poems).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Willow Croft

    I read the edition ed. by Marjorie Agosin

  7. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    There are too few anthologies like this one -- and Marjorie Agosín has done a fantastic job with this one.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Caitlyn

    To completely steal a quote from another librarian (she gets FULL credit for this): these poems make you want to stand up and shout, and sit down and listen.

  9. 4 out of 5

    OTIS

  10. 4 out of 5

    Heidi Hoff

  11. 5 out of 5

    Cecilia Dunbar Hernandez

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cbsd library

  13. 5 out of 5

    Krish Chauhan

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Ghione

  15. 4 out of 5

    River

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nathaniel Merwin

  18. 5 out of 5

    Janet Brown

  19. 5 out of 5

    Transnational

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  21. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sergio Navarro

  23. 4 out of 5

    صديق الحكيم

  24. 5 out of 5

    Meags

  25. 5 out of 5

    Diana

  26. 5 out of 5

    Maurynne Maxwell

  27. 5 out of 5

    Reuben

  28. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

  29. 4 out of 5

    Andy's

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mikaela Renz-Whitmore

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