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Buffalo Music

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Inspired by pioneer Mary Ann Goodnight, Fern and Castillo offer the story of how one woman helped to save the buffalo in the late 1800s.


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Inspired by pioneer Mary Ann Goodnight, Fern and Castillo offer the story of how one woman helped to save the buffalo in the late 1800s.

30 review for Buffalo Music

  1. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 3.5 This was a charming little book. I found the subject matter so interesting. A woman saving wild "buffalo" herds in the 1800s was fascinating to me, because we all know what happened to the buffalo but to hear that there were some left in the west that were able to make a comeback is so heartwarming. The phrases and words were country and historical and at first I thought it wasn't appropriate for a book and should have been written grammatically correct, but it is accurate and it grew on me a 3.5 This was a charming little book. I found the subject matter so interesting. A woman saving wild "buffalo" herds in the 1800s was fascinating to me, because we all know what happened to the buffalo but to hear that there were some left in the west that were able to make a comeback is so heartwarming. The phrases and words were country and historical and at first I thought it wasn't appropriate for a book and should have been written grammatically correct, but it is accurate and it grew on me and I came to appreciate it. When I got done reading and read that it was fictional, I was disappointed but I could tell while reading that the thoughts and feelings of the character were obviously imagined by the author. I was also disappointed that she changed the real people's names. Mary Ann Goodnight, the real woman, was changed to Molly, her husband Charles changed to Charlie, and William, the man who transported the buffalo, was called Billie. Since this is based on a true story, I didn't understand why the names were changed and I didn't like it. Use their real names so we can remember the real people! The illustrations were another area and the main reason why I had to dock some. I didn't like the style. It was loose and not detailed and just gave you enough to get the idea of the shapes and what they were supposed to be, but not much more. At times the buffalo was nothing more than dark blobs and humps and curving backs that don't resemble buffalo at all. She set the scene by describing the sounds Molly would have heard, chickens and coyotes and buffalo breathing, scratching on cottonwoods, splashing in mud holes, and running. It was cute how she said they're "feisty critters with a stubborn streak wider than the Rio Grande. My husband, Charlie, says they remind me of my own self and that's why I have such a fondness for them." Hunters were shooting them to sell their hides and hooves. Hunters shot them all day, killing 100 or more in a day. As far as you could see, there were the bones of the buffalo. The piles were as tall as 10 men. Charlie said he guessed they figured there would always be some left, no matter how many they killed. So it showed how wasteful and careless the hunters were, to assume they would never run out. In 6 seasons the buffalo were gone. A cowhand named Billie was always bringing Molly orphaned animals, like prairie dogs, wolves, turkeys and an antelope. He had found 2 orphan buffaloes. I was wondering how she had provided care for these wild animals. We didn't know about the others, but I'm glad she provided some info about raising the buffalo calves. She put hot water bottles inside flannel cloth and put them against the calves (I wanted to know what the bottles were made of), and wrapped them in cloth. She fed them by squeezing cow's milk from a rag. It was sweet how she kept them in the dugout until Charlie got tired of it, and put them in the pasture. And how she got the cows to accept them and nurse them. It got out that she was caring for calves and others starting bringing her some. Charlie would sigh and start stoking the fire. It was inspirational that she knew in order to hear buffalo, she had to start her own herd. She took care of the orphans, bred the healthy ones, and scared off wolves and poachers with her rifle. Her herd grew to 100. Yellowstone National Park was looking to rebuild its buffalo herd, so she had Charlie build a frame of timbers inside the boxcar with padding. She put hay and water in and used a molasses cake to lure them up the ramp and in the boxcar. Billie took 4 to Yellowstone, Calico and Chester, the first two, being part of them. The land grew crowded with settlers and longhorns and fences as far as could be seen. Trains and engines could be heard. But she could still hear the "old songs," horns clashing, bulls bellowing, and hooves. She hoped those sounds could be heard outside of her canyon. The way she spoke brought to life that time and the country area. "'Course, I can't argue with him, for fear of proving him right. But no matter the why or wherefore, that buffalo music played right to my heart." "What are all them shots?" "I was near sure the only song left in the canyon was the cold whistle of the north wind." "Lordy, that sounds brought back some memories! I didn't need to hear anything else afore making up my mind." "I know some people think I'm tough as old beef jerky, but truth is, I'd seen too many living things disappear in the hard struggle for life here." "Now, mind you, I don't look a thing like a buffalo mama. I'm thin as a flapjack and not much taller, but those calves up and followed me back to the dugout.." "When I got a notion, a wise man knew to let me have my way. And I'd got a notion that I was going to hear buffalo music again in this lifetime." Mary Ann Goodnight and her husband Charles were two of the first person to see the need to save the buffalo. Soon after they started a captive herd, a few other ranchers did the same. Mary's herd was one of the five foundation herds in the U.S. from which most of the current herds are from. After the 4, she sent more to Yellowstone, and some to Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma, National Bison Range in Montana, and some zoos. This was a nice little read, tells an important story of an iconic American animal and a pioneer in the conservation field responsible for the current herds we have today. An amazing, inspiring woman and a really cool time in history. I'm so glad I read this.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    Inspired by the real-life story of Texas pioneer and rancher Mary Ann Goonight, Tracey E. Fern tells the fictional story of Molly, a rancher's wife who has a soft spot for orphaned animals. A buffalo lover from the first, Molly is dismayed when hunters almost wipe out the species, and agrees to take in two young buffalo calves when a cowboy brings them to her. This is the start of her own herd, which she slowly assembles from young survivors of the buffalo massacres. Eventually, after the establ Inspired by the real-life story of Texas pioneer and rancher Mary Ann Goonight, Tracey E. Fern tells the fictional story of Molly, a rancher's wife who has a soft spot for orphaned animals. A buffalo lover from the first, Molly is dismayed when hunters almost wipe out the species, and agrees to take in two young buffalo calves when a cowboy brings them to her. This is the start of her own herd, which she slowly assembles from young survivors of the buffalo massacres. Eventually, after the establishment of the national parks, Molly sends some of her buffalo to help supply the herd being established in Yellowstone National Park. An engaging enough tale, told in alliterative prose and accompanied by lovely artwork from Caldecott Honoree Lauren Castillo, Buffalo Music would have been all the better, in my opinion, if it had been a straight picture-book biography of the real woman who inspired this fictionalized retelling. Given that the original subject was such an interesting character, why not write a non-fiction book about her? Leaving that disappointment aside, I found the narrative here engaging, and did appreciate Tracey Fern's afterword, in which she gave more information about Mary Ann Goodnight, and suggested further reading ideas. Recommended to anyone looking for children's stories about efforts to save the buffalo, in the face of its imminent extinction because of over-hunting. Perhaps as a companion book to Joseph Bruchac's Buffalo Song , a picture-book about the efforts of Flathead Indians to preserve this marvelous species.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    note: historical fiction would read again when studying history about western expansion.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Chind

    I grabbed this one at the used bookstore because I saw the seal of an award but this would be worth every penny brand new. Fabulous illustrations and historical detail about the national herd of buffalo. I'm absolutely enchanted. I grabbed this one at the used bookstore because I saw the seal of an award but this would be worth every penny brand new. Fabulous illustrations and historical detail about the national herd of buffalo. I'm absolutely enchanted.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cindy Mitchell *Kiss the Book*

    Fern, Tracey E. and Lauren Castillo, Ill. Buffalo Music. PICTURE BOOK, Clarion, 2008. The main character, Molly, is a fictionalization of Mary Ann Goodnight, who actually settled in the Texan Panhandle in 1876 when buffalo were still numerous in the area. Molly loves hearing "buffalo music" as the massive herds graze nearby. Within about six years, however, buffalo hunters have slaughtered the animals, and Molly is grief stricken. When a fellow settler brings her two orphaned buffalo calves to ra Fern, Tracey E. and Lauren Castillo, Ill. Buffalo Music. PICTURE BOOK, Clarion, 2008. The main character, Molly, is a fictionalization of Mary Ann Goodnight, who actually settled in the Texan Panhandle in 1876 when buffalo were still numerous in the area. Molly loves hearing "buffalo music" as the massive herds graze nearby. Within about six years, however, buffalo hunters have slaughtered the animals, and Molly is grief stricken. When a fellow settler brings her two orphaned buffalo calves to raise, Molly accepts the challenge, taking them into her dugout home to warm by the fire. The buffalo thrive, eventually more are added until Molly's herd numbers 100, and some are eventually sent to Yellowstone to help build the herd in the park. Castillo's mixed-media illustrations enhance Fern's homespun expressions, making this an appealing book. EL (K-3) - ADVISABLE - Beverly Stout, Area Library Media Specialist. http://kissthebook.blogspot.com/2008/...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jana

    Based on the true story of Mary Ann Goodnight and her husband, Charles, this historical fiction picture book tells the story of a woman’s love for animals and her determination to save the buffalo from extinction in the late nineteenth century. After hunters kill all of the buffalo around her ranch in Texas, Molly starts raising orphan buffalo calves. Eventually she sends four of her animals to Yellowstone National Park to help start herds there. This would be a good book to share with kids, esp Based on the true story of Mary Ann Goodnight and her husband, Charles, this historical fiction picture book tells the story of a woman’s love for animals and her determination to save the buffalo from extinction in the late nineteenth century. After hunters kill all of the buffalo around her ranch in Texas, Molly starts raising orphan buffalo calves. Eventually she sends four of her animals to Yellowstone National Park to help start herds there. This would be a good book to share with kids, especially as part of a study of pioneer days and westward expansion. The illustrations by Lauren Castillo are beautiful and really help bring this story to life.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kenzie Garvin

    I chose to read this book because it is historical fiction, allowing the reader to connect to history through a fictional story to create a more interesting story rather than reading about each historical event individually. The book generated questions about individuals and groups who have shaped a significant historical change as well as allowed the reader to compare life in a specific historical time period to life today. The historical figure, Mary Ann Goodnight made a major impact in buildi I chose to read this book because it is historical fiction, allowing the reader to connect to history through a fictional story to create a more interesting story rather than reading about each historical event individually. The book generated questions about individuals and groups who have shaped a significant historical change as well as allowed the reader to compare life in a specific historical time period to life today. The historical figure, Mary Ann Goodnight made a major impact in building Yellow Stone and other buffalo reserves. Readers may be inspired to visit or even donate to buffalo reserves after reading this inspirational picture book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Justine Liddle

    This book would be a great way to introduce a National Parks unit. It is a story of a lady that love to hear the sound of the buffalo while she does her daily chores. Soon buffalo hunters come and shot hundreds of buffalo a day until there were no buffalo to hear anymore. A cowhand find to orphaned buffalo calves and brings them to the lady, she raises them and soon word gets out that she is raising buffalo calves and many more cowhands begin bringing her orphaned calves. When get word that Yell This book would be a great way to introduce a National Parks unit. It is a story of a lady that love to hear the sound of the buffalo while she does her daily chores. Soon buffalo hunters come and shot hundreds of buffalo a day until there were no buffalo to hear anymore. A cowhand find to orphaned buffalo calves and brings them to the lady, she raises them and soon word gets out that she is raising buffalo calves and many more cowhands begin bringing her orphaned calves. When get word that Yellowstone National Park is looking to rebuild its buffalo herd, she sends her herd there to live.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Shana

    I tagged it as nonfiction, though it is a fictional account based on true events. I honestly would give this one 6 stars. Something about it spoke to me. The sadness and determination of Miss Molly and her gumption to keep going mingled perfectly with the history of events in a such a sweet, lyrical way. Plus, there's the subtle reminder to take care of our environment and the ones who live in it with us. A beautiful story. I tagged it as nonfiction, though it is a fictional account based on true events. I honestly would give this one 6 stars. Something about it spoke to me. The sadness and determination of Miss Molly and her gumption to keep going mingled perfectly with the history of events in a such a sweet, lyrical way. Plus, there's the subtle reminder to take care of our environment and the ones who live in it with us. A beautiful story.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Debra

    If you have an environmentalist on the horizon in your family, this is a book for your child's shelf. Buffalo were slaughtered almost to the point of extinction. In 1876 a pioneer and her husband stepped up to save the species. Today we have bison in Yellowstone National Park and the National Bison Range in St. Ignatius Montana because people cared. I liked Buffalo Music because it was a story about people caring, a species saved, and living in harmony with nature. If you have an environmentalist on the horizon in your family, this is a book for your child's shelf. Buffalo were slaughtered almost to the point of extinction. In 1876 a pioneer and her husband stepped up to save the species. Today we have bison in Yellowstone National Park and the National Bison Range in St. Ignatius Montana because people cared. I liked Buffalo Music because it was a story about people caring, a species saved, and living in harmony with nature.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Lady

    This is a story from the past about a women who saved a herd of buffalo. In this time buffalo were being killed for food, and clothing. Instead this brave women tried to save them. This would be a great book to read to students on Kansas day.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lynn Davidson

    Buffalo roamed in large herds across the United States until they nearly became extinct due to hunters slaughtering them. This story is based on a real woman who raised orphan buffalo calves and started a new herd from which the species was saved from extinction.

  13. 4 out of 5

    N

    This book was neat. It would have been better if they'd just made it a narrative non-fiction biography, but instead they fictionalized an account of the couple who helped bring back buffalo from possible extinction. Why didn't Fern just tell the real story? This book was neat. It would have been better if they'd just made it a narrative non-fiction biography, but instead they fictionalized an account of the couple who helped bring back buffalo from possible extinction. Why didn't Fern just tell the real story?

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Very interesting read. A well told story.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    I loved the story because it is so full of hope. It is a great true story of never giving up.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kianna

    Wonderful children's book that provides a realistic story of the extinction of the buffalo in the west. Wonderful children's book that provides a realistic story of the extinction of the buffalo in the west.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Margaret Keller

    Such cute book. It was really heart warming how one women helped the buffalo in Texas from going extincted.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tara Engel

    Loved this book, great read for all ages and something to not be forgotten.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Dwyer

    Originally rated G+ by Linda Lafferty Has some historical value, but it’s also a sweet story based on a true person named “Mary Ann Goodnight" a pioneer who settled in the Palo Duro Canyon in 1876. At that time, enormous herds of buffalo still roamed West Texas. Within a few years, hunters had slaughtered nearly every one.” There’s an author’s note in back, and a bibliography if young readers want to learn more about the buffalo. Molly, based on Mary Ann, finds two scrawny buffalo calves after mo Originally rated G+ by Linda Lafferty Has some historical value, but it’s also a sweet story based on a true person named “Mary Ann Goodnight" a pioneer who settled in the Palo Duro Canyon in 1876. At that time, enormous herds of buffalo still roamed West Texas. Within a few years, hunters had slaughtered nearly every one.” There’s an author’s note in back, and a bibliography if young readers want to learn more about the buffalo. Molly, based on Mary Ann, finds two scrawny buffalo calves after most of the herds are slaughtered. She nurses them back to health and finds there are others – brought to her by nearby farmers. She soon had 100 head of buffalo. “Then word came that Yellowstone National Park was looking to rebuild it’s Buffalo herd.” Molly sends her first 2 and a few more via the Santa Fe. Binding good. Cover shows Molly feeding the 2 buffalo calves she first saved. One reviewer on Amazon.com wrote “An evocative story of determination, conservation,and the ability of one person to make a difference.” and I agree.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Vicki Kier

    Set in Texas during the 1870's, a period in the nation's history when buffalo were being hunted to near extinction, Buffalo Music provides a memorable supplement to parallel textbook readings. Author Tracey E. Fern narrates in the voice of a Texas pioneer woman, whose character is modeled after real-life hero Mary Ann Goodnight. Fern's closing author's note provides factual details about Goodnight's role in saving the species from extinction. A helpful bibliography of additional sources is also Set in Texas during the 1870's, a period in the nation's history when buffalo were being hunted to near extinction, Buffalo Music provides a memorable supplement to parallel textbook readings. Author Tracey E. Fern narrates in the voice of a Texas pioneer woman, whose character is modeled after real-life hero Mary Ann Goodnight. Fern's closing author's note provides factual details about Goodnight's role in saving the species from extinction. A helpful bibliography of additional sources is also provided. The narrator's Texas drawl invites read-alouds, but the illustrations are not among Lauren Castillo's finest and will likely fail to hold the attention or capture the imagination of age-appropriate listener. An appropriate purchase for a Gr. 2-4 classroom or public library.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I really enjoyed this book. The alliteration coupled with the descriptions of the historical period were great. I felt like I was engrossed in that particular era. The illustrations were sweet and added so much personality to the story. It was also interesting to learn about the woman who worked to save a species and where some of the buffalo ended up. I found it especially cool because I've visited both of the places mentioned at the back of the book. And a part of me can't help but think I saw I really enjoyed this book. The alliteration coupled with the descriptions of the historical period were great. I felt like I was engrossed in that particular era. The illustrations were sweet and added so much personality to the story. It was also interesting to learn about the woman who worked to save a species and where some of the buffalo ended up. I found it especially cool because I've visited both of the places mentioned at the back of the book. And a part of me can't help but think I saw some of the buffalo ancestors Mary Ann Goodnight saved. This book was well-rounded and showed a part of our history people might not be familiar with. I'd recommend. *Taken from My Sentiments Exactly!: http://reviewsatmse.blogspot.com/2013...

  22. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Hayes-miller

    CIP summary: " After hunters kill off the buffalo around her Texas ranch, a woman begins raising orphan buffalo calves and eventually ships four members of her small herd to Yellowstone National Park, where they form the beginnings of newly thriving buffalo herds. Based on the true story of Mary Ann Goodnight and her husband Charles." I have read about the buffalos being hunted out west, but this book really helped to show how quickly the herds of buffalo were wiped out by the 20th century. This CIP summary: " After hunters kill off the buffalo around her Texas ranch, a woman begins raising orphan buffalo calves and eventually ships four members of her small herd to Yellowstone National Park, where they form the beginnings of newly thriving buffalo herds. Based on the true story of Mary Ann Goodnight and her husband Charles." I have read about the buffalos being hunted out west, but this book really helped to show how quickly the herds of buffalo were wiped out by the 20th century. This book shows the determination of one person and how it's impacted buffalo extinction today. This would be a great book to read with students when talking about the westward movement.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sister.Jade

    Illustrator: Lauren Castillo Publisher: Clarion Books Date: 2008 Genre: Historical Fiction Strength: Captivating and enriching account told through vivid imagery and dynamic words usage that depicts the loss of Buffalo herds in the 1800’s and how one woman with great compassion was able to save them. It helps illustrate to children that one person doing one thing can make a big difference. Interest: I am a firm believer in saving the environment and caring for the cretures of our earth. It is good Illustrator: Lauren Castillo Publisher: Clarion Books Date: 2008 Genre: Historical Fiction Strength: Captivating and enriching account told through vivid imagery and dynamic words usage that depicts the loss of Buffalo herds in the 1800’s and how one woman with great compassion was able to save them. It helps illustrate to children that one person doing one thing can make a big difference. Interest: I am a firm believer in saving the environment and caring for the cretures of our earth. It is good to see that people in the past have made a difference by working towards renewing and enriching the environment and the creatures who live in it

  24. 5 out of 5

    Keeko

    This is one of those books that you hope a lot of people read because you see how much good and what a difference one person can make. Gentle and evocative writing that doesn't draw attention to itself and made me feel like I was right out in the wide open spaces with her and the bison. The illustrations are unique and beautiful and they fit the tone of the story. Makes me want to go back to Yellowstone and see bison. Also, educational because I didn't think of buffalo being in Texas. from the f This is one of those books that you hope a lot of people read because you see how much good and what a difference one person can make. Gentle and evocative writing that doesn't draw attention to itself and made me feel like I was right out in the wide open spaces with her and the bison. The illustrations are unique and beautiful and they fit the tone of the story. Makes me want to go back to Yellowstone and see bison. Also, educational because I didn't think of buffalo being in Texas. from the few things I've read, I thought they were farther north in the prairies. A very special book. Thanks to everybody for making it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    I appreciate a story where the main characters solve a real world problem. It always shocks and dismays me that Americans felt the need to destroy anything that moved. Owls in trees? Use them for targets. An interest in nature? Collect bird nests complete with the eggs. Prairie dogs? More target practice! And the buffalo ... they were so big a person could shoot them from the window of the moving train. Even as a child, this wanton destruction distressed me. I'm glad to hear that some people fel I appreciate a story where the main characters solve a real world problem. It always shocks and dismays me that Americans felt the need to destroy anything that moved. Owls in trees? Use them for targets. An interest in nature? Collect bird nests complete with the eggs. Prairie dogs? More target practice! And the buffalo ... they were so big a person could shoot them from the window of the moving train. Even as a child, this wanton destruction distressed me. I'm glad to hear that some people felt differently. (Miss Rumphius would have approved of Molly, and the Lorax would have understood the issue of destruction until there was 'only one' animal left standing.)

  26. 5 out of 5

    Amelia

    The narrator, Molly, and her husband Charlie live in Texas on land. They always watch the buffalo pass and note the noises they make. Hunters came and over time ended up killing all of the buffalo along with the noises, or music, that they made. Later on they find two starving buffalo calves and take them in. They raise the buffalo with their cows and eventually the buffalo begin to reproduce until there are too many buffalo on the farm. Molly and Charlie release the buffalo and listen to the mu The narrator, Molly, and her husband Charlie live in Texas on land. They always watch the buffalo pass and note the noises they make. Hunters came and over time ended up killing all of the buffalo along with the noises, or music, that they made. Later on they find two starving buffalo calves and take them in. They raise the buffalo with their cows and eventually the buffalo begin to reproduce until there are too many buffalo on the farm. Molly and Charlie release the buffalo and listen to the music they make. Great message but the book has to much southern slang and could be hard to understand for young children.

  27. 5 out of 5

    JustOneMoreBook.com

    A feisty, self-aware pioneer woman, the man who knows and loves her and the coddling of a cabin full of beautiful baby bison — what more could a pet-deprived young reader ask for? Based on the true story of Mary Ann Goodnight’s determination to save the Texas buffalo and told with humour and a Texan twang, this is an inspiring story of hard work and simpler times. You can listen in on our chat about this book on our Just One More Book! Children's Book Podcast. A feisty, self-aware pioneer woman, the man who knows and loves her and the coddling of a cabin full of beautiful baby bison — what more could a pet-deprived young reader ask for? Based on the true story of Mary Ann Goodnight’s determination to save the Texas buffalo and told with humour and a Texan twang, this is an inspiring story of hard work and simpler times. You can listen in on our chat about this book on our Just One More Book! Children's Book Podcast.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    I have mixed feelings about this book. I really liked the illustrations, but do not know how much a child would appreciate them. This book would be best suited for an elementary school classroom, perhaps to compliment a lesson on the westward expansion. It's not a story time book and would be an odd choice for a personal collection (unless one was very into buffalo conservation or 1800s Texas or both). I have mixed feelings about this book. I really liked the illustrations, but do not know how much a child would appreciate them. This book would be best suited for an elementary school classroom, perhaps to compliment a lesson on the westward expansion. It's not a story time book and would be an odd choice for a personal collection (unless one was very into buffalo conservation or 1800s Texas or both).

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tony

    This is the story of the bonneted pioneer, Mary Ann Goodnight and her work in the recovery of the American buffalo--bos Americanus. While Mrs. Goodnight was instrumental in the buffalo's salvation, that she 's visually 'fenced in' (she is, after all, frontierswoman of Western expansion), it's no less ironic that the orignial orphaned bison calves are transported via rail--the very means which caused their near-extinction. Still, there are some very pretty pictures here by Lauren Castillo. This is the story of the bonneted pioneer, Mary Ann Goodnight and her work in the recovery of the American buffalo--bos Americanus. While Mrs. Goodnight was instrumental in the buffalo's salvation, that she 's visually 'fenced in' (she is, after all, frontierswoman of Western expansion), it's no less ironic that the orignial orphaned bison calves are transported via rail--the very means which caused their near-extinction. Still, there are some very pretty pictures here by Lauren Castillo.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Roxanne Hsu Feldman

    How interesting -- two picture books about the preservation of the American Buffalo in one season! I enjoyed the text of this one MUCH more than that of the Bruchac. There is a liveliness to the telling and energy that match the characteristic of a woman who would devote her time and energy to a nature cause. The illustrations serve the text well but that's it. How interesting -- two picture books about the preservation of the American Buffalo in one season! I enjoyed the text of this one MUCH more than that of the Bruchac. There is a liveliness to the telling and energy that match the characteristic of a woman who would devote her time and energy to a nature cause. The illustrations serve the text well but that's it.

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