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Hanna Reitsch and Melitta von Stauffenberg were talented, courageous, and strikingly attractive women who fought convention to make their names in the male-dominated field of flight in 1930s Germany. With the war, both became pioneering test pilots and were awarded the Iron Cross for service to the Third Reich. But they could not have been more different and neither woman Hanna Reitsch and Melitta von Stauffenberg were talented, courageous, and strikingly attractive women who fought convention to make their names in the male-dominated field of flight in 1930s Germany. With the war, both became pioneering test pilots and were awarded the Iron Cross for service to the Third Reich. But they could not have been more different and neither woman had a good word to say for the other. Hanna was middle-class, vivacious, and distinctly Aryan, while the darker, more self-effacing Melitta came from an aristocratic Prussian family. Both were driven by deeply held convictions about honor and patriotism; but ultimately, while Hanna tried to save Hitler's life, begging him to let her fly him to safety in April 1945, Melitta covertly supported the most famous attempt to assassinate the Fuhrer. Their interwoven lives provide vivid insight into Nazi Germany and its attitudes toward women, class, and race. Acclaimed biographer Clare Mulley gets under the skin of these two distinctive and unconventional women, giving a full--and as yet largely unknown--account of their contrasting yet strangely parallel lives, against a changing backdrop of the 1936 Olympics, the Eastern Front, the Berlin Air Club, and Hitler's bunker. Told with brio and great narrative flair, The Women Who Flew for Hitler is an extraordinary true story, with all the excitement and color of the best fiction.


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Hanna Reitsch and Melitta von Stauffenberg were talented, courageous, and strikingly attractive women who fought convention to make their names in the male-dominated field of flight in 1930s Germany. With the war, both became pioneering test pilots and were awarded the Iron Cross for service to the Third Reich. But they could not have been more different and neither woman Hanna Reitsch and Melitta von Stauffenberg were talented, courageous, and strikingly attractive women who fought convention to make their names in the male-dominated field of flight in 1930s Germany. With the war, both became pioneering test pilots and were awarded the Iron Cross for service to the Third Reich. But they could not have been more different and neither woman had a good word to say for the other. Hanna was middle-class, vivacious, and distinctly Aryan, while the darker, more self-effacing Melitta came from an aristocratic Prussian family. Both were driven by deeply held convictions about honor and patriotism; but ultimately, while Hanna tried to save Hitler's life, begging him to let her fly him to safety in April 1945, Melitta covertly supported the most famous attempt to assassinate the Fuhrer. Their interwoven lives provide vivid insight into Nazi Germany and its attitudes toward women, class, and race. Acclaimed biographer Clare Mulley gets under the skin of these two distinctive and unconventional women, giving a full--and as yet largely unknown--account of their contrasting yet strangely parallel lives, against a changing backdrop of the 1936 Olympics, the Eastern Front, the Berlin Air Club, and Hitler's bunker. Told with brio and great narrative flair, The Women Who Flew for Hitler is an extraordinary true story, with all the excitement and color of the best fiction.

30 review for The Women Who Flew for Hitler: The True Story of Hitler's Valkyries

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jill Hutchinson

    What an amazing book about two amazing women of the Third Reich.....Hanna Reitsch and Melitta von Stauffenberg, test pilots for the German aircraft industry and the Luftwaffe. Both received Nazi Germany's highest honor, the Iron Cross, and were feted by the public and the military. But they were as different as chalk and cheese and their paths seldom crossed, mostly by design. Hanna was a loquacious, publicity seeking rather self-serving young woman who was totally committed to Hitler. From child What an amazing book about two amazing women of the Third Reich.....Hanna Reitsch and Melitta von Stauffenberg, test pilots for the German aircraft industry and the Luftwaffe. Both received Nazi Germany's highest honor, the Iron Cross, and were feted by the public and the military. But they were as different as chalk and cheese and their paths seldom crossed, mostly by design. Hanna was a loquacious, publicity seeking rather self-serving young woman who was totally committed to Hitler. From childhood she had wanted to fly and was a glider champion but yearned to fly motor driven aircraft and her determination paid off in the years leading up to the war. Her courage was unassailable and she escaped death many times during her test flights. Melitta came from an aristocratic Prussian family and was a brilliant aeronautical engineer whose real joy was piloting an airplane. Her background was suspect to the Nazis as she was a mischling (her grandmother was Jewish). But through her connections and talents, this was overlooked by the powers that be. She was a quiet and restrained individual whose commitment to Germany and honor trumped her personal feelings about the Nazis and Hitler. (It should be noted that her brother-in-law, Claus von Stauffenberg was the leader of Operation Valkyrie, the unsuccessful assassination attempt on Hitler which cost von Stauffenberg his life and put Melitta under a cloud of suspicion throughout the rest of the war). Their stories give the reader a look at the inner working of the aircraft build-up and the eventual failure of the Luftwaffe during the last years of the war and provides an account of the contrasting but parallel lives of these heroic female pilots. I highly recommend this book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jean

    This is a duel biography of two women aviators, Hanna Reitsch (1912-1979) and Countess Melitta Schiller Schenk Gafin von Stauffenberg (1903-1945). Hanna had Aryan looks and Melitta was a brunette from Prussian aristocracy. These women became brilliant pilots in the 1930s when few women were allowed to fly. Hanna was a supporter of Hitler’s new regime and lent her image to a series of publicity articles and collectibles. She dropped out of medical school to pursue flying. She became a test pilot a This is a duel biography of two women aviators, Hanna Reitsch (1912-1979) and Countess Melitta Schiller Schenk Gafin von Stauffenberg (1903-1945). Hanna had Aryan looks and Melitta was a brunette from Prussian aristocracy. These women became brilliant pilots in the 1930s when few women were allowed to fly. Hanna was a supporter of Hitler’s new regime and lent her image to a series of publicity articles and collectibles. She dropped out of medical school to pursue flying. She became a test pilot and also flew the famous ME163 rocket plane and was almost killed in the process. She flew all types of planes including helicopters and gliders. She set 40 flight altitude records. She was the first woman to fly a helicopter and was awarded the Military Flying Medal. Hitler awarded her the Iron Cross 1st Class for her courage and commitment to duty. She was the first woman to receive the honor during the war. She was also the first woman to receive the Luftwaffe Pilot/Observer Badge in Gold with Diamonds. and to be awarded the title Flugkapitan (Flight Captain). Melitta was shy and more conflicted about the regime. Melitta graduated in 1927 cum laude from the Technical University of Munich in aeronautical engineering. She went on to obtain her Ph.D. She became one the Nazis most senior aeronautical engineer and the lead Stuka dive bomber test pilot. She did over 2,000 test dives during the war. Her father had some Jewish blood. She was married to Alexander von Stauffenberg (1905-1964) whose brother, Claus von Stauffenberg (1907-1944), was executed for Operation Valkyrie. She was arrested with all of the family after Valkyrie, but she was released and her husband was sent to a concentration camp. Melitta headed up her own military flight institute which was an unheard-of position for a woman in Nazi Germany in the 1930s. In 1944, she also received the Iron Cross. She was the second women to be awarded the title Flugkapitan (Flight Captain). She was awarded the Gold Front Flying Clasp for Bombers in 1944 for flying over 1500 test flights in bombers. Melitta was shot down on 8 April 1945 by an allied fighter plane. The book is well written and meticulously researched. The author searches for the truth about the two female pilots, how they became successful pilots and how they felt about serving Hitler. The author does not go into depth about Nazism or the war except in how the women interacted with it. Mulley stated that the two women avoided each other and had a difficult relationship. Apparently Melitta, felt that Hanna was a Nazi. The author successfully portrays their passion for flying and their dedication to aviation. I read this as an audiobook downloaded from Audible. The book is fifteen hours long. Christa Lewis does an excellent job narrating the book. Lewis is a voice-over artist and award-winning audiobook narrator.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dem

    DNF To to the Ridiculous font and spacing used in paperback copy which made this a tedious book to read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Garance

    I was most attracted to this book by its resume. It actually made me think: "now this is a movie I want to see!" Keen to discover more about these two extraordinary Germans flying ladies and their rivalry I dived in. It's a very thorough research about their lives, achievements and political points of view during the Second World War. It's therefore very interesting on a historical point of view and very well written. Unfortunately both characters, though extraordinary for their times, remain a I was most attracted to this book by its resume. It actually made me think: "now this is a movie I want to see!" Keen to discover more about these two extraordinary Germans flying ladies and their rivalry I dived in. It's a very thorough research about their lives, achievements and political points of view during the Second World War. It's therefore very interesting on a historical point of view and very well written. Unfortunately both characters, though extraordinary for their times, remain a bit on the outskirts of everything, due to their gender mostly. As such they make for very good new entry points in a period often studied but almost never through a feminine view; on the other side they tend to be a little disappointing as characters as they're kept on the edge of history no matter how excellent and involved they are in their field.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Al Berry

    A very good tale of these two very different women, Hanna Reitsch and Melitta Von Stauffenberg. Both test pilots in German, Melitta the more educated who was also an engineer and their rivalry. Hanna the die hard Nazi who at the end even flies into the Fuhrerenbunker with Ritter Von Griem, trying to convinced Hitler to flee and when that fails tries to Convince Magda Goebbels to spirit her children out. Melitta’s brother in law was Claus, leader of the Valkyrie plot to depose Hitler, she remained A very good tale of these two very different women, Hanna Reitsch and Melitta Von Stauffenberg. Both test pilots in German, Melitta the more educated who was also an engineer and their rivalry. Hanna the die hard Nazi who at the end even flies into the Fuhrerenbunker with Ritter Von Griem, trying to convinced Hitler to flee and when that fails tries to Convince Magda Goebbels to spirit her children out. Melitta’s brother in law was Claus, leader of the Valkyrie plot to depose Hitler, she remained the only member of the family not killed or thrown In prison for the duration of the war, due to her vital war research, she dies right at the end of the war while flying to visit her husband in prison. A fascinating book for many reasons, definitely worth reading.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    This was a very interesting story, one I wasn't aware of until I saw it on a library shelf. There were a few points where my interest waned, and others that were very difficult to read, given the atrocities that occurred during this time. That said, it was well-written, seemingly exhaustively researched and cited, and an overall very worthwhile read. This was a very interesting story, one I wasn't aware of until I saw it on a library shelf. There were a few points where my interest waned, and others that were very difficult to read, given the atrocities that occurred during this time. That said, it was well-written, seemingly exhaustively researched and cited, and an overall very worthwhile read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dick Reynolds

    This is a splendid book about the role of two exceptional woman aviators during the aftermath of WWI and the oncoming disaster of Germany’s actions in WWII. Hanna Reitsch was a middle class, vivacious Aryan and her flying was mostly in gliders. She loved to soar, enjoying the quiet and freedom. She once flew a Dornier aircraft with wheel fenders having sharp edges. She flew this plane against some balloons and cut their metal cables with the fenders. Hanna was not afraid to stand up to Nazi big This is a splendid book about the role of two exceptional woman aviators during the aftermath of WWI and the oncoming disaster of Germany’s actions in WWII. Hanna Reitsch was a middle class, vivacious Aryan and her flying was mostly in gliders. She loved to soar, enjoying the quiet and freedom. She once flew a Dornier aircraft with wheel fenders having sharp edges. She flew this plane against some balloons and cut their metal cables with the fenders. Hanna was not afraid to stand up to Nazi bigwigs. She once had a private talk with Himmler in his study and criticized his views of women and marriage. He thought that women should not be involved in military matters but should be at home, dutiful wives and mothers of their children. Hanna came up with Operation Suicide: Two pilots in a guided missile, like a V-1 rocket, would point themselves at the target and attack it, committing suicide. The Germans didn’t know the Japanese were planning to do the same thing with Kamikazes. Training was done all the way up to D-Day 1944 but the pilots were pulled back for more critical missions. The other prominent woman aviator was Melitta von Stauffenberg, nine years older than Hanna. Melitta was more of an engineer who flew fighters and designed various parts of planes to make them more effective. Melitta’s grandparents were Jewish and this weighed heavily on her mind when Hitler began extermination of the Jews. She managed to win a PhD and developed night landing procedures that enabled single-engine night fighters to be used as bomber-interceptors, the best practical innovation accomplished during the war. Meltitta had a small role in Operation Valkyrie, the attempted assassination of Hitler in May 1944. She was to fake an emergency landing at Hitler’s HQ while Claus (her brother-in-law) would be part of the killing group and escape on Melitta’s plane. Hanna survived the war but Melitta did not. She returned to the USA in 1961 to meet Werner von Braun who was working at NASA. She refused to work for America because she thought it would be a betrayal of her country but Von Braun thought otherwise. Hanna lived until her mid-sixties. According to friends, she was no longer able to distinguish reality from fantasy. The book is heavily footnoted and shows the extent of author Clare Mulley’s research. Two sections of black and white photographs are also provided that give the reader a glimpse into the families of both Hanna and Melitta. Anyone who has an interest in the historical aspects of air power during WWII will enjoy this book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Elsie

    This book is well researched and well written. The last sentence of the epilogue is an amazing summation of the entire book. Read it!

  9. 5 out of 5

    James Murphy

    This is one of the more interesting histories of World War II that I've read, seeing as its focus is on Hanna Reitsch and Melitta von Stauffenberg, the two women who, as the book title indicates, flew for Adolf Hitler. Interestingly, it was Hanna Reitsch who strongly aligned herself with Hitler and the Third Reich, while Melitta von Stauffenberg devoted her professional life to aeronautical engineering and test pilot work as a means of coping with the Nazi regime. Clare Mulley does an exceptiona This is one of the more interesting histories of World War II that I've read, seeing as its focus is on Hanna Reitsch and Melitta von Stauffenberg, the two women who, as the book title indicates, flew for Adolf Hitler. Interestingly, it was Hanna Reitsch who strongly aligned herself with Hitler and the Third Reich, while Melitta von Stauffenberg devoted her professional life to aeronautical engineering and test pilot work as a means of coping with the Nazi regime. Clare Mulley does an exceptional job of telling the story of these two women, as well as describing life in Germany, from the aftermath of World War I to the rise of Hitler and the resurgence of Germany to World War II. There is also a look at post-war Germany and Hanna Reitsch's place in it (Melitta von Stauffenberg was killed near the end of the war). If you enjoy reading about this period of history, this book is worth a look.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Details the lives of the only two females who persevered through Germany's machismo and were able to get licensed as pilots and grudgingly permitted to fly in World War II, though not as military. They were: 1. Melitta Schenk Gräfin von Stauffenberg, Born: Jan 09, 1903 · Krotoszyn, Poland, Died: Apr 08, 1945 · Straßkirchen, Germany and 2. Hanna Reitsch, Born: 29 March 1912, Silesia,(Jelenia Góra, Poland), Died: 24 August 1979, Frankfurt am Main, West Germany Because Hanna was 9 years younger but eac Details the lives of the only two females who persevered through Germany's machismo and were able to get licensed as pilots and grudgingly permitted to fly in World War II, though not as military. They were: 1. Melitta Schenk Gräfin von Stauffenberg, Born: Jan 09, 1903 · Krotoszyn, Poland, Died: Apr 08, 1945 · Straßkirchen, Germany and 2. Hanna Reitsch, Born: 29 March 1912, Silesia,(Jelenia Góra, Poland), Died: 24 August 1979, Frankfurt am Main, West Germany Because Hanna was 9 years younger but each pilot was born in countries that Germany annexed, their beliefs were formed by different political environments, their passions to fly were the same, and they vied with each other for recognition. I liked the 1st third of the book the best which had details about why they wanted to fly and how they got to do it. The middle third delves into their differing views shaped by heritage and their efforts in World War II, telling what they did and how they felt about it, and how different their personalities had been shaped. I skipped some of this detail for it was too filled with war atrocities that I wanted to duck out on. The final third of the book delved into after war activities, enduring relationships with Nazis who were tried, their deaths and some family follow-up. So much history here takes place while I have been living and unaware of its complications.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mark Farley

    A brilliant dual biography of two incredibly strong women, portrayed very different and from very contrasting backgrounds, operating in the very conflicting background of Nazi Germany. Clare Mulley elegantly and respectfully crafts the lives and exciting journeys of two fascinating women and their perils, pitfalls and achievements. Not to mention the many insights and uncovered secrets of the Second World War in the process. Highly recommended!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alan Shaw

    Beautifully written and engrossing biographies of 2 amazing women.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Great dual biography This dual biography is excellent, really well balanced and researched. I had never heard of Melitta von Stauffenberg before. She was truly amazing. Part Jewish, but she tests and flies military planes in Nazi Germany. She had a strong sense of family, and was so resourceful. She helped keep many of her in-laws and such alive--when they were in concentration camps! Her resourcefulness and willingness to take action is striking. I've read about Hanna Rietsch in a number of books Great dual biography This dual biography is excellent, really well balanced and researched. I had never heard of Melitta von Stauffenberg before. She was truly amazing. Part Jewish, but she tests and flies military planes in Nazi Germany. She had a strong sense of family, and was so resourceful. She helped keep many of her in-laws and such alive--when they were in concentration camps! Her resourcefulness and willingness to take action is striking. I've read about Hanna Rietsch in a number of books. Sometimes she's portrayed as a drama queen and fairly empty-headed. Sometimes she is described as a very gifted pilot and fairly normal person. This book shows both sides. Kind of reminds me off Leni Riefenstahl--ambitious, gifted, brave, blinders on, unwilling to accept the reality of the Nazis in the post-war era. The writing flows. The book kept my interest all the way through. It's definitely worth the read. So seldom to come across an interesting, valuable new slant on the Nazis and World War II.

  14. 5 out of 5

    lesley travis

    What an eyeopener two more diametrically different women would be hard to imagine. Hanna Reitch shows the effect of a meglamanic can achieve . Melitta von Stauffenberg or Grafin one of the most courageous women in the Third Reich

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jacqueline

    Hello Miss or mrs. Mulley, I recently read your book called the women who flew for Hitler about Hanna Reitch and Melitta Vonstaufenberg. I apsolutely loved it! I am interested in all sort of history from ancient and modern. I liked how they were two women who were brave in a society that was awful and they were also not always accepted by their society because they were women, but they worked in what was considered a man's job at that time;. There were different things I liked about each woman. Hello Miss or mrs. Mulley, I recently read your book called the women who flew for Hitler about Hanna Reitch and Melitta Vonstaufenberg. I apsolutely loved it! I am interested in all sort of history from ancient and modern. I liked how they were two women who were brave in a society that was awful and they were also not always accepted by their society because they were women, but they worked in what was considered a man's job at that time;. There were different things I liked about each woman. I liked how Hanna was brave an had a lot of ambition and after her accident flying one of her planes and having her terriblybad accident, it didn't discourage her from flying again. It was in her soul. I think she was a brave and good pilot but there were also cons to Hanna. I don't like her politics or her different ways of thinking. She always had to have the best of everything it seemed, and treated men almost like slaves in my opinion, using them for whatever she could get out of them. In a way, I feel a little bad for Hanna as she never chose to believe after the war, that anything bad was happening, like so many other people. She closed her eyes to what happened and made excuses for the people around her. On to Melitta. I really, really liked her! Just by reading everything about her, she seemed like a very kind, down to earth woman who believed in a Germany that was better than the third wrich and she fought for her country to be at peace and to protect her family. I like how a half Jewish woman showed them all that she wasn't stupid, or had anything wrong with her! She could do things just the same as anyone else! It must had been stressful waiting on her status to work and for her and her family to stay in the country too. I think the vonstaufenbergfamily were awesome and brave to try to assassinate Hitler as wel! I felt sad the way they treated Claus and his brother. I actually had tears in my eyes, reading that Melitta's plane had crashed. I wonder what her story could have been like if she could tell it? I think some of my favorite parts of the book was when both women told stories to the Goebbels and Staufenberg children about their adventures. I feel bad for the children because in both ways, they were in my opinion victems of the war. One group of children were hidden away and didn't know what was going to happen to them, and they all must have been scared. The other children, the Goebbels children were hidden away only to be killed by their useless horrible group of parents! I cried reading those children had died too. I also liked reading about the other female pilots too like Ellie binehorn and Marga von Etzdorf. I am sorry if there are spelling mistakes as I am totally blind. I'm sorry for the long message, and thank you for reading, and to all viewers, I give this book 5 stars. I reccomend this book for anyone who is interested in world war two, and anyone who is interested in women who changed history.

  16. 4 out of 5

    George Foord

    An amazing book didn't know anything about these women before but now want to learn more An amazing book didn't know anything about these women before but now want to learn more

  17. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    I was lucky enough to meet the author at a literary festival where she spoke about this book. Her enthusiasm for the topic and the fascinating insights she gave drew me to read this (a book I wouldn’t usually be drawn to). It is hard to read about the atrocities of war and the views held by the Nazi party, yet there are also moments of peace, love and domesticity. The dual biography allows the impressive lives of these two incredibly different women to also encompass their families and friends. I was lucky enough to meet the author at a literary festival where she spoke about this book. Her enthusiasm for the topic and the fascinating insights she gave drew me to read this (a book I wouldn’t usually be drawn to). It is hard to read about the atrocities of war and the views held by the Nazi party, yet there are also moments of peace, love and domesticity. The dual biography allows the impressive lives of these two incredibly different women to also encompass their families and friends. This a book I am glad that I read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Andy Horton

    Fascinating read. I knew of Hanna Reitsch from my father's admiration for her as a skilled and brave pilot, despite her being a German in WWII. I didn't know of Melitta von Stauffenberg at all. I learned that both women were courageous, brilliant pioneers and test pilots with a love of aviation. Very different from each other otherwise. The patrician and scientific Litta was a German patriot though part Jewish who came to rely on her work as a test pilot to protect her family, especially after th Fascinating read. I knew of Hanna Reitsch from my father's admiration for her as a skilled and brave pilot, despite her being a German in WWII. I didn't know of Melitta von Stauffenberg at all. I learned that both women were courageous, brilliant pioneers and test pilots with a love of aviation. Very different from each other otherwise. The patrician and scientific Litta was a German patriot though part Jewish who came to rely on her work as a test pilot to protect her family, especially after the attempt by her brother-in-law to assassinate Hitler. The romantic and instinctive Hanna was, it turns out, an unrepentant anti-semite and follower of Nazism. Both their stories are a kind of tragedy. Both lives, and the women's friends, family and lovers, are illuminated evocatively by Clare Mulley. In the chapters on Hanna's postwar years, I was struck by the how the post-war Nazi sympathisers were the ancestors of today's "alt right" perhaps, with their shared racism, casting themselves as victims, and denial of the horrors of Holocaust despite the evidence.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rochelle

    This book was very informative and interesting, not merely from the revealing of "hidden" women serving not only in the Luftwaffe and support services, and also those within the Allied forces but also from revealing the philosophical viewpoints of so many within Hitler's Germany. Those who adored him and bought into his philosophy of a "Great Germany" and those who believe in Germany as she was prior to WWI. One of the women, Hannah Reitsch, was an adorer of Hitler....and never recanted her love This book was very informative and interesting, not merely from the revealing of "hidden" women serving not only in the Luftwaffe and support services, and also those within the Allied forces but also from revealing the philosophical viewpoints of so many within Hitler's Germany. Those who adored him and bought into his philosophy of a "Great Germany" and those who believe in Germany as she was prior to WWI. One of the women, Hannah Reitsch, was an adorer of Hitler....and never recanted her love and adoration for him and his ideals, whereas the other , Malitta von Stuaffenberg, was herself part Jewish and used her position as an engineer and test pilot to insure the safety of her own family, and assisted her own brother inlaw Claus von Stauffenberg in plotting against Hitler in the now famouse Operation Valkrie.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cordelia Feldman

    This is such a wonderful book. It follows the lives and careers of Hitler’s two female pilots. We learn about the role of women in Nazi Germany; the development of the Luftwaffe and innovations in war machinery. Hanna and Melitta, The 2 Pilots are very different: Hanna is a fanatical Nazi whereas Melitta is critical of the regime and part-Jewish. I found the book fascinating and unputdownable: the world of the Third Reich is evoked in fascinating detail. There is also a lot of interesting inform This is such a wonderful book. It follows the lives and careers of Hitler’s two female pilots. We learn about the role of women in Nazi Germany; the development of the Luftwaffe and innovations in war machinery. Hanna and Melitta, The 2 Pilots are very different: Hanna is a fanatical Nazi whereas Melitta is critical of the regime and part-Jewish. I found the book fascinating and unputdownable: the world of the Third Reich is evoked in fascinating detail. There is also a lot of interesting information about the development of war planes. We also meet some fascinating characters. Heartily recommended.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    This book is about two women who were pilots for Germany during WW II whose lives took two completely different directions because of the war. An incredible book, which is also a look back that shows how some of the same things could happen again.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Linda Romer

    The Woman Who Flew for Hitler was an interesting read. I learned a lot about these two women and history of the Third Reich. I admired their courage and tenacity. While both women were similar in their desire to fly they had different views on the war in Germany. Hanna wanted to help win the war and protect Hitler while Melitta wanted the war to end and help in the assassination of Hitler. I give The Women Who Flew for Hitler 5 stars for its Historical read. I would recommend this book to everyone The Woman Who Flew for Hitler was an interesting read. I learned a lot about these two women and history of the Third Reich. I admired their courage and tenacity. While both women were similar in their desire to fly they had different views on the war in Germany. Hanna wanted to help win the war and protect Hitler while Melitta wanted the war to end and help in the assassination of Hitler. I give The Women Who Flew for Hitler 5 stars for its Historical read. I would recommend this book to everyone.

  23. 4 out of 5

    K C

    Just when you thought there couldn't be any more new and interesting stories coming from WWII, this book comes along. It took me awhile to get into it, I found the flow back and forth between one woman's story and the other woman's story somewhat confusing at times - I had to go back and read paragraphs over when I suddenly realized we had switched gears -, and the aeronautic info was lost on me, but I found the main part of the book fascinating. Just when you thought there couldn't be any more new and interesting stories coming from WWII, this book comes along. It took me awhile to get into it, I found the flow back and forth between one woman's story and the other woman's story somewhat confusing at times - I had to go back and read paragraphs over when I suddenly realized we had switched gears -, and the aeronautic info was lost on me, but I found the main part of the book fascinating.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sherry

    A very interesting story of Hanna Reitsch and Melitta von Stauffenberg (2 women who flew during the 1930's and 40's). Not only was it unusual for women to become test pilots for the WWII effort but the lives of these 2 women were very interesting. And one of them was actually half Jewish. The author really did her research and made me interested to read more about these gals A very interesting story of Hanna Reitsch and Melitta von Stauffenberg (2 women who flew during the 1930's and 40's). Not only was it unusual for women to become test pilots for the WWII effort but the lives of these 2 women were very interesting. And one of them was actually half Jewish. The author really did her research and made me interested to read more about these gals

  25. 5 out of 5

    Savannah Pine

    Read this book. It has a beautifully written and composed narrative. It is well-researched and it provides citations (one would be surprised how many "history" books do not use footnotes or endnotes). Read this book. It has a beautifully written and composed narrative. It is well-researched and it provides citations (one would be surprised how many "history" books do not use footnotes or endnotes).

  26. 5 out of 5

    Hillary Watson

    A wonderful read about two very talented woman. Much to admire in their courage and dedication to their work. Interesting to see how small decisions and differences in priorities led to two very different lives.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Erin Woodall

    This book was very well written and full of all sorts of history. The two women it followed had such different view points on what was going on and what their part in it was. If you like history this is a must read!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Boris

    A fascinating look a the two then-famous aviatrices of WWII Germany. In examining their lives the times are also evoked; the famous and minor figures of NAZI Germany to the development of aviation. It's interesting to view WWII unfold from the perspective of the Germans. A fascinating look a the two then-famous aviatrices of WWII Germany. In examining their lives the times are also evoked; the famous and minor figures of NAZI Germany to the development of aviation. It's interesting to view WWII unfold from the perspective of the Germans.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    An exceptional book about two strong & clever women who were more different than alike. Lots and lots of historical detail handled in a clear and readable way. I highly recommend this!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

    An absolutely riveting book about two women who flew gliders and became elite flyers for the German Luftwaffe during WW II.

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