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Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners: By John Bunyan - Illustrated (Comes with a Free Audiobook)

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How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners, or The Brief Relation of the Exceeding Mercy of God How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners, or The Brief Relation of the Exceeding Mercy of God in Christ to his Poor Servant John Bunyan is a Puritan spiritual autobiography written by John Bunyan. It was written while Bunyan was serving a twelve-year prison sentence in Bedford gaol for preaching without a license and was first published in 1666. The title contains allusions to two Biblical passages: 'Grace Abounding' is a reference to Romans 5:20, which states 'Where sin abounded, grace did much more abound' (KJV) and 'Chief of Sinners' refers to 1 Timothy 1:15, where Paul refers to himself by the same appellation.


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How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners, or The Brief Relation of the Exceeding Mercy of God How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners, or The Brief Relation of the Exceeding Mercy of God in Christ to his Poor Servant John Bunyan is a Puritan spiritual autobiography written by John Bunyan. It was written while Bunyan was serving a twelve-year prison sentence in Bedford gaol for preaching without a license and was first published in 1666. The title contains allusions to two Biblical passages: 'Grace Abounding' is a reference to Romans 5:20, which states 'Where sin abounded, grace did much more abound' (KJV) and 'Chief of Sinners' refers to 1 Timothy 1:15, where Paul refers to himself by the same appellation.

30 review for Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners: By John Bunyan - Illustrated (Comes with a Free Audiobook)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Stuart Turton

    If you pick up and read this book, one of two things will happen. You will get 15 pages in and decide its not for you, or you will carry on reading and find yourself amazed at the journey God brought this poor tinker through. I found myself at first thinking something was clinically wrong with Bunyan (and maybe there was), but the more I read I wondered if there wasn't something wrong with me. Sure, one mans conversion cannot truly be poorer than another's from Heavens perspective. However, to w If you pick up and read this book, one of two things will happen. You will get 15 pages in and decide its not for you, or you will carry on reading and find yourself amazed at the journey God brought this poor tinker through. I found myself at first thinking something was clinically wrong with Bunyan (and maybe there was), but the more I read I wondered if there wasn't something wrong with me. Sure, one mans conversion cannot truly be poorer than another's from Heavens perspective. However, to walk the struggle he walked with him left me rebuked for my thoughts of entitlement and made me thankful once again for Christ's saving work in my life. Ironically, after such a journey, I reckon Bunyan is the last saint in heaven you'd ever have to convince of Gods election. His story, if left up to him, should have concluded in Hell, but for the intervening and saving grace of God; a grace that also sustained him in the fiery furnace of Christian persecution: and even now a grace that sustains and nourishes many other pilgrims, plagued with doubts and suffering.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    at a time when I didn't think that christians could have a thought life as crazy as mine, this book was a great comfort to me. john bunyan and charles spurgeon were probably a couple of the greatest preachers of GRACE and comforters of the conscience in this last 500 yeras.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    John Bunyan was a non-conformist English pastor who lived from 1628-1688. During his years of ministry, he spent approximately 14 years in prison for preaching without a legal license as required by England at the time. Bunyan’s best known work is certainly The Pilgrim’s Progress, a book that I feel every Christian should read. Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners is Bunyan’s autobiographical account, which he wrote in 1666 while in prison primarily for the benefit of the people under his min John Bunyan was a non-conformist English pastor who lived from 1628-1688. During his years of ministry, he spent approximately 14 years in prison for preaching without a legal license as required by England at the time. Bunyan’s best known work is certainly The Pilgrim’s Progress, a book that I feel every Christian should read. Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners is Bunyan’s autobiographical account, which he wrote in 1666 while in prison primarily for the benefit of the people under his ministry. Bunyan first describes his pre-conversion lifestyle and attitude towards the church and Christianity. God used various people and incidents in his life to gradually bring him to true faith and repentance, but not without a long struggle with guilt, doubt, and assurance of salvation. If you’re familiar with Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress, it is interesting to note that many of the incidents that take place in the story reflect Bunyan’s personal life and experiences. Following his testimony of his conversion, Bunyan gives an account of how he came to be a minister. At first, he would share his thoughts with acquaintances in small groups, then he was encouraged to speak in meetings, which he felt unworthy but willing to do. He came to acknowledge that God had given him a gift for teaching and preaching, so he must not bury it but must use it for the good of God’s people. He remarks, "I concluded, a little grace, a little love, a little of the true fear of God, is better than all the gifts…Let all men therefore prize a little with the fear of the Lord (gifts indeed are desirable), but yet great grace and small gifts are better than great gifts and no grace." I found it interesting that what Bunyan was personally going through spiritually often influenced his preaching style and subject matter. He comments, “I preached what I felt, what I smartingly did feel; even that under which my poor soul did groan and tremble to astonishment.” When he was feeling the weight of sin on his conscious and a sense of his own unworthiness, he preached messages on the burden of the law and the seriousness of sin. As he experienced the peace and comfort of Christ within himself, he preached the person, grace and benefits of Christ. Bunyan’s description of being called to the ministry and what he experienced as a preacher provides insight into what many true ministers of God’s Word likely experience, and provide words of encouragement and warning to other pastors, preachers, and teachers of the Word. The humility, pure heart, and godly desires of Bunyan are evident in many ways; consider his concluding remarks for example: "I find to this day seven abominations in my heart: • Inclining to unbelief. • Suddenly to forget the love and mercy that Christ manifests. • A leaning to the works of the law. • Wanderings and coldness in prayer. • To forget to watch for that I pray for. • Apt to murmur because I have no more, and yet ready to abuse what I have. • I can do none of those things which God commands me, but my corruptions will thrust in themselves. When I would do good, evil is present with me." "These things I continually see and feel, and am afflicted and oppressed with, yet the wisdom of God orders them for my good: • They make me abhor myself. • They keep me from trusting my heart. • They convince me of the insufficiency of all inherent righteousness. • They show me the necessity of flying to Jesus. • They press me to pray unto God. • They show me the need I have to watch and be sober. • They provoke me to pray unto God, through Christ, to help me, and carry me through this world." Grace Abounding gives us a glimpse into the life of a man whose traveled a long, hard path to true faith in Christ, and into the heart of a man whose primary desire was to please God in every aspect of his life.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Valerie Kyriosity

    Poor Brother John! What self-tortures he put himself through rather than simply believing. I can sympathize, being prone to the same sort of overthinking and navel-gazing, myself, but I confess that I laughed at him a few times. Even he called his thoughts foolish at one point, though I don't know as he ever learned to laugh at them. I listened to this right after I listened to John Piper's biography of William Cowper. Sadly, Cowper never got the better of his doubts, and died in despair. Piper Poor Brother John! What self-tortures he put himself through rather than simply believing. I can sympathize, being prone to the same sort of overthinking and navel-gazing, myself, but I confess that I laughed at him a few times. Even he called his thoughts foolish at one point, though I don't know as he ever learned to laugh at them. I listened to this right after I listened to John Piper's biography of William Cowper. Sadly, Cowper never got the better of his doubts, and died in despair. Piper was very enthusiastic about John Newton's pastoral care of Cowper, which was certainly generous and gracious, but the man needed a kindly smack upside the head and never received it. He needed to learn to laugh at himself. If Bunyan had had a Newton, the latter's cheerful reasoning might have brought him out of the slough sooner. (And if Newton had had a Bunyan, he'd have needed to see a podiatrist. But I digress.) Anyway, although I sympathized with the author's wrestling to understand the nature of salvation, it was pretty tedious at times to listen to his prolonged agonies of doubt, as I am sure it's been tedious for others to listen to mine. Sorry 'bout that, friends! Always a bonus to have one reader throughout a whole book. Steven Escalera was solid, steady, and unannoying, for which I am grateful.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Luis

    What a precious book to me. Very relieving and comforting to know that there are people in time past that have gone through similar, if not, the same conflict of the soul as I have encounter in my spiritual life. although it was kind of hard for me to read due to the old English language, i could still understand what was expressed by John Bunyan. looking forward to buying this book in 21st century language so that i can read it better. What a blessing of a book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    "Bunyan's crisis, as anyone can see to-day, was far more pathological than spiritual. The way he got into trouble and the way he got out of trouble were both irrational. The one need not alarm, and the other can hardly help, any sane person." This is understated. Duuuuude! You didn't have to do that to yourself. Bunyan makes Luther look like a sane and socially well-adjusted human being. This is morbid introspection on steroids on stilts, and is the most excruciating thing I have read recently, t "Bunyan's crisis, as anyone can see to-day, was far more pathological than spiritual. The way he got into trouble and the way he got out of trouble were both irrational. The one need not alarm, and the other can hardly help, any sane person." This is understated. Duuuuude! You didn't have to do that to yourself. Bunyan makes Luther look like a sane and socially well-adjusted human being. This is morbid introspection on steroids on stilts, and is the most excruciating thing I have read recently, to say the least. His relapses are so frequent that it feels like a cartoon. How could somebody think that and be sane? For instance: "151. Then again, being loth and unwilling to perish, I began to compare my sin with others to see if I could find that any of those that were saved, had done as I had done. So I considered David’s adultery, and murder, and found them most heinous crimes; and those too committed after light and grace received: but yet by considering that his transgressions were only such as were against the law of Moses, from which the Lord Christ could, with the consent of His word, deliver him: but mine was against the gospel; yea, against the Mediator thereof; I had sold my Saviour." On the one hand, I'm glad this book exists and that we have evidence of the insanity and the depths of repetitive sin to which a soul in the grip of a misunderstanding will descend. The grip that despair has on our soul is sometimes really that deep and it seems to have attacked rather than merely depressed Bunyan. On the other, I would not want this published in a set with practical Puritan works, because it may make some thing that something along these lines is necessary or even a natural or normal part of getting saved. Not that Bunyan was born saved. I think he was right to see that he was a poorly educated infidel at first and up to around section 49, he was just trying to "be good" rather than receiving grace. I'm especially amused that he got worried he couldn't get saved because of being an Israelite and how he realized that Muslims have just as good a claim to sincere belief as us. His descriptions of being glibly theological are actually really good and really vivid. The moment he interrupts a bunch of women and gets convicted is an amazing moment of self-discovery that captures so much of life. I suspect we would cheer to see it happen on screen, but I do have one complaint: often there is a sort of pietistic cool-shaming that goes on in the Christian world. Whenever some Christians are just living life or discussing some theological matter, no surer way to end a decent conversation or make people, especially established Christians, feel bad is to turn the topic to "spiritual matters," especially discussions of one's sins. I can think of few situations where such a discussion would be profitable. This comes to what I think the real flaw of the book is: despite Bunyan's undoubted humility, humility that only comes from being pushed in the dirt and made to live in it for a few years, there is a sort of spiritual pride that this book creates. Many people who have deeply emotional experiences like Bunyan do in fact think that this has earned their salvation. I've been especially guilty of this. We think that because we really meant our prayers, because we really confessed our sins, and because we really trusted in Jesus, we are saved and God is on our side. Charles Williams says somewhere that Protestants tend to not know how to imagine faith simply, slowly, almost comfortable growing. There's something to that and this gets at the heart of the issue. We do have quite a few people who go through abnormal excitement and there is a sort of normal excitement that accompanies conversion, and we have to compare both of these things from what happened to the disciples and the Jews, which strikes me as tied up with all the differences between early modernity and the birth of spontaneity and the more public ancient world where people overflow in Psalms when they see the Spirit moving. There's a lot in common and there's a lot that's different. I want to read more on this. Anyway, Bunyan was a good man. A troubled man who doubted himself when he was preaching and would probably have not been a fun pastor, but definitely someone fun to talk to. He was also clearly insufficiently attuned to the concerns of his accusers: "But I was persuaded of this, not to render railing for railing; but to see how many of their carnal professors I could convince of their miserable state by the law, and of the want and worth of Christ". One can see the Evangelist and feel his struggle with understanding what's wrong with gathering people, and doubtless Judge Hate-Good was no caricature. One wishes he had read Richard Hooker. Bunyan's insanity was such that he devoured Scripture and not only would verses pop into his head saying "take me, take me!" under pressure, he would cite a verse and then if it's meaning was disputed, he could cite the one immediately afterwards. His Biblical allusions and metaphors are almost as powerful here as in the Pilgrim's Progress. I think one of my favorites was when he compared preaching from the pulpit against one of his own sins to Samson taking himself down with the Philistines. In John Bunyan, one finds a kindred spirit.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Carsten Thomsen

    The author of Pilgrims Progress invites us into his own heart - his very disturbing struggle of faith - for many years he had symptoms of what we today would call OCD - Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - thoughts that almost drove him mad. Blasphemous thoughts. I was surprised reading this account of the violence of his inner turmoil. Yet, how determined he was to reach that state of resting in Gods grace. And he did. How different our individual experience of God.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ed

    I really enjoyed this book that covered John Bunyan's life. When you read it you must put yourself into the shoes of the person described and then you will find that the thoughts of this person would probably be the same thoughts of ourselves in salvation, Christian growing, imprisonment, and preaching.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Wilson

    Good. Also read in August of 1979. Excellent that time. Read again in 2012. Really appreciated it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Marie

    3 stars. This was interesting and was not at all what I expected. I was not always captured by Bunyan, but his story is weighty and powerful. Review to come.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Chrystal

    I found this book to be most edifying and inspiring. The life of John Bunyan is one that every Christian should learn about; he lived during a time of great persecution when it was unlawful for dissenting Christians to meet and worship God as they felt compelled to do by the scriptures and their consciences. This is not an autobiography in the usual sense; we don't learn about his family or youth, but it is rather a spiritual autobiography of his conversion, how he became a preacher, then was ar I found this book to be most edifying and inspiring. The life of John Bunyan is one that every Christian should learn about; he lived during a time of great persecution when it was unlawful for dissenting Christians to meet and worship God as they felt compelled to do by the scriptures and their consciences. This is not an autobiography in the usual sense; we don't learn about his family or youth, but it is rather a spiritual autobiography of his conversion, how he became a preacher, then was arrested and spent 12 years in prison. The last chapter is written by a friend and describes how Bunyan died and what kind of a person he was. I would encourage all Christians and people interested in history to read this. Although written in 1666, the language is accessible and not difficult at all for the modern reader to follow.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah Rojas

    This is an amazingly sobering book that draws attention to the Grace of God that is ever abounding even in the life on one to whom it seems that he had sinned past all forgiveness! How great is the blood of Jesus! ♥️

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jason Harrison

    Worth reading! “Sometimes, when after sin committed, I have looked for sore chastisement from the hand of God, the very next that I have had from Him, hath been the discovery of His grace” (180).

  14. 5 out of 5

    Donald Owens II

    This book came highly recommended; often in 'top ten' and 'must read' lists by theology minded writers and friends. I found it an agony of someone else's private introspections. I related so little to most of his internal doubts and temptations, I could hardly take them seriously. I think he might have benefitted from a good shaking and a gruff exhortation to get over himself, look to Jesus, and go do something practical. Maybe a little Prov. 18:2 or Jer. 17:9 would have been apt. I'm not sure i This book came highly recommended; often in 'top ten' and 'must read' lists by theology minded writers and friends. I found it an agony of someone else's private introspections. I related so little to most of his internal doubts and temptations, I could hardly take them seriously. I think he might have benefitted from a good shaking and a gruff exhortation to get over himself, look to Jesus, and go do something practical. Maybe a little Prov. 18:2 or Jer. 17:9 would have been apt. I'm not sure it is healthy to even keep a journal of all the tricks and deceits of one's heart, much less to publish it. I only give it three stars because of the author and historical value, but despite the smattering of quotable lines, and the insight into the back story of Christian, it was a dry groan of a read I am glad to have finished.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Scott Marquis

    If ever someone poured out their soul in a book this is it. Bunyan refused to cease from preaching the gospel. For that he found himself in prison for many years. His wife and children (including one blind daughter) were left alone for well over a decade. Bunyan suffered much, but remained faithful to the Word. As I read Bunyan struggling with and hating his sin, I had to wonder why my hatred of sin isn't as great.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Alvers

    The book of man who was vexed by his sin to the degree that he found great hope in the gospel. A untrained brilliant man in regards to the doctrines of God. It was like a spiritual rollercoaster. The fear of selling Jesus as Esau did is present. People do not write or talk like this today. Perhaps we should pray that they did. This book challenged me to take my life and sin very seriously. Thank you Jesus, for working your grace through the man John Bunyan.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bailey Marissa

    I didn't realize that this was mostly in autobiographical formate, but it definitely makes this book better. Bunyan mentally wrestles with the balance of the punishment we humans deserve and the grace God gives His elect. I also have experienced a lot of what Bunyan struggled with and I found this book to be a great help in realizing this is something everyone goes through at least once in their lives.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Helen Fisher

    Really good read, very encouraging!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mary Beth

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I loved it at first, I almost quit in the middle, and I loved the end. The existential struggle in the middle felt a bit overwhelmingly emo to me (am I saved, am I not, am I saved, am I not), but that's probably because that's not really a doubt that's plagued me personally. I'm really glad I stuck around though, because Bunyan's doubts and torments in prison are more in my line of things. What if there isn't really an afterlife? What if I'm made miserable here and then there's no reward in heav I loved it at first, I almost quit in the middle, and I loved the end. The existential struggle in the middle felt a bit overwhelmingly emo to me (am I saved, am I not, am I saved, am I not), but that's probably because that's not really a doubt that's plagued me personally. I'm really glad I stuck around though, because Bunyan's doubts and torments in prison are more in my line of things. What if there isn't really an afterlife? What if I'm made miserable here and then there's no reward in heaven? What if there is no reward for serving God? What if God doesn't really care what happens to me? It's interesting that I was reading this and Blue Like Jazz (which is, surprisingly, not nearly as emo as Grace Abounding) at the same time, which, while separated by hundreds of years, talks about many of the same doubts and both authors end up at the conclusion that even if they can't have certainty, Jesus is so fair, so lovely, so compelling that it would be worth it to risk everything for and on him, and to say with Job, "Though he slay me, yet will I trust in him."

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bobby Bonser

    John Bunyan wrote this autobiography while in prison, along with Pilgrims Progress. It is a fascinating and encouraging book, allowing us to see inside the mind and heart of one of the most influential Christian men of all time. His heart yearns for the Lord and it is encouraging to read of his struggles, battles, and despondency because of how he combats all of them with specific truths of the gospel. This book helped me to realize that brothers and sisters, though separated by many years on ea John Bunyan wrote this autobiography while in prison, along with Pilgrims Progress. It is a fascinating and encouraging book, allowing us to see inside the mind and heart of one of the most influential Christian men of all time. His heart yearns for the Lord and it is encouraging to read of his struggles, battles, and despondency because of how he combats all of them with specific truths of the gospel. This book helped me to realize that brothers and sisters, though separated by many years on earth, are linked eternally because they are bought by the same precious blood of Christ, and are found In Him.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Faye Smith

    This book was so good! Parts were very sad, understanding the turmoil that Bunyan went through. 🥺 But overall, he explains so well some of the exact same feelings I went through about a year and a half ago .... up until recently. 🙂 John Bunyan is a wonderful writer!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    Having recently read Pilgrim's Progress, it was interesting to see how that book related to John Bunyan's life as written here.

  23. 4 out of 5

    David West

    I don't hear of people wrestling with assurance of salvation today the way Bunyan did. This work is a fascinating account. Bunyan spent many years in jail for preaching and God allowed him to write books during that time which continue to bless us today. This book certainly blessed me.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dustin Turner

    Insightful! If you’re remotely interested in learning about Bunyan, read his own words about his life. His understanding of his call to preach was very insightful.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Levi Miles

    Although my theology professor dad does not like this book very much, I found it to be very relatable and deeply encouraging.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sha

    One of the best books I've ever read. It's probably not for everyone but I think it is certainly for those that have an understanding of the ever present battle in a Christian's life in wrestling with angst and fears. If those with OCD can read it without starting to worry about the same things (such as the Bible verses and thoughts) he was worried about then I certainly recommend this book for them too. I think it will help people with OCD see that they are not alone in their thoughts and fears One of the best books I've ever read. It's probably not for everyone but I think it is certainly for those that have an understanding of the ever present battle in a Christian's life in wrestling with angst and fears. If those with OCD can read it without starting to worry about the same things (such as the Bible verses and thoughts) he was worried about then I certainly recommend this book for them too. I think it will help people with OCD see that they are not alone in their thoughts and fears. I came across this book because of an article about a doctor looking back at John's writings and life believing that John Bunyan had OCD. Although I am not a doctor, I have had much experience with OCD and therefore I believe that it is HIGHLY likely that he did have OCD and/or depression. God Bless John Bunyan for having the courage to write down his soul's sufferings on paper for the edification of the church. To bring comfort to those who experience tumultuous fears in this world.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Pratt

    this autobiography, which corresponds tightly with Pilgrim's Progress, is a thought provoking, heart searching, good read for all Christians. I would the person who is quick to laugh at Bunyan's struggles, "self-tortures", or lack of believing in his salvation. Rather, we would all do well to take heed from the many Puritan examples of taking sin faaaaar more seriously than we do today. We have much to learn from Bunyan's example of being honest about out utter depravity and the complete useless this autobiography, which corresponds tightly with Pilgrim's Progress, is a thought provoking, heart searching, good read for all Christians. I would the person who is quick to laugh at Bunyan's struggles, "self-tortures", or lack of believing in his salvation. Rather, we would all do well to take heed from the many Puritan examples of taking sin faaaaar more seriously than we do today. We have much to learn from Bunyan's example of being honest about out utter depravity and the complete uselessness of anything in and of ourselves. This all must drive us to Christ as it did him. Everyone's journey is different, and yes I would have counseled him to look in faith to Christ and his saving work (which is eventually what brought him peace), but everyone would be bettered by not glossing over sin and presuming our salvation, but truly make much of Christ, not in theory only, but in heart and practice.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Brian Eshleman

    This work offers refreshing honesty from a spiritual giant. His own thoughts, he admits, make him seek Christ's grace for his own purposes. His own thoughts, he then admits, condemn him for that motive and way him down with the oppression that he can never get beyond his guilt for trying to manipulate God. As he has been honest about that sad state, his joy when rescued by the love of God is palpable.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Vaughn

    Grace Abounding....is an excellent autobiography of John Bunyan and his spiritual struggle to obtain assurance of his salvation in light if his thinking that he had committed the unpardonable sin. Amazing book and highly recommended.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jerry

    I read the edition contained in The Works of John Bunyan. Amazing to read the experience of the man who wrote Pilgrim's Progress. Probably the best jail sentence to ever serve humanity, next to Paul and Joseph.

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