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ALPHABET: The LGBTQAIU Creators from Prism Comics

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For over a decade the Prism Comics Queer Press Grant has provided up and coming LGBTQAIU cartoonists with the resources they need to bring their work to the reading public. ALPHABET celebrates this mission with a diverse collection of comics creators from all corners of our community. Herein you will find past grant winners, queer comics pioneers, and promising new talents For over a decade the Prism Comics Queer Press Grant has provided up and coming LGBTQAIU cartoonists with the resources they need to bring their work to the reading public. ALPHABET celebrates this mission with a diverse collection of comics creators from all corners of our community. Herein you will find past grant winners, queer comics pioneers, and promising new talents, each of them detailing their unique place in the mosaic of a polychromatic culture.


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For over a decade the Prism Comics Queer Press Grant has provided up and coming LGBTQAIU cartoonists with the resources they need to bring their work to the reading public. ALPHABET celebrates this mission with a diverse collection of comics creators from all corners of our community. Herein you will find past grant winners, queer comics pioneers, and promising new talents For over a decade the Prism Comics Queer Press Grant has provided up and coming LGBTQAIU cartoonists with the resources they need to bring their work to the reading public. ALPHABET celebrates this mission with a diverse collection of comics creators from all corners of our community. Herein you will find past grant winners, queer comics pioneers, and promising new talents, each of them detailing their unique place in the mosaic of a polychromatic culture.

30 review for ALPHABET: The LGBTQAIU Creators from Prism Comics

  1. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Alphabet, a 372-page full color queer comics anthology, is a celebration of the diversity and range of the LGBTQAIU cartooning community (yeah, I just learned about the AIU part recently myself). On the diversity front the book is especially successful; also, being such a huge tome, editors Jon Macy and Tara Madison Avery managed to keep it all cohesive, with the stories flowing together nicely in little thematic cycles. I especially like the little quartet of artier pieces by talented young new Alphabet, a 372-page full color queer comics anthology, is a celebration of the diversity and range of the LGBTQAIU cartooning community (yeah, I just learned about the AIU part recently myself). On the diversity front the book is especially successful; also, being such a huge tome, editors Jon Macy and Tara Madison Avery managed to keep it all cohesive, with the stories flowing together nicely in little thematic cycles. I especially like the little quartet of artier pieces by talented young newcomers Zak Plum, Bex, Dylan Good, and Dax Tran-Caffee—it was very smart to group these folks together, imho; their pieces bolstered one another beautifully. As for the rest of the book, gender in all its many variations and permutations is often addressed, particularly effectively in stories by Ahri Almeida & Emeric Kennard, Jennifer Camper, Hanna Oliver, and Tara Madison Avery. There are also good comics about historical figures (Elizabeth Beier's "V is for Virginia") and civil rights (Diego Gomez's "The Feminine Mystique," which I really hope he will continue as a series); fantasy and adventure (Christianne Benedict's "Here They be Monsters"), comic riffs and gags ("Meet Cute" by David Quantic and Bill Ferenc), coming of age perspectives (Todd Brower & Steve MacIsaac's "Food for Thought, Ajuan Mance's "Requiem for a Hot Comb," Eric Orner's "A Glad Day," and a new Wuvable Oaf story from Ed Luce), and a gritty look at some young people on the edge (Calvin Gimpelevich and Emiliano Quale's "And Then This"). Also, being that the book is a benefit for PrismComics.org and their annual Prism Queer Press Grant, there are many comics here about the world of comics itself—including the business and social aspects of selling comics at comic cons—by creators like Tyler Cohen, Dave Davenport, Dylan Edwards, Tana Ford, Justin Hall, Victor Hodge, Soizick Jaffre, Jon Macy, and Hazel Newlevant. Many of these folks won the Prism Grant in past years; in fact, 12 of the 18 total QPG recipients to date contributed to this book, a good showing! (Btw, full disclosure time: I won the grant in 2011 and I'm in this book too, on pages 219-230. Just in case you're, you know, *interested*) In sum, there's a lot of great stuff in here—as well as some stuff I'm not crazy about, inevitable in a book this size—but overall Alphabet is a solid anthology, especially for those looking to explore the world of the queer graphic sequential narrative—for anyone considering going for the grant themselves, it is a must get.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    What can I say about this book that might possibly interest you in it? If you are curious about LGBTQ cartoonists this is an excellent collection of cartoonists of all ages and persuasions. I have been reading and collecting LGBTQ comics long before they were part of an alphabet soup, as they are these days. Happily, this collection includes some of the cartoonists I grew up on, such as Howard Cruz, and Jennifer Camper, and Roberta Gergory, as well as newer ones, who I have discovered by going t What can I say about this book that might possibly interest you in it? If you are curious about LGBTQ cartoonists this is an excellent collection of cartoonists of all ages and persuasions. I have been reading and collecting LGBTQ comics long before they were part of an alphabet soup, as they are these days. Happily, this collection includes some of the cartoonists I grew up on, such as Howard Cruz, and Jennifer Camper, and Roberta Gergory, as well as newer ones, who I have discovered by going to such conventions as APE (Alternative Press Expo), like Tana Ford. There are some great stories, very personal, very close to the bone, as well as funny stories as well. The stories aren't all about being queer. Some are just about creating cartoons. There is an excellent story by Ajuan Mance about having to straighten her hair all her life. One by Tod Brower tells how he hates blueberries and beets. This is a nice way to dip ones toes into the world of LGBTQ comics, and have them all in one great collection.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lauri-Ann

    In the interest of transparency, I supported the kickstarter campaign for this project and I'm friends with some of the contributors. I was excited to see how the anthology would turn out, and aside from a few cosmetic issues involving proofreading, it is a wonder. With over 50 contributors, the variety of queer voices and experience astonishes. With so many elements there was the risk of the collection feeling disjointed, but editors (and contributors) Jon Macy and Tara Madison Avery have given In the interest of transparency, I supported the kickstarter campaign for this project and I'm friends with some of the contributors. I was excited to see how the anthology would turn out, and aside from a few cosmetic issues involving proofreading, it is a wonder. With over 50 contributors, the variety of queer voices and experience astonishes. With so many elements there was the risk of the collection feeling disjointed, but editors (and contributors) Jon Macy and Tara Madison Avery have given the book the book a natural feeling flow and cohesion. As a bisexual woman, I fell in love with 2016 Queer Press Grant Winner Elizabeth Beier's "V is for Virginia," but there were many other moments of connection and surprise. This book introduced me to artists I was not aware of whose catalogues I now want to dive into. ALPHABET spoke to me, and it feels like it will speak to the queer community.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lavoie Lianne (The Towering Pile)

    I really found this collection to be all over the place in terms of quality. There were a few comics I enjoyed. Maybe this should have been marketed as an anthology FOR comic book writers, because most of the comics were actually about being a comic book writer and, as someone who doesn't write comics, I got a bit bored with that theme. I really found this collection to be all over the place in terms of quality. There were a few comics I enjoyed. Maybe this should have been marketed as an anthology FOR comic book writers, because most of the comics were actually about being a comic book writer and, as someone who doesn't write comics, I got a bit bored with that theme.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    Excellent introduction to the work of a number of LGBTQ+ comics creators working in the comics field today. As with any book with numerous contributors, I found some of the art and storytelling pretty spectacular, while other pieces didn't really grab me (there were a few too many pieces revolving around comics creators meeting each other at comic cons to really hold my attention, for example). But I will definitely be looking for more work by a number of these creators and as someone who has fo Excellent introduction to the work of a number of LGBTQ+ comics creators working in the comics field today. As with any book with numerous contributors, I found some of the art and storytelling pretty spectacular, while other pieces didn't really grab me (there were a few too many pieces revolving around comics creators meeting each other at comic cons to really hold my attention, for example). But I will definitely be looking for more work by a number of these creators and as someone who has followed and read queer comics for decades, it's nice to see the directions that works by creators established and new is taking. And Prism Comics is pretty awesome and deserves a lot of love.

  6. 4 out of 5

    John

    very entertaining, talent galore--

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    741.5973 A4566 2015

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tiamatty

    This was good. It's an anthology featuring short comics from various creators who've been published through Prism Comics Press, which is a publisher focused on LGBTQ+ creators. Most of the stories are autobiographical. Some are about being gay, but most are actually about being cartoonists. A few of the stories are about other things, as well. But being gay and making comics are really the two common themes. Most of the stories are pretty interesting. Some are weaker than others. There's a wide This was good. It's an anthology featuring short comics from various creators who've been published through Prism Comics Press, which is a publisher focused on LGBTQ+ creators. Most of the stories are autobiographical. Some are about being gay, but most are actually about being cartoonists. A few of the stories are about other things, as well. But being gay and making comics are really the two common themes. Most of the stories are pretty interesting. Some are weaker than others. There's a wide range of artistic styles, though most are not what one would call traditional comic art. That's going to make this book a lot more hit-or-miss for the average reader. But on the whole, I did enjoy reading this.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dinah

    Great sampler of a huge range of voices in queer comics.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Emory Black

  11. 4 out of 5

    chuck

  12. 4 out of 5

    Zara

  13. 4 out of 5

    Teresita Cruz

  14. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

  15. 4 out of 5

    Topher McCulloch

  16. 5 out of 5

    Emma Hern

  17. 4 out of 5

    Loren Peterson

  18. 4 out of 5

    Susan H.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Brando Gee

  20. 4 out of 5

    Maia

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  22. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bee Buehring

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kat Hulu

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tara

  26. 4 out of 5

    Andy

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nero O'Reilly

  28. 5 out of 5

    Diego Gómez

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ragnar-Ex

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn Hemmann

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