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CHARLES PERRAULT (12 January 1628 - 16 May 1703) was a French author and member of the Académie Française. He laid the foundations for a new literary genre, the fairy tale, with his works derived from pre-existing folk tales. The best known of his tales include Le Petit Chaperon Rouge (Little Red Riding Hood), Cendrillon (Cinderella), Le Chat Botté (Puss in Boots), La Bell CHARLES PERRAULT (12 January 1628 - 16 May 1703) was a French author and member of the Académie Française. He laid the foundations for a new literary genre, the fairy tale, with his works derived from pre-existing folk tales. The best known of his tales include Le Petit Chaperon Rouge (Little Red Riding Hood), Cendrillon (Cinderella), Le Chat Botté (Puss in Boots), La Belle au bois Dormant (The Sleeping Beauty), and Barbe Bleue (Bluebeard). Some of Perrault's versions of old stories may have influenced the German versions published by the Brothers Grimm more than 100 years later. The stories continue to be printed and have been adapted to opera, ballet (such as Tchaikovsky's The Sleeping Beauty), theatre, and film. Perrault was an influential figure in the 17th-century French literary scene, and was the leader of the Modern faction during the Quarrel of the Ancients and the Moderns. This edition is an athoritative translation by Robert Samber and J. E. Mansion, with the original color illustrations and ornamentations by Harry Clarke.


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CHARLES PERRAULT (12 January 1628 - 16 May 1703) was a French author and member of the Académie Française. He laid the foundations for a new literary genre, the fairy tale, with his works derived from pre-existing folk tales. The best known of his tales include Le Petit Chaperon Rouge (Little Red Riding Hood), Cendrillon (Cinderella), Le Chat Botté (Puss in Boots), La Bell CHARLES PERRAULT (12 January 1628 - 16 May 1703) was a French author and member of the Académie Française. He laid the foundations for a new literary genre, the fairy tale, with his works derived from pre-existing folk tales. The best known of his tales include Le Petit Chaperon Rouge (Little Red Riding Hood), Cendrillon (Cinderella), Le Chat Botté (Puss in Boots), La Belle au bois Dormant (The Sleeping Beauty), and Barbe Bleue (Bluebeard). Some of Perrault's versions of old stories may have influenced the German versions published by the Brothers Grimm more than 100 years later. The stories continue to be printed and have been adapted to opera, ballet (such as Tchaikovsky's The Sleeping Beauty), theatre, and film. Perrault was an influential figure in the 17th-century French literary scene, and was the leader of the Modern faction during the Quarrel of the Ancients and the Moderns. This edition is an athoritative translation by Robert Samber and J. E. Mansion, with the original color illustrations and ornamentations by Harry Clarke.

30 review for The Fairy Tales of Charles Perrault

  1. 4 out of 5

    Petra-X Off having adventures

    Edit Riquet with the Tuft - review of a Perrault fairy tale that is mystifyingly not a Disney movie. When I was very young, my grandmother had a set of very small books with uncut pages. One of the books was an early edition of Charles Perrault's fairy tales with hand-printed woodblock illustrations. Another was Grimms'. Naturally I cut the pages and read the stories which were bloody and didn't always have nice endings. At least one of the ugly sisters tumbled into a well to be devoured by snake Edit Riquet with the Tuft - review of a Perrault fairy tale that is mystifyingly not a Disney movie. When I was very young, my grandmother had a set of very small books with uncut pages. One of the books was an early edition of Charles Perrault's fairy tales with hand-printed woodblock illustrations. Another was Grimms'. Naturally I cut the pages and read the stories which were bloody and didn't always have nice endings. At least one of the ugly sisters tumbled into a well to be devoured by snakes in one version, in another they both get their eyes pecked out by birds and are cast out to live as blind beggars. The Little Mermaid, offered a choice between murdering the prince's bride or committing suicide, chooses the latter. And poor Little Red Riding Hood didn't escape those big, bad teeth! These stories, before Disney got them, were wonderful. Children like blood and guts as much as they like marshmallows and cuddly bears, but today everything is sanitised for them. I wonder why - the policy has not decreased the amount of violence in the world by one jot. My grandmother, who not very pleased at my cutting the pages on these valuable books, gave them to me and for years they were stored in my attic along with the things-that-might-come-in-useful-one-day that we all have, inherited silver that needed endless polishing, cassettes from my dj-ing days and even my old teddy bear who'd lost all his stuffing and had such a sad face. I had one particular tenant who stole a lot of valuable books. He'd also not been too honest with the rent, bouncing cheques, that kind of thing, and would cry PREJUDICE at everything. If I didn't like blacks why would I have rented my place to him? Or married one and had children, or live in the West Indies? Still, it probably got him out of a lot of situations where people were too uncomfortable to speak up and let him get away with shit. I wasn't intimidated though and eventually got most of the money he owed me (and threats from his father) and gave him notice to leave. He raided my attic, took the silver and also took with him some of my best Haitian paintings, a really rare banned book on Turkey, and these lovely little hand-printed children's fairy tales. It made me very sad to lose them this way and I always wondered if I would come across them in an antique shop one day. But so far, no luck.

  2. 4 out of 5

    K.D. Absolutely

    The original fairy tales of Charles Perrault (1628-1703) before they were bastardized or sanitized (depending on your view) by Disney. Perrault, however, did not invent most of these stories himself. He also based some of them on existing French folklores. Perrault was said to be the one who laid the foundations for a new literary genre: the fairy tale. Many of Perrault’s stories were rewritten by the Brothers Grimm, continue to be printed and have been adapted to opera, ballet (such as Tchaikov The original fairy tales of Charles Perrault (1628-1703) before they were bastardized or sanitized (depending on your view) by Disney. Perrault, however, did not invent most of these stories himself. He also based some of them on existing French folklores. Perrault was said to be the one who laid the foundations for a new literary genre: the fairy tale. Many of Perrault’s stories were rewritten by the Brothers Grimm, continue to be printed and have been adapted to opera, ballet (such as Tchaikovsky’s The Sleeping Beauty), theatre, and film. What I liked about this book was that I was able to read the original versions of the tales that I heard or saw when I was a young boy. I did not know that those goody-goody versions were sanitized. The original versions in this 1697 first published book were sometimes gory and gruesome that I wondered how they could have passed as children’s stories. For example, Little Red Riding Hood is eaten alive by a wolf, seven girls were knifed by their father to death or an ogress demanding to eat two poor captured kids. Here are the stories and my reactions upon reading them: The Little Red Riding-Hood. Stupid girl. How she could not have noticed that the wolf was not her grandma? Well, in “The Moral,” Perrault seems to say that this exactly is the moral of the story: the young pretty people are easy to deceive so they have to watch out for wolf in sheep’s clothing. – 4 STARS The Fairy. Would not that be painful? I mean flowers and jewels coming out from your mouth when you speak? No wonder, I have not seen any movie adaptation of this story. The morals, according to Perrault: the manner we speak is more important that wealth and good behaviors pay in the end when we least expect it – 3 STARS Blue Beard. If only Perrault knew that time will come blue beard would no longer be scary. Why there is even green hair now, hah! The morals according to Perrault: Curiosity kills a cat and a very little share of common sense can save your dear life. – 2 STARS The Sleeping Beauty in the Wood. I remember the first half of the story but it’s my first time to hear the 2nd half that happens after the prince kisses the sleeping princess. There is a ogress (a queen that eats small children) and the tub full of different kinds of serpents. This part is new to me. I don’t remember that there was an ogress character in the Disney movie. As to the moral of the story according to me: be careful in creating your guest list. – 5 STARS The Master Cat; or, Puss in Boots Clever, clever cat. If a cat will be as useful as this, I know my wife would agree for us to have a cat in the house. She hates the odor of cat’s feces. However, in the story the youngest child gets the cat as inheritance from his poor father. Then the clever cat turns him into Marquis de Carabas. Morals: Be thankful for the inheritance that you get and also be careful with cunning people. The cat deceived the ogre to turn into a mouse so the cat could eat him hahaha. My first time to read this story. Funny! – 4 STARS. Cinderilla; or, The Little Glass Slipper. Exactly as what is in the Disney movie except the spelling. Take note that this is Cinderilla and not Cinderella. But there are somethings in Perrault’s writing that made me read the whole text. Not just making sure that there are nothing Disney removed or was not able to capture. The forgiveness that Cinderilla gave to her odious sisters; it’s heartfelt. Well written, I should say. Besides, who does not love Cinderilla? You have not been a child if you never heard of her. – 5 STARS Riquet with the Turf. There is a fairy here who gives either wit or beauty to the newborn children of royalties. However, if you equate it in the real world, it is just the power of words that seem to work here. When the beautiful but dumb princess utters that the ugly prince be given wit, it is actually her love for him that makes this possible. In short, the moral of the story, according to me, is that we have to be happy for other people that we speak positively of them and wish them good things instead of talking negatively behind their backs and wish them ill. Those are very unchristian especially if the person is not around; don’t talk ill of that person because he is not there to defend himself. – 4 STARS Little Thumb. There is a family that is so poor that the couple decides to bring and lost their 7 small children in the forest. The youngest of the 7 is Little Thumb who is born, because they are so poor her mama has no more nutrients in her body, as big as a thumb (that’s why the name). However, Little Thumb is very smart. His intelligence is far more than the intelligence of his six big brothers’ put together. Again, there is an ogre (third in this collection, yes I am counting) that Little Thumb is able to deceive that the poor ogre kills his seven daughters instead of Little Thumb and his six brothers. Little Thumb also does a dugo-dugo by fooling the ogre’s wife into giving all their riches to him. I know I read or heard this story before when I was a small boy but I forgot the gist of it. I have always associated the throwing of stones to come back home to Hansel and Gretel and not in this Perrault’s story. I enjoyed every minute of reading or re-reading this. – 4 STARS The Ridiculous Wishes. A man is complaining that he is so poor and he envies people whose wishes are easily granted. Jupiter, yes the god in the Olympus, hears him so the god says he can have 3 wishes and Jupiter will grant them. However, the man has this habit of saying I wish… without really meaning those things and that habit almost gets him and his wife in bigger misery. Nothing really extraordinary here. – 2 STARS The Donkey-skin. A princess asks for the skin of a precious donkey in their stable expecting that her father, the King, would not be able to kill the poor donkey. This is part of the series of impossible demands that the princess is asking the king hoping that one of them will not be granted and so she’ll be left by the king and not make her his wife. Had not heard this tale before but it is quite typical. I liked it though. – 3 STARS Very good classic collection of the original fairy tales. To think that Charles Perrault invented the fairy tales as a genre is a strong testament of his brilliance as a writer and storyteller.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Charles Perrault (1628 – 1703) was a controversial figure who argued before the Académie française (at his initiation ceremony(!)) that "modern" French literature was superior to that of the Greco-Romans. That enlivened the proceedings... Later, he elaborated his reasons and included the less than convincing argument that because the reign of Louis XIV was so enlightened, his age was superior in all respects to that of the ancients. Apparently, he spent part of his life writing epic poems with C Charles Perrault (1628 – 1703) was a controversial figure who argued before the Académie française (at his initiation ceremony(!)) that "modern" French literature was superior to that of the Greco-Romans. That enlivened the proceedings... Later, he elaborated his reasons and included the less than convincing argument that because the reign of Louis XIV was so enlightened, his age was superior in all respects to that of the ancients. Apparently, he spent part of his life writing epic poems with Christian themes. But after he went off on these tangents, he composed fairy tales in verse and prose which have entered into the popular culture and thought of all the peoples of Western Europe and their colonial offspring, including the Land of Unlimited Opportunity: Cinderella, Little Red Riding Hood, Sleeping Beauty, Puss-In-Boots, and others. The Brothers Grimm reworked many of these stories and added their own macabre touch, but already Perrault's stories were not the prettified and watered down versions I grew up with. Not at all. I don't recall being told in Sleeping Beauty about fairies being transported in fiery chariots drawn by dragons; nor that the Prince's mother was of the race of ogres, so he kept his relationship with Sleeping Beauty secret in order that she not be tempted to devour her grandchildren. When the King died, the Prince and new King made the relationship public, and, shortly after he went off to war, the Queen Mother ordered her four year old granddaughter to be served à la sauce Robert. If you want to know if she succeeded in her desire (with a little Chianti), you'll have to read Perrault's version of the tale. She did like the sauce, though - she ordered her grandson and then the young Queen to be served in the same manner. I was amused how Perrault hastened to assure the reader that when the prince came by the château ensorcelé, he was of a different royal family (I know how worried I was about the horrid possibilities of incest). But I don't think Walt Disney would have been pleased to read that Sleeping Beauty was not quite 16 years old when she awoke and the Prince made her acquaintance, since over the next two years they had two children which were probably not brought by storks... Or maybe she was not quite 116 years old - then it is OK, yes? But the children were born out of wedlock. Hmmm, not even fairy tales written by authors of epic poems about obscure bishops are reliable! If, like me, you only know the strictly abridged versions of these tales, do look at Perrault's originals. You might even want to tell them to your children, because children like the macabre also. At least I was told that the wolf ate poor old grandma... Due to the immeasurably valuable resources of Gallica http://gallica.bnf.fr/?lang=EN I was able to read an illustrated edition of Perrault's Contes published in 1697 (I was also able to snag a file containing all of Gustave Doré's illustrations, as well - see above). Rating http://leopard.booklikes.com/post/893...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Terrington

    Once upon a time, long before farmboys arose to defeat Dark Lords and even longer before the rise of imagined histories attempting to be gritty in a way that removed most moral compasses from fantasy, there was the fairytale. A simple little literary beast masquerading as a story with a morality play contained within its fascinating bounds. A little creation marketed for children but one which contained deeper adult themes. Fairytales did not need to attempt to be gritty, they simply were in how Once upon a time, long before farmboys arose to defeat Dark Lords and even longer before the rise of imagined histories attempting to be gritty in a way that removed most moral compasses from fantasy, there was the fairytale. A simple little literary beast masquerading as a story with a morality play contained within its fascinating bounds. A little creation marketed for children but one which contained deeper adult themes. Fairytales did not need to attempt to be gritty, they simply were in how they conveyed themes that clearly indicated that incest, rape, cannibalism and other heinous deeds were abhorrent and that. Nowadays, as the epic form seems to have merged with fairytales thanks to the meddling of Hobbits, fairytales are becoming less relevant. Yet I still believe that the old classic fairytales are relevant to modern audiences. Except perhaps Rumpelstiltskin. In today's social media environment it makes no sense for no one to know that imp's name. If he were around today the prince would hunt down his name on Facebook or Twitter. Speaking of which can you imagine the tweets? The fairytales in this volume include the classic: Little Red Riding Hood, Cinderilla and Sleeping Beauty. However they are not the fairytales you may have heard or read as a child. While both Cinderilla and Sleeping Beauty avoid the greater horrors that were part of their genesis (according to other sources in the Cinderilla (or Cinderella) tale the stepsisters attempted to put on the glass slipper by cutting their toes and heels off. As for the real Sleeping Beauty story, apparently there are references to the prince of the tale taking advantage of the sleeping princess. The Little Red Riding Hood story remains in its classic form however, with the wolf ending up eating everyone. There is a reason behind the plots of these stories however, with the tale of the wolf being a symbol for predatory men who would take advantage of a young girl's virtue. In fact each of these stories is accompanied with a moral at the end. These morals reveal the underlying message as indicated by the author. However, there appears to be room in each story for anyone else to enjoy other messages they can observe. Whether you like fantasy stories and want to see some of the older tales in that format, or if you merely like short stories and fairytales I recommend giving this collection a read. It's not particularly long with around 100 pages and you should be able to get through it in around an hour or so.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    Cinderella, or The Little Glass Slipper -- My first Disney surprise of the volume. I had always been under the assumption that Disney’s early fairy tale movies were glossy, post-WWII bastardizations of the earlier versions of the tales. So I was surprised to discover that Charles Perrault’s 17th Century version of Cinderella was, with the exception of an extra ball and a lack of talking mice, the clear source for Walt’s masterpiece. I’ve always been partial to Cinderella (the best princess movie Cinderella, or The Little Glass Slipper -- My first Disney surprise of the volume. I had always been under the assumption that Disney’s early fairy tale movies were glossy, post-WWII bastardizations of the earlier versions of the tales. So I was surprised to discover that Charles Perrault’s 17th Century version of Cinderella was, with the exception of an extra ball and a lack of talking mice, the clear source for Walt’s masterpiece. I’ve always been partial to Cinderella (the best princess movie from the pre-Eisener (post-Walt) era, before the Mouse House turned “princess” into a dirty word). The animation is gorgeous (and so wonderfully blue), the music is properly serious and its storytelling is tightly woven. Silly as it may be, knowing that it is almost completely based on Perrault’s story makes me feel a smidge less guilty about my appreciation. The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods -- And here’s my second Disney surprise. Walt and his cronies did away with the nasty Ogre Queen Mother who tries to eat the Sleeping Beauty’s children after she wakes up, but the first half of Perrault’s tale is intact, so Disney, once again, stuck closely to his source material with excellent results. I have to say, though, that I would love to have seen the Ogre Queen Mother munching on the well-dressed animals the cook prepared to trick her into thinking they were her grandkids. Little Thumb -- The anti-Ogre sentiment gets a bit much in Little Thumb (Tom?). He and his brothers – after their poor parents try to lose them in the wild to relieve their responsibilities and survive themselves -- stumble into an Ogre’s home, and the big, mean, evil Ogre man – whose natural prey seems to be humans – tells his wife that he wants to have all these yummy little boys cooked for the next days dinner party. To save his and his brothers’ skins, Little Thumb tricks the Ogre into cutting the throats of his seven daughters rather than the throats of Tom and his six brothers. Then Tom steals seven golden crowns and the Ogre’s magic boots, and he becomes an important and rich messenger. Probably my least favourite story, Little Thumb’s Ogre-other is just the sort of insidious racism that makes my skin crawl. If the Shrek movies weren’t so crappy in so many ways, I could almost appreciate their attempt to turn Ogres into protagonists. Almost. The Master Cat, or Puss in Boots -- I knew nothing about this story until I read this take. The Master Cat is a jerk. He victimizes an Ogre King, a king who seems to be a pretty decent ruler. His people, whom we meet throughout the tale, are kind, healthy, prosperous, and Puss just walks in and kills the Ogre King and hands the King’s lands over to his own “nobody” master. Puss’s master gets the castle, gets the girl and wins big. Just under a hundred years later it would have been Puss in Guillotine. Riquet with the Tuft -- My favourite of them all. What a shame this has never been adapted to the screen. The ugliest guy in the land is blessed with the greatest wisdom and intelligence. The most beautiful girl in the land is cursed with the greatest stupidity. So the ugliest guy gives her the gift of an intelligence to match his own, but she must marry him in return. What happens next is fascinating, and one of the finest lessons I’ve read in a fairy tale. I think Paul Giamatti and Charlize Theron (remember her character in Arrested Development) should make this on the stage somewhere. Blue Beard -- DON’T LOOK IN THE CLOSET! Just once I would love for someone in one of these stories to do what they are asked. I suppose we wouldn’t have a story then. The Fairy -- This is a weird one. A fairy rewards a girl who was nice to her with a mouth that spews gems whenever she speaks and curses her mean sister with a mouth that spews lizards whenever she speaks. A Prince falls in love with the gems and marries the nice girl, making her happy forever while she makes him rich. Ummm ... okay. Come to think of it, though, I bet gems from the mouth would have benefited Carrie in Sex and the City. Little Red-Riding Hood -- I have to spoil this one. Sorry folks. The Wolf ... he eats Little Red Riding Hood. His trick succeeds. His teeth are there to better eat her. And that’s it. Story over. Eat your heart out Wile E. Coyote.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Florencia

    Yes. I'm reviewing The Tales Of Mother Goose and I'm not ashamed of it. So, I was looking at my childhood shelves (yes, that actually exists) this morning and I ended up re-re-re-re-reading Perrault's fairy tales. I decided to write some lines because, well, it's Sunday and I didn't have this book on my GR shelves (even though as a kid, I was a big fan of "the guy who wrote Cinderella"). And by "lines" I mean just one thought. These 17th-century fairy tales are really, honestly, so fucked-up. Wo Yes. I'm reviewing The Tales Of Mother Goose and I'm not ashamed of it. So, I was looking at my childhood shelves (yes, that actually exists) this morning and I ended up re-re-re-re-reading Perrault's fairy tales. I decided to write some lines because, well, it's Sunday and I didn't have this book on my GR shelves (even though as a kid, I was a big fan of "the guy who wrote Cinderella"). And by "lines" I mean just one thought. These 17th-century fairy tales are really, honestly, so fucked-up. Wolves and ogres eating little kids, snakes coming out of girls' mouths, cruel/negligent parents and subjugated kids, several killings for different reasons (hunger, disobedience). I wouldn't have been able to get a good night sleep after hearing about grandma's desire of eating her grandsons. And what about hubby serial killer Bluebeard? Wasn't he a delight? Disney certainly gave us a lighter version of all these. There are little pieces of truth inside those innocent tales (“The Fairies”, where there's a mother who loved the elder daughter because she resembled her so closely –“as people naturally love their own likeness”) and other stuff are confusing and unfair (ugly people telling you it's more important to be smart than beautiful but eventually, they end up being beautiful too, so...). I've always enjoyed the morals; those little verses at the end of the tale that shows the author's interpretation. After a bloody, disturbing tale, there's usually a lesson to be learned. Nature oft, with open arms, Lavishes a thousand charms; But it is not these that bring True love's truest offering. 'Tis some quality that lies All unseen to other eyes -- Something in the heart or mind. Jan 19, 14 * Also on my blog.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Muphyn

    Not having read any of Perrault's fairytales before, I didn't quite realise what I was in for... And people say that Grimm's fairytales are gruesome - huh, think again and read Perrault's! There's an ogre appearing in about almost every single one of the eight tales in this edition, and, of course, they love eating fresh flesh (i.e. little people) and do so without delay. Yet in a strange way, I found these tales delightful and just so different to the Grimm's; in fact, they made me laugh out lou Not having read any of Perrault's fairytales before, I didn't quite realise what I was in for... And people say that Grimm's fairytales are gruesome - huh, think again and read Perrault's! There's an ogre appearing in about almost every single one of the eight tales in this edition, and, of course, they love eating fresh flesh (i.e. little people) and do so without delay. Yet in a strange way, I found these tales delightful and just so different to the Grimm's; in fact, they made me laugh out loud a few times - perhaps mostly because things took me by surprise, like the ending for "The Fairies": Nowhere could the wretched girl find anyone who would take her in, and at last she lay down in the forest and died". End of story. Each tale has a moral at the end, some even have two. There are some real nice gems among them, like the "Another moral" at the end of Blue Beard: You can tell this tale is old By the very way it's told. Those were days of derring-do; Man was lord, and master too. Then the husband ruled as king. Now it's quite a different thing; Be his beard what hue it may - Madam has a word to say! And this being written in 1697!

  8. 5 out of 5

    David

    In addition to the usual list of difficulties encountered when learning any foreign language, French has a few specific wrinkles of its own. In particular, there are certain verb tenses that have fallen into disuse, so that they are no longer used when speaking, but may still be encountered in written French, particularly in older texts. Most intermediate French students will have seen at least one of these, the so-called "simple past tense", or passé simple. Although it has been completely repla In addition to the usual list of difficulties encountered when learning any foreign language, French has a few specific wrinkles of its own. In particular, there are certain verb tenses that have fallen into disuse, so that they are no longer used when speaking, but may still be encountered in written French, particularly in older texts. Most intermediate French students will have seen at least one of these, the so-called "simple past tense", or passé simple. Although it has been completely replaced by the perfect tense, the passé composé , in spoken French, it is still reasonably common in modern texts, though it can come across as being slightly pompous. Given that it's still used in modern writing, inclusion of the passé simple as part of the curriculum seems entirely reasonable. But the passé simple is not the only French "literary tense". No, indeed, there are four others: the passé antérieur (now replaced by the plus-que-parfait, or pluperfect), the imperfect subjunctive (now replaced by the present subjunctive), the pluperfect subjunctive (now replaced by the past subjunctive), and the so-called second form of the conditional past (something clearly dreamed up solely for the purpose of making life more interesting back in the days before television and video games). This past week, in my French class, we read part of Perrault's "Comtes", as a way of introducing us to the whole morass of French literary tenses. So I was moved to go out and buy my own copy, which I've been reading over the weekend, and enjoying thoroughly. Many of your favorite Disney tales are included: "Sleeping Beauty", "Cinderella", "Tom Thumb", "Puss in Boots" (oh wait, wasn't he in "Shrek"?), as well as "Little Red Riding Hood", "Bluebeard", and a handful of others. But don't necessarily expect those Disney happy endings. The Perrault version of these tales errs heavily on the side of cruelty and brutality. There's more than one's fair share of incest, cannibalism, and good old-fashioned gore. For instance, that hunter or woodsman who arrives to save Little Red Riding Hood and her grandma at the end of the Brothers Grimm version? Completely absent from Perrault. In his view of the world, wander from the path to chase butterflies or talk to wolves and you'll come to a grisly ending. The illustrations are the original drawings by Gustav Dore, and are terrific. Finally, on the topic of "Little Red Riding Hood", I came across the following photo, which dates from the winter of 1968, my first term at boarding school, and which I present, in all its horrifying detail, without further commentary. The psychic scars run too deep*. But can you guess which of the characters depicted is now one of Ireland's best-known architects, a figure of international renown? *: For instance, I was forced to sing, in my adorable boy soprano voice, to the tune of "Just a Song at Twilight" I am getting loooone-ly for Red Riding Hood THE HORROR! THE HORROR!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cynda

    Boy oh Boy these are more authentic. Some of the stories have moments of more blood and gore. I read to fill my Early Modern slot in my personal Classics Challenge. I chose this format--audiobook--because this is format I could borrow from library service Hoopla. I read a little over 1/2 during a 24-hour Readathon. Charles Perrault seems to have been the original collector and popularizer of fairy tales. So not having a developed tradition for fairy tales, Perrault used the tradition of fables, e Boy oh Boy these are more authentic. Some of the stories have moments of more blood and gore. I read to fill my Early Modern slot in my personal Classics Challenge. I chose this format--audiobook--because this is format I could borrow from library service Hoopla. I read a little over 1/2 during a 24-hour Readathon. Charles Perrault seems to have been the original collector and popularizer of fairy tales. So not having a developed tradition for fairy tales, Perrault used the tradition of fables, ending the stories in morals, sometimes multiple morals. It seems that Perrault was writing for his children and was used to the tradition of morals endings. The morals--however outside of a developed tradition of fairy tales--shows us today what value system parents were trying to instill in their children. My current fave: Bluebeard. Very scary fairytale.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    010316: i looked at this for the art, but then thought of how i am familiar with several tales- Disney? other authors? Angela Carter? do not remember ever the first time heard or read. i do not remember some details and some tales eg. 'donkey skin', 'Tom thumb', somewhat disappointed in the art, this collection not as fascinating as Hans Christen Andersen... good, quick, simple... 010316: i looked at this for the art, but then thought of how i am familiar with several tales- Disney? other authors? Angela Carter? do not remember ever the first time heard or read. i do not remember some details and some tales eg. 'donkey skin', 'Tom thumb', somewhat disappointed in the art, this collection not as fascinating as Hans Christen Andersen... good, quick, simple...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Olivermagnus

    This is a beautifully illustrated book of classic fairy tells written by Charles Perrault with 35 black-and-white illustrations by Gustave Dore which include Little Red Riding Hood, Little Thumb, The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods, Cinderella, Puss in Boots, Riquet with the Tuft, The Fairy, and Blue Beard. One of my reading goals in 2017 is to revisit some favorite books that I enjoyed as a young girl. I loved that the stories were told in the original form, not the Disney style. I forgot how scar This is a beautifully illustrated book of classic fairy tells written by Charles Perrault with 35 black-and-white illustrations by Gustave Dore which include Little Red Riding Hood, Little Thumb, The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods, Cinderella, Puss in Boots, Riquet with the Tuft, The Fairy, and Blue Beard. One of my reading goals in 2017 is to revisit some favorite books that I enjoyed as a young girl. I loved that the stories were told in the original form, not the Disney style. I forgot how scary the original Little Red Riding Hood story actually was. For $1.50 I purchased a copy formatted for an Amazon Fire tablet. The illustrations are magnificent and I thought the Victorian look of the stories was just beautiful. When I delivered it to my Kindle Oasis, an ereader, the illustrations were just as crisp and clear. I loved this book, but some of the fairy tale versions may be too scary for young children.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Vaishali

    Ten stories, most rehashed a century later by the Grimm Brothers. Both Perrault and the Grimms collected village folktales, so read if you want to see the nuances between them. Two ("Ridiculous Wishes", "Donkey's Skin") are apparently ancient; the former features Jupiter as a character, and the other liberally mentions "gods" and "goddesses." The Ten Tales: 1. Little Red Riding Hood 2. The Fairy 3. Bluebeard 4. The Sleeping Beauty in the Wood 5. Puss in Boots 6. Cinderella 7. Riquet with the Tuft 8. Lit Ten stories, most rehashed a century later by the Grimm Brothers. Both Perrault and the Grimms collected village folktales, so read if you want to see the nuances between them. Two ("Ridiculous Wishes", "Donkey's Skin") are apparently ancient; the former features Jupiter as a character, and the other liberally mentions "gods" and "goddesses." The Ten Tales: 1. Little Red Riding Hood 2. The Fairy 3. Bluebeard 4. The Sleeping Beauty in the Wood 5. Puss in Boots 6. Cinderella 7. Riquet with the Tuft 8. Little Thumb 9. The Ridiculous Wishes 10. Donkey’s Skin

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ana

    These stories were predominat in my childhood so now as an adult I have decided to re-read them. I was slightly shocked there was no happy ending at times and also the language used can be at times harsh, but Charles Perrault lived in the 17th century so there was no need to use kid-gloves. But what I enjoy most is that after the traditional story there is a moral at the end in the form of a poem that even as adults we can enjoy.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Naiara

    Not as gruesome as I expected. Will have to read Grimms' versions to see that. I loved reading the original tales and their morals in their right context. Beautiful illustrations, wasn't expecting to find Gustave Doré's originals here. Not as gruesome as I expected. Will have to read Grimms' versions to see that. I loved reading the original tales and their morals in their right context. Beautiful illustrations, wasn't expecting to find Gustave Doré's originals here.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gary

    Most of the faerie tales in this installment will be familiar to anyone whose parents did a halfway decent job reading to them as a kid. If not, feel free to redeem your copy of the book along with this review to mommy and daddy for a full childhood refund as stipulated by the nightie-night clause of their offspring license. Tell them I sent you. Personally, I always prefer the pre-Disney, "not nice" versions of faerie tales. Little Red Riding Hood and her old biddie of a grandmamma do not get re Most of the faerie tales in this installment will be familiar to anyone whose parents did a halfway decent job reading to them as a kid. If not, feel free to redeem your copy of the book along with this review to mommy and daddy for a full childhood refund as stipulated by the nightie-night clause of their offspring license. Tell them I sent you. Personally, I always prefer the pre-Disney, "not nice" versions of faerie tales. Little Red Riding Hood and her old biddie of a grandmamma do not get rescued in M. Perrault's version, and the "moral" of the story in the end gives more than a few hints as to what that story is really about. I'm always amazed that so few people put together the symbolism in that tale, so it was pleasant to get a little validation from a master, even if it was couched in a "moral" from several centuries ago. M. Perrault does give us a few niceties. I thought it amusing that he felt it necessary to point out that the handsome prince who comes to awaken Sleeping Beauty after a century of slumber was a member of another royal family entirely. Since he later mentions in narration that his little princess is wearing clothes like his grandmother, it probably occurred to him that she could be his great-great-great aunt or something. While that's probably not any closer than third or fourth cousin (meaning marital taboos are probably not an issue) it did seem enough to awaken M. Perrault's sense of propriety. Plus, the Prince's mom is an ogress, and he pretty much leaves his narcoleptic lady and their kids at her cannibalistic mercy, which seems like pushing the mother-in-law stereotype a bit. I can see her wanting to gobble down Beauty, but her kids are her own grandkids. Bad Nanna! Similarly, his telling of the Cinderella story doesn't have the gory, toe and heel pruning of the rotten step-sisters of the Grimm Brothers account. They are suitably humiliated, but if you're looking to keep the kids up all night rather then send them off to sleep (I'm at best a weird uncle not a stodgy dad, so I prefer to hear "Eeeww!" than "Aaahh!" when dealing with The Littles) then you might want to go Teuton rather than Celt. It isn't until the last several tales that I ran into stories with which I was unfamiliar. I had not heard/read "Riquet with the Tuft" or "Little Thumb" (not to be mistaken with "Tom Thumb") or "Donkeyskin." In fact, I picked this book up because I'm reading Deerskin by Robin McKinley, which is her version of that faerie tale. It was nice to run into new, old material, particularly as those stories were suitably dark in spots, and with a modern version of the story to contrast it with. M. Perrault was apparently a well known wit (esprit) in literary/academic circles of his time, and glimmers of that charm appear throughout his narration. Unfortunately, some of the lilt and innuendo might get lost in translation from the French. Apparently, there are several versions of his original translated into English, and opinions vary. Nonetheless, we get a shadow of that spirit, even if it is somewhat obscured by the vagaries of language. Until someone miracles a babel fish into being (and disappears in a puff of logic) we're stuck with the occasional transcriptive tragedy.... I'd recommend this one to anyone who doesn't like kids too much--or who doesn't like the stories we read to kids these days are doing them any good. I'm knocking off a star for the issues with translation, which may not be fair to M. Perrault, but we may never know....

  16. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

    Giving this 5 stars simply because I'm a huge sucker for fairy tales. However, don't let the term "fairy tale" fool you, as the stories in this book are the original French "conte de fées" versions of many Disney adaptations. I'm not sure if I would suggest this for children, however the ambiguity will most likely be lost on them anyway so what could it hurt? As the description says and as I've already pointed out, this is a compilation of fairy tales in their original French form (Cinderella, S Giving this 5 stars simply because I'm a huge sucker for fairy tales. However, don't let the term "fairy tale" fool you, as the stories in this book are the original French "conte de fées" versions of many Disney adaptations. I'm not sure if I would suggest this for children, however the ambiguity will most likely be lost on them anyway so what could it hurt? As the description says and as I've already pointed out, this is a compilation of fairy tales in their original French form (Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, etc.), but I would recommend it to anyone (French speaking or not). There is most definitely a translated version if you don't have at least an intermediate understanding of French or any intent on arriving at that point someday. As another reviewer pointed out, there are some tense issues. The passe simple is used and is quite outdated and can be confusing (even for native speakers). Back to the point: This is charming and whimsical and amusing, just as all fairy tales should be. Rather light reading of course. It is a good book for travelling, vacation, or filling free time.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rikke

    I often feel like Perrault is being overlooked and underestimated when it comes to fairy tales. He is not nearly as famous as the Brothers Grimm or H.C. Andersen, however I do think his fairy-tales are equally as powerful as theirs. The stories are well composed, and truly terrifying in some aspects. It's definitely not the happy disneyfied stories as we know today, but grim and raw tales dealing with problems everyone - even adults - can relate to, and written with a specific point or morale in I often feel like Perrault is being overlooked and underestimated when it comes to fairy tales. He is not nearly as famous as the Brothers Grimm or H.C. Andersen, however I do think his fairy-tales are equally as powerful as theirs. The stories are well composed, and truly terrifying in some aspects. It's definitely not the happy disneyfied stories as we know today, but grim and raw tales dealing with problems everyone - even adults - can relate to, and written with a specific point or morale in mind. Each fairy tale ends with a moral poem, that holds the key to unlocking the true meaning of the story. Perrault's version of "Cinderella" is my all-time favorite fairy tale. It is the work of a true artist, and I can only regret that so few people are aware of it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nana

    Turns out that the fairy tales we know today as Red Riding Hood, Cinderella, and others are not entirely correct according to their original designs. I loved that the morals of these stories were better pronounced. The tales were pretty funny, not only in a humourous way, but in a strange way as well. Until I'd read this book, I'd never heard a fairy tale end with "...and [then she died]" Turns out that the fairy tales we know today as Red Riding Hood, Cinderella, and others are not entirely correct according to their original designs. I loved that the morals of these stories were better pronounced. The tales were pretty funny, not only in a humourous way, but in a strange way as well. Until I'd read this book, I'd never heard a fairy tale end with "...and [then she died]"

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joel

    Awesome collection of classic fairy tales with amazing illustrations. I was shocked by the amount of cannibalism and child abandonment in these stories. The real stories are way more hardcore than the Disney versions. Some of these stories are really disturbing.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Fiona Robson

    This was fascinating. I only really read it because of its connections with the Rennes-le-Chateau mystery and Le Serpent Rouge, but enjoyed it nontheless.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Elsbeth

    I thought I knew these stories - turns out I didn't... I thought I knew these stories - turns out I didn't...

  22. 5 out of 5

    Disha Bose O'Shea

    The illustrations are beautiful. I'm not sure if these particular versions of the fairytales are appropriate for kids. Most of them are quite dark and abound in sexism. The illustrations are beautiful. I'm not sure if these particular versions of the fairytales are appropriate for kids. Most of them are quite dark and abound in sexism.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Suad Alhalwachi

    We all know fairy tales of course and we had read them, heard them, seen their movies and maybe dreamt of them or even made up our own fairy tales. All the stories in the book are made into movies except I guess Tom Thumb( if I am not mistaken) but the most that was made into so many movies is Cinderella ( or Cindy-slut) as one of the sisters had called her in the book. What I liked though is the moral of the stories at the end of each one, so I am going to put these excerpts: 1- Moral Many a girl We all know fairy tales of course and we had read them, heard them, seen their movies and maybe dreamt of them or even made up our own fairy tales. All the stories in the book are made into movies except I guess Tom Thumb( if I am not mistaken) but the most that was made into so many movies is Cinderella ( or Cindy-slut) as one of the sisters had called her in the book. What I liked though is the moral of the stories at the end of each one, so I am going to put these excerpts: 1- Moral Many a girl has waited long For a husband brave or strong; But I’m sure I never met Any sort of woman yet Who could wait a hundred years, Free from fretting, free from fears. Now, our story seems to show That a century or so, Late or early, matters not; True love comes by fairy-lot. Some old folk will even say It grows better by delay. Yet this good advice, I fear, Helps us neither there nor here. Though philosophers may prate How much wiser ‘tis to wait, Maids will be a-sighing still— Young blood must when young blood will! 2- Moral Little girls, this seems to say, Never stop upon your way. Never trust a stranger-friend; No one knows how it will end. As you’re pretty, so be wise; Wolves may lurk in every guise. Handsome they may be, and kind, Gay, or charming—never mind! Now, as then, ’tis simple truth— Sweetest tongue has sharpest tooth 3- Moral Ladies, you should never pry,— You’ll repent it by and by! ‘Tis the silliest of sins; Trouble in a trice begins. There are, surely—more’s the woe!— Lots of things you need not know. Come, forswear it now and here— Joy so brief, that costs so dear! Another Moral You can tell this tale is old By the very way it’s told. Those were days of derring-do; Man was lord, and master too. Then the husband ruled as king. Now it’s quite a different thing; Be his beard what hue it may— Madam has a word to say 4- Moral It’s a pleasant thing, I’m told, To be left a pile of gold. But there’s something better still, Never yet bequeathed by will. Leave a lad a stock of sense— Though with neither pounds nor pence— And he’ll finish, as a rule, Richer than the gilded fool. Another Moral Can the heart of a Princess Yield so soon to borrowed dress? So it seems—but wait a while— ’Tis not all a tale of guile. He was young and straight of limb; She was just the girl for him. He was brave, and she was fair. Tell me, when the right man’s there— Be he but a miller’s son— What Princess will not be 5- Moral Diamonds and rubies may Work some wonders in their way; But a gentle word is worth More than all the gems on earth. Another Moral Though—when otherwise inclined— It’s a trouble to be kind, Often it will bring you good When you’d scarce believe it could 6-Moral Beauty is a treasure rare. Who complains of being fair? He perceived that her little foot slid in without trouble Yet there’s still a something more That good fairies have in store. ’Tis that little gift called grace, Weaves a spell round form and face, Of each word makes magic, too, Lends a charm to all you do. This it was—and nothing less— Cinderella’s fairy dress! And if you would learn the way How to get that gift today— How to point the golden dart That shall pierce the Prince’s heart— Ladies, you have but to be Just as kind and sweet as she! Another Moral Godmothers are useful things Even when without the wings. Wisdom may be yours and wit, Courage, industry, and grit What’s the use of these at all, If you lack a friend at call? 7-Moral Here’s a fairy tale for you, Which is just as good as true. What we love is always fair, Clever, deft, and debonair. Another Moral Nature oft, with open arms, Lavishes a thousand charms; But it is not these that bring True love’s truest offering. ’Tis some quality that lies All unseen to other eyes— Something in the heart or mind Love alone knows how to find 8-Moral Children are a pride to all When they’re handsome, straight, and tall. But how many homes must own Some odd mite who’s seldom shown— Just a little pale-faced chap, No one thinks is worth a rap! Parents, brothers, laugh him down Keep him mute with sneer and frown. Yet it’s Little Thumbling may Bring them fortune one fine day

  24. 4 out of 5

    ☆Ruth☆

    It was fascinating to see the similarities and the differences between these original stories and their modern-day counterparts. The story-telling is very unrefined and reads as though someone is just making it up as they go along.... which perhaps they were. Still, these age-old tales retain a certain charm and provide an interesting study in literary development.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Heather L

    This is a collection of eight fairy tales by Perrault, all but two of which were familiar. About of the third of the pages contain illustrations by Gustave Dore’. Being so short, one could easily read this collection in one day—but why would you not want to savor them?

  26. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Very interesting renditions of classic fairytales with some new ones I hadn’t read before. Would recommend this if you have read the Brothers Grimm collection.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    How beautiful life would be if I lived in such a fiction !

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mimi

    Charles Perrault's fairy stories have long interested me but I have never managed to read them up until now. This book contains ten of his stories and some are ones people will be familiar with. Little Red Riding Hood, Cinderella and Puss in Boots all feature in this collection. The stories • Little Red Riding Hood- This version was different to the one I know but I didn't like it as much as I thought I would. She didn't seem very clever and I couldn't like her as a character. 3/5 •The Fairy- I d Charles Perrault's fairy stories have long interested me but I have never managed to read them up until now. This book contains ten of his stories and some are ones people will be familiar with. Little Red Riding Hood, Cinderella and Puss in Boots all feature in this collection. The stories • Little Red Riding Hood- This version was different to the one I know but I didn't like it as much as I thought I would. She didn't seem very clever and I couldn't like her as a character. 3/5 •The Fairy- I didn't really like this story and wanted to finish it quickly. 2/5 •Blue Beard- This story shocked me the most out of them all. I wasn't expecting the story end up that way. I always like it when stories surprises and this story did that well. 3.5/5 •The Sleeping Beauty in the Wood- Different to what I thought it was going to be and I liked it. 4/5 •The Master Cat (Puss in Boots) - A good story and I liked the cat in it. He was very clever and I liked how he tricked people to help his master. 4/5 •Cinderella (The Little glass Slipper) Different in places to the story that I know. Not bad but I thought it would be better. 3/5 • Riquet with The Tuft- Boring and I couldn't get into the story. 1/5 • Little Thumb- Not bad, it had an interest plot. little Thumb, was a good character and I liked how he kept making his way home with his brothers. 3.5/5 •The Ridiculous Wishes and Donkey Skin- I really didn't like these stories. Their plots didn't interest me and I wanted to get through them quickly. I didn't really care for the characters in them. 1/5 Overall, the stories weren't bad but I couldn't really like them. It was interesting to see how the versions were different but that was it for me. I think it was the way that it was written. I knew it would be hard because the stories were very old. But some of the language was hard for me such as when there would be a moral at the end of each stories. I didn't know what they really meant. I would recommend this if your interested in fairy tales and would like to see how different the versions are.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nostalgia Reader

    2.5 stars. Those were.... well... boring. I may have read a bad translation, but even then, these were simply too happily ever after and saccharine for me (obviously, Disney opted to use these as a source, rather than other grittier versions). The Grimm versions of many of these tales are MUCH better, as they aren't always happily ever after and more engaging in their style. Perrault certainly gets all the points for being a prominent fairy tale teller, but the way these were written/translated w 2.5 stars. Those were.... well... boring. I may have read a bad translation, but even then, these were simply too happily ever after and saccharine for me (obviously, Disney opted to use these as a source, rather than other grittier versions). The Grimm versions of many of these tales are MUCH better, as they aren't always happily ever after and more engaging in their style. Perrault certainly gets all the points for being a prominent fairy tale teller, but the way these were written/translated was just, ugh.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Maria Fernanda Gama

    I have to admit I've been unfair to this book. I forced myself to read it even though it wasn't what I was in the mood for, so I don't really think there was any chance for me to enjoy this. Still, I didn't enjoy it. It just felt too ancient to make any sense. None of the morals feel even remotely like good advices and the stories are just too bizarre to fit this little happy ending mold. Well, here's the morals I got from this: don't push a book down you're throat when you're not that intereste I have to admit I've been unfair to this book. I forced myself to read it even though it wasn't what I was in the mood for, so I don't really think there was any chance for me to enjoy this. Still, I didn't enjoy it. It just felt too ancient to make any sense. None of the morals feel even remotely like good advices and the stories are just too bizarre to fit this little happy ending mold. Well, here's the morals I got from this: don't push a book down you're throat when you're not that interested in reading it

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