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The Renaissance: A History From Beginning to End (Leonardo Da Vinci, Michelangelo, Theresa of Avila, William Shakespeare, Martin Luther, Johannes Gutenberg)

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☆ The Renaissance ☆ During the Middle Ages, the nations of Europe forged new identities that moved them away from the lost glory of the Roman Empire into their own ethnicity. The experience of maturation was often clumsy and out of step, an evolutionary process that saw the nation's developing at their own pace as they struggled to replace the protection of Rome with thei ☆ The Renaissance ☆ During the Middle Ages, the nations of Europe forged new identities that moved them away from the lost glory of the Roman Empire into their own ethnicity. The experience of maturation was often clumsy and out of step, an evolutionary process that saw the nation's developing at their own pace as they struggled to replace the protection of Rome with their own home-grown strength. What the nations, once they were ready to be described in that manner, did have was the Roman Catholic Church, which defined itself as the spiritual protector of Christian believers. But the dutiful Christians of the Middle Ages who sought orthodoxy and for the most part obeyed the papal rules underwent a change when the Middle Ages ended. The Renaissance, or rebirth, was a period of time when Europeans began to question what they had been told was sacrosanct. Through art, inventions, science, literature, and theology, the separate nations of the European continent sought answers that the Roman Catholic Church was unwilling, or perhaps unable, to offer. Inside you will read about... ✓ The Rebirth of Europe ✓ The Italian Renaissance ✓ The French Renaissance ✓ The Spanish Renaissance ✓ The German Renaissance ✓ The Low Countries Renaissance ✓ The English Renaissance ✓ Here Be Dragons: Exploring the Unknown The Church that had become a powerful political entity was viewed with distrust and skepticism by many Christians; the spread of learning that accompanied the invention of Gutenberg’s printing press meant that bold new ideas were traveling across the boundaries of Europe faster than the Church could silence them. Lascivious, power-brokering popes could not bring a halt to the challenges they encountered when a German priest rebelled against corrupt practices that masqueraded as ecclesiastical authority. As the walls came tumbling down, humanism burst forth, inspiring the art of Michelangelo, the science of Vesalius, the literature of Shakespeare and Cervantes. But with the loss of religious uniformity came terrible conflicts: France suffered the St. Bartholomew’s Day Massacre; Spain welcomed the Inquisition to purge heresy; the Low Countries were split between Catholic and Protestant. The Renaissance was a triumph of the human spirit and a confirmation of human ability, even as it affirmed the willingness of men and women to die for the right to think freely.


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☆ The Renaissance ☆ During the Middle Ages, the nations of Europe forged new identities that moved them away from the lost glory of the Roman Empire into their own ethnicity. The experience of maturation was often clumsy and out of step, an evolutionary process that saw the nation's developing at their own pace as they struggled to replace the protection of Rome with thei ☆ The Renaissance ☆ During the Middle Ages, the nations of Europe forged new identities that moved them away from the lost glory of the Roman Empire into their own ethnicity. The experience of maturation was often clumsy and out of step, an evolutionary process that saw the nation's developing at their own pace as they struggled to replace the protection of Rome with their own home-grown strength. What the nations, once they were ready to be described in that manner, did have was the Roman Catholic Church, which defined itself as the spiritual protector of Christian believers. But the dutiful Christians of the Middle Ages who sought orthodoxy and for the most part obeyed the papal rules underwent a change when the Middle Ages ended. The Renaissance, or rebirth, was a period of time when Europeans began to question what they had been told was sacrosanct. Through art, inventions, science, literature, and theology, the separate nations of the European continent sought answers that the Roman Catholic Church was unwilling, or perhaps unable, to offer. Inside you will read about... ✓ The Rebirth of Europe ✓ The Italian Renaissance ✓ The French Renaissance ✓ The Spanish Renaissance ✓ The German Renaissance ✓ The Low Countries Renaissance ✓ The English Renaissance ✓ Here Be Dragons: Exploring the Unknown The Church that had become a powerful political entity was viewed with distrust and skepticism by many Christians; the spread of learning that accompanied the invention of Gutenberg’s printing press meant that bold new ideas were traveling across the boundaries of Europe faster than the Church could silence them. Lascivious, power-brokering popes could not bring a halt to the challenges they encountered when a German priest rebelled against corrupt practices that masqueraded as ecclesiastical authority. As the walls came tumbling down, humanism burst forth, inspiring the art of Michelangelo, the science of Vesalius, the literature of Shakespeare and Cervantes. But with the loss of religious uniformity came terrible conflicts: France suffered the St. Bartholomew’s Day Massacre; Spain welcomed the Inquisition to purge heresy; the Low Countries were split between Catholic and Protestant. The Renaissance was a triumph of the human spirit and a confirmation of human ability, even as it affirmed the willingness of men and women to die for the right to think freely.

30 review for The Renaissance: A History From Beginning to End (Leonardo Da Vinci, Michelangelo, Theresa of Avila, William Shakespeare, Martin Luther, Johannes Gutenberg)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Anil Swarup

    "The popes were intent on preserving power in a worldly domain that had very little in common with poverty, chastity, or obedience." This captures the essence of why Renaissance happened. The book outlines the background and the role of principal actors that were in the forefront of Renaissance and does it pretty well. "The popes were intent on preserving power in a worldly domain that had very little in common with poverty, chastity, or obedience." This captures the essence of why Renaissance happened. The book outlines the background and the role of principal actors that were in the forefront of Renaissance and does it pretty well.

  2. 5 out of 5

    George

    …AND WORTH EVERY PENNY OF IT. “The Renaissance was a triumph of the human spirit and a confirmation of human ability, even as it affirmed the willingness of men and women to die for the right to think freely.” (Kindle Locations 25-26) The Renaissance: A History From Beginning to End, by Henry Freeman; one of the ‘Hourly History Series’ is a very brief, pretty thorough, introduction to the European Renaissance. It is perhaps one of the first books I’ve read that writing the review might just take …AND WORTH EVERY PENNY OF IT. “The Renaissance was a triumph of the human spirit and a confirmation of human ability, even as it affirmed the willingness of men and women to die for the right to think freely.” (Kindle Locations 25-26) The Renaissance: A History From Beginning to End, by Henry Freeman; one of the ‘Hourly History Series’ is a very brief, pretty thorough, introduction to the European Renaissance. It is perhaps one of the first books I’ve read that writing the review might just take longer than the reading did (about an hour). It was also a free book from Kindle… thus my lead-in/headline. Recommendation: Despite its necessary lack of depth, I still plan to read other offerings from this series—so, yes, I do recommend it to you and to your teens. “…unlocking doors was a character trait of the Renaissance that neither the hope of heaven nor the fear of hell could shackle.” (Kindle Locations 430-431). “Here be dragons.” (Kindle Location 423). Hourly History. Kindle Edition. 465 Kindle Locations.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Thom Swennes

    To mark the close of the Middle Ages, a new age of rebirth started. This period lasted from the 14th Century to the 17th Century and saw many changes in the religious, cultural, scientific, and philosophical spheres. This transition period lasted so long because different European countries and cultures started at different times, progressed at different paces, and faced different obstacles while attempting this change. Since the fall of Rome and its empire, the church wielded great power, influ To mark the close of the Middle Ages, a new age of rebirth started. This period lasted from the 14th Century to the 17th Century and saw many changes in the religious, cultural, scientific, and philosophical spheres. This transition period lasted so long because different European countries and cultures started at different times, progressed at different paces, and faced different obstacles while attempting this change. Since the fall of Rome and its empire, the church wielded great power, influencing everyone from monarch to pauper. Church views and doctrines were not questioned. The ability to read and own books were reserved for a chosen few. In 1440, the German Johannes Gutenberg invented a printing press, using moveable print. This invention opened the door to mass publications; a concept previously unimaginable. With this increase in printed books, the need and desire to read increased throughout Europe. With more and more people reading, more and more questions were being asked. When the church couldn’t answer these queries, the people went in search of answers; instantly putting them at odds with the church. Florence is rightly considered by many, to be the incubator and birthplace of the Renaissance. It was here that the period witnessed the rise of multi-talented artists, builders, and thinkers, like Michelangelo Buonarroti, Leonardo da Vinci, and Raphael Sanzio da Urbino. Other countries took up the Renaissance torch, like France, and made inroads into religious freedom and other art forms, such as music. The Renaissance can be seen as an oxymoron. It was a time of expansion, art, and beauty, but also a time of strife, mistrust, horror, and unbelievably cruel acts, perpetrated in the name of God; the Holy Inquisition. In these inquisitions, one’s innocence had to be proved, as guilt was assumed; not a very fair playing field. This short book is packed remarkably full with interesting information. To explore the Renaissance period in full, a library of books would be required, as virtually every part of Europe developed in a different way and at varying times. This publication provides just a taste, but what a sweet morsel it is! I think it will satisfy everyone’s inquisitive palate.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jon

    This is my first read from Hourly History. True to the publishing name, these books are all approximately fifty pages long and offer bare bones overviews of the topic. It absolutely lacks the depth to give you any real understanding, but supplies some great surface information that can be quickly absorbed. If you're looking for a very brief examination of the Renaissance, this book has it. It explores a few separate European countries and how they experienced this time of humanism while also spo This is my first read from Hourly History. True to the publishing name, these books are all approximately fifty pages long and offer bare bones overviews of the topic. It absolutely lacks the depth to give you any real understanding, but supplies some great surface information that can be quickly absorbed. If you're looking for a very brief examination of the Renaissance, this book has it. It explores a few separate European countries and how they experienced this time of humanism while also spotlighting several key individuals with their summary accomplishments. I downloaded about eight of these books that were free offerings so far and may even get some more. Great for a quick breather in between my typical novels while also providing knowledge on important subjects.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Maheswara

    This book is not as comprehensive as its title says. There is no cause and effect relationship explanation. The only correlation I could take out from this entire book is that the development of the printing press and failure of the religious institutions ushered Renaissance, and that's about it. But it serves its purpose as a general introduction to major personalities and developments in religion, art, music, and technology across Europe. I loved the beautiful portrayal on the essence of the R This book is not as comprehensive as its title says. There is no cause and effect relationship explanation. The only correlation I could take out from this entire book is that the development of the printing press and failure of the religious institutions ushered Renaissance, and that's about it. But it serves its purpose as a general introduction to major personalities and developments in religion, art, music, and technology across Europe. I loved the beautiful portrayal on the essence of the Renaissance.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Carolina Casas

    A fairly good introduction I would have given it five stars. It certainly merited that on many sections. However, when I came to religion and kingship, it fell short, resorting to generalizations about these subjects that we are all used to. So nothing new there. But where it did excel was on the other subjects: the arts, literature, social hierarchies, exploration and colonization. Rather than focusing on the popular kings and queens, it focused on the innovative thinkers; scholars, architects, A fairly good introduction I would have given it five stars. It certainly merited that on many sections. However, when I came to religion and kingship, it fell short, resorting to generalizations about these subjects that we are all used to. So nothing new there. But where it did excel was on the other subjects: the arts, literature, social hierarchies, exploration and colonization. Rather than focusing on the popular kings and queens, it focused on the innovative thinkers; scholars, architects, artists, mathematicians, etc; that brought a classical rebirth to Europe, and encouraged a rebellious spirit in these new men that set the basis for the modern world.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Gian Andrea

    The usual short read from Hourly History on one of the most significant and important period in history, that literally shaped the world as we know it. A bit of this, a bit of that, all sprinkled with some inaccuracy and typos, as the usual perfect recipe for a free book that's not really a book at all, but it may help you kill half an hour on a bus or maybe, hopefully, push young kids who don't know much about this incredible historical moment to go and research more. Maybe even read a proper b The usual short read from Hourly History on one of the most significant and important period in history, that literally shaped the world as we know it. A bit of this, a bit of that, all sprinkled with some inaccuracy and typos, as the usual perfect recipe for a free book that's not really a book at all, but it may help you kill half an hour on a bus or maybe, hopefully, push young kids who don't know much about this incredible historical moment to go and research more. Maybe even read a proper book about it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    William

    This book takes the obnoxious “church & medieval period=bad, secularism=good” view toward the renaissance, ignoring or downplaying the positive influences of the church in this period, and emphasizing or calling up the sins of the church even when their influence on a particular event was positive.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ada Topacio

    It covers too much without much detail. Basically just listing out events without learning the real importance of each. You cannot just enumerate events and people that’s spans over a hundred years without giving much detail - their importance are incomprehensible.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Syed

    Good accounts for beginners, I guess I don't know much about the Renaissance movement, so reading this was a good foundation. Particularly, the neutral tone made for an easy and rough outlining of the events. Thank you. Good accounts for beginners, I guess I don't know much about the Renaissance movement, so reading this was a good foundation. Particularly, the neutral tone made for an easy and rough outlining of the events. Thank you.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sai Gayatri Vemuri

    A very colonialist perspective. How are you going to say Europeans "discovered" Australia when people have been living there for at least 40 thousand years???? Australian aborigines are literally one of the world's oldest continuous cultures. A very colonialist perspective. How are you going to say Europeans "discovered" Australia when people have been living there for at least 40 thousand years???? Australian aborigines are literally one of the world's oldest continuous cultures.

  12. 4 out of 5

    clkmkr

    quick look Short but catches all the main points. From this book you have a guide of where one might want to explore further the topics that most interest you.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bruce

    The Renaissance was an exciting period in the history of western civilization, and this Hourly History does a good job of describing those times.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Savina

    I've always been fascinated by the Renaissance and learning more or rereading more about it from this short history book was nice. I've always been fascinated by the Renaissance and learning more or rereading more about it from this short history book was nice.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Najib Ahmad

    Thank you Hourly history for these amazingly concise past of our miraculous yesterday.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Brian Drumbore

    Good but short A nice overview of Renaissance history. Brief and easy to read in one sitting. Nothing goes too in depth which may bother some readers.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Robin Dix

    The is much to be learned here. It might be a quick read but it provides a lot of insight.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ajay Srinivas

    A good surfacial primer for people who want to dive into Renaissance.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rosa Löfman

    There were a bunch of spelling errors in the e-book i read, but otherwise a good read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jenika Ioffreda

    3.5 stars A quick read giving an overview of Renaissance in Europe, I enjoyed it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ritika Gaur

    A good book by Hourly History.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tushar Mathur

    Eye-opening facts post Roman Empire.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mitchell

    The mission of Hourly History is to give brief surveys of historical eras or figures that can be read in one sitting. By their very nature, the works will not be exhaustive. That is not their intention. Instead, they give a high-level view of the subject. They are midway between a Wikipedia article and a more thorough, scholarly volume. This volume accomplishes Hourly History's mission perfectly. In 45 pages, it gives the outline of the history of the Renaissance from beginning to end. The perio The mission of Hourly History is to give brief surveys of historical eras or figures that can be read in one sitting. By their very nature, the works will not be exhaustive. That is not their intention. Instead, they give a high-level view of the subject. They are midway between a Wikipedia article and a more thorough, scholarly volume. This volume accomplishes Hourly History's mission perfectly. In 45 pages, it gives the outline of the history of the Renaissance from beginning to end. The period is broken down geographically, so that the Renaissance in Italy, France, Germany and England are examined. In addition, short biographical sketches are given which give a little more color and depth to what could have been a superficial survey. I found the biographical sketches particularly interesting since they are not of the 'usual suspects'. You do get Michelangelo, but you also get St. Teresa of Avila. You do get Shakespeare, but you also get Thomas Tallis. This is a clever touch and it works well to round out the topic. I think the best way to view this book, is to take it as either a good introduction to the topic, or as a refresher if you have some familiarity with it already. It should then be a jumping off point to explore topics that are touched on here. Perhaps you might be interested in the last days of the Roman empire which led to the decentralization of authority and the rise of independent states. Perhaps your interest will be piqued by the tension between religion and humanism, which this little volume posits is one of the hallmarks of the Renaissance. In other words, this book is a great beginning for further reading on the subject. I look forward to the others....the one on The Vikings looks particularly enticing!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Carol Ryan

    If you are like me, knowledge of the fascinating period of history we now call, 'The Renaissance', has come in fits and starts. I've learned about visual art in an art history class, literature in 'English', or music in an Opera class, without connecting the dots. Or maybe my European history was a bit rusty. Luckily, Henry Freeman has put it all together in a short easy to read book, The Renaissance The History From Beginning To End. He shows how the historical period conquered Europe, and how If you are like me, knowledge of the fascinating period of history we now call, 'The Renaissance', has come in fits and starts. I've learned about visual art in an art history class, literature in 'English', or music in an Opera class, without connecting the dots. Or maybe my European history was a bit rusty. Luckily, Henry Freeman has put it all together in a short easy to read book, The Renaissance The History From Beginning To End. He shows how the historical period conquered Europe, and how if affected the various cultures in their own way. There is an incredible mastery of the subject in this book. Also great skill in distilling so much into a short engaging read. Bravo!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mardi Gorham

    4 stars Basically, this is a short history of the Renaissance that can be read in one sitting. A good place to start if you want to know more about the major figures during this time period

  26. 4 out of 5

    Claire Boyle

    Great, short read Five stars is because it is short, easy to read and very enjoyable. It is written I easy to understand language but very concise.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Yazir Paredes

    Short and fast way to undestand the basics of the Renaissance by country. It also has sidebars on the greatest or defining Renaissance artist of each country.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Blair

    This is a really great book very very intersting if you like history.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Victor H Fisher Jr

    Interesting kept me reading. A lot of good information on the History of the Era. In a short and concise book that made it a learning experience interesting.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Michael Schaffer

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