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The Wish List (Puffin Audiobooks)

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Can dead teen Meg save her soul by helping a near-death senior finish his wish list? Meg Finn is accidentally killed by her partner-in-crime during a burglary. Her last-minute act of kindness rescues her from being sent through the tunnel directly to hell. After winding up in limbo instead, the girl's spirit returns to earth in the hope of eventually going through "the Pea Can dead teen Meg save her soul by helping a near-death senior finish his wish list? Meg Finn is accidentally killed by her partner-in-crime during a burglary. Her last-minute act of kindness rescues her from being sent through the tunnel directly to hell. After winding up in limbo instead, the girl's spirit returns to earth in the hope of eventually going through "the Pearlies." To make the heavenly cut, Meg goes to the aid of the elderly Lowrie McCall 68, a depressed down-and-out bloke who has four wishes on his list before he dies. But demon Beelzebub wants her soul, too, and he's sent a "Soul Man" -- a vicious dog-boy who murdered her -- to retrieve it.


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Can dead teen Meg save her soul by helping a near-death senior finish his wish list? Meg Finn is accidentally killed by her partner-in-crime during a burglary. Her last-minute act of kindness rescues her from being sent through the tunnel directly to hell. After winding up in limbo instead, the girl's spirit returns to earth in the hope of eventually going through "the Pea Can dead teen Meg save her soul by helping a near-death senior finish his wish list? Meg Finn is accidentally killed by her partner-in-crime during a burglary. Her last-minute act of kindness rescues her from being sent through the tunnel directly to hell. After winding up in limbo instead, the girl's spirit returns to earth in the hope of eventually going through "the Pearlies." To make the heavenly cut, Meg goes to the aid of the elderly Lowrie McCall 68, a depressed down-and-out bloke who has four wishes on his list before he dies. But demon Beelzebub wants her soul, too, and he's sent a "Soul Man" -- a vicious dog-boy who murdered her -- to retrieve it.

30 review for The Wish List (Puffin Audiobooks)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    I saw this on the shelf at my local library and had immediate flashbacks to reading this over and over again throughout my youth. I have half a mind that this was one of the books you received at a discount when you pre-ordered Harry Potter from Waterstones - I could be wrong but the two are definitely interwoven in my memories. The Wish List follows Meg Finn, a teenager who dies with an equal number of "bad points" (sins) and "good points" (whatever the opposite of sins is) who therefore needs t I saw this on the shelf at my local library and had immediate flashbacks to reading this over and over again throughout my youth. I have half a mind that this was one of the books you received at a discount when you pre-ordered Harry Potter from Waterstones - I could be wrong but the two are definitely interwoven in my memories. The Wish List follows Meg Finn, a teenager who dies with an equal number of "bad points" (sins) and "good points" (whatever the opposite of sins is) who therefore needs to go back to rectify her mistakes else she end up in "the bad place". This was short and sweet and made for a nostalgic and enjoyable hour or two of reading.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mir

    Not as fun or funny as his Artemis Fowl books. Also, although the theology here is really just a plot device, I have to object to the misrepresentation of the Catholic economy of salvation as a ledger in which one is saved by earning good behavior points to outweigh the sin points. Possibly Colfer was told that as a child by nun teachers who wanted to make him behave, but equating moral failings and juvenile misdemeanors is pretty shallow. I think even young kids can handle more sophisticated rel Not as fun or funny as his Artemis Fowl books. Also, although the theology here is really just a plot device, I have to object to the misrepresentation of the Catholic economy of salvation as a ledger in which one is saved by earning good behavior points to outweigh the sin points. Possibly Colfer was told that as a child by nun teachers who wanted to make him behave, but equating moral failings and juvenile misdemeanors is pretty shallow. I think even young kids can handle more sophisticated religious concepts. And that wish list was pathetic. Other than the first regret about never getting up the courage to kiss the girl he liked, those were so tiny they made me sad. I really hope most people aren't fretting over this petty crap in their last years of life. Although I did appreciate the episode where (view spoiler)[he goes to confront the childhood bully and the other old man has also been dwelling regretfully on it, and they are able to find peace instead of revenge (hide spoiler)] . I picked this up for my nephew and will probably go ahead and give it to him since, theology aside, there isn't anything particularly objectionable in it, but it was a disappointment. Maybe he'll enjoy the sports bits.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    This is the type of book that Oprah usually parades around, but fortunately for Eoin Colfer she didn't find this one. It's an old story: wouldn't it be great if you were given an opportunity at the end of your life to correct past mistakes? Thanks to some irresponsible decisions, a young girl finds herself in the tube to the afterlife...unsure where she's going to get routed. It turns out that her ledger is 100% even - she's sinned and sainted in equal numbers. So she ends up getting sent back t This is the type of book that Oprah usually parades around, but fortunately for Eoin Colfer she didn't find this one. It's an old story: wouldn't it be great if you were given an opportunity at the end of your life to correct past mistakes? Thanks to some irresponsible decisions, a young girl finds herself in the tube to the afterlife...unsure where she's going to get routed. It turns out that her ledger is 100% even - she's sinned and sainted in equal numbers. So she ends up getting sent back to the land of the living - albeit in a vaporous form - to help one lonely old man make peace with his past and look forward contentedly to the future. Aaawww... Like all of Colfer's books, the writing is snappy, witty, and well-edited. The book is suitable for children, but the clever editorializations (often masked as one-liners) kept me thinking. By the time I'd finished reading it, I was almost ready to review my life and decide how to make amends for past mistakes. Almost.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie (Bookfever)

    The Wish List is no Artemis Fowl but, damn it, if I didn't love it! For a long time now I've had a dislike to heaven/hell - angel/demon books. I can't quite explain why but from all paranormal books I dislike books about that certain topic the least. However, Eoin Colfer shows with The Wish List how you write a truly great book in this topic. It was fun, very humoristic. I laughed a lot. But it was also very heart warming. Eoin Colfer always creates amazing characters that I love. Meg Finn was one The Wish List is no Artemis Fowl but, damn it, if I didn't love it! For a long time now I've had a dislike to heaven/hell - angel/demon books. I can't quite explain why but from all paranormal books I dislike books about that certain topic the least. However, Eoin Colfer shows with The Wish List how you write a truly great book in this topic. It was fun, very humoristic. I laughed a lot. But it was also very heart warming. Eoin Colfer always creates amazing characters that I love. Meg Finn was one of them. Though I tend to read more books where the main characters are 16+, I really like Eoin's characters who tend to be more of the age of 12+. Meg was 14 in this book and I loved her. She had a lot to deal with in her life, like her mother dying, which left her all alone with her awful stepfather. When she gets involved in a attempted robbery of the elderly Lowrie McCall together with Belch things go wrong when an explosion occurs which causes for both Meg and Belch to die. As a spirit, Meg ends up in limbo, right in the middle between hell and heaven. To go to heaven she'll have to help Lowrie McCall to do all the things on his Wish List. But Belch is on her heels to stop her from doing the good deed she'll do if she helps Lowrie. The Wish List is a very fast, light book but nevertheless amazing as I always expect from a Colfer book. Is it the best book of him? No, of course not. That honor (in my opinion) goes to Artemis Fowl but if you want to read something different by him, you should definitely try it. I'm sure no one will be able to put it down once they start this adventure! This review has also been posted on Bookfever and Owl Post Reviews

  5. 5 out of 5

    Teno Q.

    Eoin Colfer's style can be detected from a mile away. Whatever it is that he writes, Colfer's work will always have the markings of someone who writes bluntly humorous, technological, and sarcastic sci-fi fantasies - in other words, Artemis Fowl. He can't seem to adapt to different genres or story types. The problem is, his style only seems to be effective when he's writing Artemis. In a book that is supposed to examine morality, and life and death, it just feels ridiculous at times. The gateway Eoin Colfer's style can be detected from a mile away. Whatever it is that he writes, Colfer's work will always have the markings of someone who writes bluntly humorous, technological, and sarcastic sci-fi fantasies - in other words, Artemis Fowl. He can't seem to adapt to different genres or story types. The problem is, his style only seems to be effective when he's writing Artemis. In a book that is supposed to examine morality, and life and death, it just feels ridiculous at times. The gateway to heaven has been monitored by a computer ever since an computer engineer made it up there. Really? Where exactly did Colfer get his mythology about heaven from? Second point of doubt: entry to heaven or hell depends on the colour of your ghost after death. Red means you're completely evil, so you go to hell. Blue means heaven. Purple is in between, but if the purple becomes 1% more red than blue, than off to hell you go. Since when do heaven and hell have such carefully laid out, logical rules concerning everything? This is not a scientific documentary, and it is not a math problem. And this type of novel won't work if you view it that way. When anyone in the cast, any character at all, says something, what comes out is always snarky and sarcastic. Everyone speaks in the same way. Everyone. There are two possible reasons for this: One, the author has been watching/living in bad sitcom(s) his whole life, and doesn't know real people speak; or he needs to brush up on his dialogue writing skills. This book has an interesting premise, with a lot of creativity, but it would have worked better with a different author. I'm not sure if I would recommend it - I'm a bit split in the middle, like Meg; I enjoyed it, but only when I wasn't cringing.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    From a blog post I wrote in 2006: The Wish List is another Eoin Colfer creation. The main character is Meg Flynn, an Irish girl whose Mother has passed away and whose Step-Father is pretty much an uncaring, lazy slob. Meg breaks into an old man's house with a neighborhood small-time hood named Belch but things take a dark turn. Meg and Belch end up dying. On the way to heaven, it's discovered that Meg's soul is equally balanced between good and evil so she's sent back to Earth to try to make amends From a blog post I wrote in 2006: The Wish List is another Eoin Colfer creation. The main character is Meg Flynn, an Irish girl whose Mother has passed away and whose Step-Father is pretty much an uncaring, lazy slob. Meg breaks into an old man's house with a neighborhood small-time hood named Belch but things take a dark turn. Meg and Belch end up dying. On the way to heaven, it's discovered that Meg's soul is equally balanced between good and evil so she's sent back to Earth to try to make amends to the old man from the break-in. If she helps him complete his Wish List (things he regrets never doing), she gets to heaven. If she fails, it's to the other side. Satan and Beelzebub conspire against her by sending Belch's spirit to stop her from completing her task. As with his other books, Colfer doesn't talk down to his audience. The situations and characters are realistic (I know, Satan and St Peter might seem more like fantasy material but they're well constructed here) and intelligently presented. Another thumbs up from me on this one.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Violet

    It was okay. It wasn't the best but not the worst. Okay, I'm not the type of person that believes in heaven and/or hell. (Though I do sometimes tell someone to go to hell.) I just think the all that stuff is a little over rated (if you haven't guessed all ready, I don't go to church). The whole go-to-heaven-if-good-and-live-forever-in-bliss, or go-the-hell-if-bad-and-live-forever-in-flames, is a little bit cheesy and over done. But the things that Eoin Colfer does in this book is very orignal. Wh It was okay. It wasn't the best but not the worst. Okay, I'm not the type of person that believes in heaven and/or hell. (Though I do sometimes tell someone to go to hell.) I just think the all that stuff is a little over rated (if you haven't guessed all ready, I don't go to church). The whole go-to-heaven-if-good-and-live-forever-in-bliss, or go-the-hell-if-bad-and-live-forever-in-flames, is a little bit cheesy and over done. But the things that Eoin Colfer does in this book is very orignal. What with bringing the modern age in to the afterlife, and the soul residue colors, and the humor from Bub, and the connection between Bub and Peter, and more. It really turns the classic heaven and hell upside down. I like it. Wow, really rare. Well, at least it sounds rare. The purple soul residue. But it seems to me that amost all of us have a little purple in us. There are moments when we all do bad, and when we all do good. Basically no one is just straight black and white, or red and blue in the book. But the way they have it determinded whether you are going to heaven or hell in the book is to see if the good or bad out weigh the other. Sounds fair.... I love Meg's attuidude. It's very funny, but not very nice. I can see how she could be purple, she doesn't seem very nice but does do good things. Meg is bad but not evil. The relationship between Lowrie and Meg is a complicated one. More of a love/hate relationship. Which is fine with them. But kind of confusing. If it wasn't for the lines about a bond between them, a normal person looking on the outside would think that they hate eachother. Weird, you can only see sprits if you are close to death. Interesting....If that's true then someone who says that they can see ghosts are close to death ALL the time....but that can't be right. Someone can't be close to their death ALL the time, it's just not possible. But I have to rememeber that this is a book after all, and probably not a word about the afterlife in it is true. That's basically it. I know, I know. This review is not as long as some of the others, but there's really not much to say about this book....

  8. 5 out of 5

    Amith Cheeran

    I read this book because it was by Eoin Colfer, one of my two favorite authors, the other being Rick Riordan. Also, I needed a pretty funny read and sure enough Eoin served me with his best. It had The Colfer touch to it every page. The story was a pretty cliched one : Make amends with your enemies and do something good in your afterlife to gain entry into heaven. An interesting character was Lowrie McCall. He is lonely old man, a funny old man at that and is in a totally bad health condition. M I read this book because it was by Eoin Colfer, one of my two favorite authors, the other being Rick Riordan. Also, I needed a pretty funny read and sure enough Eoin served me with his best. It had The Colfer touch to it every page. The story was a pretty cliched one : Make amends with your enemies and do something good in your afterlife to gain entry into heaven. An interesting character was Lowrie McCall. He is lonely old man, a funny old man at that and is in a totally bad health condition. Meg Finn (main character) had to fulfill his Wish List (thus the name), to make her aura blue and gain access to heaven which has St.Peter as the gatekeeper. I thought giving him an iPhone to monitor the residents was a great touch. But if she screws up any wish, her aura turn red and sends her to hell. Also Satan and his assistant Beelzebub are trying desperately to get her to hell. But Lowrie doesn't make life any easier for the 13 year old Meg. He has some absurd wishes up his sleeve and is determined to get them done. “Satan was crouched in the corner of his office, playing a gameboy, 'Die alien scum' he was saying feverishly..” This quote perfectly shows how funny and creative the book is. This is exactly why I like Eoin Colfer's writing style, it never ceases to surprise the reader. "Maybe ahemming the Master of the Underworld was a bit of a no no." This quote also proves my point. Overall it takes the Heaven and Hell concept to a whole new level. This book shows you that live life to the purest and fullest, helping and being nice to others when you have the chance, so that you wont repent it when you cant change the past. Colfer you are great.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Fox

    I'm torn between giving this book one or two stars, but for my personal taste it veers heavily more towards the one. Eoin Colfer just isn't an author that is much to my liking. He's a bit too childish for my taste, and his humor veers more towards the "isn't this funny and random" rather than the more subtle. A lot of his humor is also technologically based, with jokes revolving around people not being technologically gifted or knowing what the word "upgrade" means. This might have been amusing I'm torn between giving this book one or two stars, but for my personal taste it veers heavily more towards the one. Eoin Colfer just isn't an author that is much to my liking. He's a bit too childish for my taste, and his humor veers more towards the "isn't this funny and random" rather than the more subtle. A lot of his humor is also technologically based, with jokes revolving around people not being technologically gifted or knowing what the word "upgrade" means. This might have been amusing to me as a kid, but as an adult it's just grating. Similarly, the devil playing a gameboy or wearing sweatpants just doesn't cut it for me. I need more substance to my humor. The basic plot is that Meg Finn dies in a failed break and entry alongside the thug she owed a favor to. Since her 'aura' is an even mix between good and bad she's allowed to return to earth for a certain period of time to skew it one way or the other. Good deeds make her aura good, bad deeds make it bad. The devil is as interested in Meg as God is, so he sends the thug ("Belch") after her in order to sabotage the mission. What follows is the run of the mill, girl and old man she saved in the break in go completing his list of things he wished he had done with his life.. The book just didn't do much for me. Meg wasn't a very likable protagonist and I don't feel her attitude changed very much over the course of the book. She was rude, impatient, and showed next to no real character development. She was 'too cool' to really admit that she liked Lowrie (the old man) throughout the course of the book, and that gets rather old. Not even their banter really developed much. Eoin Colfer might be a good read for younger readers, but for me he just fell flat time and time again.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Helen Mc

    The Wish List : Eoin Colfer The Wish List is a fantasy novel by Eoin Colfer who has also written the famous Arttemis Fowel series. This story tells of the adventures of Meg Finn, a young teenage girl killed in a gas explosion, who must return to Earth to help the pensioner she tried to rob in order to secure a place in Heaven. Megs mother is dead and she lives with her lazy and abusive stepfather, her only living family member. When Meg is forced to help the local idiotic criminal, Belch Brennan, The Wish List : Eoin Colfer The Wish List is a fantasy novel by Eoin Colfer who has also written the famous Arttemis Fowel series. This story tells of the adventures of Meg Finn, a young teenage girl killed in a gas explosion, who must return to Earth to help the pensioner she tried to rob in order to secure a place in Heaven. Megs mother is dead and she lives with her lazy and abusive stepfather, her only living family member. When Meg is forced to help the local idiotic criminal, Belch Brennan, to rob Lowrie McCall, the attempted crime ends with disaster. Dim-witted Belch decides to scare Meg by shooting near a gas tank resulting in an explosion killing them both and the vicious dog Raptor. Belch’s soul merges with the soul of his dog Raptors, making him half boy, half dog. He is sent straight to hell. Meg on the other hand has the perfect balance between good and evil which gives her the chance to redeem herself and get blue back in her aura. She is sent back to help Lowrie complete the items on his Wish List. However, Satan decides that he wants Megs soul and Belch is sent to capture Meg and “make her bad”. Following a confrontation at the Cliffs of Moher, Belch is destroyed and Megs final good deed, giving her stepfather a new life, gains her entry into Heaven where she is reunited with her mother. The Wish List is a book which, in my opinion, is best suited for children aged between 11 and 14 years old. The various themes and images portrayed throughout the story may set a good foundation for children’s creative writing. In my opinion, this is a wonderful, occasionally comical tale of forgiveness and redemption that can be enjoyed by both boys and girls, young and old alike.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    The whole time I was reading this I couldn't help thinking through my teacher brain about the kids for whom this is intended. I was wondering how many of them would get all the content based on Christian, specifically Catholic, ideas of the afterlife. Colfer plays around with Saint Peter, and demons, and purgatory, and how a soul gets to heaven but most of the kids I know don't have any background knowledge in that stuff. And I suppose if they did, they'd probably be kind of religious and maybe The whole time I was reading this I couldn't help thinking through my teacher brain about the kids for whom this is intended. I was wondering how many of them would get all the content based on Christian, specifically Catholic, ideas of the afterlife. Colfer plays around with Saint Peter, and demons, and purgatory, and how a soul gets to heaven but most of the kids I know don't have any background knowledge in that stuff. And I suppose if they did, they'd probably be kind of religious and maybe their parents wouldn't want to let them read a book in which Saint Peter has a cell phone that he uses to make bargains with demons. On the other hand, my religion student nerd self was kind of into it. That being said, Colfer has the right sense of humor for the adolescents he's aiming at and I did like the story. The main relationship, between the spirit of a dead teenage girl and a dying elderly man is really touching and I think that was one of my favorite parts of the book. I actually teared up a little bit toward the end.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Natty

    This book was surpirsing and genualiey heart warming. Not fuzzy-everyones-a-happy-little-ray-of-sunshine heart warming, but we-can-do-this-thing-together-old-man heart warming.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Karen Barber

    Simple, maybe, but a lovely story to illustrate the power of being good and looking out for others. When we first meet Belch and Meg they are breaking into the home of an old man called Lowrie. He doesn’t give in as they expect, fighting back and causing a problem. Belch overreacts in his determination to play the tough guy and ends up blowing up a gas tank, killing himself and Meg outright. The two teens are sucked into the tunnel and make their way towards their final destination. Belch is taken Simple, maybe, but a lovely story to illustrate the power of being good and looking out for others. When we first meet Belch and Meg they are breaking into the home of an old man called Lowrie. He doesn’t give in as they expect, fighting back and causing a problem. Belch overreacts in his determination to play the tough guy and ends up blowing up a gas tank, killing himself and Meg outright. The two teens are sucked into the tunnel and make their way towards their final destination. Belch is taken straight to Hell, but because she tried to save Lowrie at the last minute Meg is given the chance to return as a spirit and do something to sort out her situation. In a rather simplistic but very entertaining story we watch Meg develop a friendship with Lowrie as they work together to try and right a number of wrongs. Definite strains of Colfer’s humour throughout, and I think it would make a great primary school read to introduce people to Colfer’s style. I enjoyed the characters and the attempt to explore some religious concepts in a light and engaging way.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Smaug the Unmerciful Editor

    This story is fantastic and well executed. The writing is Eoin's unique style, and impeccable as usual, but this is definitely not a Christian book. Saint Peter, who guards the Pearly Gates, is portrayed as a bit of a fool, but the story never harps on Jesus or God. Satan is made fun of (which is fine) but turned into a harmless, goofy sort of being. Where you go when you die depends on how many good deeds you do in life, not whether or not you accept Christ. It's definitely and atheist book, bu This story is fantastic and well executed. The writing is Eoin's unique style, and impeccable as usual, but this is definitely not a Christian book. Saint Peter, who guards the Pearly Gates, is portrayed as a bit of a fool, but the story never harps on Jesus or God. Satan is made fun of (which is fine) but turned into a harmless, goofy sort of being. Where you go when you die depends on how many good deeds you do in life, not whether or not you accept Christ. It's definitely and atheist book, but still excellent in story.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Redfox5

    This is the Second book written by Eoin Colfer that I've read and it's just as good as the last one (The Supernaturalist, in case you were wondering). Meg gets blown up by a gas tank after a botched burglary with a nasty bloke called Belch. Belch gets sent straight to hell but it turns out that Meg's soul is 50/50. She gets sent back to Earth as a spirit to help get her into the Pearlies by helping the old man she burgled. She has to help him complete his wish list, but the devil also wants her This is the Second book written by Eoin Colfer that I've read and it's just as good as the last one (The Supernaturalist, in case you were wondering). Meg gets blown up by a gas tank after a botched burglary with a nasty bloke called Belch. Belch gets sent straight to hell but it turns out that Meg's soul is 50/50. She gets sent back to Earth as a spirit to help get her into the Pearlies by helping the old man she burgled. She has to help him complete his wish list, but the devil also wants her soul and sends Belch down to make it difficult. Meg and Lowrie start ticking of items and form a good relationship. This is a really sweet story. And Belch was so bad at his job, I never felt like the wishlist wasn't going to be completed. A quick enjoyable read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Mix

    Personal response: I believe that books in the fantasy and science fiction genres are exciting. The Wish List brings in an aspect of Heaven and Hell that makes me think about the things that people do and how it affects them. I personally loved reading this book and hope anyone else who picks up this book enjoys it. Plot: When Meg lived with Franco she began a life of trouble-making and involved herself with a brute named Belch with his dog Raptor. Franco, in the beginning of the book, was a compl Personal response: I believe that books in the fantasy and science fiction genres are exciting. The Wish List brings in an aspect of Heaven and Hell that makes me think about the things that people do and how it affects them. I personally loved reading this book and hope anyone else who picks up this book enjoys it. Plot: When Meg lived with Franco she began a life of trouble-making and involved herself with a brute named Belch with his dog Raptor. Franco, in the beginning of the book, was a complete slob and Meg hated him for it. Meg had lived with him until he sold Meg's mother's ring, which was given to Meg before her mother died in a car accident. Meg retaliated by smashing his new television that he bought with the ring money and recorded him crying about it. Characterization: Meg Finn was an energetic 14 year old girl who lived with her mom and Franco until her mom died and she went to rob an old man. She was a brat that was rude, not trust worthy, and a real menace to society and now she died she is trying complete enough good in her purgatory to change herself into heaven material. Throughout her time as a spirit she learns to forgive and forget, which allows her to ascend in her time of need. Impacts of setting: The book The Wish List took place in Ireland in the city during a small time frame long ago. Heaven and Hell were explained in small details throughout the duration of the book. The author took to heart explaining the depths of Hell, but did not explain much more that the Pearly gates. Thematic Connection: A primary theme is redemption or a second chance. Meg is faced with a sight of her future if she does not change her way of life she will go to hell. Her story points out the importance of being a good person so that even in the afterlife existence is not as cruel. Recommendation: I recommend this book to all of those who are religious or not, because the reader does not have to be religious to read a book that involves God. I give it a five out of five for a star rating. Both genders would enjoy reading this book because the main character is a girl, while her partner is a male. Ages 13 and up should readThe Wish List because this book contains harsh treatment and graphic imagery.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Matt Sands

    Death. Just one word can change someone's life. Can somebody really be too good for hell and too bad for heaven? Meg Finn can and she is. After dealing with her mother's death, Meg's abusive father shuns her and kicks her out of her own home. As a drifter, she does what she can to survive, but sometimes people make mistakes. After being forced to help Belch Brennan rob an old man, the situation ends in a disaster. Were it not for Belch shooting the gas tank, him, Meg, and his dog, Raptor, would Death. Just one word can change someone's life. Can somebody really be too good for hell and too bad for heaven? Meg Finn can and she is. After dealing with her mother's death, Meg's abusive father shuns her and kicks her out of her own home. As a drifter, she does what she can to survive, but sometimes people make mistakes. After being forced to help Belch Brennan rob an old man, the situation ends in a disaster. Were it not for Belch shooting the gas tank, him, Meg, and his dog, Raptor, would still be alive. Unfortunately, after this disaster, Belch is sent straight to hell with his dog, while Meg has nowhere to go. By being balanced between good and bad, Meg is given a second chance to redeem herself by helping Lowrie McCall (the elderly she attempted to rob) complete his wish list. Though this seems simple, Meg must also avoid being made evil by Belch after Satan sends him after Meg. Through her battles and strong efforts, Meg eventually destroys Belch and is able to complete her final task of giving her stepfather a new life. With this, she gains entry to heaven, where she once again sees her mom. This was an interesting novel. With many twists and turns, the reader didn't know what to expect. The theme of this novel was redemption and how people are given second chances that they must not take for granted. Throughout the novel, Meg shows her strength as a person and how she is able to accomplish any task no matter what obstacles get in her way. The author's purpose in writing this novel was again to show the reader that second chances are given and that one must handle their second chance by correcting all the wrongs they had committed before. I liked this novel, though I would not necessarily recommend it as a high school read. I would rather recommend it for a junior high student. Overall, it was a well-written, compelling novel with much suspense and entertainment.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    By the end of the first chapter, 14 year old Meg Finn is dead, along with her 16 year old partner in crime, Belch, and his ravening pit bull of indeterminate age. Her last living act--robbing an old age pensioner. Belch's last living act--miscalculating the effect of shot gun pellets on a rusty old gas tank. Next time we see Meg, she's a spirit awaiting her fate. But when her good and bad deeds are totaled--surprise!--it's a tie. Apparently there's no tossing a coin in the afterlife. Meg is sent By the end of the first chapter, 14 year old Meg Finn is dead, along with her 16 year old partner in crime, Belch, and his ravening pit bull of indeterminate age. Her last living act--robbing an old age pensioner. Belch's last living act--miscalculating the effect of shot gun pellets on a rusty old gas tank. Next time we see Meg, she's a spirit awaiting her fate. But when her good and bad deeds are totaled--surprise!--it's a tie. Apparently there's no tossing a coin in the afterlife. Meg is sent back to earth until her life force gives out, at which time surely the scales will have tipped one way or the other. I won't tell you how it all turns out, but trust the incredibly imaginative Eoin Colfer to provide surprises, wit, and pathos as Meg tries to help a robbery victim and old age pensioner tick off the last four items on his bucket list. Satan has different plans, however, and sends the spirit of Belch (inextricably mixed with the soul of his pit bull) to stop her. I just wanted to add that it is what DIDN'T happen in the book that impressed me as much as what did. I liked the fact that Meg didn't get another chance at mortal life, that she didn't acquire a love interest, and that Lowry, Meg's old age pensioner, didn't accomplish quite everything on his to-do list. Colfer may caricature the denizens of heaven and hell, but for the reader Meg and Lowry come to life.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Brent

    Where do I start? 1. The story telling was great. Eoin Colfer is very good at keeping the reader engaged. 2. The entire premise of the book, along with evry nuance of the after life, or ghosts, or what salvation is based on is completely the opposite of what the Bible says. It took many many religions (except Christianity) and mysticism and blended them together and came out with this. It is stories like this that mislead people into thinking they can earn their way to heaven, or that the good nee Where do I start? 1. The story telling was great. Eoin Colfer is very good at keeping the reader engaged. 2. The entire premise of the book, along with evry nuance of the after life, or ghosts, or what salvation is based on is completely the opposite of what the Bible says. It took many many religions (except Christianity) and mysticism and blended them together and came out with this. It is stories like this that mislead people into thinking they can earn their way to heaven, or that the good needs to outweigh the bad, and since this is for young readers, who are very impressionable, I cannot recommend this book to anyone. 3. For the record, no one can ever be good enough to earn heaven. We all know it, which is why someone who was perfect needed to pay the price of our sin for us. His name was Jesus, God in the flesh. (God was like, "These guys can't make their way here, do I need to do this myself? Yes, yes I do." And he came down from His throne to save us from punishment we deserve and give to us freely what we don't..... forgiveness. We just have to ask for it and recieve it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Khalia Hades

    The heroine, Meg Fin, finds herself prematurely in the hereafter, due to her and her partner in crime, Belch, untimely death while they are trying to rob an ageing pensioner, Lowrie McCall. Meg's balance sheet tallies to an unusual 50/50. Since neither heaven nor hell can claim her, she is sent back by St. Peter to help Lowrie. If she can tilt the balance sheet by doing good, she will go to heaven. However, Satan has decided he'd like to have someone of Meg's intelligence and determination in he The heroine, Meg Fin, finds herself prematurely in the hereafter, due to her and her partner in crime, Belch, untimely death while they are trying to rob an ageing pensioner, Lowrie McCall. Meg's balance sheet tallies to an unusual 50/50. Since neither heaven nor hell can claim her, she is sent back by St. Peter to help Lowrie. If she can tilt the balance sheet by doing good, she will go to heaven. However, Satan has decided he'd like to have someone of Meg's intelligence and determination in hell, so he sends Belch to drag her back. Lowrie feels he wasted his life. The Wish List is a list Lowrie has made of four things he wants to do before dying and Meg must help him achieve them if she wants to get to heaven. How they work together, and while so doing, develop a deep respect and compassion for each other, is amazing. Meg comes to understand Lowrie's life and heart and develops a deep compassion for him and a determination to help him atain his four wishes before he dies. Lowrie also comes to understand Meg's deep sorrow after losing her mother.

  21. 5 out of 5

    K.C.

    Now this is an interesting book. It dives somewhat into the realms of religion - if Satan is real or not, how he would act upon hearing the news of a soul he's trying to snatch. Meg Finn is neither good nor bad in the beginning - perhaps just mixed in with the wrong kind of folk. She has to help Lowrie with his wish list in order to get into the "Pearlies". I believe this book to be a few steps down from Artemis Fowl. Artemis Fowl is complete fantasy and sci-fi. This book, although written with o Now this is an interesting book. It dives somewhat into the realms of religion - if Satan is real or not, how he would act upon hearing the news of a soul he's trying to snatch. Meg Finn is neither good nor bad in the beginning - perhaps just mixed in with the wrong kind of folk. She has to help Lowrie with his wish list in order to get into the "Pearlies". I believe this book to be a few steps down from Artemis Fowl. Artemis Fowl is complete fantasy and sci-fi. This book, although written with originality, (involving a not-so-original idea, ie. afterlife), seems to have a lower level of fantasy than Artemis Fowl does. Fantasy lovers will still love this book, although slightly less than Artemis Fowl.

  22. 4 out of 5

    C.P. Cabaniss

    While I found this overall interesting and well written, I didn't find it as compelling as other books from Colfer that I've read. This story follows a girl who enters death with an equal tally on both her bad and good deeds. This gives her a chance to revisit the land of the living to try and shift her tally one way or the other. There were some laugh worthy moments through her journey and some sad moments as well. James Wilby narrated the audiobook that I listened to for this. There were certa While I found this overall interesting and well written, I didn't find it as compelling as other books from Colfer that I've read. This story follows a girl who enters death with an equal tally on both her bad and good deeds. This gives her a chance to revisit the land of the living to try and shift her tally one way or the other. There were some laugh worthy moments through her journey and some sad moments as well. James Wilby narrated the audiobook that I listened to for this. There were certain aspects of his reading that I enjoyed a lot, some of his voices were a bit difficult to understand at times.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Art

    Humorous look at earning one's way into the Pearly Gates. Along w/how the Master of Hades works w/his Minions. Good Tale by Eoin Colfer. He knows how to spin a good yarn, using his Characters from "Artemis Fowler". I was thinking of C.S. Lewis and the "Screwtape letters" and "Hercules" by Disney.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Clarissa

    So not doctrinally sound when it comes to life after death and choice and accountability, but a very interesting read. Great to read with younger (or older) teeenagers and get their perspectives on agency, eternity, and charity. Liked it better than his one Artemis Fowl that I've read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Myra Sullivan

    Eoin Colfer had only worked with male protagonists in his previous books up until this one. I thought the idea was unique and I enjoyed the adventures that Meg and Lowrie got up to while trying to fulfill his wish list.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Katy

    Eoin Colfer has a witty, sarcastic writing style that he uses even when writing about serious subjects that I love.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Brigid ✩

    Great book! A fast read, with an intriguing and original premise, unique characters – a somewhat depressing story, but told with a touch of humor and hope. I really liked it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Louisa

    Really good book, fun, interesting, and really unique! Loved it!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Brenda-Jean Shephard

    (2000) In a uniquely imaginative premise, 14-year-old Meg Finn loses her life, but her eternal destination - up or down - cannot be determined. The archangel and demon in charge of entrance to heaven and hell come to an agreement that she will be sent back to earth to earn points or damn herself. Back on earth, she is tasked with helping an elderly gentleman who sees no point in living. He has a list of regrets he would like to amend. Meanwhile, enemy forces are also sent in to prevent Meg and L (2000) In a uniquely imaginative premise, 14-year-old Meg Finn loses her life, but her eternal destination - up or down - cannot be determined. The archangel and demon in charge of entrance to heaven and hell come to an agreement that she will be sent back to earth to earn points or damn herself. Back on earth, she is tasked with helping an elderly gentleman who sees no point in living. He has a list of regrets he would like to amend. Meanwhile, enemy forces are also sent in to prevent Meg and Lowrie from accomplishing their goals. Being not alive has challenges like being invisible and running out of energy, but Meg learns that she has new powers including teleportation and being able to take control of Lowrie's body to enable him to do things he wouldn't otherwise have strength for. His wish list includes kissing a woman he'd failed to kiss 40 years earlier, kicking a soccer ball at Croke Park, confronting a bully from the past, and spitting over the Cliffs of Moher. Along the way, Meg also confronts her own abusive stepfather, and ends up forgiving him. Through this final act of goodness, Meg earns entrance to heaven, where she will reunite with her mother. This book is available in audio (narrated in multiple accents by James Wilby) and e-book format as well as hard copy. I downloaded audio and e-book to compare, and ended up both listening and reading. It was very convenient to be able to carry the book in my pocket, on my phone, and I can now recommend that to students and walk them through the process of signing up for online access using their LAPL account. target audience: 4th-8th grade

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia

    Meg Finn is 14 years old and is very unhappy. Her mother is dead, and her step-father is not nice. The step-father finds the diamond ring Meg's mother gave her and he sells it to buy a TV. He also steals what money Meg has managed to save. Meg borrows a camera and films her step-father in all his grossness. Then Meg plays the film for a group of men who really do not like the step-father. Unfortunately, for Meg, the owner of the camera calls for pay-back--they will rob an elderly man. They get ca Meg Finn is 14 years old and is very unhappy. Her mother is dead, and her step-father is not nice. The step-father finds the diamond ring Meg's mother gave her and he sells it to buy a TV. He also steals what money Meg has managed to save. Meg borrows a camera and films her step-father in all his grossness. Then Meg plays the film for a group of men who really do not like the step-father. Unfortunately, for Meg, the owner of the camera calls for pay-back--they will rob an elderly man. They get caught. Then they end up dead. This story is how Meg turns her life around and get to heaven. The story is OK, but not one I want to read again.

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