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What would happen if Socrates--yes, the Socrates of ancient Athens--suddenly showed up on the campus of a major university and enrolled in its divinity school? What would he think of human progress since his day? How would he react to our values? To our culture? And what would he think of Jesus? Peter Kreeft, Christian philosopher and longtime admirer of the historic Socra What would happen if Socrates--yes, the Socrates of ancient Athens--suddenly showed up on the campus of a major university and enrolled in its divinity school? What would he think of human progress since his day? How would he react to our values? To our culture? And what would he think of Jesus? Peter Kreeft, Christian philosopher and longtime admirer of the historic Socrates, imagines the result. In this drama Socrates meets such fellow students as Bertha Broadmind, Thomas Keptic and Molly Mooney. Throughout, Kreeft weaves an intriguing web as he brings Socrates closer and closer to a meeting with Jesus. Here is a startling and provocative portrayal of reason in search of truth. In a new introduction to this revised edition, Kreeft also highlights the inspiration for this book and the key questions of truth and faith it addresses.


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What would happen if Socrates--yes, the Socrates of ancient Athens--suddenly showed up on the campus of a major university and enrolled in its divinity school? What would he think of human progress since his day? How would he react to our values? To our culture? And what would he think of Jesus? Peter Kreeft, Christian philosopher and longtime admirer of the historic Socra What would happen if Socrates--yes, the Socrates of ancient Athens--suddenly showed up on the campus of a major university and enrolled in its divinity school? What would he think of human progress since his day? How would he react to our values? To our culture? And what would he think of Jesus? Peter Kreeft, Christian philosopher and longtime admirer of the historic Socrates, imagines the result. In this drama Socrates meets such fellow students as Bertha Broadmind, Thomas Keptic and Molly Mooney. Throughout, Kreeft weaves an intriguing web as he brings Socrates closer and closer to a meeting with Jesus. Here is a startling and provocative portrayal of reason in search of truth. In a new introduction to this revised edition, Kreeft also highlights the inspiration for this book and the key questions of truth and faith it addresses.

30 review for Socrates Meets Jesus: History's Greatest Questioner Confronts the Claims of Christ

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

    Peter Kreeft is perhaps one of the best known presenters of Christian Apologetics in the world today, and one of the few for whom I have any respect. That being said, Socrates Meets Jesus is a a tremendous disappointment. The rise of fanatical Evangelism has contributed to Christian apologists becoming a dying breed, and this book fails to help preserve their survival. Socrates represents the ultimate rational skeptic, and his name is among the pillars of Western philosophy. If Peter Kreeft c Peter Kreeft is perhaps one of the best known presenters of Christian Apologetics in the world today, and one of the few for whom I have any respect. That being said, Socrates Meets Jesus is a a tremendous disappointment. The rise of fanatical Evangelism has contributed to Christian apologists becoming a dying breed, and this book fails to help preserve their survival. Socrates represents the ultimate rational skeptic, and his name is among the pillars of Western philosophy. If Peter Kreeft can convince Socrates to believe in God, then his battle is won, right? Well, perhaps, but regardless, it's a battle he most certainly loses (Which is actually impressive since he's really just arguing with himself). Kreeft is forced to deal with the clashing intentions of this book. One intention is to convince the rational mind (in this case Socrates) that it is not only perfectly logical and reasonable to believe in God, but a perfectly rational and logical person would believe in God. Yet Kreeft is faced with same problem Thomas Aquinas faced in the Summa Theologica , that reason and logic alone cannot bring you to a belief in God. Anselm tried to power his way through the problem with his a priori being of perfection. Augustine and Anselm tried to side-step it. But what does Kreeft do? He tries to write it off as not being important. But the problem is, it IS important. Which is why the issue of its importance takes up the whole first 6/8ths of his book. I was actually enjoying the book, up until the very end when I almost threw the book across the room. Kreeft paints Socrates well until the end. Socrates remains the consummate logician, following the trail of reasoning like a bloodhound, and latching onto inconsistencies like a rottweiler. Yet ultimately, we are faced with a problem. With Socrates remaining true to his logical and skeptical nature, we find it's impossible for Socrates to accept the existence of God prima facie . Logic will always end up steering him off the path of belief. To deal with this Kreeft basically ruins the whole book. He makes Socrates have a "religious experience," a "vision." Socrates then knowingly throws out all logic or reason, and dismisses them as being no longer relevant. He digs in his heels, sets his jaw, and suddenly becomes an ardent believer even though he can't explain why. Essentially, Kreeft makes Socrates become someone other than Socrates. Instead of acknowledging the problem of how Logic can only take you so far, like Thomas Aquinas did. Peter Kreeft tries to solve the problem by changing the game pieces. Thomas Aquinas tried to use what tools we have within realm of logic, in order to help people make that leap of faith easier and shorter. Peter Kreeft decides that logic is just too damn hard, so the hell with it anyway. But wait! Peter Kreeft is a logician, so... Oh, right. Logic is great and all until it becomes unable to mold to the shape you want to give it. "This pen is blue dammit! Even if I have to rearrange the schema of the rainbow to do it!" "But Peter, weren't you initially trying to convince me that the pen is blue by explaining the blueness of it? You even said that the pen's blueness was self-evident." "Yeah I was, but I can't do it. So I'm changing the meaning of the word blue. All better now." "So what was the point of you even trying to convince me?" "I didn't convince you? But... I waved my hand, used magic, and made it blue. Shouldn't that convince you I was right?" "Um...Peter?... I think you should go take a nap now." My advice about what to do with this book? Start reading this book, you'll enjoy it. Then when you get to the last 10-20 pages or so, stop. Because if you continue on it will make you want to urinate on garden gnomes. And nobody likes pee-splattered garden gnomes, do they?

  2. 5 out of 5

    Walter

    Peter Kreeft, one of the foremost Christian philosophers today, wrote this satirical work about the ancient Greek philosopher Socrates, who is mysteriously resurrected on the modern day campus of "Have It" University. In this dialogue, which is reminiscent of Plato's dialogues, Socrates questions graduate theological students at this elite Ivy League university about Jesus Christ and the claims of the Bible. The dialogue is fascinating, at times hilarious, at other times profound. Socrates reads Peter Kreeft, one of the foremost Christian philosophers today, wrote this satirical work about the ancient Greek philosopher Socrates, who is mysteriously resurrected on the modern day campus of "Have It" University. In this dialogue, which is reminiscent of Plato's dialogues, Socrates questions graduate theological students at this elite Ivy League university about Jesus Christ and the claims of the Bible. The dialogue is fascinating, at times hilarious, at other times profound. Socrates reads the Bible and comments on its claims from a philosophical point of view. Then he questions his fellow theology students about their culture, their beliefs and the philosophy that they take for granted. It is fascinating how the philosophical assumptions of modern theologians fall so much more quickly at the feet of Socrates' questioning than do the claims and assumptions of scripture. It is also fascinating to read how a transplant from Ancient Greece would interact with modern American society. One of the great things about Kreeft is how he is able take the thought and assumptions of various philosophers from the many ages of the Western mind and distill them in a way that allows him to see the world as they would see it, if they were still here. In his "Socrates meets..." series, Kreeft inserts Socrates into the thoughts of many different philosophers and examines their thought through the lens of pure reason as Socrates practiced it. In using humor, Kreeft helps the reader to keep interest in complicated subjects that would bore the student in the lecture hall. And he keeps everything relevant for the non-philosopher as well. I would highly recommend this book to anyone who is interested in philosophy, Christianity, and the intersection of the two.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    Kreeft is not a genius, and he has written some howlers, most recently on ecumenism. That said, I wish I could have given this to my students instead of Christianity and Liberalism by Machen, because many Christian kids just do not understand what liberalism is saying, and this book gives the view almost a full hearing, and Kreeft decisively shows, perhaps overmuch, why it fails. Now, I recognize that this book needs to be balanced by exhortations to patience, the recognition that people are usua Kreeft is not a genius, and he has written some howlers, most recently on ecumenism. That said, I wish I could have given this to my students instead of Christianity and Liberalism by Machen, because many Christian kids just do not understand what liberalism is saying, and this book gives the view almost a full hearing, and Kreeft decisively shows, perhaps overmuch, why it fails. Now, I recognize that this book needs to be balanced by exhortations to patience, the recognition that people are usually swayed by rhetoric and life-witness as well as by truth, and by a strong, robust theology of charity that does not turn people and their problems or actions into easily diagnosed "propositions" that are either true or false. I think I was sort of like that as a high school/early college student, but I think now I almost tilt the other way. Heh, I probably tilt in the wrong way whenever it is convenient. In other words, we need Richard Hooker as well as J. Gresham Machen or Charles Hodge. Kreeft makes the basic point that loving the heretic cannot and must not include loving the heresy. That point stands, and I wish that more Evangelicals would read some of this stuff, given how liberal Evangelicalism is coming, in ethos if not in doctrine. Finally, Kreeft is, I think, the only person I have read who is reproducing C.S. Lewis' apologetic method. Passages in the last chapters are especially reminiscent of Miracles, and it's even combined with some pop "doctrine of God" stuff (i.e. God's transcendence and immanence is briefly discussed). That kind of thing needs to be done more, and I wish Canon Press could publish some of those, since the method seems so useful. Also, ideal for waking up young people to philosophy, and for inspiring older people to go back to it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rod Horncastle

    I'm gonna have to read this a few more times - This is almost the most enjoyable reading experience I have ever had. So much fun! Reading a book thats written in the style of a play (all dialogue) is sure a fast moving experience. I would love to see a group perform this...it's very possible, and endlessly entertaining. Socrates has probably never been so humorous. This book is an interesting challenge: would Socrates end up a Bible believing Christian using his questioning methods to investigate I'm gonna have to read this a few more times - This is almost the most enjoyable reading experience I have ever had. So much fun! Reading a book thats written in the style of a play (all dialogue) is sure a fast moving experience. I would love to see a group perform this...it's very possible, and endlessly entertaining. Socrates has probably never been so humorous. This book is an interesting challenge: would Socrates end up a Bible believing Christian using his questioning methods to investigate the Truth of Christianity? Maybe? Maybe NOT. The Bible tells us that it isn't pure logic that makes someone a Christian - there's a heart angle as well. And it seems that Peter Kreeft has given Socrates a heart in this story. Not just a heart (everyone has one of those) but a heart that longs for the truth of God. I haven't read enough Socrates to know if this has any truth to it. The moments of brilliance in this story are observing Socrates challenging liberal Christians (which generally aren't Christians at all) to explore the core of their unbiblical thinking. Liberals generally only follow the Bible as far as it agrees with the God they imagine meets their needs and desires. But Kreeft and Socrates suggest the Biblical God is very specific and must be acknowledged as the deity found in ALL of scripture - not just the lovey parts that agree with liberal theology - Love and Justice in the Old and New Testaments. I'm now on a quest to find Kreeft other Socrates offerings: Apparently there are discussions with numerous other historical thinkers.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Steven Robertson

    Absolutely brilliant. LOVED. IT.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    I choose this word purposefully: this book is delightful. Mr. Kreeft imagines the ancient Greek philosopher Socrates appearing on the campus of a thinly disguised Harvard University, where he enrolls in the Divinity School's graduate program and begins to make everyone insane. I have been a fan of Socrates for a long time, and I found the author's insights to be both amusing and thought-provoking. Socrates, who lived and died before Jesus, approaches the idea of Christianity with his keen, logic I choose this word purposefully: this book is delightful. Mr. Kreeft imagines the ancient Greek philosopher Socrates appearing on the campus of a thinly disguised Harvard University, where he enrolls in the Divinity School's graduate program and begins to make everyone insane. I have been a fan of Socrates for a long time, and I found the author's insights to be both amusing and thought-provoking. Socrates, who lived and died before Jesus, approaches the idea of Christianity with his keen, logical mind, and through many pages of questions and answers, manages to disassemble much of what passes for theological thinking in the modern era. While that sounds heavy, it is not: Mr. Kreeft has a very light touch, and makes reading about deep philosophical questions and conundrums quite enjoyable. I wish I had majored in philosophy in college. I'm pretty much self-taught, which is difficult since philosophy is very...philosophical. Wonderful book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Achord

    Reading Kreeft's Socrates is like trying to iron a shirt while riding a rollercoaster; like trying to eat spaghetti while boxing Mike Tyson; like trying to whack those goffer things at Chuck-E-Cheese, while intoxicated; like trying to transverse an M.C. Escher stairwell that is on fire; like trying to juggle baby alligator snapping turtles; like trying to comb a hedgehog with a slice of cucumber. I find it interesting, enlightening, and memorable, to say the least. I recommend this book to my be Reading Kreeft's Socrates is like trying to iron a shirt while riding a rollercoaster; like trying to eat spaghetti while boxing Mike Tyson; like trying to whack those goffer things at Chuck-E-Cheese, while intoxicated; like trying to transverse an M.C. Escher stairwell that is on fire; like trying to juggle baby alligator snapping turtles; like trying to comb a hedgehog with a slice of cucumber. I find it interesting, enlightening, and memorable, to say the least. I recommend this book to my best friends and worst enemies.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Isaac

    As a high school student and beginning Theologian reading Peter Kreeft for one of the first times, I found this book interesting, yet sometimes exhausting book to read. Socrates Meets Jesus made very sound and logical (which I expected from Peter Kreeft after reading one of his books on Logic) points through it's fantastical settings and stereotypical characters, but it took it's sweet time making them. I enjoyed this book overall and found it to be thought provoking and funny. But I would need As a high school student and beginning Theologian reading Peter Kreeft for one of the first times, I found this book interesting, yet sometimes exhausting book to read. Socrates Meets Jesus made very sound and logical (which I expected from Peter Kreeft after reading one of his books on Logic) points through it's fantastical settings and stereotypical characters, but it took it's sweet time making them. I enjoyed this book overall and found it to be thought provoking and funny. But I would need a good break before I would want to read another "Socrates meets.." book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Niall

    How can I put it nicely... While mildly entertaining it isn't long before this book descends into some crazy whacked out bullshit. A somewhat entertaining work of fiction but of very little merit except if you want to find out how the writer consolidates the philosophy of Socrates with his own ideals and beliefs about Christianity How can I put it nicely... While mildly entertaining it isn't long before this book descends into some crazy whacked out bullshit. A somewhat entertaining work of fiction but of very little merit except if you want to find out how the writer consolidates the philosophy of Socrates with his own ideals and beliefs about Christianity

  10. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    A diverting, quick read. I was rather taken with the stage adaptation I'd seen live some years ago but only just now got around to reading the original book. (https://youtu.be/ZWxop3Kz8Fg) This could no doubt be considered a "fictional, abridged" version of some more comprehensive Feser book on "Christology" or what-have-you. A diverting, quick read. I was rather taken with the stage adaptation I'd seen live some years ago but only just now got around to reading the original book. (https://youtu.be/ZWxop3Kz8Fg) This could no doubt be considered a "fictional, abridged" version of some more comprehensive Feser book on "Christology" or what-have-you.

  11. 4 out of 5

    James Nance

    A fun read, though not as well crafted as "Between Heaven and Hell" A fun read, though not as well crafted as "Between Heaven and Hell"

  12. 4 out of 5

    Thom Willis

    I did not feel compelled to finish this book. I love Peter Kreeft, but this, for some reason, just doesn't hold up to his other works. I recently read his Socratic dialogue on Marxism, which was fantastic. This is just not that great. Watch the stage adaptation of it, however. That's worth seeing. (I was actually at this production.) I did not feel compelled to finish this book. I love Peter Kreeft, but this, for some reason, just doesn't hold up to his other works. I recently read his Socratic dialogue on Marxism, which was fantastic. This is just not that great. Watch the stage adaptation of it, however. That's worth seeing. (I was actually at this production.)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kendall Davis

    Creative and well done. This book is more about exposing the logical inconsistencies of various forms of modern theological liberalism than one might expect, but Kreeft does this with ample wit and humor.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Socrates Meets Jesus: History's Greatest Questioner Confronts the Claims of Christ. Downers Grove: IVP Books, 2002 Socrates Meets Jesus is book with a creative story-line and a miraculous ending. The thesis of this book is that the claims of Christ are not false and absurd. They are so robust and true that even history's greatest questioner, Socrates, would have great reason to reject deism, open theism, and other worldviews through the reading, testing, and examination of the trustworthy Word of Socrates Meets Jesus: History's Greatest Questioner Confronts the Claims of Christ. Downers Grove: IVP Books, 2002 Socrates Meets Jesus is book with a creative story-line and a miraculous ending. The thesis of this book is that the claims of Christ are not false and absurd. They are so robust and true that even history's greatest questioner, Socrates, would have great reason to reject deism, open theism, and other worldviews through the reading, testing, and examination of the trustworthy Word of God. This philosophical work is a collection of interactions between Socrates and students at Have it Divinity School ending with Socrates' acceptance of the gospel through philosophical and logical reasoning and God's Word. Kreeft's story line is simple, Socrates comes back to life in this age to discover the modern day beliefs of many professing Christians and then evaluate The Scriptures in order to come to a final, rounded understanding of Jesus. Through the book, Socrates seems to slowly realize that the miracle of his return to earth years after his death was an act of a higher being and he even eludes to the fact that this higher being may be more than the god's that were worshiped in his day, but rather a single God who is Sovereign. He comes to this realization through a presentational idea that he has a porpoise in being back on earth, most likely the discovery of a new idea or a more rounded understanding of the “Unknown God”. Peter Kreeft did an amazing job at portraying the historical Socrates living in a modern context in a way that pouts his historical method of learning on display and applies it to the claims of Christ as well as The Scriptures. The Socrates displayed in this book used the Socratic method of asking questions in a way that makes this imaginary Socrates come alive in a philosophically accurate portrayal of what would actually happen. It's hard to open to a page of this book without reading some kind of clever and eyeopening question that displays the effectiveness of the Socratic method in a theological and christian context. An example of this is when he is talking to Bertha about how love and justice correlate. “Why could God not be both a loving God and a just God?... Does not love make its own judgments? Has love no eyes? And is love not like an earthquake as well as like a still small voice? In fact, is not love the greatest earthquake?” (56). Socrates Meets Jesus is filled with eyeopening truths and ideas that challenge the liberal perspective of religion. Socrates uses his method of asking questions in order to challenge the liberal idea of miracles (59-76), ethics (91), essence of religion (88-98), and being open minded (79-83). In Kreeft's section What is the point of being open minded?, Kreeft helps the reader realized how irrational it is to be open minded without a desire and goal of coming to understand a truthful idea or logical, truthful conclusion. Kreeft uses Socrates to help drive the point home that being open minded is similar to the point of opening ones mouth; to bite down on something, in this situation, a dependable truth. The book can also help readers understand the problem with the Open-Theist idea of love. Socrates shows that if the Scriptures are true, the loving thing to do is not shut up and let the ones being lied to parish, but rather speak up about what is true and help others see it. The largest strength of this book is the effect it can have on world view. Everyone has a world view but not everyone has a correct one and Kreeft helps challenge so many ideas and bring false ideas to their logical conclusions by bringing out contradictions that are sometimes overlooked. Socrates uses a presupposition approach to thinking about the ideas on love, truth, joy, and many other topics showing the contradictions that appear all over different worldviews and Ultimately, ending in the acceptance of Jesus and God's Word in The Bible as the only reasonable explanation of everything. The thesis of this book that the claims of Christ are not false and absurd but are so robust and true that even history's greatest questioner, Socrates, would have great reason to reject deism, open theism, and other worldviews through the reading, testing, and examination of the trustworthy Word of God.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Adam Graham

    Peter Kreeft is the master of the rare art of fictional philosophical dialogs. While Between Heaven & Hell is perhaps the best known of these, Socrates Meets Jesus is a worthy entry. Socrates doesn't meet and dialog with Jesus, rather he dialogs about Jesus with modern 20th Century students on the fictional Have It University Divinity Schoo, a thinly veiled version of Harvard Divinity School where he encounters students like Bertha Broadmind and Thomas Keptic. While their names indicate roles the Peter Kreeft is the master of the rare art of fictional philosophical dialogs. While Between Heaven & Hell is perhaps the best known of these, Socrates Meets Jesus is a worthy entry. Socrates doesn't meet and dialog with Jesus, rather he dialogs about Jesus with modern 20th Century students on the fictional Have It University Divinity Schoo, a thinly veiled version of Harvard Divinity School where he encounters students like Bertha Broadmind and Thomas Keptic. While their names indicate roles they play, Kreeft does a surprisingly good job making them real and sympathetic characters. Kreeft doesn't begin with the big issues of the resurrection but starts smaller with discussions of ideas such as whether we are really progressing as humans and the idea of how we interpret a book, whether we interpret it by what is meant or by what the author meant. The answer may seem obvious but many do quite the opposite. Then he discusses whether Miracles happen with a teacher of Science and Religion. And then discusses concepts of openmindedness. The book then wraps up with a 3-chapter series in a Christology class. This is an enjoyable book. Kreeft's Socrates is indeed, a great questioner, challenging constantly the orthodoxy of an age that has abandoned clear-thinking for pseudo-religiosity with ideas that stating the definitive truth of the resurrection is to be avoided at all costs to interpreting scripture to teach what we'd like it to rather than what it actually does. As another reviewer pointed out, Socrates does have an experience of meeting Christ through his study of the New Testament, a religious experience. While it does have Socrates broach his general character, I think it was a theologically honest stroke by Kreeft. Reason can answer many questions about Christianity, it cannot bring us to faith in Christ, that is the work of the Holy Spirit. Thus to have Socrates defend the resurrection and other Christian doctrines in the final chapter, Socrates must first come to Christ. Overall, this was a great work that was as fun as it was intellectually stimulating.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Emily Cook

    One of the first books assigned to my daughter for her high school class at Wittenberg Academy. Excellent read!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tom Talamantez

    I am adding Socrates meets Jesus to my required reading shelf. This book is brilliant in it's simplicity. Using Socratic diologue, Kreeft creates conversations with students who are the products of 20th century progressive education. Through simple Q&A, Socrates challenges faulty premises and leads students to think about the presuppositions regarding Jesus that they have blindly accepted. I think this book is important because as Christians, we are often anxious to just give someone the right a I am adding Socrates meets Jesus to my required reading shelf. This book is brilliant in it's simplicity. Using Socratic diologue, Kreeft creates conversations with students who are the products of 20th century progressive education. Through simple Q&A, Socrates challenges faulty premises and leads students to think about the presuppositions regarding Jesus that they have blindly accepted. I think this book is important because as Christians, we are often anxious to just give someone the right answer, but as Kreeft shows, it is often more important to ask the right question than to give the right answer. Helping folks examine their beliefs and arrive at the right answer themselves is of paramount importance in helping people meet the real Jesus. From an evangelism standpoint, I think it also helps believers determine if the person we are engaging is interested in finding the truth. The biblical criteria for finding God requires a complete commitment to finding truth. God says that "you will find Me if you seek for me with all of your heart", a promise made to every person. C.S. Lewis followed the same logical process to determine that Jesus could only be Lord, a liar or a lunatic, all other personas applied to Jesus are just not supported by His claims or the eyewitness accounts of His contemporaries. Okay, this review is starting to feel preachy, so let me just say that I highly recommend this book and many others by Peter Kreeft.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Andriel Costiuc

    Although slightly corny in its approach to naming, the book is a solid read, in depth and superbly critical of the thought processes that pervade in our society. Much of what people believe is not based on research and deep thinking, but in gut-feeling and 'I-wish-it-was' mentality. And this does not necessarily pertain to nonbelievers, but to the Christian population as well. So much of modern Christians and Evangelicals are engaging in a dangerous game of syncretism. The book provides a clear-e Although slightly corny in its approach to naming, the book is a solid read, in depth and superbly critical of the thought processes that pervade in our society. Much of what people believe is not based on research and deep thinking, but in gut-feeling and 'I-wish-it-was' mentality. And this does not necessarily pertain to nonbelievers, but to the Christian population as well. So much of modern Christians and Evangelicals are engaging in a dangerous game of syncretism. The book provides a clear-eyed analysis of how one should think and apply knowledge. Another reviewer stated that you should skip the last 20 pages of the book because Socrates essentially has a religious experience and drops logic in favor of revelation. I do not agree. All arguments against the faith or twisting the faith are essentially barriers that one must overcome through careful thought, but just because you tear down walls around a castle doesn't automatically mean you are inside the castle. No, you actually have to walk inside. Just so with Christianity; you can tear down the faulty logic around your heart, but the next step, the actual acceptance of the Gospel, is by necessity by faith.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    Great book - maybe I'm really congratulating myself for having read a "logic" book and not only finished it, but enjoyed it. That's what it takes to get me to enjoy one of these ... The scenario is that Socrates, having lived and died before Jesus, would never have known His claims or life. Somehow he finds himself at Harvard Divinity School, participating in lectures and small groups where he comes face to face with "progress" since his time, and then comparative religion, christology, the power Great book - maybe I'm really congratulating myself for having read a "logic" book and not only finished it, but enjoyed it. That's what it takes to get me to enjoy one of these ... The scenario is that Socrates, having lived and died before Jesus, would never have known His claims or life. Somehow he finds himself at Harvard Divinity School, participating in lectures and small groups where he comes face to face with "progress" since his time, and then comparative religion, christology, the power of myth, etc. Ultimately he reads the Old and then New Testament and Jesus's teachings. All this is done through imaginary conversations, in the Socratic method, between him and his students and professors. Slightly corny, but an eye opener as to all the side roads of philosophy there are, with the author choosing a few to go down, just mentioning others. I'm going to have to find another by Peter Kreeft...

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lee Harmon

    If we were to revive Socrates, what would he think of today’s world? This is a light-hearted—dare I say “cute” without offending Kreeft—conversation with the most famous of all philosophers. Socrates, who lived long before Jesus came on the scene, awakens in the 21st century and enrolls in a divinity school. In typical Socratic pursuit, he aims at uncovering the truth about the Bible and this man, Jesus, who made such a profound impact on the world. Jesus, he learns, was God in the flesh. Not a G If we were to revive Socrates, what would he think of today’s world? This is a light-hearted—dare I say “cute” without offending Kreeft—conversation with the most famous of all philosophers. Socrates, who lived long before Jesus came on the scene, awakens in the 21st century and enrolls in a divinity school. In typical Socratic pursuit, he aims at uncovering the truth about the Bible and this man, Jesus, who made such a profound impact on the world. Jesus, he learns, was God in the flesh. Not a God, but the God. Remarkable! Who could ever believe in a “one and only” God? Socrates discusses Jesus with fellow students Bertha Broadmind, Tomas Keptic, and Molly Mooney, and soon takes on the professors themselves, leaving them in a bewildered state of confusion about everything they thought they understood. By the book’s end, Socrates takes on the big question—the resurrection—and comes to a startling conclusion. An enjoyable read!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Naomi Ruth

    There were aspects of this book I liked. I liked the dialogue format, the punny names, and the clear understanding of many, many different philosophical, theological, political standpoints. I was quite impressed with how Kreeft wove in so much philosophy from so many different philosophers. I will say, sometimes I felt like his bias got in the way - I'm not convinced Socrates would have responded quite the way Kreeft has him respond, and sometimes I think there was confusion on how ancient pagan There were aspects of this book I liked. I liked the dialogue format, the punny names, and the clear understanding of many, many different philosophical, theological, political standpoints. I was quite impressed with how Kreeft wove in so much philosophy from so many different philosophers. I will say, sometimes I felt like his bias got in the way - I'm not convinced Socrates would have responded quite the way Kreeft has him respond, and sometimes I think there was confusion on how ancient pagans believed/behaved but... That's to be expected. I think sometimes he was unfair to liberals and those people he obviously does not agree with. It is in keeping with how Socrates treated people of his day, but it felt like poor philosophy to me. But definitely worth the read, I think. Good information in an easy-to-read format. I used it with my 8th graders and they were able to follow quite a bit of the dialogue.

  22. 4 out of 5

    George Shubin

    Written in the form of dialog between characters, we meet the ancient Greek philosopher at a modern-day university, Have It U. The various characters he encounters are interesting, and one notices quickly that place and person names are usually puns. The first student he meets is Bertha Broadmind, then Thomas Keptic, and Professor Flatland who teaches 'Science and Religion'. Then Socrates meets Professor Shift who teaches 'Comparative Religions'. Socrates next meets the claims of Christ in Profe Written in the form of dialog between characters, we meet the ancient Greek philosopher at a modern-day university, Have It U. The various characters he encounters are interesting, and one notices quickly that place and person names are usually puns. The first student he meets is Bertha Broadmind, then Thomas Keptic, and Professor Flatland who teaches 'Science and Religion'. Then Socrates meets Professor Shift who teaches 'Comparative Religions'. Socrates next meets the claims of Christ in Professor Fesser's 'Christology' seminar. The purpose of the book is to have Socrates encounter and deal with the claims of Christ. It is quite clever and entertaining. Peter Kreeft obviously has a great sense of humor, and has a good handle on the question of who Christ is and what we should do about it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Brett

    This is a good book to read if you want an introduction to some of the historical and rational claims of Christianity. Kreeft addresses many of the historical and philosophical challenges to Christianity through a fictional dialogue that takes place when the ancient philosopher, Socrates, wakes up on the campus of a modern, liberal divinity school. As the pre-Christian philosopher attends courses such as comparative religions and Christology, he uses his "Socratic Method" to challenge the belief This is a good book to read if you want an introduction to some of the historical and rational claims of Christianity. Kreeft addresses many of the historical and philosophical challenges to Christianity through a fictional dialogue that takes place when the ancient philosopher, Socrates, wakes up on the campus of a modern, liberal divinity school. As the pre-Christian philosopher attends courses such as comparative religions and Christology, he uses his "Socratic Method" to challenge the beliefs and assumptions of modern scholarship. The fictional conversations make this an easy and engaging read unlike others that may handle the same questions more technically. I would recommend this book for any Christian, interested seeker, or skeptic wanting an engaging and interesting introduction the basic issues concerning the validity of the Christian faith.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Fernando Navarro

    It was a funny an interesting book. I'm not sure if Socrates would have the same reaction, as the author depicts it, reading the New Testament. It might be or might not. Anyway, I think we should consider to evaluate different world views with some Socratic intuition. I believe that we can understand God with logic. Tomas Aquina already thought about it. But the principal rule, in my opinion is understanding Jesus not rationally only but through a deep relationship. If I think that if I try to l It was a funny an interesting book. I'm not sure if Socrates would have the same reaction, as the author depicts it, reading the New Testament. It might be or might not. Anyway, I think we should consider to evaluate different world views with some Socratic intuition. I believe that we can understand God with logic. Tomas Aquina already thought about it. But the principal rule, in my opinion is understanding Jesus not rationally only but through a deep relationship. If I think that if I try to live Christianity with a logic concept I won't be able to to know the core of it, because Jesus was a men, he is God and the only way to know him and understand it is having a dialogue with him.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Paul Goble

    Fictionalized Socrates awakes at 1980's "Have It University" and discusses religion with students. A gentle introduction to some philosophical concepts. The book provides some good examples to those who might wish to share the Gospel with humility and openness. Several good quotes regarding what it means to have a truly open mind. Those who know Socrates well may object to the shallowness of the portrayal. Those who have carefully considered the issues may object to the one-sided approach, where Fictionalized Socrates awakes at 1980's "Have It University" and discusses religion with students. A gentle introduction to some philosophical concepts. The book provides some good examples to those who might wish to share the Gospel with humility and openness. Several good quotes regarding what it means to have a truly open mind. Those who know Socrates well may object to the shallowness of the portrayal. Those who have carefully considered the issues may object to the one-sided approach, where the students easily "roll over" and raise only straw-man objections.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mike Gaeta

    Kreeft is at his best when writing for a popular audience. Like his idol, CS Lewis, he does an excellent job of taking what would otherwise be read by a narrow audience of Catholics and makes it accessible to anyone. Inevitably, though, the arguments that lie behind it are watered down. His point, however, is to peak the interest of those who otherwise would never be interested in what Christianity has to offer in terms of life, death, redemption, etc. I enjoyed his tact and wordplay in creating Kreeft is at his best when writing for a popular audience. Like his idol, CS Lewis, he does an excellent job of taking what would otherwise be read by a narrow audience of Catholics and makes it accessible to anyone. Inevitably, though, the arguments that lie behind it are watered down. His point, however, is to peak the interest of those who otherwise would never be interested in what Christianity has to offer in terms of life, death, redemption, etc. I enjoyed his tact and wordplay in creating (I think, quite accurately), a modern Socrates in a context of today's modern culture.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dennis Henn

    I love Kreeft's writings. In this book, Kreeft resurrects Socrates and places him on a liberal college campus to attend several religion courses. Through questioning basic, widely held premises, Socrates (Kreeft) examines Jesus' claim to be God incarnate. Is there a sound basis for our belief in Jesus? Kreeft answers with a yes. I particularly enjoyed the final chapter on the resurrection being more than myth or archetype. That Jesus' body was physically and literally raised or our faith falls a I love Kreeft's writings. In this book, Kreeft resurrects Socrates and places him on a liberal college campus to attend several religion courses. Through questioning basic, widely held premises, Socrates (Kreeft) examines Jesus' claim to be God incarnate. Is there a sound basis for our belief in Jesus? Kreeft answers with a yes. I particularly enjoyed the final chapter on the resurrection being more than myth or archetype. That Jesus' body was physically and literally raised or our faith falls apart.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Michael Buchanan

    I enjoyed the rational breakdown of Christianity and the claims that people on both sides of Christianity make. The arguments were clearly presented and I learned a thing or two about Socrates and his method. I liked the concept as well, they could do a whole series on this idea of two historic titans meeting and debating. I thought the dialgue was a little cheesy and unreal. I also went through periods of exhaustion with this book in which I was not really into it anymore. I will give this anot I enjoyed the rational breakdown of Christianity and the claims that people on both sides of Christianity make. The arguments were clearly presented and I learned a thing or two about Socrates and his method. I liked the concept as well, they could do a whole series on this idea of two historic titans meeting and debating. I thought the dialgue was a little cheesy and unreal. I also went through periods of exhaustion with this book in which I was not really into it anymore. I will give this another read in the future and it will probably get another star.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Despite the corny sense of humor, I really like Kreeft. I was really cheering for Socrates by the end of this book. Humorously exposes typical college student fallacies about Christianity. I hope my teen will read it before she goes off to college. Gave it three stars only because I don't like to engage in star inflation and I'm really picky about what gets four stars (never mind five), but it could get 3.5 at least. Despite the corny sense of humor, I really like Kreeft. I was really cheering for Socrates by the end of this book. Humorously exposes typical college student fallacies about Christianity. I hope my teen will read it before she goes off to college. Gave it three stars only because I don't like to engage in star inflation and I'm really picky about what gets four stars (never mind five), but it could get 3.5 at least.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Will

    Socrates is roaming Haveit Divinity School (or "the Div") at his old occupation of corrupting the youth. Most of his interactions link to Lewis' "liar, Lord or lunatic" dilemma (while trying to find out what this "fundamentalism" that everyone seems to afraid of is.) Not completely up to the standard of THE BEST THINGS IN LIFE. And, of course, I don't for a moment believe that is the real Socrates Socrates is roaming Haveit Divinity School (or "the Div") at his old occupation of corrupting the youth. Most of his interactions link to Lewis' "liar, Lord or lunatic" dilemma (while trying to find out what this "fundamentalism" that everyone seems to afraid of is.) Not completely up to the standard of THE BEST THINGS IN LIFE. And, of course, I don't for a moment believe that is the real Socrates

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