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The Classical Unschooler: Education Without School

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Does classical homeschooling seem like a worthy but overwhelming goal and unschooling too lax in its approach? Find out how to combine the two. If you're the kind of homeschooler who likes the eclectic approach or has always wanted to try it, you've come to the right place. This book will excite and fascinate you. Learn how to create a curriculum that works for your family Does classical homeschooling seem like a worthy but overwhelming goal and unschooling too lax in its approach? Find out how to combine the two. If you're the kind of homeschooler who likes the eclectic approach or has always wanted to try it, you've come to the right place. This book will excite and fascinate you. Learn how to create a curriculum that works for your family and your children's learning styles. Give them a home-based education without school!


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Does classical homeschooling seem like a worthy but overwhelming goal and unschooling too lax in its approach? Find out how to combine the two. If you're the kind of homeschooler who likes the eclectic approach or has always wanted to try it, you've come to the right place. This book will excite and fascinate you. Learn how to create a curriculum that works for your family Does classical homeschooling seem like a worthy but overwhelming goal and unschooling too lax in its approach? Find out how to combine the two. If you're the kind of homeschooler who likes the eclectic approach or has always wanted to try it, you've come to the right place. This book will excite and fascinate you. Learn how to create a curriculum that works for your family and your children's learning styles. Give them a home-based education without school!

44 review for The Classical Unschooler: Education Without School

  1. 5 out of 5

    Clare

    UPDATE: my initial review has been playing on my mind - I'm new to writing them on a public forum and I feel I may have been a little brutal! My rating stands but I will amend the rest to read a little more kindly. --- As far as I can make out, Mrs Brown instructs her children in the basics of reading, writing and maths, with lots of memorisation along the way, and then when they are proficient in those areas lets them follow their interests a bit more, using strewing and conversations as part of UPDATE: my initial review has been playing on my mind - I'm new to writing them on a public forum and I feel I may have been a little brutal! My rating stands but I will amend the rest to read a little more kindly. --- As far as I can make out, Mrs Brown instructs her children in the basics of reading, writing and maths, with lots of memorisation along the way, and then when they are proficient in those areas lets them follow their interests a bit more, using strewing and conversations as part of the learning process. Sounds fine. The author has found a way of home educating that works for her family, and I'm all for people taking what they want from different methods and sharing what they are doing. Where the book stops working for me is the addition of the label "Classical Unschooling". Part of the problem is that I don't agree with the author's initial definitions - Classical education is about far more than memorisation and the three "stages" (what about truth, goodness, beauty, virtue?), and unschooling is about more than being "child-led" - where is the excitement, confidence and joy that comes from realising that you are more than capable of learning without being "made" to do it (there is a lot of "making" in the book). This was a Kindle unlimited (free-trial) book. I couldn't help but compare it to Karen Glass's Consider This - a truly excellent assessment of two seemingly different educational methods, Classical and Charlotte Mason. There are probably some good ideas in Mrs Brown's book if you are new to home education in general, but unfortunately I didn't get much out of it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Galina Krasskova

    I was fine with the author's approach until she talked about how she is (or more likely isn't) teaching a foreign language. what she suggests, I do not believe will be effective and her dismissiveness toward teaching Latin (not everyone has to, but consider why it might be useful) an more importantly toward systematically teaching grammar (in addition to immersive conversation) is a recipe for language learning disaster. I was fine with the author's approach until she talked about how she is (or more likely isn't) teaching a foreign language. what she suggests, I do not believe will be effective and her dismissiveness toward teaching Latin (not everyone has to, but consider why it might be useful) an more importantly toward systematically teaching grammar (in addition to immersive conversation) is a recipe for language learning disaster.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Becky Peak-Marquez

    Fascinating concept, but unfortunately this book is somewhat thin on substance. It's best audience is more with someone newer to homeschooling, without much previous knowledge of the classical education model or unschooling principles. Although I am not an ardent classical educator, but am a passionate unschooler, I did not feel that I learned anything significant. I was interested to see how the author married the two educational methodologies, but found that rather than uniting the two, her bo Fascinating concept, but unfortunately this book is somewhat thin on substance. It's best audience is more with someone newer to homeschooling, without much previous knowledge of the classical education model or unschooling principles. Although I am not an ardent classical educator, but am a passionate unschooler, I did not feel that I learned anything significant. I was interested to see how the author married the two educational methodologies, but found that rather than uniting the two, her book simply addressed how to use both, side by side, within her homeschool.

  4. 5 out of 5

    John Dekker

    This book presents an approach that blends two major, but seemingly inconsistent, approaches to home schooling: classical education and unschooling. The classical approach sees home education as progressing through three stages: in the grammar stage (covering approximately grades 1 to 4) the emphasis is on learning facts, often with memorisation; the logic stage (grades 5 to 8) emphasises the connections between these facts; while the rhetoric stage (grades 9 to 12) emphasises the application and This book presents an approach that blends two major, but seemingly inconsistent, approaches to home schooling: classical education and unschooling. The classical approach sees home education as progressing through three stages: in the grammar stage (covering approximately grades 1 to 4) the emphasis is on learning facts, often with memorisation; the logic stage (grades 5 to 8) emphasises the connections between these facts; while the rhetoric stage (grades 9 to 12) emphasises the application and expression of the facts. The classical approach often uses history as a backbone, and covers the whole of world history a number of times (e.g. once in each stage). Unschooling might seem to be the complete opposite to this. It emphasises a lack of "subjects", and focuses on topics that the student is interested in himself. Unschooling places a high value on nature study and field trips. In this book, and also on her blog (purvabrown.com), Purva Brown boldly presents an approach which combines the two. In doing so she has done a great service to the world of homeschooling, and her writings deserve to be more widely known. Classical unschooling manages to take the best of both worlds. So how does it work? It means giving your children access to lots of books. It means reading lots of stories and getting them reading what they are interested in. It often means eschewing formal bookwork and engaging in creative play. Classical unschooling recognises that in young children memorisation is natural and exciting. It's classical schooling without being a slave to curriculum, and unschooling that is purposeful. This is a slim volume that has been self-published. It does not even have page numbers. But it is still worth reading, and Purva Brown's audacious approach is definitely worth considering.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    As one who is delving into the realms of this thing called Unschooling while also desperately trying to ensure my own sanity, this is a refreshing read indeed! I love how this makes it all make sense. SO many example for us to follow; wisdom to help us see what is at work and help make things come to life as we unschooling. It isn't about chaos, or total freedom. It is about direction, its about lighting that fire! Step by step each page helps us to understand and search for ourselves what it is As one who is delving into the realms of this thing called Unschooling while also desperately trying to ensure my own sanity, this is a refreshing read indeed! I love how this makes it all make sense. SO many example for us to follow; wisdom to help us see what is at work and help make things come to life as we unschooling. It isn't about chaos, or total freedom. It is about direction, its about lighting that fire! Step by step each page helps us to understand and search for ourselves what it is that we seek for our children to know and grow in. A reminder that the old paths are good; there is wisdom in the way that things have been which we can greatly use. A classical, well rounded, eclectic path of learning for our children with them being in the driver's seat. :-)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Charles A Wallace

    Good reminder I like the emphasis on empowering student and teacher. I was revitalized in my love for Geography. Good reminder to slow down and drop the teacher act, learn alongside.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Smpaetz

    It very much helped me wrap my head around the way I already homeschool

  8. 5 out of 5

    Erin Smith

    good first half some great ideas and resources are shared but in my opinion there are a few things math and the arts that the author in very dogmatic on. I prefer guildence over institutions.

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    Mary

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    Rebecca Ruiz

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