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Though Russell H. Conwell's Acres of Diamonds have been spread all over the United States, time and care have made them more valuable, and now that they have been reset in black and white by their discoverer, they are to be laid in the hands of a multitude for their enrichment. In the same case with these gems there is a fascinating story of the Master Jeweler's life-work Though Russell H. Conwell's Acres of Diamonds have been spread all over the United States, time and care have made them more valuable, and now that they have been reset in black and white by their discoverer, they are to be laid in the hands of a multitude for their enrichment. In the same case with these gems there is a fascinating story of the Master Jeweler's life-work which splendidly illustrates the ultimate unit of power by showing what one man can do in one day and what one life is worth to the world. As his neighbor and intimate friend in Philadelphia for thirty years, I am free to say that Russell H. Conwell's tall, manly figure stands out in the state of Pennsylvania as its first citizen and "The Big Brother" of its seven millions of people. From the beginning of his career he has been a credible witness in the Court of Public Works to the truth of the strong language of the New Testament Parable where it says, "If ye have faith as a grain of mustard-seed, ye shall say unto this mountain, 'Remove hence to yonder place,' AND IT SHALL REMOVE AND NOTHING SHALL BE IMPOSSIBLE UNTO YOU." As a student, schoolmaster, lawyer, preacher, organizer, thinker and writer, lecturer, educator, diplomat, and leader of men, he has made his mark on his city and state and the times in which he has lived. A man dies, but his good work lives. His ideas, ideals, and enthusiasms have inspired tens of thousands of lives. A book full of the energetics of a master workman is just what every young man cares for.


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Though Russell H. Conwell's Acres of Diamonds have been spread all over the United States, time and care have made them more valuable, and now that they have been reset in black and white by their discoverer, they are to be laid in the hands of a multitude for their enrichment. In the same case with these gems there is a fascinating story of the Master Jeweler's life-work Though Russell H. Conwell's Acres of Diamonds have been spread all over the United States, time and care have made them more valuable, and now that they have been reset in black and white by their discoverer, they are to be laid in the hands of a multitude for their enrichment. In the same case with these gems there is a fascinating story of the Master Jeweler's life-work which splendidly illustrates the ultimate unit of power by showing what one man can do in one day and what one life is worth to the world. As his neighbor and intimate friend in Philadelphia for thirty years, I am free to say that Russell H. Conwell's tall, manly figure stands out in the state of Pennsylvania as its first citizen and "The Big Brother" of its seven millions of people. From the beginning of his career he has been a credible witness in the Court of Public Works to the truth of the strong language of the New Testament Parable where it says, "If ye have faith as a grain of mustard-seed, ye shall say unto this mountain, 'Remove hence to yonder place,' AND IT SHALL REMOVE AND NOTHING SHALL BE IMPOSSIBLE UNTO YOU." As a student, schoolmaster, lawyer, preacher, organizer, thinker and writer, lecturer, educator, diplomat, and leader of men, he has made his mark on his city and state and the times in which he has lived. A man dies, but his good work lives. His ideas, ideals, and enthusiasms have inspired tens of thousands of lives. A book full of the energetics of a master workman is just what every young man cares for.

30 review for Acres of Diamonds (Illustrated): Free Audiobook Link

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chris Munson

    Based on a speech originally given as a lecture to raise money for what would become Temple University, this parable about seeing the riches around you can help give you a new perspective. Short and powerful (the book is much like "Who Moved My Cheese" in that it is brief, but contains an important lesson told in the form of a story) "Acres of Diamonds" will force you to take a new look at your own backyard when looking for opportunity. The basic story revolves around a Persian farmer who loses Based on a speech originally given as a lecture to raise money for what would become Temple University, this parable about seeing the riches around you can help give you a new perspective. Short and powerful (the book is much like "Who Moved My Cheese" in that it is brief, but contains an important lesson told in the form of a story) "Acres of Diamonds" will force you to take a new look at your own backyard when looking for opportunity. The basic story revolves around a Persian farmer who loses his life and significant wealth looking for a mine of diamonds when, ironically, his own farm land (which he sold to finance his search for diamonds) literally contained acres of diamonds. Conwell gives several other examples of similar stories revolving around gold, oil, etc. The grass isn't always greener on the other side...don't discount where you are, what you know and the relationships that you already have too quickly. Rambles a bit, but it's still a great story with a timeless message.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tori

    I wish I could remember what caused me to buy this book over 10 years ago. I have been taking it with me through 6 moves, and I finally read it last night. Horrid. Maybe it is the original prosperity gospel. I have never read so much bs in so few pages. I have never done this with a book before but I am throwing it in the trash.

  3. 4 out of 5

    David

    This is a small book with a large message that could potentially have an enormous impact on the reader with the 'ears to hear' it and the will to internalize it and put it into action in his or her life every day. The greatness that exists within every one of us does not exist in any external form whatsoever. Rather, it exists within us...waiting to be uncovered and unleashed. When used for the good of others and not for reasons of selfish gain, we discover that we, also, have more than we need; This is a small book with a large message that could potentially have an enormous impact on the reader with the 'ears to hear' it and the will to internalize it and put it into action in his or her life every day. The greatness that exists within every one of us does not exist in any external form whatsoever. Rather, it exists within us...waiting to be uncovered and unleashed. When used for the good of others and not for reasons of selfish gain, we discover that we, also, have more than we need; of contentment, of happiness and, yes, of wealth also. As we like to say in my household, "Change your mind, change your life."

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ian Connel

    There are some good values in Acres of Diamonds, but a pastor who argues that "poverty is the result of God's opinion of those people" and "rich men are the most honest men" is unbelievably misled. For one, does he know Jesus led a life of poverty, serving the poor? And for two, has he ever heard of advertising? If only he had any clue that many businesses would depend on, and thrive on, using fear and false information to sell things that nobody actually needs. In fairness, I made it through ab There are some good values in Acres of Diamonds, but a pastor who argues that "poverty is the result of God's opinion of those people" and "rich men are the most honest men" is unbelievably misled. For one, does he know Jesus led a life of poverty, serving the poor? And for two, has he ever heard of advertising? If only he had any clue that many businesses would depend on, and thrive on, using fear and false information to sell things that nobody actually needs. In fairness, I made it through about 15% of the book before deciding that while I am conservative and there are great arguments for working hard, this is not one of them.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ayodele

    Book teaches: 1. Prosper where you are (there is a veritable gold mine where you are NOW, find it). 2. Great men are often plain men. Greatness does not come by gaining some "important" office. 3. Figure out what people want and then give it to them. Book teaches: 1. Prosper where you are (there is a veritable gold mine where you are NOW, find it). 2. Great men are often plain men. Greatness does not come by gaining some "important" office. 3. Figure out what people want and then give it to them.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mario Tomic

    I'm really amazed how much wisdom this book contains, every lesson is presented with a true story and it's very easy to recognize the value in these stories. The book itself really goes hard against the very common belief people have that the grass is always greener at the other side of the fence. To read this entire book it won't take you longer than an hour and it's full of powerful concepts that can be just as easily applied today as in 1846 when this book was first published. I'm really amazed how much wisdom this book contains, every lesson is presented with a true story and it's very easy to recognize the value in these stories. The book itself really goes hard against the very common belief people have that the grass is always greener at the other side of the fence. To read this entire book it won't take you longer than an hour and it's full of powerful concepts that can be just as easily applied today as in 1846 when this book was first published.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    I picked this book up on a whim, intrigued by the banner of text touting the words inside as one of the most famous sermons in American history. So. I liked it at first. I liked the idea that we all strive for something that is often already in our lives and that we’re seduced by the idea that something better is out there in some far off place. It’s the old the-grass-is-always greener adage. I like the message that we don’t need to wait to do good or make an impact – we can start now, start small I picked this book up on a whim, intrigued by the banner of text touting the words inside as one of the most famous sermons in American history. So. I liked it at first. I liked the idea that we all strive for something that is often already in our lives and that we’re seduced by the idea that something better is out there in some far off place. It’s the old the-grass-is-always greener adage. I like the message that we don’t need to wait to do good or make an impact – we can start now, start small, that greatness is not some future calling for someone else, but something that starts here and now. If that were the entirety of this sermon, I would like it. Unfortunately, Acres of Diamonds is the worst sort of prosperity gospel. Mr. Conwell injects significant amounts of pull-yourself-up-by-your-bootstraps, everybody-can-get-rich-and-if-you-aren’t-it’s-your-own-fault religious justification for capitalism. I don’t entirely disagree with the importance of hard work in finding success, but Mr. Conwell’s vision of America doesn’t jive with the reality of America at that point in the country’s history or the dire circumstances facing many of its citizens. The sermon presents a narrow view of the world, one based on, I would imagine, Mr. Conwell’s own experiences and the assumption that everyone had his opportunities and advantages, along with a misguided belief that financial success is proof of God’s love. From a historical standpoint, it’s an interesting and quick read. And there’s no doubt that Mr. Conwell did significant good over the course of his own life. It’s just a shame he couldn’t appreciate and acknowledge the extraordinariness of his own life when delivering this sermon. Quasi-recommended.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nomi

    Sometimes we forget to look in our own backyard be it for answers or for ideas to further our wealth, health, or spiritual self. We live in a society where everything better is assigned an 'elusive' tag. Where everything better is always something we don't possess. This little book reminds us that that is not always the case. We are taught to always weigh all our options before proceeding with a decision and too many times we only weigh 'outer' options failing to take stock of what we already po Sometimes we forget to look in our own backyard be it for answers or for ideas to further our wealth, health, or spiritual self. We live in a society where everything better is assigned an 'elusive' tag. Where everything better is always something we don't possess. This little book reminds us that that is not always the case. We are taught to always weigh all our options before proceeding with a decision and too many times we only weigh 'outer' options failing to take stock of what we already possess and how we can enhance our current inventory or current skills to receive greater returns. Another gem this book touches on is people's attitude towards money. You won't become wealthy if you believe money to be evil. You won't become wealthy if you begrudge others for their success. Develop a healthy attitude towards money. It is not evil. Always be generous. Always. Opportunities are readily available, but you have to learn to not pursue one avenue of means to attain what you want. Keep an open mind and start at home. Lastly, embrace who you are and work from there. Be a noble character and be great. Don't say you will become great when you have achieved what you wanted. If you are not great now you can't be great then. Substitute 'great' for any other word until the message clicks for you. Charity starts at home. "Begin where you are and what you are."

  9. 5 out of 5

    Amina

    Everything you want to do lies within you, all the sources and the forces are in you.. " Greatness consists not in the holding of some future office, but really consists in doing great deeds with little means and the accomplishment of vast purposes from the private ranks of life." " Let every man or woman here, if you never hear me again, remember this, that if you wish to be great at all, you must begin where you are and what you are, in Philadelphia, now. He that can give to his city any blessin Everything you want to do lies within you, all the sources and the forces are in you.. " Greatness consists not in the holding of some future office, but really consists in doing great deeds with little means and the accomplishment of vast purposes from the private ranks of life." " Let every man or woman here, if you never hear me again, remember this, that if you wish to be great at all, you must begin where you are and what you are, in Philadelphia, now. He that can give to his city any blessing, he who can be a good citizen while he lives here, he that can make better homes, he that can be a blessing whether he works in the shop or sits behind the counter or keeps house, whatever be his life, he who would be great anywhere must first be great in his own Philadelphia"

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    Written by the founder of Temple University, "Acres of Diamonds" is an inspirational lecture about success. (The edition I read also included a biography of Russell Conwell and a brief autobiographical note from the author.) Conwell, who presented this lecture in excess of 5,000 times during his life, was a Civil War officer, lawyer and pastor. His family farm was one of the stops on the Underground Railroad and he established one of the first schools that would educate African-American children. Written by the founder of Temple University, "Acres of Diamonds" is an inspirational lecture about success. (The edition I read also included a biography of Russell Conwell and a brief autobiographical note from the author.) Conwell, who presented this lecture in excess of 5,000 times during his life, was a Civil War officer, lawyer and pastor. His family farm was one of the stops on the Underground Railroad and he established one of the first schools that would educate African-American children. In his presentation, Conwell talks about the importance of generosity, ideas, and finding out what needs one can fulfill as an entrepreneur. His style is flowing and eloquent, which makes it a delight to read despite some of the antiquated vernacular (this book was originally published in 1915). Despite the age of the text, the ideas still hold true. Highly recommended for those interested in self-improvement and better business practices.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Diya Bundhoo

    Acres of Diamonds by Russell H. Conwell is a small, easy to read book with deep thoughts. It is an inspiring lecture on success in life, with emphasis on the perspective of wealth, money and doing good: Some of his powerful words: “Money is power, money is force, money will do good as well as harm. In the hands of good men and women it could accomplish, and it has accomplished, good.” “You cannot trust a man with your money who cannot take care of his own. You cannot trust a man in your family that Acres of Diamonds by Russell H. Conwell is a small, easy to read book with deep thoughts. It is an inspiring lecture on success in life, with emphasis on the perspective of wealth, money and doing good: Some of his powerful words: “Money is power, money is force, money will do good as well as harm. In the hands of good men and women it could accomplish, and it has accomplished, good.” “You cannot trust a man with your money who cannot take care of his own. You cannot trust a man in your family that is not true to his own wife. You cannot trust a man in the world that does not begin with his own heart, his own character, and his own life.” “The discipline of a poor boy is worth more than a university education to anyone.” “The secret of success: You must first know the demand. You must first know what people need, and then invest yourself where you are most needed.”

  12. 4 out of 5

    Keith Aul

    Another great example of someone who started out in life with nothing and achieved greatness. Mr. Conwell believed if you can find enough people to fulfill then need you are giving, you will become 'wealthy' because it is an automatic process. Mr. Conwell was driven for the need to help other people help themselves. His primary motivation was to meet the needs of other people. Have you heard of the Chinese proverb - 'Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed h Another great example of someone who started out in life with nothing and achieved greatness. Mr. Conwell believed if you can find enough people to fulfill then need you are giving, you will become 'wealthy' because it is an automatic process. Mr. Conwell was driven for the need to help other people help themselves. His primary motivation was to meet the needs of other people. Have you heard of the Chinese proverb - 'Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime'. Well Mr. Conwell discovered that you could help a lot more people through the proper instruction than through the mere handout of material goods and food.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Avel Rudenko

    Think about a simple lesson you may have learned in your life. How about: The answer you are looking for is usually right in front of you. Well...this is what the book depicts for the reader. It really is well written and the story makes you wonder. Really enjoyed this little gem. Abe Lincoln's success formula and others are filled with common sense tactics to leading a rich life. Looking forward to using some of these pearls and passing this book on to those I care about. Gold Nugget of a book! Think about a simple lesson you may have learned in your life. How about: The answer you are looking for is usually right in front of you. Well...this is what the book depicts for the reader. It really is well written and the story makes you wonder. Really enjoyed this little gem. Abe Lincoln's success formula and others are filled with common sense tactics to leading a rich life. Looking forward to using some of these pearls and passing this book on to those I care about. Gold Nugget of a book!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Will Simpson

    The message of this speech which Russell gave over 5500 times over the years, is something we all could learn from and continue to relearn. Appreciate what we have and resist the urge to search afar for fortune in whatever form. I’m reminded about a couple of lines from a old Zen poem, "How sad that people ignore the near / And search for truth afar: / Like someone in the midst of water / Crying out in thirst, / Like a child of a wealthy home / Wandering among the poor.' The message of this speech which Russell gave over 5500 times over the years, is something we all could learn from and continue to relearn. Appreciate what we have and resist the urge to search afar for fortune in whatever form. I’m reminded about a couple of lines from a old Zen poem, "How sad that people ignore the near / And search for truth afar: / Like someone in the midst of water / Crying out in thirst, / Like a child of a wealthy home / Wandering among the poor.'

  15. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

    This book speaks of looking at your life and having a go at making it better. It encourages people to succeed. I really liked it. It is a classic for a reason. If you like to keep yourself motivated you can't go wrong with this one. 4 stars. This book speaks of looking at your life and having a go at making it better. It encourages people to succeed. I really liked it. It is a classic for a reason. If you like to keep yourself motivated you can't go wrong with this one. 4 stars.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Don Gubler

    Good advice in knowing and using the resources all around you.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mark "Lefty" Holencik

    Very uplifting story of how he followed his heart and built a legacy.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Aman Kabra

    This speech-to-text conversion of the words of a Philadelphian will give you a message long known yet frequently forgotten, in less than 50 pages.

  19. 5 out of 5

    sadiq

    A very Christian book, but there is a lot to learn in the first quarter of the book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Vaishali

    From a very famous speech in the 1800s. Hilarious in places, and with some surprising historical information. I'm listing the historic info first, followed by a few quotes on self-improvement. HISTORIC INFO: 1. Inventions originally by women (but patented by men) Jacquard loom cotton gin sewing machine mower/reaper trolley switch iron squeezers in steel mills 2. Funny meeting w/ General Robert E. Lee "The general told me about his servant Rastus, who was an enlisted colored soldier. He called him From a very famous speech in the 1800s. Hilarious in places, and with some surprising historical information. I'm listing the historic info first, followed by a few quotes on self-improvement. HISTORIC INFO: 1. Inventions originally by women (but patented by men) Jacquard loom cotton gin sewing machine mower/reaper trolley switch iron squeezers in steel mills 2. Funny meeting w/ General Robert E. Lee "The general told me about his servant Rastus, who was an enlisted colored soldier. He called him in one day to make fun of him, and said "Rastus, I hear that all the rest of your company are killed… why are you not killed?" Rastus winked at him and said, " 'Cause when there is any fighting going on, I stay back with the generals." 3. On meeting President Lincoln "He was one of the world's greatest men, and was made great by one single rule. Abraham Lincoln's principle for greatness can be adopted by nearly all. This was his rule: whatsoever he had to do at all, he put his whole mind into it and held it all there until that was all done. That makes men great almost anywhere. He stuck to those papers at that table and did not look up at me, and I sat there trembling. Finally, when he had put the string around his papers, he pushed them over to one side and looked over to me, and a smile came over his worn face. He said: “I am a very busy man and have only a few minutes to spare. Now tell me in the fewest words what it is you want." ...A few days later...I saw the... the coffin of Abraham Lincoln, and when I looked at the upturned face of the murdered President, I felt then that the man I had seen such a short time before, who, so simple a man, so plain a man, was one of the greatest men that God ever raised up..." SELF-IMPROVEMENT QUOTES: "A diamond is a congealed drop of sunlight." "He had not lost anything, but he was poor because he was discontented, and discontented because he feared he was poor." "It is your duty to get rich." "98% of the rich men in America are very honest. That is why they are rich… that is why they are trusted with all that money. That is why they carry great enterprises and find plenty of people to work with them." "Money is power, and you ought to be reasonably ambitious to have it. You ought to because you can do more good with it then you could without it." "You cannot trust a man with your money if he cannot take care of his own." "Sell a known demand. That's the secret to success." "You don't know where your neighbor comes from… and you don't care. If you cared, you would be a rich man now. If you'd have cared enough about him to take an interest in his affairs, to find out what he needed, you would be rich." "Your wealth is so near you, you're looking right over it." "Greatness consists not in the holding of some future office, but in doing great deeds with little means, and the accomplishment of vast purposes from the private ranks of life." "Did you ever see a man who struts around altogether too large to notice an ordinary working mechanic? Do you think he is great? He is nothing but a puffed up balloon, held down by his big feet. There is no greatness there." "He who cannot be a blessing where he now lives will never be great anywhere on the face of God's earth." "He most lives who thinks most, who feels the noblest, and who acts the best."

  21. 5 out of 5

    Donovan Richards

    An Inspiring Story For some reason, the simplicity of the standard “success story” conjures the hopeful sentiment that such accomplishments could occur in any life. Truthfully, most successful stories begin with an idea, a notion of which all human beings are equally capable. In Acres of Diamonds, Russell Conwell utilizes positive and negative narratives in order to inspire productivity in his community. In Defense of Wealth Simply speaking, Conwell is pro wealth. While many theologians and ethici An Inspiring Story For some reason, the simplicity of the standard “success story” conjures the hopeful sentiment that such accomplishments could occur in any life. Truthfully, most successful stories begin with an idea, a notion of which all human beings are equally capable. In Acres of Diamonds, Russell Conwell utilizes positive and negative narratives in order to inspire productivity in his community. In Defense of Wealth Simply speaking, Conwell is pro wealth. While many theologians and ethicists warn society about the dangers of increasing riches, Conwell believes that Christians possess an ethical duty to be rich. He writes: “Money is power, and you ought to be reasonably ambitious to have it. You ought because you can do more good with it than you could without it. Money printed your Bible, money builds your churches, money sends your missionaries, and money pays your preachers, and you would not have many of them, either, if you did not pay them… The man who gets the largest salary can do the most good with the power that is furnished to him. Of course he can if his spirit be right to use it for what it is given to him” (13). Viscerally, such statements seem disconnected with reality. Many people would love to make as much money as possible but do not possess the opportunities to do so. However, when charitably considered, Conwell’s philosophy seems sensible to a certain extent. First, Conwell’s opinions resemble pro-business theological arguments. Many Christians affirm profit, arguing that it is an integral piece of the marketplace puzzle. However, profit ought not to be an end; profit ought to be made with the purpose of serving others. How is this position different than Conwell’s where he suggest that the rich can do more good in the world with money? It isn’t. In many ways, Conwell’s theory resembles the first two bullet points in John Wesley’s economic theory: one, gain all you can; and two, save all you can. Once made rich by gaining and saving, a Christian is capable of doing good deeds in the world. This notion of good resembles Wesley’s “give-all-you-can” principles minus the all-you-can part. The Problem of Systemic Injustice Nevertheless, Conwell’s position on wealth is untenable because it disregards the concept of systemic injustice. Certain people who possess the desire and talent to succeed in business will never find the opportunity. In Conwell’s mind, such poverty is attributed to a lack of belief or a lack of trying. Given our economic system, it is important to remember the role of profit and to do good things when in positions of power. But, Christians also ought to campaign against systemic injustice in order to provide opportunity for those with a will but without a way. Acres of Diamonds inspires people to pursue wealth. I am not convinced this position is correct. Conwell’s writing carries the foundations of prosperity gospel, a worrisome theology which focuses on wealth creation as evidence of faithfulness. Acres of Diamonds is an influential work and therefore ought to be studied. However, if you are uninterested in the relationship between theology and economic theory, avoid this book. Originally published at http://wherepenmeetspaper.blogspot.com

  22. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    Mind awakening powerful message so many nuggets of truth and idioms. Must read! Nuggets of Truth: The man who inspires nobly is open to noble inspiration In a deep silence Marvelous heights you have attained Naturally enough Deep tenderness crept into his voice Enthusiasm invites enthusiasm I have a large hearted regard Use illustrations that illustrate Delightful and confident way Delightfully terse common sense Each illustration is a hammer in which I drive home a truth I can see at a glance all that is Mind awakening powerful message so many nuggets of truth and idioms. Must read! Nuggets of Truth: The man who inspires nobly is open to noble inspiration In a deep silence Marvelous heights you have attained Naturally enough Deep tenderness crept into his voice Enthusiasm invites enthusiasm I have a large hearted regard Use illustrations that illustrate Delightful and confident way Delightfully terse common sense Each illustration is a hammer in which I drive home a truth I can see at a glance all that is and all that ever was The vast number of people I have met and the infinite variety of things my observant eyes have seen give me my ceaseless flow of illustrations and my memory and my skill make admirable use of them. Parenthetically remarks Vocab word terse There's an absolute simplicity about myself and my words. A man has no right to use words carelessly. He stands for that respect of words craftsmanship. Listening to me you begin to feel in touch with everybody and everything. He said to me with deep feeling in one of his self revealing conversations Everything should be so put as to be understood by all. Let me make this vividly clear. He's good an enbuing others with happiness. He makes the church attractive. There is nothing of stiffness or constraint. No wonder the place is packed. He's the good old man that brought me up as a boy. I liked it intensely This is an astonishing proof of your power His sincerity is so evident in everything he does Trust in God and do the next thing A rich man I can turn to In the depths of gloom Superb optimism We have been closely in touch for many years Vaguely disturbed I came to this city a stranger and won instant popularity We got over our jealousy long ago He's a delightful story after all these years I dispense wit and wisdom Staggering total He's a man that doesn't know the meaning of rest His modesty goes hand in hand with kindliness Everywhere the man wins love My dearest hope I know and will admit I work hard. Things keep turning my way because I'm on the job An odd trait of his character When someone asks how are you reply full of strength and fire I am the head of everything of which I am associated with I talk with superb effectiveness The demand for it never diminishes It's a task and a duty He has done such skillful work It's a special opportunity to do good work

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Two huge takeaways from this book that I loved. Read the stories though still to get the full effect: 1) Don't go searching for "diamonds" in other areas. Take advantage of where you are right here and right now. Consider what's under your feet and in front of you right now. Don't get caught up in other endeavors outside of your "territory" but focus on what you can impact here and now. Very good practical application to focusing on your work, your company, and your clients here and now. 2.) In Two huge takeaways from this book that I loved. Read the stories though still to get the full effect: 1) Don't go searching for "diamonds" in other areas. Take advantage of where you are right here and right now. Consider what's under your feet and in front of you right now. Don't get caught up in other endeavors outside of your "territory" but focus on what you can impact here and now. Very good practical application to focusing on your work, your company, and your clients here and now. 2.) In your work, find a need in your community. Don't assume what people need while wasting your time working in that area. Ask others what they need. Create value for others. Create a service or product that fills a void in the marketplace and people will flock to it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Russ

    This is really about looking for what you have right around you, and being capable of being in control of your life. It is within everyone's grasp to make the most of what is right in your "backyard". I think it's a good one to read, and full of good little stories, but it is what you make of it. This is really about looking for what you have right around you, and being capable of being in control of your life. It is within everyone's grasp to make the most of what is right in your "backyard". I think it's a good one to read, and full of good little stories, but it is what you make of it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Will Edwards

    Another self help classic in the public domain, this text is essentially the transcript of Conwell's popular lecture on the subject of success. If you are struggling to find the right opportunity, its certainly worth a read to refocus your attention on the opportunities that may be right under your nose. Another self help classic in the public domain, this text is essentially the transcript of Conwell's popular lecture on the subject of success. If you are struggling to find the right opportunity, its certainly worth a read to refocus your attention on the opportunities that may be right under your nose.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ben Russell

    A short and quick read. This book was highly recommended from Dan Miller, one of my favorite mentors for business success. Its full of inspiration about how you might be sitting on top of your own fortune, if you simply tap into what you already have.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Eve H

    "One way to sum up Acres of Diamonds would be to say this: the greatest opportunities in life are often found in our own backyard. Conwell clearly writes about the importance of being aware of one’s own world and that great success can be found in doing the simplest of things that no one previously had the insight to notice. The opening story of the essay in particular has become a classic tale of the cannon of the New Thought." - introduction My review here represents both my feeling towards the "One way to sum up Acres of Diamonds would be to say this: the greatest opportunities in life are often found in our own backyard. Conwell clearly writes about the importance of being aware of one’s own world and that great success can be found in doing the simplest of things that no one previously had the insight to notice. The opening story of the essay in particular has become a classic tale of the cannon of the New Thought." - introduction My review here represents both my feeling towards the book, and my feeling towards the core principle: growth starts here, now. It's a criminally simple idea that we often lose sight of throughout the humdrum of our daily routines, but that can shake things up when it hits us at the right time. I think it's important to provide a caveat here: In this book, the message is presented within the frame of industrialism. This means that his examples and rationalizations are based on "immature" economic thinking, if you believe that prioritizing people over profits is more mature than the inverse. I don't think the core principle is rendered obsolete by historical or cultural context, however. Principles can glide through time and find new rationalizations as they do so, or die trying. This one's a keeper in my book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    This book was recommended by both Jim Meisenheimer and Jeffrey Gitomer. This book did not live up to their recommendations or hype for me. I cannot recommend this book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Killer of Dreams

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I believe this is a great speech in explaining how every man can start a business with nothing and even in his own area. I enjoyed the talk about traditional values, understanding the value of money, and the dangers of inheritance. But I can't agree with his underlying core belief in how Christianity supports capitalism. Take for example one of his arguements refering to a pious man: "I have no more right to sell goods without making a profit on them than I have to overcharge him dishonestly beyo I believe this is a great speech in explaining how every man can start a business with nothing and even in his own area. I enjoyed the talk about traditional values, understanding the value of money, and the dangers of inheritance. But I can't agree with his underlying core belief in how Christianity supports capitalism. Take for example one of his arguements refering to a pious man: "I have no more right to sell goods without making a profit on them than I have to overcharge him dishonestly beyond what they are worth." Really? This just blows my mind. I don't think there's anything wrong in not making profit. It's almost like charity. It seems like he goes to far at times in deeming how capitalism is a God-given right and "God is telling you know to go and get rich". Sounds an awful lot like manifest destiny... In supporting man's God-given right to Capitalism, he does interpret one Bible verse, 1st Timothy 6:10: For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows. He makes the argument that the verse is referring to greed. That someone can pursue different avenues in expanding his business without being greedy. Is that so? I find it very interpretative and subjective. Rating Update 3/12/2019 - 3 to 2 stars. I was too generous with the 3 stars. I didn't really enjoy it. Rating Update 4/6/19- 2 stars to 1 star. Just the whole biblical support for Capitalism put me off. It's a lecture and I didn't enjoy reading 30 pages and felt it could've been shortened. August 31, 2019 Update With the adoption of my new rating system, a one star rating is befitting. The original review and rating updates conform to the new rating system. The main reason behind retaining the one star rating is because of the rating update from April 6, 2019. For further support for this rating choice, read the original section of the review.

  30. 4 out of 5

    David

    -“When I stood beside the body of John Ring and realized that he had died for love of me, I made a vow that has formed my life. I vowed that from that moment I would live not only my own life, but that I would also live the life of John Ring. And from that moment I have worked sixteen hours every day—eight for John Ring’s work and eight hours for my own.” -“Every morning when I rise I look at this sword, or if I am away from home I think of the sword, and vow anew that another day shall see sixte -“When I stood beside the body of John Ring and realized that he had died for love of me, I made a vow that has formed my life. I vowed that from that moment I would live not only my own life, but that I would also live the life of John Ring. And from that moment I have worked sixteen hours every day—eight for John Ring’s work and eight hours for my own.” -“Every morning when I rise I look at this sword, or if I am away from home I think of the sword, and vow anew that another day shall see sixteen hours of work from me.” And when one comes to know Russell Conwell one realizes that never did a man work more hard and constantly. -I say that you ought to get rich, and it is your duty to get rich. How many of my pious brethren say to me, “Do you, a Christian minister, spend your time going up and down the country advising young people to get rich, to get money?” “Yes, of course I do.” They say, “Isn’t that awful! Why don’t you preach the gospel instead of preaching about man’s making money?” “Because to make money honestly is to preach the gospel.” That is the reason. The men who get rich may be the most honest men you find in the community. -He who can give to this city better streets and better sidewalks, better schools and more colleges, more happiness and more civilization, more of God, he will be great anywhere. Let every man or woman here, if you never hear me again, remember this, that if you wish to be great at all, you must begin where you are and what you are, in Philadelphia, now. He that can give to his city any blessing, he who can be a good citizen while he lives here, he that can make better homes, he that can be a blessing whether he works in the shop or sits behind the counter or keeps house, whatever be his life, he who would be great anywhere must first be great in his own Philadelphia.

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