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How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books Emily Elizabeth Dickinson (December 10, 1830 – May 15, 1886) was an American poet. Dickinson How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books Emily Elizabeth Dickinson (December 10, 1830 – May 15, 1886) was an American poet. Dickinson was born in Amherst, Massachusetts. Although part of a prominent family with strong ties to its community, Dickinson lived much of her life highly introverted. After studying at the Amherst Academy for seven years in her youth, she briefly attended the Mount Holyoke Female Seminary before returning to her family's house in Amherst. Considered an eccentric by locals, she developed a noted penchant for white clothing and became known for her reluctance to greet guests or, later in life, to even leave her bedroom. Dickinson never married, and most friendships between her and others depended entirely upon correspondence.


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How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books Emily Elizabeth Dickinson (December 10, 1830 – May 15, 1886) was an American poet. Dickinson How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books Emily Elizabeth Dickinson (December 10, 1830 – May 15, 1886) was an American poet. Dickinson was born in Amherst, Massachusetts. Although part of a prominent family with strong ties to its community, Dickinson lived much of her life highly introverted. After studying at the Amherst Academy for seven years in her youth, she briefly attended the Mount Holyoke Female Seminary before returning to her family's house in Amherst. Considered an eccentric by locals, she developed a noted penchant for white clothing and became known for her reluctance to greet guests or, later in life, to even leave her bedroom. Dickinson never married, and most friendships between her and others depended entirely upon correspondence.

30 review for Poems By Emily Dickinson, Series One: By Emily Elizabeth Dickinson - Illustrated

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ammara Abid

    The heart asks pleasure first, And then, excuse from pain; And then, those little anodynes That deaden suffering; And then, to go to sleep; And then, if it should be The will of its Inquisitor, The liberty to die.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Vipassana

    I reason, earth is short, And anguish absolute, And many hurt; But what of that? I reason, we could die: The best vitality Cannot excel decay; But what of that? I reason that in heaven Somehow, it will be even, Some new equation given; But what of that? To review Emily's poetry feels like a slight injustice. It is not meant to be explained, but pondered within yourself. As, I read her poems, moments of my life flashed by. Not what was happening in those moments, but what I felt then. I wonder how she does I reason, earth is short, And anguish absolute, And many hurt; But what of that? I reason, we could die: The best vitality Cannot excel decay; But what of that? I reason that in heaven Somehow, it will be even, Some new equation given; But what of that? To review Emily's poetry feels like a slight injustice. It is not meant to be explained, but pondered within yourself. As, I read her poems, moments of my life flashed by. Not what was happening in those moments, but what I felt then. I wonder how she does that. Her style gives one the room to ruminate, yet the straightforwardness of her language does not allow you to diverge too far. Is it really that? Or is that her words are so indefinite that anything I meditate upon, she agrees with. It must be the questions. She asks me a lot of questions and I can't differentiate between her or me. But what of it? My gaze lingers on the page, I read it a few times more. Then shrug it off and go to bed, but wake up feeling sore. I wish I could just hobble on drown your raging blaze, then I see I'm burning myself for smooth and cold is your gaze

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mela

    Mirth is the mail of anguish, In which it cautions arm, Lest anybody spy the blood And "You're hurt" exclaim! I had read two poems from 'Selected Poems' and decided that I have to read them all. After the first series I know it was the correct decision. Because I could not stop for Death, He kindly stopped for me Some of her thoughts, metaphors are priceless. A pure genius of feeling and observations. And somebody has lost the face That made existence home! I admit, not all of her poems were as brill Mirth is the mail of anguish, In which it cautions arm, Lest anybody spy the blood And "You're hurt" exclaim! I had read two poems from 'Selected Poems' and decided that I have to read them all. After the first series I know it was the correct decision. Because I could not stop for Death, He kindly stopped for me Some of her thoughts, metaphors are priceless. A pure genius of feeling and observations. And somebody has lost the face That made existence home! I admit, not all of her poems were as brilliant as some other. But reading each one of them I was next to Emily, I almost could have touched her. And I wanted so much to hug her, to talk to her... Below my three absolute favourites: If I can stop one heart from breaking, I shall not live in vain; If I can ease one life the aching, Or cool one pain, Or help one fainting robin Unto his nest again, I shall not live in vain.*** THE MYSTERY OF PAIN. Pain has an element of blank; It cannot recollect When it began, or if there were A day when it was not. It has no future but itself, Its infinite realms contain Its past, enlightened to perceive New periods of pain.*** If you were coming in the fall, I'd brush the summer by With half a smile and half a spurn, As housewives do a fly. If I could see you in a year, I'd wind the months in balls, And put them each in separate drawers, Until their time befalls. If only centuries delayed, I'd count them on my hand, Subtracting till my fingers dropped Into Van Diemen's land. If certain, when this life was out, That yours and mine should be, I'd toss it yonder like a rind, And taste eternity. But now, all ignorant of the length Of time's uncertain wing, It goads me, like the goblin bee, That will not state its sting.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Amelia Oswald

    That I did always love, I bring thee proof: That till I loved I did not love enough. That I shall love alway, I offer thee That love is life, And life hath immortality. Dickinson from Apple TV+ inspired me to be here (the show is highly recommended (view spoiler)[ so gay (hide spoiler)] ) :>. I'm glad I have read it. Emily Dickinson was brilliant and a genius. That I did always love, I bring thee proof: That till I loved I did not love enough. That I shall love alway, I offer thee That love is life, And life hath immortality. Dickinson from Apple TV+ inspired me to be here (the show is highly recommended (view spoiler)[ so gay (hide spoiler)] ) :>. I'm glad I have read it. Emily Dickinson was brilliant and a genius.

  5. 5 out of 5

    B. P. Rinehart

    I had no time to hate, because The grave would hinder me, And life was not so ample I Could finish enmity. Nor had I time to love ; but since Some industry must be, The little toil of love, I thought, Was large enough for me. I have repeated from time to time on this site that I was not a big fan of 19th century literature as far as America and western Europe were concerned. That even someone who reads the classics like me found it out of my toleration. Well, even I can have exceptions and the poetry o I had no time to hate, because The grave would hinder me, And life was not so ample I Could finish enmity. Nor had I time to love ; but since Some industry must be, The little toil of love, I thought, Was large enough for me. I have repeated from time to time on this site that I was not a big fan of 19th century literature as far as America and western Europe were concerned. That even someone who reads the classics like me found it out of my toleration. Well, even I can have exceptions and the poetry of Emily Dickinson is one of those exceptions. Many complaints about her poetry are familiar to my complaint about most prose written in her era. It is dry, too simple, boring, etc. Despite all this I have to say she is one of my favorite poets. She is no Langston Hughes, not a Maya Angelou, or Sylvia Plath but I could read poem after poem. Is the way she uses her verse sparse simplicity? Perhaps. Is it the way she deals so precisely with the subject matter of each of her poems? That could be. Far be it from me to explain, but her poems keep me wanting to read another one, and since this is just her first volume (published posthumously) I will definitely be reviewing volume 2 as well.

  6. 5 out of 5

    d

    I hide myself within my flower, That wearing on your breast, You, unsuspecting, wear me too-- And angels know the rest. I hide myself within my flower, That, fading from your vase, You, unsuspecting, feel for me Almost a loneliness. - VII

  7. 4 out of 5

    Illiterate

    Dickinson’s irony sometimes lights up what otherwise would be insipid poems on a romanticized nature and Puritan God.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Wilder

    Emily Dickinson: the handheld sublime Words for no one but herself; most humble, chapped, resembling a pocket of careworn pennies. And in that: transcendence! Scene.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Denisa Ciubotaru

    It is truly beautiful how many quotes you can extract from her poems. I decided that she's my favourite poet of all times. It is truly beautiful how many quotes you can extract from her poems. I decided that she's my favourite poet of all times.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Grace, Queen of Crows and Tomes

    Emily Dickinson is one of my favorite poets. Her poems can be more spiritual than most, but she has very unique descriptions and how she sees the world. Her poems are very quick to read and are easy on the eyes. I can guarantee that will enjoy some of her poems! I will definitely be reading her second and third series!!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dipika Desaboyina

    Emily Dickinson's verse infects you like an unsuspecting bacterium. My thoughts realigned instinctively into strings of unbalanced rhythm, for a while, after I was done reading this volume and it was amusing and disarming at the same time. In a Library was the first of a long list of poems from this book, that I fell in an endearing love with. The last couple of stanzas read : "He traverses familiar, As one should come to town And tell you all your dreams were true; He lived where dreams were sown. H Emily Dickinson's verse infects you like an unsuspecting bacterium. My thoughts realigned instinctively into strings of unbalanced rhythm, for a while, after I was done reading this volume and it was amusing and disarming at the same time. In a Library was the first of a long list of poems from this book, that I fell in an endearing love with. The last couple of stanzas read : "He traverses familiar, As one should come to town And tell you all your dreams were true; He lived where dreams were sown. His presence is enchantment, You beg him not to go; Old volumes shake their vellum heads And tantalize, just so. If men were books that I could own, more men would I have known, if all it took was to bow my lashes and read, I would have encountered my love indeed. It was hard not to include that conveniently rhythmic afterthought in this review and I apologize for the cheekiness but such was her impression upon me. You can see her sitting by a window building blocks of verse in her mind, as you turn every page of the book. Her melancholy is beautiful and earnest. Some verse is gentle and bitter, like a healing medicine that is hard to get down. I see iterations of truths as the unchangeable constants they are, with no complaint or hope for a better tomorrow, and that is the quality of Dickinson's poetry that I cherish the most. She is not feisty or entitled. She does not impinge. She dwells in her personal world and does not want you to know or visit. From Surrender : "Had I, a humble maiden, Whose farthest of degree Was that she might, Some distant heaven, Dwell timidly with thee!" Dickinson is known to be a willfully private poet and I felt a strange sense of indignation while I was reading her published works, as if I were doing something I should not be, however, there are some certain emotions that remain undistilled within us, that she elicits with such a keen and profound insight that one might find a part of themselves in an unassuming line of her poetry. From In Vain : "I cannot live with you, It would be life, And life is over there Behind the shelf" This volume is partitioned thematically and the last section contains several of Dickinson's musings on death, which is one of the more recurring themes of her works, and to say that reading them was unnerving is a slight understatement. This beautiful and nameless combination of words sent a perfectly frosty shiver down my spine: "I died for beauty, but was scarce Adjusted in the tomb, When one who died for truth was lain In an adjoining room. He questioned softly why I failed? "For beauty," I replied. "And I for truth - the two are one; We brethren are," he said. And so, as kinsmen met a-night, We talked between the rooms, Until the moss had reached our lips, And covered up our names." Dickinson's poetry is to be read, slowly and meticulously and with great empathy.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lisa N

    Emily Dickinson is my all-time favorite poet. I loved one of her nature poems that was including in an anthology I read often as a child. I will never forget the effect the following poem had on me the first time I read it, which was in college: Because I could not stop for Death, He kindly stopped for me; The carriage held but just ourselves And Immortality. We slowly drove, he knew no haste, And I had put away My labor, and my leisure too, For his civility. We passed the school where children played, Emily Dickinson is my all-time favorite poet. I loved one of her nature poems that was including in an anthology I read often as a child. I will never forget the effect the following poem had on me the first time I read it, which was in college: Because I could not stop for Death, He kindly stopped for me; The carriage held but just ourselves And Immortality. We slowly drove, he knew no haste, And I had put away My labor, and my leisure too, For his civility. We passed the school where children played, Their lessons scarcely done; We passed the fields of gazing grain, We passed the setting sun. We paused before a house that seemed A swelling of the ground; The roof was scarcely visible, The cornice but a mound. Since then 't is centuries; but each Feels shorter than the day I first surmised the horses' heads Were toward eternity. The above poem is contained in this collection as well as one of my two Dickinson favorites (the other being, of course, There is no Frigate like a Book…)— If I can stop one heart from breaking, I shall not live in vain; If I can ease one life the aching, Or cool one pain, Or help one fainting robin Unto his nest again, I shall not live in vain. This collection, which I downloaded from project Gutenberg combines two of her favorite topics, nature and death. I really got a kick out of this poem that combines the two topics, as no one but Emily can: If I should n’t be alive When the robins come, Give the one in red cravat A memorial crumb. If I could n’t thank you, Being just asleep, You will know I’m trying With my granite lip! “These verses will seem to the reader like poetry torn up by the roots, with rain and dew and earth still clinging to them, giving a freshness and a fragrance not otherwise to be conveyed.” Emily is simple, eloquent, lyrical, down-to-earth, and occasionally morbid. I love her!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

    I must admit that reading this was my first real exposure to Emily Dickinson. Yes, I knew she was a famous poet, but I had never spent any time reading her work, nor could I identify any poem as belonging to her. But after having her mentioned repeatedly in another book I just read I decided to download a free e-book version of her poems. Poetry is such a unique writing style to me. I am not an expert on poetry, and poems either resonate with me, or they don’t. A poem could be a brilliant work of I must admit that reading this was my first real exposure to Emily Dickinson. Yes, I knew she was a famous poet, but I had never spent any time reading her work, nor could I identify any poem as belonging to her. But after having her mentioned repeatedly in another book I just read I decided to download a free e-book version of her poems. Poetry is such a unique writing style to me. I am not an expert on poetry, and poems either resonate with me, or they don’t. A poem could be a brilliant work of art, but for me it is just mediocrity. Yet other poems, which may not be brilliant at all to others, can tend to resonate with me. Such is the relationship between poetry and me. Some of the poems of Emily Dickinson resonated with me, some did not. I can see the woman did have a gift with the written word though, so I can understand why she is still popular, or at least well known, over 100 years after her death. For those who themselves can not identify any poem written by Ms. Dickinson, here is one I enjoyed to give you a taste of her work: IN A LIBRARY. A precious, mouldering pleasure 't is To meet an antique book, In just the dress his century wore; A privilege, I think, His venerable hand to take, And warming in our own, A passage back, or two, to make To times when he was young. His quaint opinions to inspect, His knowledge to unfold On what concerns our mutual mind, The literature of old; What interested scholars most, What competitions ran When Plato was a certainty. And Sophocles a man; When Sappho was a living girl, And Beatrice wore The gown that Dante deified. Facts, centuries before, He traverses familiar, As one should come to town And tell you all your dreams were true; He lived where dreams were sown. His presence is enchantment, You beg him not to go; Old volumes shake their vellum heads And tantalize, just so.

  14. 5 out of 5

    charlotte sometimes

    Some personal highlights: “Pain has an element of blank; It cannot recollect When it began, or if there were A day when it was not. It has no future but itself, Its infinite realms contain Its past, enlightened to perceive New periods of pain.” “A precious, mouldering pleasure ’t is To meet an antique book” “Because I could not stop for Death, He kindly stopped for me; The carriage held but just ourselves And Immortality.”

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ameaka

    I never really consider Poetry books as 'read'. For me it is always and ongoing process of discovery. Take this book for example; I've had it for years but never really read through. I have my favorites though that I read over and over: THE heart asks pleasure first, And then, excuse from pain; And then, those little anodynes That deaden suffering; And then, to go to sleep; And then, if it should be The will of its Inquisitor, The liberty to die. I never really consider Poetry books as 'read'. For me it is always and ongoing process of discovery. Take this book for example; I've had it for years but never really read through. I have my favorites though that I read over and over: THE heart asks pleasure first, And then, excuse from pain; And then, those little anodynes That deaden suffering; And then, to go to sleep; And then, if it should be The will of its Inquisitor, The liberty to die.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Maram

    One of my favorites was; “Some things that fly there be, — Birds, hours, the bumble-bee: Of these no elegy. Some things that stay there be, — Grief, hills, eternity: Nor this behooveth me. There are, that resting, rise. Can I expound the skies? How still the riddle lies!”

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jaimie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Reviewing a whole book of poetry concisely is an art which I have not mastered (and honestly am not planning on attempting), so instead we’ll take a different tactic and explore a handful of the poems which I enjoyed best in this first collection from Emily Dickinson. I’ve always been a fan of Dickinson for the few poems which I had read, so it was interesting to get to know her on a more broad level - even if this is only the very beginning, as there are quite a few more of her collections left Reviewing a whole book of poetry concisely is an art which I have not mastered (and honestly am not planning on attempting), so instead we’ll take a different tactic and explore a handful of the poems which I enjoyed best in this first collection from Emily Dickinson. I’ve always been a fan of Dickinson for the few poems which I had read, so it was interesting to get to know her on a more broad level - even if this is only the very beginning, as there are quite a few more of her collections left to go! The first poem which stood out for me was expectedly “In a Library.” I mean, this one was an easy favourite, as Dickinson explores the mutual love that all writers, readers, and literary aficionados have for the most accessible supplier of books! Her words evoke the unique smells of a library chalk-a-block full of old, rich tomes, which even though most of us frequent more modern collections we can’t help but imagine in the deepest recesses of our minds, and then the deep veneration and respect that we feel for librarians, the purveyors of our drug of choice, before moving on to the books themselves. These small offerings which take us to other worlds, into other minds, and remind us of ages past are expressed as adored in some of Dickinson’s most expressive language; it is clear that she is as deeply in love with books and the stories they hold as any of us, even though her selection was severely limited by the Victorian period (what would she have thought of the high fantasy that has become popular now?) and her subject matter tends towards the ancient and classical authors. Dickinson clearly had a penchant for Death, and her most well-known poem (read and examined in every high school curriculum) is included here, but I’m actually going to choose a different poem as my favourite ode to Death: the untitled piece whose first line reads “I died for beauty, but was scarce…” This short poem tells the story of two beings entombed together, one having died for beauty and the other for truth. The two ideas play a nice contrast throughout the poem as the two characters get to know one another in their repose. Their story is extremely brief, but Dickinson’s imagery is strong enough to wrap my imagination in wondering who these people are. Did they know each other in the mortal realm, as enemies or rivals, and were they brought together after death to teach each other some much needed lessons? Are they actually people, or simply ideas, whose time for death has come to bring them together to create a new and more improved world? Either way, Dickinson plays an interesting game with her words here, and paints a lovely (if macabre) story. Last, but not least, is the small poem “Lost.” This piece is such an enigma, I couldn’t help but be charmed with it, as Dickinson explores themes of loss, magic, and differing points of view. She was clearly someone out of step with her time period, and saw things from a unique perspective, so it is not surprising that these themes come up again and again in her poems. Here Dickinson finds value in a mysterious world (synonymous with a person, an idea, a freedom) bound by a shining row of stars which hides invisible to the eyes of a rich man. The poem is only two short stanzas, and in typical Dickinsonian fashion we are left with a perfect gem but very much wanting more. Who or what is this lost world, will it be found in later poems, and who is the gentleman who overlooks what Dickinson so clearly values? Considering the strange and lonely life that she seems to have lived, the world could be almost anything (in fact, it may be the world that she was largely kept from due to her sex and circumstances), and we can see Dickinson’s poem as a cry, not so much for help but for the recognition that she feels she deserves. I’m going to take a break from reading the larger collection of Dickinson’s poems, since they are a rather large weight, but rest assured that I fully plan on returning to them after I delve into some other collections which are restlessly waiting on by TBR!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I very much enjoyed this, not just because it was short. I enjoyed that the poems were also relatively short and that made them easier to keep my short attention span. My favorite part of reading these poems by Emily Dickinson was probably recognizing the differences in the beliefs that people had back during her time and what the modern day believe. One poem I found intriguing was number 17 Dawn, it makes mention of getting the dimples ready and it made we wonder how you would get your dimples I very much enjoyed this, not just because it was short. I enjoyed that the poems were also relatively short and that made them easier to keep my short attention span. My favorite part of reading these poems by Emily Dickinson was probably recognizing the differences in the beliefs that people had back during her time and what the modern day believe. One poem I found intriguing was number 17 Dawn, it makes mention of getting the dimples ready and it made we wonder how you would get your dimples ready? Just smile and look pleasant, possibly. Though what does one without dimples do, just have no need to prepare them. All in all, I would suggest this book for those who are interested in a quick read and books that show differences in times.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Marinela

    If I had to describe the poems I just read with one word - I'd say beautiful. I'll admit that I don't really read poetry but after watching A Quiet Passion, I decided that it's high time I read some of Emily Dickinson's works, because I had this feeling that I'd really love them. And let me just say that if you want to read some beautiful, gentle and melodic poems - Emily Dickinson is definitely a great choice. If I had to describe the poems I just read with one word - I'd say beautiful. I'll admit that I don't really read poetry but after watching A Quiet Passion, I decided that it's high time I read some of Emily Dickinson's works, because I had this feeling that I'd really love them. And let me just say that if you want to read some beautiful, gentle and melodic poems - Emily Dickinson is definitely a great choice.

  20. 4 out of 5

    mariana

    I always thought I didn't like poems, but that all changed when I watched Dickinson, the Apple+ series about the poet Emily Dickison, and I felt that those poems were so deep, with an appropriate dose of melancholy, that it ended up making me love her poems even more. I was so interested in reading her poems, I can only say that I’m in love with her works, and I hope to know more about it, and it was so good to read this book while I was fighting my insomnia, I read it so fast, that I regretted I always thought I didn't like poems, but that all changed when I watched Dickinson, the Apple+ series about the poet Emily Dickison, and I felt that those poems were so deep, with an appropriate dose of melancholy, that it ended up making me love her poems even more. I was so interested in reading her poems, I can only say that I’m in love with her works, and I hope to know more about it, and it was so good to read this book while I was fighting my insomnia, I read it so fast, that I regretted not having read it anymore slowly.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jamaica Santos

    The collection of poems in this book are really good. Some are very deep while some are shallow. I would like to return to them from time to time. Here is one of my favorites: The Mystery of Pain. Pain has an element of blank; It cannot recollect When it began, or if there were A day when it was not. It has no future but itself, Its infinite realms contain Its past, enlightened to perceive New periods of pain.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Maryam

    This is my letter to the world,            That never wrote to me,         The simple news that Nature told,            With tender majesty.         Her message is committed            To hands I cannot see;         For love of her, sweet countrymen,            Judge tenderly of me!

  23. 4 out of 5

    B. Rule

    Dickinson is one of our best nature poets. All of her (many) poems about bees are a delight. I was also impressed by her arch sense of humor and her frank approach to death. This is a great collection, although it's not the ideal way to read her, as her intended punctuation and capitalization have been altered to her detriment. Dickinson is one of our best nature poets. All of her (many) poems about bees are a delight. I was also impressed by her arch sense of humor and her frank approach to death. This is a great collection, although it's not the ideal way to read her, as her intended punctuation and capitalization have been altered to her detriment.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kaylabookworm22 L

    A beautiful collection of poetry by someone I wish I had read sooner but better late than never. I got an Interest in reading her after watching the Apple TV show Dickinson. I was curious to read full poems from her and I am glad I did. I love both the show and her poetry. I’ll read whatever else I can find of hers soon.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I’m trying to read more and varied poetry. This collection does a good job of placing poems by subject. I may have read one or two Dickinson poems in classes, but never in a collection, so the categorization was helpful with my understanding. I prefer the love-of-nature poems to the religious ones.

  26. 4 out of 5

    lina ✰

    Some of Dickinson's poetry is absolutely phenomenal; her use of rhyme, both in lines and from one line to another makes the poem almost melodic. The varied themes she writes on and the general motifs throughout this volume were wonderful. I did find that these poems weren't her best selection, but a good read nonetheless. Some of Dickinson's poetry is absolutely phenomenal; her use of rhyme, both in lines and from one line to another makes the poem almost melodic. The varied themes she writes on and the general motifs throughout this volume were wonderful. I did find that these poems weren't her best selection, but a good read nonetheless.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Miles Smith

    Dickinson is a naturalist like so many of her peers but she also invokes a metaphysical life that seems to draw its intensity from a sort of Americanized and idealized disembodiment. This is the first volume of her poetry so Im admittedly still a novice regarding her poetry. Its clearly very good, but it also lacks the heaviness of Longfellow.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Claudia Sanchez

    2.5 There is something very nice about some of the author's poems but most of them did not really grab me. It doesn't feel right to make this my lowest ranked book of the year so far. But, I tend to be more demanding when it comes to poetry and classics so this is the rating this particular collection is getting. 2.5 There is something very nice about some of the author's poems but most of them did not really grab me. It doesn't feel right to make this my lowest ranked book of the year so far. But, I tend to be more demanding when it comes to poetry and classics so this is the rating this particular collection is getting.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ketan Pawar

    I had no time to hate, because The grave would hinder me, And life was not so ample I Could finish enmity.   Nor had I time to love; but since         Some industry must be, The little toil of love, I thought, Was large enough for me.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Karla Goforth Abreu

    It is beautiful! At times, raw emotion is expressed. The poems on death had me crying, at their beauty, pain, but hopeful and faith-discourse. The poems on love and nature inspired mindful pictures and awe, at times. (The volume I read did not have the Japanese translation added)

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