counter Horror: A Thematic History in Fiction and Film - Free Download Books
Hot Best Seller

Horror: A Thematic History in Fiction and Film

Availability: Ready to download

Horror is an established tradition in literature, contemporary fiction and film. From books such as Frankenstein and Dracula to films such as Seven and The Blair Witch Project, the genre has held an irresistible appeal for audiences. Is the horror genre inherently anti-establishment and an argument for social revolution? Is it a liberating expose of human nature and a peek Horror is an established tradition in literature, contemporary fiction and film. From books such as Frankenstein and Dracula to films such as Seven and The Blair Witch Project, the genre has held an irresistible appeal for audiences. Is the horror genre inherently anti-establishment and an argument for social revolution? Is it a liberating expose of human nature and a peek at the dark side of the unconscious? Or is it pure evil, solely designed to corrupt and deprave? Starting from such questions about the nature of horror, this book offers an accessible history of the genre. Using examples from key Gothic texts of the Romantic period, as well as more recent popular novels and films, this book examines its subject thematically. It includes chapters on horror, religion and identity; "mad science," vampires and the undead; madness and psycho-killers; forbidden knowledge and books; narratives of invasion and pestilence; Satanism and demonic possession; ghosts and the ghost-story; and body-horror and metamorphoses.


Compare

Horror is an established tradition in literature, contemporary fiction and film. From books such as Frankenstein and Dracula to films such as Seven and The Blair Witch Project, the genre has held an irresistible appeal for audiences. Is the horror genre inherently anti-establishment and an argument for social revolution? Is it a liberating expose of human nature and a peek Horror is an established tradition in literature, contemporary fiction and film. From books such as Frankenstein and Dracula to films such as Seven and The Blair Witch Project, the genre has held an irresistible appeal for audiences. Is the horror genre inherently anti-establishment and an argument for social revolution? Is it a liberating expose of human nature and a peek at the dark side of the unconscious? Or is it pure evil, solely designed to corrupt and deprave? Starting from such questions about the nature of horror, this book offers an accessible history of the genre. Using examples from key Gothic texts of the Romantic period, as well as more recent popular novels and films, this book examines its subject thematically. It includes chapters on horror, religion and identity; "mad science," vampires and the undead; madness and psycho-killers; forbidden knowledge and books; narratives of invasion and pestilence; Satanism and demonic possession; ghosts and the ghost-story; and body-horror and metamorphoses.

30 review for Horror: A Thematic History in Fiction and Film

  1. 5 out of 5

    Danielle Klassen

    This is an excellent resource book for people looking for academic research on horror in general. What's really invaluable is to be able to get the perspective from a point of view outside of the US. I think that it's important to consider the wider context of horror as a genre and it was a really interesting read for this alone. There were a few areas where I didn't necessarily agree with the author but overall, this book has a lot of really interesting ideas, great information and a good bit o This is an excellent resource book for people looking for academic research on horror in general. What's really invaluable is to be able to get the perspective from a point of view outside of the US. I think that it's important to consider the wider context of horror as a genre and it was a really interesting read for this alone. There were a few areas where I didn't necessarily agree with the author but overall, this book has a lot of really interesting ideas, great information and a good bit of humor too. Highly recommended.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Steve Wiggins

    This book is exactly what the title says it is: a textbook history of horror, thematically presented. Including both fiction (novels, short stories) and films, this is a witty, knowledgeable exploration of what makes us afraid. I found Jones' sense of humor engaging and his insights compelling. As with any history of horror there are things you wish to find that just aren't there. That's not the author's fault, but it reflects just how many things can make us afraid. Jones has chapters on Religio This book is exactly what the title says it is: a textbook history of horror, thematically presented. Including both fiction (novels, short stories) and films, this is a witty, knowledgeable exploration of what makes us afraid. I found Jones' sense of humor engaging and his insights compelling. As with any history of horror there are things you wish to find that just aren't there. That's not the author's fault, but it reflects just how many things can make us afraid. Jones has chapters on Religion and horror (hating others), mad scientists, vampires, mind monsters, hidden knowledge fears, invasion movies, transformations (like werewolves or Jekyll and Hyde), and Satan. The chapter on Satan is especially good. Like any division of horror, the boundaries are somewhat fluid. This is a non-technical treatment and although it is intended for use in courses it is readable by anyone who finds horror compelling. I commented further on this wonderful book on my own blog, for those who wish to read more: Sects and Violence in the Ancient World.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Galen

    This book covers the origins of horror in 18th century literature, tracing the evolution of the vampire from legend, to the penny dreadful, to Hammer films. It examines the use of 'mad science' in both literature and film, as well as the fear of the unknown that dominates much of horror films/fiction. Told with a dry wit that makes even the analysis of slasher films engaging, Jones traces the themes that dominate horror in an engaging style. This book covers the origins of horror in 18th century literature, tracing the evolution of the vampire from legend, to the penny dreadful, to Hammer films. It examines the use of 'mad science' in both literature and film, as well as the fear of the unknown that dominates much of horror films/fiction. Told with a dry wit that makes even the analysis of slasher films engaging, Jones traces the themes that dominate horror in an engaging style.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tara Calaby

    I liked this because it's one of only a very few works on academic horror that I've read that actually come across as being written by someone who actually likes the genre. It's also interesting to have things discussed in terms of broad themes. It doesn't delve very deeply, but it's a good survey of what's out there and I particularly liked the discussion of slasher films. I liked this because it's one of only a very few works on academic horror that I've read that actually come across as being written by someone who actually likes the genre. It's also interesting to have things discussed in terms of broad themes. It doesn't delve very deeply, but it's a good survey of what's out there and I particularly liked the discussion of slasher films.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tine

    I don't really like horror movies, but these theories are so interesting! I don't really like horror movies, but these theories are so interesting!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    The writing and layout isn't very good. The information is interesting, though. I just wish it was presented in a better fashion. The writing and layout isn't very good. The information is interesting, though. I just wish it was presented in a better fashion.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lindsi

  9. 5 out of 5

    Emmet Mclaughlin

  10. 4 out of 5

    Will Errickson

  11. 5 out of 5

    Randy

  12. 4 out of 5

    Maria

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ksenia

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chery

  15. 4 out of 5

    Spinjitzo

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lara Dallet

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chris O'connor

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mindy

  19. 5 out of 5

    Melody

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rosemary

  21. 4 out of 5

    Qurratulain

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jay

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Johnson

  24. 5 out of 5

    Vince Fontaine

  25. 5 out of 5

    Raymond

  26. 4 out of 5

    James McNerney

  27. 5 out of 5

    E

  28. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  29. 5 out of 5

    Elliot

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Yadlosky

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.