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Feeding Hannibal: A Connoisseur's Cookbook

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Feeding Hannibal: A Connoisseur’s Cookbook is a collection of easy-to-follow recipes inspired by the show and created by its food stylist, Janice Poon. Each recipe is accompanied by fascinating insider’s anecdotes, delightful artwork and revealing behind-the-scenes photos of stars and crew on the set of Hannibal.


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Feeding Hannibal: A Connoisseur’s Cookbook is a collection of easy-to-follow recipes inspired by the show and created by its food stylist, Janice Poon. Each recipe is accompanied by fascinating insider’s anecdotes, delightful artwork and revealing behind-the-scenes photos of stars and crew on the set of Hannibal.

30 review for Feeding Hannibal: A Connoisseur's Cookbook

  1. 5 out of 5

    Gabrielle

    I absolutely loved the show "Hannibal": Bryan Fuller's aesthetic and his touch for atmosphere and rhythm is amazing; and of course, what Mads Mikklesen did with the character was wonderful. Hannibal Lecter has always been my favorite villain, and he elevated him to another level. Refined, sophisticated, elegant, flawlessly polite. Oh, and of course, he is an excellent cook... Didn't the food on the show looked to die for? Pun intended... Now relax: there's no recipe indicating how to cook human p I absolutely loved the show "Hannibal": Bryan Fuller's aesthetic and his touch for atmosphere and rhythm is amazing; and of course, what Mads Mikklesen did with the character was wonderful. Hannibal Lecter has always been my favorite villain, and he elevated him to another level. Refined, sophisticated, elegant, flawlessly polite. Oh, and of course, he is an excellent cook... Didn't the food on the show looked to die for? Pun intended... Now relax: there's no recipe indicating how to cook human parts in this book. But if you enjoyed the show, you might want to check it out. It was written by the food stylist who had the pleasure (and often massive challenge) of preparing all the decadent and gorgeous food the characters prepared and ate on the show. Recipes often have little stories related to the episodes in which the dishes appeared, there is breathtaking food photography every few pages, practical shopping and entertaining advice, and as much dark humor as one can infuse in a cookbook. While Hannibal points out to his dinner guests that nothing he serves is vegetarian, there is a surprising amount of vegetarian dishes in the book! From faux foie gras, to beet pâté and vegetarian osso bucco (basically a clever way of presenting eggplants and leeks to look like the original dish), there are a few really interesting and creative options for people who like their food cruelty-free. But mostly, this is what I would call a challenge cookbook: the dishes are often on the complicated side, requiring ingredients that will demand a bit of hunting (pun not intended this time), such as organ meat. That being said, more simple substitutions are often indicated, in case you feel self-conscious about going to the butcher shop and asking if they have any lamb testicles in stock. It seems unlikely to me that I will be cooking much out of this book (though I am dying to try to make prosciutto melon peacock tails, because wow!), but it is an absolute pleasure to flip through: I guess it does require a certain twisted sense of humor to appreciate - but fans of the show will find it an absolute delight.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Heather V ~The Other Heather~

    To paraphrase Richard Nixon, “I am not a cook.” Okay, that was bad even by my standards. But it’s true. It’s not that I can’t cook; I just never have, really. Not anything ambitious. I’m a very good baker, but cooking? I haven’t put the time into it to get good at it. This book is going to change that. (Hello, 2017 Resolutions!) I’d kiss the chef. Zero hesitation. My very dear friend Wendy gave this book to me as a gift, knowing of my love for Hannibal but perhaps not knowing that I’d been watching To paraphrase Richard Nixon, “I am not a cook.” Okay, that was bad even by my standards. But it’s true. It’s not that I can’t cook; I just never have, really. Not anything ambitious. I’m a very good baker, but cooking? I haven’t put the time into it to get good at it. This book is going to change that. (Hello, 2017 Resolutions!) I’d kiss the chef. Zero hesitation. My very dear friend Wendy gave this book to me as a gift, knowing of my love for Hannibal but perhaps not knowing that I’d been watching the Food Network a lot lately (avoiding politics and other devastating world news), so I was already feeling inspired. And this absolutely gorgeous tome has just solidified my temptation to branch out and take my oven for a serious whirl. Hannibal makes cooking hot. “Nature loves to creep us out,” Janice Poon tells us before launching into a section about shellfish and how to use shells in the presentation of our homemade masterpieces. I like the way this woman thinks. She served as the food stylist throughout HANNIBAL’s run, and she’s also Canadian, which makes me love her even more. Toronto gals represent! Here's why I think the cookbook will appeal to both chefs and TV viewers, and why it's an absolute must-have if you happen to be a combination of the two. For the foodies: FEEDING HANNIBAL is chock full of creative twists on traditional recipes, and there are artsy little flourishes here and there that will almost certainly impress the hell out of even your snobbiest-palated friends at your next dinner party. I mean, there’s even an elaborate (yet still totally do-able) take on a Caesar salad in here. Really, any salad that comes with an introductory line like this - “A platter of Caesar Salad arranged to look like a philosopher’s walk in a miniature brook-side garden” - has got to appeal to most any food lover, no? And yes, though it might seem counter to the show from whence the book comes, there are vegetarian dishes, too (see “Shallow Veggie Grave,” for example). Having both hand-drawn sketches and beautifully rendered photographs of how the meal should be presented, featured on the pages opposite to most of the recipes, doesn’t hurt either. HELLRAISER for dinner? Sign me up! For the TV show fans: The detail work in these pages is superb. Like, where the recipes specify how many servings are meant to come out of them, it could just say, “Makes two servings.” But this is HANNIBAL. That’s too pedestrian. Instead, you’ll find a little notation at the bottom of the ingredient list that reads, “Yields 2 servings”...and the “2” is inside a tiny sketch of a circle with antlers sprouting from the top. Anyone who’s spent ten minutes watching the show will understand that delightful touch. There are also hilariously perfect titles to the chapters (i.e. “HAVING FRIENDS FOR DINNER,” “HOW TO HANNIBALIZE YOUR TABLE,” etc.), and quite a few evil names of recipes (like “Deerly Beloved Meat Pies”), all of which just make me want to watch the series through for a fourth (!!!) time. Of course, some of the dishes are very elaborate and probably not suitable for beginners, but the instructions are quite thorough, so it’s not as intimidating as I’d expected. Scattered liberally throughout the book are photos of and notes about the television series, pointing out which dish was served in what episode, or explaining the significance of certain ingredients within the context of the show. It’s enough that you’ll actually want to sit down and read it from cover to cover, rather than just flipping through to see which dessert you could make to freak out your family over the holidays. The full-page, glossy, delectable photo spreads of Hannibal himself, the great Mads Mikkelsen (who also wrote the introduction - bonus!), are practically dessert unto themselves. The book is open next to me as I’m typing this, and it happens to be at page 107, which features the infamous (and illegal) “Quail Stuffed with Sweetbreads and Hazelnuts.” If you’re a fan of the show you’ll know immediately upon seeing the photo which episode that one comes from. I’ll wager a guess that I won’t be trying it myself. But that’s really the most surprising thing about the book: most of the recipes are stuff you’d legitimately want to try, and would have more than a snowball’s chance in hell of pulling it off successfully, too. It would’ve made for a magnificent coffee table book, sure, but isn’t it exciting to know that you could venture into your kitchen and get crazy with some chicken?? Wendy sure knows how to give a gift. Five shiny, cookie-cutter stars for this book. I can’t wait to find myself in the kitchen, wine glass in hand, carefully selected symphonic strings playing in the background. Maybe I’ll skip the wine and go with one of the drinks suggested among the recipes...because I’m not sure I can turn down the chance to try a Scotch-based cocktail simply called “The Chesapeake Ripper.” Or perhaps the “Mirium Beerium?” Hells to the yeah! Who’s coming over for dinner?? Why are you running away?!? Uh... 2017 Resolution #2: Become a vegetarian.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    I really can't speak about this as a cookbook, sine I don't actually cook in any significant way. I loved the images, the production, and the behind the scenes stories and inspirations for the dishes. I noticed some unfortunate copyediting issues, though.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Joanna

    OMG, it is perfect! Everything I ever wanted from a Hannibal book! I mean, it's a book based on a cult TV show about a serial killing cannibal and it has RECIPES?!? This EXISTS?! It has beautiful pictures and is funny and I'm not imagining it? wow The fact that I have this in my hands makes me feel so loved and accepted by the universe. Well... it's close to perfect. Hahah, there was this one paragraph where she spelled Filipino "Philipino," which I have never seen in my 32 years as a Filipina. A OMG, it is perfect! Everything I ever wanted from a Hannibal book! I mean, it's a book based on a cult TV show about a serial killing cannibal and it has RECIPES?!? This EXISTS?! It has beautiful pictures and is funny and I'm not imagining it? wow The fact that I have this in my hands makes me feel so loved and accepted by the universe. Well... it's close to perfect. Hahah, there was this one paragraph where she spelled Filipino "Philipino," which I have never seen in my 32 years as a Filipina. Also, she misspelled dinuguan as "dinguan" haha. Oh well. It really is quite good, though. I am afraid of finishing it lest the fun be over! PS If you are interested, it is really easy to get pig blood in a Filipino grocery store. I made some sanguinaccio dolce for a dinner party. PPS I am not a serial killing cannibal

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tokio Myers

    Read all the things about the show and marked all the recipes I am going to try. God I love Hannibal and yes I know I have problems.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Salma

    > made me want to go vegetarian. > lots of full page pictures of mads. > made me want to go vegetarian. > lots of full page pictures of mads.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mafalda

    I wanted to love this book, because this TV show was one of my favorites and this book was on my wishlist for a long time. The food design in Hannibal is truly impressive and I have to applaud Janice's brilliant work on the show. But this book feels too incomplete. I loved reading Janice's notes on each dish and her adventures and misadventures while shooting, but for a cookbook focused on food design, it lacks photographs of many dishes and step-by-step photos or illustrations to help explain ce I wanted to love this book, because this TV show was one of my favorites and this book was on my wishlist for a long time. The food design in Hannibal is truly impressive and I have to applaud Janice's brilliant work on the show. But this book feels too incomplete. I loved reading Janice's notes on each dish and her adventures and misadventures while shooting, but for a cookbook focused on food design, it lacks photographs of many dishes and step-by-step photos or illustrations to help explain certain steps of a recipe. I'm not saying that every single recipe must have a photo, but there are a lot of fairly complex preparations that would be greatly simplified with a photo of the finished product or an illustration. Janice has such beautiful sketches of plating ideas scattered along this book, but it's not enough, in my opinion. There are also some typos in the text, but other than that I think the recipes are properly written. I haven't tried any of them, though.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    I will never be able to make most of these recipes but I loved the insight into, and the possibility of recreating, Hannibal's dishes. Other, easier, options are given along with vegetarian options and helpful hints. Maybe one day I'll take something on - the cocktails are probably something I can handle! A must for my fellow Fannibals.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    As Hannibal would say (in episode 1x07, 'Sorbet'): "this is very educational." And probably also: "I LOVE you work!" Because man, did Janice Poon deliver a delicious (sorry) book. Things I learned: - blood is sold in half liters, but don't worry, it freezes well! - it takes about four parts of pig loin to make an Eddie Izzard leg but only three to make a Gillian Anderson leg (women's legs are thinner). - you can totally brew people beer. - everyone involved with this show is totally crazy in a compl As Hannibal would say (in episode 1x07, 'Sorbet'): "this is very educational." And probably also: "I LOVE you work!" Because man, did Janice Poon deliver a delicious (sorry) book. Things I learned: - blood is sold in half liters, but don't worry, it freezes well! - it takes about four parts of pig loin to make an Eddie Izzard leg but only three to make a Gillian Anderson leg (women's legs are thinner). - you can totally brew people beer. - everyone involved with this show is totally crazy in a completely awesome way The book features a wide range of dishes and drinks, including some that didn't make it on the screen. It also has several vegetarian options and a few substitutes for those who don't relish the idea of real foie gras (like Gina Torres; she got a substitute while Mads Mikkelsen and Laurence Fishburne nommed happily) or snails (like Eddie Izzard). Along with the recipes are serving suggestions and background information on the recipes and the food. It has absolutely GORGEOUS photographs which really match the aesthetic of the show. But even if you're not a Hannibal-caliber foodie but just a fan of the show, this book delivers. It has a ton of anecdotes about the filming of the show, some about the lengths janice went to to deliver the food, some about filming the food scenes or the actors. They are illustrated by photographs. An added bonus for the die-hard Hannifan are the injokes Janice makes to the fandom, like the "can you make people beer" discussion or the fact that she calls Anthony Dimmond "Scarf Dad"! I do have one quibble, and that's the occassional typo's in the book. I don't think any of the recipes suffer (although I haven't yet made anything out of this book) but the introductiory texts sometimes have slight mistakes. Some episodes are misnamed - the numbers would be correct but for example a season 2 episode would get a name from season 3. Occassionally there's a missing word. And Miriam Lass is named Mirium for some reason. But those typo's don't really detract from the feast for the eyes and stomach that is this book. I will definitely try my hand at some of the recipes (hey, Christmas is coming up!) and if nothing else it will get pride of place in my kitchen! If only to freak out my guests. :p

  10. 4 out of 5

    Eleanor

    Feeding Hannibal: A Connoisseur's Cookbook, has some weird yet wonderful recipes and it is beautiful. It has over 150 recipes, broken into several categories from Appetizers to Deserts and Drinks. The book is full of pictures of the cast and the beautiful exotic food that they ate onscreen was authentic cuisine, often prepared by Poon. Some weird things I learnt reading this book. Blood is sold in half liters, but don't worry, it freezes well!That it takes about four parts of pig loin to make an Feeding Hannibal: A Connoisseur's Cookbook, has some weird yet wonderful recipes and it is beautiful. It has over 150 recipes, broken into several categories from Appetizers to Deserts and Drinks. The book is full of pictures of the cast and the beautiful exotic food that they ate onscreen was authentic cuisine, often prepared by Poon. Some weird things I learnt reading this book. Blood is sold in half liters, but don't worry, it freezes well!That it takes about four parts of pig loin to make an Eddie Izzard leg but only three to make a Gillian Anderson leg. Woman have smaller legs don't ya know! Also you can brew people beer which I'm sure is yummy LOL This book has a wide range of dishes and drinks, even some that didn't make it on the screen. I would definitely recommend this cookbook for any foodies or fans of the TV show.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Redsteve

    This book is incredible. 1) Tons of recipes from the show (many using blood, organ meats, bones, etc. but also many vegetarian “illusion foods”), 2) Amazingly elegant food arrangements, 3) humorous anecdotes from the making of the series, 4) artists sketches of the dishes from various episodes if you decide to pull out all the stops, 5) gorgeous photos of the foods, 6) additional prop tips for things like bone bud vases and candlesticks and edible (including the “dirt”) garden/graveyard displays This book is incredible. 1) Tons of recipes from the show (many using blood, organ meats, bones, etc. but also many vegetarian “illusion foods”), 2) Amazingly elegant food arrangements, 3) humorous anecdotes from the making of the series, 4) artists sketches of the dishes from various episodes if you decide to pull out all the stops, 5) gorgeous photos of the foods, 6) additional prop tips for things like bone bud vases and candlesticks and edible (including the “dirt”) garden/graveyard displays.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bob Lewis

    This is a brilliant cookbook, but it's not for everyone. Some might be turned off by the cannibalistic inspiration for these dishes, while many will be turned off by the exotic ingredients used in several of the dishes. However, I see two overlapping audiences who will find a lot of value here. The first consists of those who are devoted fans of the TV show Hannibal and want some additional insight into his culinary designs. The second are those with a sophisticated and somewhat adventurous pala This is a brilliant cookbook, but it's not for everyone. Some might be turned off by the cannibalistic inspiration for these dishes, while many will be turned off by the exotic ingredients used in several of the dishes. However, I see two overlapping audiences who will find a lot of value here. The first consists of those who are devoted fans of the TV show Hannibal and want some additional insight into his culinary designs. The second are those with a sophisticated and somewhat adventurous palate who are looking for some artful if unorthodox meals. I find myself in both categories. I'm the kind of person who already keeps his copy of Gray's Anatomy on the same shelf as his cookbooks, so I was more than intrigued by the promise of this book, and I wasn't disappointed. That said, you should be aware that these are not just whimsical ways to plate mundane dishes (though there are a few of those included). The majority of the recipes in this book include exotic ingredients that might not be to everyone's liking and might be difficult to source depending on one's location. It doesn't take long to see just how adventurous these recipes will get. As early as the fourth recipe, the ingredients list includes one lamb brain and 1 lamb testicle. Substitutions abound, however, so even if most people mightn't be interested in most of these recipes, I think almost everyone will find at least some dishes to try. And I'm not going to sit here and claim that I have any interest in every single recipe in the book. I may be willing to experiment in the kitchen, but I also know the limits of my own tastes. People who want some insight into the TV show will also find a lot of value. Of course this is a cookbook, not a "making of" documentary, but there are numerous little anecdotes about the filming interspersed throughout the book, giving the reader a brief if vivid picture of what it was like for the filmmakers (the author in particular) to design Dr. Lecter's dinners. A brief early section of the book provides some insight into the techniques you'll need to master and the equipment you'll require if you want to attempt these dishes. I place emphasis, however, on the word "brief." While a large number of the recipes are not particularly difficult, this book does assume the reader knows his or her way around the kitchen. If you're just beginning to cook, I wouldn't presume to warn you away from this book, but I would recommend you supplement it with a more "beginner-friendly" volume like Mark Bittman's How to Cook Everything or the always-popular Joy of Cooking. I do recommend reading the book straight through before deciding which dishes you want to sample. For one thing, unlike many cookbooks, it actually makes for an entertaining read even for those who never want to pick up a chef's knife at all. More importantly, though, it wouldn't do to simply prepare just one of these dishes. These dishes are better viewed as the components of a larger menu (perhaps for a dinner party), and you'll want to survey the entire selection of offerings before planning your menu. As much as I enjoyed the book, I do have one complaint and one wish. My wish is that the book had included suggestions for wine pairings with each dish. Though there is a small selection of cocktail recipes near the back of the book (some of which are quite appealing indeed!), it's my opinion that each course should be consciously paired with the perfect wine, and it would have been helpful had the book included some insights. My complaint is that, though the book is beautifully illustrated with a mixture of photographs of the food, sketches of the food, and photographs from the set, I feel like a photograph should have been included for each and every dish. Presentation is always important, but in these recipes, it's arguably of paramount importance, and some additional visual guidance would have been quite helpful. Nevertheless, while I didn't find it a perfect book, I do highly recommend it. It's a fun read, and I think all you chefs out there will enjoy recreating some of these dishes.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Horror DNA

    Janice Poon served as food stylist for all three seasons of the television program Hannibal. Each episode featured a lavishly prepared meal presented as a work of artistic beauty. The allure of these dishes complemented the elegance of the titular character, a refined man of many talents. This book is every bit the counterpart one of means and taste would expect, but the recipes found within are quite complicated for novices. To be fair, there are a variety of “introductory level” selections and Janice Poon served as food stylist for all three seasons of the television program Hannibal. Each episode featured a lavishly prepared meal presented as a work of artistic beauty. The allure of these dishes complemented the elegance of the titular character, a refined man of many talents. This book is every bit the counterpart one of means and taste would expect, but the recipes found within are quite complicated for novices. To be fair, there are a variety of “introductory level” selections and honestly, Poon takes the time to walk you through some of the more challenging selections. She carries herself with a professionalism that encourages readers to pay attention and take notes, as we are in the presence of a master. Her knowledge appears limitless and her willingness to share anecdotes from the show is always a welcome treat. Whether you are making something as simple or complex, her approach to instruction is always thoughtful and distinct. You can read ZigZag's full review at Horror DNA by clicking here.

  14. 5 out of 5

    alyssa

    This book is something that i will probably never use, and merely bought because i am a Hannibal fan. I read through every recipe and i think this book is very interesting because it really is what they displayed and ate on the Hannibal show. It has a lot of cool tips and tricks for cooking as well as a bunch of new recipes that you probably wouldn't have otherwise thought to try. I probably won't ever use this because it is strongly focused on meat (go figure right?) and personally i hate cooki This book is something that i will probably never use, and merely bought because i am a Hannibal fan. I read through every recipe and i think this book is very interesting because it really is what they displayed and ate on the Hannibal show. It has a lot of cool tips and tricks for cooking as well as a bunch of new recipes that you probably wouldn't have otherwise thought to try. I probably won't ever use this because it is strongly focused on meat (go figure right?) and personally i hate cooking meat, so that's just a personal thing. But i would highly recommend this to anyone who wants to learn to make really fancy food, including how to display it and what should be eaten with it, as well as people who are just Hannibal fans, like me, who want to know how they did it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Rood

    As a fan of the show and a lover of cooking, I was so excited to get this book, and it definitely didn't disappoint. There are fun behind-the-scenes anecdotes and photos throughout the book, which would make it a fun read even if you have no interest in the cooking aspect of the book, but the recipes are what sells it for me. There are 'simple' recipes which require ingredients you'll definitely find in your kitchen. And then there are the more exotic ones, which call for things like a cup of bl As a fan of the show and a lover of cooking, I was so excited to get this book, and it definitely didn't disappoint. There are fun behind-the-scenes anecdotes and photos throughout the book, which would make it a fun read even if you have no interest in the cooking aspect of the book, but the recipes are what sells it for me. There are 'simple' recipes which require ingredients you'll definitely find in your kitchen. And then there are the more exotic ones, which call for things like a cup of blood or "one medium octopus (7 to 8 lbs)". The great thing is that regardless of which recipe you want to try, the instructions make it sound achievable.

  16. 4 out of 5

    KEITH T

    Feeding Hannibal is Hannibal in recipe form. The book itself has heft and smoothness that will not allow you to leave in on a shelf. You will want to display it. The recipes individually and as a collection enact a reverence for the ingredients and like its namesake, this exquisite cookbook exposes the essence of the ingredients without any sort of molestation. The top rating for Michelin rated restaurant is three stars. Feeding Hannibal would be at home in any of them. Bravissimo!!!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Darca

    Loved this cookbook. There are variety of recipes including vegetarian ones. Dishes are of varying difficulty, some very easy to do at home, some require ingridients that may be almost impossible to obtain in some regions. Nevertheless you can learn a lot of culinary techniques and the sketches and pictures of the food are amazing. Janice has great sense of humor and her anecdotes about the show were brilliant and provided great insight to the tv series. I think it was a really nice addition to t Loved this cookbook. There are variety of recipes including vegetarian ones. Dishes are of varying difficulty, some very easy to do at home, some require ingridients that may be almost impossible to obtain in some regions. Nevertheless you can learn a lot of culinary techniques and the sketches and pictures of the food are amazing. Janice has great sense of humor and her anecdotes about the show were brilliant and provided great insight to the tv series. I think it was a really nice addition to the show and as a stand alone, worth reading.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Gin

    This is a beautiful cookbook. Yes, there are recipes in it I will never make. But I love the behind-the-scenes information about the show that is interspersed with the recipes. One of my favourite purchases in a while.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chris Cool

    Yes, I just read a cookbook from cover to cover. And I've completely messed with my google algorithm because I've been searching for lamb testicles, brains, and where to buy fresh blood. I'm probably on a list now. It's for cooking! Really!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kelex

    Poon's cookbook is for cooks and chefs of every experience level. Not only recipes, but behind the scenes commentary, production art, and anecdotes makes this a delicious way to spend the evening.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    I have not actually cooked from this book, but I'm hoping the recipes work out. I read it for fun bc I loved the show

  22. 4 out of 5

    Marina Sanford

    This book is a work of art, and full of behind the scenes goodies.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    Feeding Hannibal is a perfect ending to the popular show. If you've ever wondered how to make your own Hannibal cuisine, without being a hannibal, Janice Poon has done it for you. Some of these recipes are beyond fancy, while some are basic. From hors d'oeuvres to desserts you can entertain your guests. For the full review along with images and some recipes please see here: http://gamerssphere.com/feeding-hanni... Feeding Hannibal is a perfect ending to the popular show. If you've ever wondered how to make your own Hannibal cuisine, without being a hannibal, Janice Poon has done it for you. Some of these recipes are beyond fancy, while some are basic. From hors d'oeuvres to desserts you can entertain your guests. For the full review along with images and some recipes please see here: http://gamerssphere.com/feeding-hanni...

  24. 5 out of 5

    Evan Crean

    Heartbroken by the cancellation of Bryan Fuller’s deliciously deviant crime drama Hannibal? Fear not Fannibal, you can still feast on its tasty morsels with Feeding Hannibal: A Connoisseur’s Cookbook. Released by Titan Books, and written by the show’s food stylist Janice Poon, this book contains recipes for the beautiful and elaborate dishes prepared by your favorite cannibal (Mads Mikkelsen) throughout the show’s three seasons. Poon’s book is one part recipes for her breathtaking creations, one Heartbroken by the cancellation of Bryan Fuller’s deliciously deviant crime drama Hannibal? Fear not Fannibal, you can still feast on its tasty morsels with Feeding Hannibal: A Connoisseur’s Cookbook. Released by Titan Books, and written by the show’s food stylist Janice Poon, this book contains recipes for the beautiful and elaborate dishes prepared by your favorite cannibal (Mads Mikkelsen) throughout the show’s three seasons. Poon’s book is one part recipes for her breathtaking creations, one part instruction manual for novice chefs, and one part examination of how her collaboration with the show’s cast and crew made such visually stunning television. As a cookbook, Poon’s work is logically organized by food category: breakfast; appetizers; main courses with meat; fish and vegetarian main courses; soups, salads, and sides; and desserts and drinks. She provides helpful definitions of common cooking terms, history lessons on the origins of certain exotic foods, and information on the real ingredients that stand in for body parts. She also writes easy to understand instructions with details on how many each dish serves, so that you can throw delectable dinner parties just like Hannibal. Poon even includes instructions on “Hannibalizing Your Table” and achieving the right look cultivated by the good doctor. Feeding Hannibal is filled with lush, colorful photographs on bright, glossy paper that will whet your appetite if you’re an omnivore. Picky eaters need not apply, since many recipes are for exotic dishes like snail, frog legs, and fois gras. You have to be an adventurous eater and a daring chef to prepare the recipes in this book. Although Poon’s instructions are simple and she offers plenty of advice on using unfamiliar ingredients, you can’t be squeamish about using said ingredients or about reading related anecdotes like the one she shares about an onset maggot wrangler. Otherwise the book will spend more time on your coffee table than in your kitchen. The best part about Feeding Hannibal is all the amazing behind-the-scenes information about the show that it contains. Poon includes neat sketches of her ideas, hilarious anecdotes, and detailed information about how the show’s creative sausage was made. One particularly memorable story involves an egg trick that should have needed expert assistance, but Mads Mikkelsen (professional that he is), nailed it in a single take. Speaking of the actor, Mikkelsen offers a kind foreword to the book, where he graciously honors Poon for her hard work. Hannibal might not be on anymore, although if you’re a fan, Feeding Hannibal gives you enough yummy content to satiate your cravings for more time with the characters and with Janice Poon’s beautiful food styling. Bon appetit Fannibals!

  25. 5 out of 5

    NoBeatenPath

    Firstly, if you are a Fannibal you should have this book. If you don't already own it, remedy that. Secondly - this book is so much like the series - gorgeous to look at, witty, full of sly humour and managing to draw you in while grossing you out. It is dark, gothic and beautiful, and the epitome of food porn. The beautiful styling of the series carries over to the book. And Mads comes across as super-talented and witty in real life so that makes me happy too :)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Colby Denton

    Beautiful rendition of the elegantly grotesque world of Bryan Fuller's Hannibal series. The art is gorgeous, the food is intoxicating and the recipes are incredibly detailed and easy to prepare. Definitely recommend for any foodie or aspiring psychopath!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Linden

    For fans of the show, this is an inside look on how Hannibal created the dishes in various episodes along with some others. Without having to actually have your friends for dinner, this book gives you recreatable recipes that you don't have to murder anyone to make!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Meredith Borders

    Don’t just eat the rude. Eat them well. (Read my review here: http://birthmoviesdeath.com/2016/10/1... Don’t just eat the rude. Eat them well. (Read my review here: http://birthmoviesdeath.com/2016/10/1...

  29. 5 out of 5

    Isa

    janice poon is really funny and i am really hungry. eager to try some of these, should i ever come into the required exorbitant food budget.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ark

    Beautiful, haunting, morbid. This is certainly not a conventional little cookbook full of quick bites but a culinary art form full of morbidly delightful recipes both featured and inspired by the show Hannibal. While casual and beginner chefs may find the recipes a bit complicated, anyone can appreciate the luscious images of the food as prepared by Janice Poon, the food artist of the show. Bon appetit!

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