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How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books Love and Freindship is a juvenile story by Jane Austen, dated 1790. From the age of eleven u How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books Love and Freindship is a juvenile story by Jane Austen, dated 1790. From the age of eleven until she was eighteen, Jane Austen wrote her tales in three notebooks. The notebooks still exist – one in the Bodleian Library; the other two in the British Museum. They include among others Love and Freindship, written when Jane was fourteen, and The History of England, when she was fifteen. Written in epistolary form, like her later unpublished novella, Lady Susan, Love and Freindship is thought to be one of the tales she wrote for the amusement of her family; it was dedicated to her cousin Eliza de Feuillide, "La Comtesse de Feuillide". The instalments, written as letters from the heroine Laura, to Marianne, the daughter of her friend Isabel, may have come about as nightly readings by the young Jane in the Austen home. Love and Freindship (the misspelling is one of many in the story) is clearly a parody of romantic novels Austen read as a child. This is clear even from the subtitle, "Deceived in Freindship and Betrayed in Love", which completely undercuts the title.


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How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books Love and Freindship is a juvenile story by Jane Austen, dated 1790. From the age of eleven u How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books Love and Freindship is a juvenile story by Jane Austen, dated 1790. From the age of eleven until she was eighteen, Jane Austen wrote her tales in three notebooks. The notebooks still exist – one in the Bodleian Library; the other two in the British Museum. They include among others Love and Freindship, written when Jane was fourteen, and The History of England, when she was fifteen. Written in epistolary form, like her later unpublished novella, Lady Susan, Love and Freindship is thought to be one of the tales she wrote for the amusement of her family; it was dedicated to her cousin Eliza de Feuillide, "La Comtesse de Feuillide". The instalments, written as letters from the heroine Laura, to Marianne, the daughter of her friend Isabel, may have come about as nightly readings by the young Jane in the Austen home. Love and Freindship (the misspelling is one of many in the story) is clearly a parody of romantic novels Austen read as a child. This is clear even from the subtitle, "Deceived in Freindship and Betrayed in Love", which completely undercuts the title.

30 review for Love and Friendship: By Jane Austen - Illustrated (Comes with a Free Audiobook)

  1. 4 out of 5

    midnightfaerie

    Letter The FIRST is from Mrs. M Faerie to M. Goodreads Janry 1st -- 2016 My Dearest M. Goodreads, I write this to you not in praise of a worthy book - though it is indeed worthy - but instead as a dire warning. I cannot in good conscience give you this warning beforehand, instead, for you to fully understand the necessity of said warning, I must start at the beginning. My day began like most others, awakening in the Fae Manor to a quiet house long before the sun would kiss the clouds. But today, I wa Letter The FIRST is from Mrs. M Faerie to M. Goodreads Janry 1st -- 2016 My Dearest M. Goodreads, I write this to you not in praise of a worthy book - though it is indeed worthy - but instead as a dire warning. I cannot in good conscience give you this warning beforehand, instead, for you to fully understand the necessity of said warning, I must start at the beginning. My day began like most others, awakening in the Fae Manor to a quiet house long before the sun would kiss the clouds. But today, I was determined to put from my mind the chaos that was the abhorrent mess of a house that so vexed me brought about by my children and husband. Instead, I thought upon the precious time so allotted me this morn and sat before the hearth with this book, after starting a fire. My list of unread tomes were great, but these particular letters called to me in their brevity and in the hope of making progress of such said list for not only the sake of progress. Little more than one hundred pages, it could be said that I achieved that goal. Miss Jane Austen in all her sensibility and charms makes good on her promise to entertain in all her somewhat five and ten years. So much so, that I, myself, felt as if I were once again of the same age. What only could be called a "true teenagers drama" of this age is readily apparent in these letters. From all the "misfortunes and adventures" to be had in life, to all the circumstances that one should "avoid the imputation of Obstinacy", these letters address it. Not only does Miss Austen pull you into her world of scandalous behavior and the sheer enjoyment of her writing but with the intensity of dramatic events, will leave your sensibilities being most severely tried. I, myself, felt faint quite often and had to revive myself justly thereafter. But herein is the warning. For those who have not the stern disposition of my fortitude, I implore you, leave this book alone! For as one of the characters shows us by continued fainting after the death of her beloved, doing so, especially in the chillings of the night air can cause violent pain in delicate limbs which will lead to death! Said character even uses her dying breath and last words to warn her best friend to beware the fainting spells, especially in one who has a gentle nature like herself! Well I steeled myself at this most important warning, and resolved not to be so affected in disposition to such maladies. I am happy to say I made it through the letters which I am enclosing, without further mishap. But, dear reader, I leave you with this last bit of advice as well from an old woman of my one and forty years - Beware of fainting-fits whilst reading these letters! In all good conscience it can now be said that I did all I could to diminish the probability of destruction to any and all constitutions. I am justified in the writing of this letter and refuse to be a martyr to my sorrow should you perish in the same manner. I wash my hands of the situation and will return to the fireside to continue with a different set of letters. Perhaps some continued reading of Wrath of Dragons, the fifth book in the series of George R. R. Martin, will be better for my disposition. Affectionately yours, M. Faerie N.B. I must also make quick note of the history section of these letters. I concur with Miss Austen in her opinion that history is not at all droll but instead dull, lacking in affection and excitement, and with not enough women. Her account of a history lesson, although lacking in dates, points out sufficient information of the time. Another woman in my stature and age might say they find this passage highly amusing and very accurate of a viewpoint of a girl of this age, however, I will not deign to agree with this opinion, in that it is more desirable from an outwards appearance to coincide with Miss Austen's beliefs.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cal Jeannette

    In order to enjoy this book, you have to know a few things. First, Jane Austen wrote this compilation of short stories between the age of 11-18 to entertain her family. The main stories were written when Jane was 14-15 years old. Moreover, the "Laura" story was written as a parody of the romantic notions of the time. I say this b/c when I started the book, I found the characters to be silly, foolish, overly-emotional, overly-dramatic nitwits. I couldn't believe this was Jane Austen, so I did som In order to enjoy this book, you have to know a few things. First, Jane Austen wrote this compilation of short stories between the age of 11-18 to entertain her family. The main stories were written when Jane was 14-15 years old. Moreover, the "Laura" story was written as a parody of the romantic notions of the time. I say this b/c when I started the book, I found the characters to be silly, foolish, overly-emotional, overly-dramatic nitwits. I couldn't believe this was Jane Austen, so I did some quick research. Having discovered that the characters were a parody of the cult of "sensibility" (susceptibility to feelings, emotionalism, sentimentalism), I enjoyed the stories much more. As one website put it: "Violent and overt emotions substitute for morality and common sense. Characters who have this "sensibility" fall into each other's arms weeping the first time they ever meet, and on suffering any misfortune are too preoocupied with indulging their emotions to take any effective action. They use their fine feelings as the excuse for any misdeeds, and despise characters without such feelings." Knowing the historical and cultural context made me truly enjoy and appreciate all of the stories. Quite clever and funny for such a young writer. A quick and fun read for Jane Austen fans.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    I'm sad to say this might be my favorite Austen. I love P&P and S&S, but this bit of juvenalia is a scream. 14 year old Austen parodies the sentimental novels of the time quite deftly. My friend Jean and I loved this book so much in grad school we would sign cards to each other "love and freindship (sic)." Before I walked down the aisle at my wedding Jean stuck her head in the door and said "don't faint." (This is the book with the famous quote "run mad if you chuse, but do not faint.") Also -- I I'm sad to say this might be my favorite Austen. I love P&P and S&S, but this bit of juvenalia is a scream. 14 year old Austen parodies the sentimental novels of the time quite deftly. My friend Jean and I loved this book so much in grad school we would sign cards to each other "love and freindship (sic)." Before I walked down the aisle at my wedding Jean stuck her head in the door and said "don't faint." (This is the book with the famous quote "run mad if you chuse, but do not faint.") Also -- I find it fascinating to read Austen's early fiction. It kind of gives her later books a history.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    Though uneven of course, "Love and Freindship [sic]," an epistolary story, is hilarious with its constant mentions of sensibility, its unnecessarily despised fathers, and the young-lady heroines who are also petty thieves. (Oct 3, 2012) Who changed the spelling of the title? (And I mean the cover of my download, not something done by a GR librarian.) That is not how Jane spells "friend" and it was spelled 'her' way when I opened it last year. Anyway ... while the quality (or the novelty) of the " Though uneven of course, "Love and Freindship [sic]," an epistolary story, is hilarious with its constant mentions of sensibility, its unnecessarily despised fathers, and the young-lady heroines who are also petty thieves. (Oct 3, 2012) Who changed the spelling of the title? (And I mean the cover of my download, not something done by a GR librarian.) That is not how Jane spells "friend" and it was spelled 'her' way when I opened it last year. Anyway ... while the quality (or the novelty) of the "letters" (almost all her early works are epistolary) seemed to go down as I read on, I don't really want to rate them, as some are not even completed drafts; some mere ideas. No writer wants those to be widely read. (Sept 11, 2013) I didn't reread the witty The History of England, though I remember enjoying it quite a bit when I read it pre-GR. I am now an Austen completist.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Beware of swoons Dear Laura... A frenzy fit is not one quarter so pernicious; it is an exercise to the Body and if not too, is I dare say conducive to Health in its consequences---Run mad as often as you chuse; but do not faint- My edition included the juvenile epistolary works of Jane Austen, including,Love and Freindship, Lesley Castle, The History of England, Collection of Letters, and "Scraps." Although I wouldn't recommend a new reader to Austen starting with this collection, it does give u Beware of swoons Dear Laura... A frenzy fit is not one quarter so pernicious; it is an exercise to the Body and if not too, is I dare say conducive to Health in its consequences---Run mad as often as you chuse; but do not faint- My edition included the juvenile epistolary works of Jane Austen, including,Love and Freindship, Lesley Castle, The History of England, Collection of Letters, and "Scraps." Although I wouldn't recommend a new reader to Austen starting with this collection, it does give us insight to the youthful writing style that would encourage Jane Austen to become a writer. As a reader who fell in love with Austen's writings at the tender age of 13( Sense and Sensibility) and as an adult that now owns almost all the adaptations of her novels to the small and big screens, this was incredibly enjoyable. It was also absolutely ridiculous! Since Austen never really intended for these writings to see a printing press, I feel that there are things we have to overlook, such as, disjointed writing, swooning, and other hysterical dramas.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mariah

    This ain’t it chief. Stick with the classic novels.

  7. 5 out of 5

    antiquarian reverie

    I found some Juveniles Kindle editions of Jane Austen & "Love & Friendship" was the one I wanted to try next. This was about 97 pages which included 2 short stories, Jane's history of the kings & Queens of England, collections of letters & scraps. Love and Friendship is more of a rough incomplete thought story but complete enough that you would have liked a book instead of this 30 page story. When I was ready this I saw the mature writer Jane Austen trying to tell a story. Having read all her no I found some Juveniles Kindle editions of Jane Austen & "Love & Friendship" was the one I wanted to try next. This was about 97 pages which included 2 short stories, Jane's history of the kings & Queens of England, collections of letters & scraps. Love and Friendship is more of a rough incomplete thought story but complete enough that you would have liked a book instead of this 30 page story. When I was ready this I saw the mature writer Jane Austen trying to tell a story. Having read all her novels including Lady Susan which many say these stories in Love & Friendship should have been published instead of that story. The similarity between Lady Susan & almost all the short stories in Love & Friendship is that they are all written epistolary style which I must say I really enjoy. I agree that these stories are better than Lady Susan. I have read Sense & Sensibility and loved that book but had a hard time understanding the "Sensibility" but these stories had cleared that up for me. I know that seem silly that a word being defined in a dictionary but not really understanding what it means. It is simple "Sensibility" means caring, understanding not just for oneself but others & that is how it is used in her Juveniles stories. Love and Friendship-- Isabel is imploring her friend, Laura & now middle age to give the details of her "misfortunes and Adventures of your Life.". Laura decides to write to her daughter Marianne. She gives the history through a series of letters. This story is the roughest & reminds me of Anne Radcliffe's characters, swooning & in need of assistance. I really think this would have made a great novel because there is a lot of adventure but too coincidental at parts throughout. All these stories seem to have a melancholy endings compares to a happier Austen in her books. This was written in 1790 & most of her works at this time around 17 years old. Lesley Castle--- This is my favorite of these stories. The humor in this delicious, in more ways than one. This is so like her published adult books but also with a kind of sadness but not as much as Love & Friendship. Charlotte & Margaret are friends and correspond about friends & family. The History of England--- Jane tells of the Kings & Queens with her dry sense of humor. Collection of Letters - 5 letters a story in each & not related to each other. Interesting mix of the working of Austen's mind. Scraps- a very short play & many really short stories. Excerpt-This is from Love & Friendship--"My Father started - "What noise is that," (said he.) "It sounds like a loud rapping at the door" - (replied my Mother.) "it does indeed." (cried I.) "I am of your opinion; (said my Father) it certainly does appear to proceed from some uncommon violence exerted against our unoffending door." Yes (exclaimed I) I cannot help thinking it must be something who knocks for admittance"

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    This collection of Jane Austen's juvenilia incudes the titular story, "Lesley Castle" (both of which are experiments in the epistolary novel form), "The History of England", "First Act of a Comedy" and various fictional letters. All of the works in the collection are worth reading. "Love and Freindship", with its multiple deaths, illegitimacy and fainting fits, is a very silly satire on the sensibility evident in novels of the period. "Lesley Castle" is rather more confusing because of its mult This collection of Jane Austen's juvenilia incudes the titular story, "Lesley Castle" (both of which are experiments in the epistolary novel form), "The History of England", "First Act of a Comedy" and various fictional letters. All of the works in the collection are worth reading. "Love and Freindship", with its multiple deaths, illegitimacy and fainting fits, is a very silly satire on the sensibility evident in novels of the period. "Lesley Castle" is rather more confusing because of its multiple writers and recipients of letters, but is also evidence of Austen's gift for poking fun at the ridiculous. "The History of England" is a wonderfully exuberant race through a number of the kings and queens of England ostensibly told to praise Mary, Queen of Scots and to criticise Elizabeth I. I found it laugh-out-loud funny and in some respects it reminded me of the equally silly but very entertaining 1066 and All That: A Memorable History of England). In the various letters, characters appear who have names or characteristics which are recognisably those of characters who figure in Austen's mature works. There is a Lady Greville, for example, who is a clear precursor to Lady Catherine de Burgh. A Willoughby, a Crawford and a Musgrove also make appearances. Overall, this a quick, undemanding and very entertaining read. For readers who appreciate Jane Austen's novels, it is fascinating to see her gift for wit and satire, her lively mind and her sense of the ridiculous so evident in her teenage writings. It is said that Austen used to read her works aloud to her family and it is easy to imagine how much laughter there must have been in the Austen household when Jane shared some of these very silly, but very funny works with her parents and siblings.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Vaishali

    As a rule, I'm confounded by Austen novels, but decided to pick up one of her shortest and give it a whirl. Mistake! I didn't get this one either: I found it heart-wrenchingly tragic, but per Wikipedia she wrote it at age 14 to mock romance books. I henceforth return to relishing Austen via British cinema, and blame my sappiness here straight on Bollywood :) As a rule, I'm confounded by Austen novels, but decided to pick up one of her shortest and give it a whirl. Mistake! I didn't get this one either: I found it heart-wrenchingly tragic, but per Wikipedia she wrote it at age 14 to mock romance books. I henceforth return to relishing Austen via British cinema, and blame my sappiness here straight on Bollywood :)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lexy

    I thought that this book was good

  11. 5 out of 5

    Hayden

    If you're a Jane Austen fan and haven't read Love & Friendship yet, do so. It's an absolute hoot. Teenage Jane was a Sass Queen. "It was too pathetic for the feelings of Sophia and myself--We fainted alternately on a Sofa." (This edition isn't the one I had; I read mine in a collection) If you're a Jane Austen fan and haven't read Love & Friendship yet, do so. It's an absolute hoot. Teenage Jane was a Sass Queen. "It was too pathetic for the feelings of Sophia and myself--We fainted alternately on a Sofa." (This edition isn't the one I had; I read mine in a collection)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Dawn

    I've always seen Jane Austen as an intimidating author, not from her style but by how everyone raves about her. She is the supposed grandmother of romantic drama, better known as chick lit, and most people say she is their favourite author for a number of reasons. I have never read anything of hers before nor have I seen any of the movie adaptions from her works, I did dabble in Emma for my High School course but at the time I found the book so thick that I knew there was no way I was going to b I've always seen Jane Austen as an intimidating author, not from her style but by how everyone raves about her. She is the supposed grandmother of romantic drama, better known as chick lit, and most people say she is their favourite author for a number of reasons. I have never read anything of hers before nor have I seen any of the movie adaptions from her works, I did dabble in Emma for my High School course but at the time I found the book so thick that I knew there was no way I was going to be able to get through it at sixteen (I can even quote my teacher, "I was made to read this book in High School and I hated the thing, it wasn't until I went back to it in my adult life, maybe more than ten years later, that I truly felt I could appreciate Emma"). I have set myself a personal challenge this year to complete a number of specific books, and I have chosen Emma to be the one 'I should have read in school'. Before I tackle it though, I needed to know if I could do it, so I did some research on how best to start with Jane Austen and found this. Love And Freindship (Not Love and Friendship - but we'll let the Goodreads librarians continue to argue this) is such a delightful read, It's hilarious! The character is such a drama queen you want to slap your forehead at all of her antics, but how she tells her story and brushes over things in her ansy pansy way is what makes this such a great book. Jane Austen makes fun of the cliches of romantic fiction centuries before they were ever considered cliche, she's a genius! Do you remember the fainting damsel trope? well, I do say it appears on almost every page. I took away a star for the execution of the letters. I just didn't understand who was writing to who in the initial stages and it was rather confusing. Once the narrative starts however, it runs much better although still in letter form. The character Laura is asked to write about her life in a serious of letters to her best friends daughter, more or less to warn her about the harshness of the world from a woman who has "simply had it the worst". She details how she fell in love and was LITERALLY married to the man of her dreams from their second sentence, how she's whisked away to his abode, only to have his sister hate her, then her husband dies! Conveniently her parents die three weeks after she is married and gone so naturally there should be money left to her, or is there? The antics that this woman and her 'best friend, not best friend' Sophie get up to on their quest are hilarious! They need money but they can't bare to carry a large sum around so will just spend it on silver buckles. The ending is gold, so I won't spoil it here, I'll only say that the mind of this then fourteen-year-old author is a gifted mind indeed. I may actually be able to sit through the two-page description of Emma's bouquet of flowers now.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Celeste

    “This was too cruel, to unexpected a Blow to our Gentle Sensibility - we could not support it - we could only faint.” I think I sprained both eyeballs from rolling them so hard and so frequently at this story. Which was most likely the point. Ms. Austen’s objective in writing this story at the tender age of fifteen was to convey that, for the most part, teenagers are kind of terrible. Or at least, that’s what I got from it. She made her point and made it well, but I can’t say that I enjoyed this “This was too cruel, to unexpected a Blow to our Gentle Sensibility - we could not support it - we could only faint.” I think I sprained both eyeballs from rolling them so hard and so frequently at this story. Which was most likely the point. Ms. Austen’s objective in writing this story at the tender age of fifteen was to convey that, for the most part, teenagers are kind of terrible. Or at least, that’s what I got from it. She made her point and made it well, but I can’t say that I enjoyed this story as much as the other five I’ve read by her. Lady Susan was a tasteful comedy of errors; Love and Freindship was over the top. The dramedy was strong with this one. And no, I didn’t spell the title wrong.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    I was going to give this two and a half stars but it's Jane Austen (I know that's cheating a bit). While this novel was not her best ("Emma" "Pride & Prejudice") it was certainly not her worst ("Lady Susan"). There are some humorous parts with extremely clever dialogue which reminds the reader as to why Jane Austen is the literary icon that she is. While I wouldn't highly recommend this one it was a decent read and anyone who is an avid Jane Austen fan such as myself will appreciate it. I was going to give this two and a half stars but it's Jane Austen (I know that's cheating a bit). While this novel was not her best ("Emma" "Pride & Prejudice") it was certainly not her worst ("Lady Susan"). There are some humorous parts with extremely clever dialogue which reminds the reader as to why Jane Austen is the literary icon that she is. While I wouldn't highly recommend this one it was a decent read and anyone who is an avid Jane Austen fan such as myself will appreciate it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Martha

    Jane Austen's juvenilia. The first of them written at age 14. The sharp eye for what's really happening, the ear for dialog, the unfailing BS meter, the wit that goes to the bone, the rapier-edged turns of phrase, the snobs, the buccaneers, the fortune-hunting jilters, even the names that will reappear attached to some of the most memorable characters in Eng lit--Dashwood, Annesley, Crawford, Willoughby. You can glimpse the incipient Lady Catherine, Lydia Bennett, Mrs. John Dashwood, lots of fun Jane Austen's juvenilia. The first of them written at age 14. The sharp eye for what's really happening, the ear for dialog, the unfailing BS meter, the wit that goes to the bone, the rapier-edged turns of phrase, the snobs, the buccaneers, the fortune-hunting jilters, even the names that will reappear attached to some of the most memorable characters in Eng lit--Dashwood, Annesley, Crawford, Willoughby. You can glimpse the incipient Lady Catherine, Lydia Bennett, Mrs. John Dashwood, lots of fun. A short book. All epistolary--some just single letters--as Faye Weldon says in the intro, they're short stories all by themselves. Fascinating to think about how Austen decided she could get closer to what she wanted when she changed the first epistolary draft of P&P into an omniscient author narrative. And put in a few characters of principle and sense around whom the chaos could swirl. Don't you wish we had a diary that explained some of that. If you know Austen and want to see how she got started, this is a great find.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Adrian Duţă

    I don't think I've ever read something so stupid. I don't think I've ever read something so stupid.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ana

    After being a little disappointed with Austen's The Beautifull Cassandra, I was hesitant to try her more of her juvenilia, but this collection alleviated that fear. I can assure you dear, sensible readers that all three stories are delightfully bonkers. In Love and Friendship , our heroine Laura marries Edward against his father’s wishes, thus forcing the lovers to run away. Laura’s fate is overwrought with the dangers of loving and swooning too much so naturally several sudden and inexplicabl After being a little disappointed with Austen's The Beautifull Cassandra, I was hesitant to try her more of her juvenilia, but this collection alleviated that fear. I can assure you dear, sensible readers that all three stories are delightfully bonkers. In Love and Friendship , our heroine Laura marries Edward against his father’s wishes, thus forcing the lovers to run away. Laura’s fate is overwrought with the dangers of loving and swooning too much so naturally several sudden and inexplicable deaths ensue. I was personally affected with the fate of Augustus, friend to Edward and husband to Sophia. When the two best friends reunite, Laura remarks: Never did I see such an affecting Scene as was the meeting of Edward and Augustus. "My Life! my Soul!" (exclaimed the former) "My adorable angel!" (replied the latter) as they flew into each other's arms. It was too pathetic for the feelings of Sophia and myself—We fainted alternately on a sofa. I can’t help but feel that Austen’s talents would have been better served by presenting the backstory of this friendship, but alas ‘twas not to be. Mary, the heroine of The Three Sisters , ways the pros and cons of accepting an offer from a detestable, rich man, who threatens to propose to her sisters should she refuse him. Finally, on a more serious note, A Collection of Letters show five stories through letters regarding horrid chaperones, tyrannical relations, courtship and elopement.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kirsty

    This is another one of Janu Austen's short stories told in the form of letters. This was written when Austen was much younger and I think this really shows in the quality of the writing. There seemed to be very little plot to this story and I found it very boring. Despite being really short it is a very slow read as so little happens. You can really tell that this was written by a younger Austen as it feels very immature. The characters seemed to do a lot of giggling and fainting and came off as This is another one of Janu Austen's short stories told in the form of letters. This was written when Austen was much younger and I think this really shows in the quality of the writing. There seemed to be very little plot to this story and I found it very boring. Despite being really short it is a very slow read as so little happens. You can really tell that this was written by a younger Austen as it feels very immature. The characters seemed to do a lot of giggling and fainting and came off as very immature and not like the main characters we are used to seeing in Austen's books. Overall I wouldn't recommend this novel as it is not of the same standard as Austen's other works although that is to be expected as she wrote this when she was very young.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Steph

    There didn't seem to be much of a point to this book, though I don't think Jane ever expected it to be published. I've noticed that all but the 1 or 2 main characters of each of her novels are complete assholes. However, I've only read L&F, P&P and am currently reading S&S, so maybe this is not a true pattern in her writting. I'll know better once I've read them all I suppose. There didn't seem to be much of a point to this book, though I don't think Jane ever expected it to be published. I've noticed that all but the 1 or 2 main characters of each of her novels are complete assholes. However, I've only read L&F, P&P and am currently reading S&S, so maybe this is not a true pattern in her writting. I'll know better once I've read them all I suppose.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    The title's spelled wrong! (It's Freindship as fourteen year old Jane spelled it.) Juvenilia, epistolary form, and a satire of Gothic romances, this book is priceless for the Austen fan. "Run mad as often as you chuse; but do not faint --" The title's spelled wrong! (It's Freindship as fourteen year old Jane spelled it.) Juvenilia, epistolary form, and a satire of Gothic romances, this book is priceless for the Austen fan. "Run mad as often as you chuse; but do not faint --"

  21. 4 out of 5

    Daiva

    I guess I would give it 3 stars if it was any other author. But for Jane Austen... I just can't force myself to do it. So let's call this very strong 3 and give it 4 :) Cheating I know. I guess I would give it 3 stars if it was any other author. But for Jane Austen... I just can't force myself to do it. So let's call this very strong 3 and give it 4 :) Cheating I know.

  22. 5 out of 5

    WhatIReallyRead

    This one was sort of...meh. I know it was supposed to be kind of a parody. But it ended up being quite boring and silly. Didn't care for it. This one was sort of...meh. I know it was supposed to be kind of a parody. But it ended up being quite boring and silly. Didn't care for it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Biese

    It's no P&P, but it made me chuckle. Always funny how Austen's stories stand the test of time to remind us that people are ridiculous. It's no P&P, but it made me chuckle. Always funny how Austen's stories stand the test of time to remind us that people are ridiculous.

  24. 5 out of 5

    DJ

    A sweet story with an emphasis on friendship, which I really liked.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sam! at the bookstore

    Rating: 3 stars Run mad as often as you choose, but do not faint! What a fun little look into young Jane Austen! The sarcasm is certainly stronger and less subtle here than any of her full-fledged novels, and it was such a fun experience. However, that excess of sarcasm - and, perhaps, the fact that it was primarily an epistolary novel - prevented me from really becoming invested in any of the characters. That's why I ended up ranking this 3 stars. Fay Weldon's foreword was a perfect addition, and Rating: 3 stars Run mad as often as you choose, but do not faint! What a fun little look into young Jane Austen! The sarcasm is certainly stronger and less subtle here than any of her full-fledged novels, and it was such a fun experience. However, that excess of sarcasm - and, perhaps, the fact that it was primarily an epistolary novel - prevented me from really becoming invested in any of the characters. That's why I ended up ranking this 3 stars. Fay Weldon's foreword was a perfect addition, and definitely got me excited to get into the stories. Her notes about how some of the personalities described in the letters would later become signature, full-fledged, Austen favorites was very interesting. A lot of the names here, too, are later seen in Austen's novels. Overall, this was just a fun little insight into a teenage Austen's mind, and a hint of the wonderful author she would soon become.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Em*Greedy* (Iniya)

    Read this book unexpectedly....Hilarious and dramatic start to the year.....

  27. 5 out of 5

    Layla (Between the Lines)

    Yet another required text for my "Reading Jane Austen" class. I would recommend this to any usual fans of Jane Austen but would not shout about this from the rooftops. I typically enjoy epistolary tales, however, I struggle enough as is with classic literature and I think the letter form made it even harder for me to immerse myself in the story. Still an important text to consider when looking at the overall themes of her writing! Yet another required text for my "Reading Jane Austen" class. I would recommend this to any usual fans of Jane Austen but would not shout about this from the rooftops. I typically enjoy epistolary tales, however, I struggle enough as is with classic literature and I think the letter form made it even harder for me to immerse myself in the story. Still an important text to consider when looking at the overall themes of her writing!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Laura Verret

    'At M——. we arrived in a few hours; and on sending in our names were immediately admitted to Sophia, the Wife of Edward's freind. After having been deprived during the course of 3 weeks of a real freind (for such I term your Mother) imagine my transports at beholding one, most truly worthy of the Name. Sophia was rather above the middle size; most elegantly formed. A soft languor spread over her lovely features, but increased their Beauty—. It was the Charectarestic of her Mind—. She was all sen 'At M——. we arrived in a few hours; and on sending in our names were immediately admitted to Sophia, the Wife of Edward's freind. After having been deprived during the course of 3 weeks of a real freind (for such I term your Mother) imagine my transports at beholding one, most truly worthy of the Name. Sophia was rather above the middle size; most elegantly formed. A soft languor spread over her lovely features, but increased their Beauty—. It was the Charectarestic of her Mind—. She was all sensibility and Feeling. We flew into each others arms and after having exchanged vows of mutual Freindship for the rest of our Lives, instantly unfolded to each other the most inward secrets of our Hearts—. We were interrupted in the delightfull Employment by the entrance of Augustus, (Edward's freind) who was just returned from a solitary ramble. Never did I see such an affecting Scene as was the meeting of Edward and Augustus. "My Life! my Soul!" (exclaimed the former) "My adorable angel!" (replied the latter) as they flew into each other's arms. It was too pathetic for the feelings of Sophia and myself—We fainted alternately on a sofa. Adeiu Laura.' 'Sophia shreiked and fainted on the ground—I screamed and instantly ran mad—. We remained thus mutually deprived of our senses, some minutes, and on regaining them were deprived of them again. For an Hour and a Quarter did we continue in this unfortunate situation—Sophia fainting every moment and I running mad as often.' This book was so far beyond hilarious there's like... not a word for it. It's a parody of the sentimental literature that was being produced in vast quantities by the early Gothics, and its cavalclade of emotional spikes and plunges was fabulously spot on. The bits I quoted above were, admittedly, the moments that most tickled my fancy, but they were not atypical - the entire book is written exactly like that. Also worth noting are all of the misspelled words: compleat, freind, adeiu, delightfull, simpathy, chearfullness, shewn, wellcome, head-ake, agreable, beleive, dieing, eoconomy et cetera. Perfect for lovers of Austen, Gothic literature, or comic splashes in the park. http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/1212

  29. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    When I consider that Jane Austen wasn't even 15 years old yet when she wrote this, it is an amazing book. It doesn't take long to catch onto the fact that this is biting SATIRE- from a 14-year-old!- mocking over-melodramatic romance novels. It starts as a letter from Isabel to her dear friend Laura, begging her to disclose the unhappy story of her life to her daughter Marianne as a cautionary tale. Laura complies in a series of letters to Marianne, and a more convoluted life history would be har When I consider that Jane Austen wasn't even 15 years old yet when she wrote this, it is an amazing book. It doesn't take long to catch onto the fact that this is biting SATIRE- from a 14-year-old!- mocking over-melodramatic romance novels. It starts as a letter from Isabel to her dear friend Laura, begging her to disclose the unhappy story of her life to her daughter Marianne as a cautionary tale. Laura complies in a series of letters to Marianne, and a more convoluted life history would be hard to imagine. A recurrent theme throughout the letters indicates that the circumstance least likely to result in compliance from an offspring is for a father to suggest marriage to someone. So, although Edward's father wishes him to marry Lady Dorothea, Edward immediately runs off and marries Laura instead. When his sister Augusta also disapproves, the couple go to the home of his best friend, Augustus, who is married to Sophia. Sophia and Laura become close friends. The two ladies spend much of the rest of the book fainting and swooning and running mad over one tragedy or another. I couldn't keep up with the bizarre weaving and bobbing of the plot, with numerous characters appearing and disappearing and then reappearing later in unlikely circumstances. It's all very Tragic and Sorrowful and surely Miss Marianne will have learned to walk the Strait and Narrow after reading all the Horrible Things that happened to Laura and her friends during this period of her life. This is by no means up to the quality of Jane Austen's most revered works. I expect she would be mortified to know that it was ever published, since it was composed as an amusement for only her immediate family to read. Her sharp sense of humor shines through, as does her clever dialogue. However, it demonstrates only the author's potential, not her mastery.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Love and Freindship is Jane Austen's juvenilia written between ages 11 and 18. I'll let that sink in for a moment. She wrote some of these stories at 11, and quite honestly, they are absolutely hilarious. It has romance, death, scandal, fainting, and more! The story is told in the epistolary form, and it makes it all the more impressive. There are loads of spelling mistakes and random proper nouns (that have no business being capitalized), but that makes the book all the more charming. Even the t Love and Freindship is Jane Austen's juvenilia written between ages 11 and 18. I'll let that sink in for a moment. She wrote some of these stories at 11, and quite honestly, they are absolutely hilarious. It has romance, death, scandal, fainting, and more! The story is told in the epistolary form, and it makes it all the more impressive. There are loads of spelling mistakes and random proper nouns (that have no business being capitalized), but that makes the book all the more charming. Even the title is misspelled! The story is over the top and every sensible person is perceived to be in the wrong. It clearly is laying the groundwork for her exploration of social classes and romance in her future works (even if she didn't realize it). It's a charming read and well worth taking the time to read it. I found it for free on Amazon Kindle.

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