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Jimmy is a guitar prodigy, wears hair long to cover scars, and walks with the wide swing of a drop-foot. The lanky, six foot musician is known on the east side as “Ojotriste,” the mariachi with one sad eye—the legacy of a horrific accident that resulted in a beautiful but heartsick glass-eye. He has made a living since childhood with two other boys, serenading in the resta Jimmy is a guitar prodigy, wears hair long to cover scars, and walks with the wide swing of a drop-foot. The lanky, six foot musician is known on the east side as “Ojotriste,” the mariachi with one sad eye—the legacy of a horrific accident that resulted in a beautiful but heartsick glass-eye. He has made a living since childhood with two other boys, serenading in the restaurants and bars from Mariachi Plaza to the famous Mercadito. At twenty, each boy in the trio is hungry. Jimmy is the best working guitarist on the street, but he is still undocumented, disabled and living on tips. He has fallen hard for a striking, Jewish flamenca from the Valley, and he wants to find a way into her world. Ray, the violinist in Jimmy’s trio, is refusing to accept the cancer they have found in his bones, and thinks music, not medicine, will keep him alive. Vic, the trio's handsome tenor, is dating a Vietnamese businesswoman, and needs music to become money. In a flamenco and mariachi odyssey, three young musicians in a half-painted low rider leave the east side and take on the city in search of love, money and a miracle. “Romantic in the biggest sense of the word.” Goodreads Review “Lovely novel about young mariachis finding their place in the world, soaked in a vibrant sense of place and time. Somehow captures that feeling of being twenty and seeing the world spread before you in a way I've rarely seen portrayed well.” Goodreads Review “Wrapped in the sights and sounds of 1970s Los Angeles, vibrant and nostalgic, Hernandez explores the complex intersections of race, love, poverty and coming of age…and through it all we are serenaded by his lyrical descriptions of the life and music of the mariachi.” Tate Hurvitz, Phd. Grossmont College Literature Dept. “Reminded me of Mambo Kings. Definitely for music lovers and romantics. Lyrical scenes - odd and memorable characters; lots of taste and smell (the author uses food like music). Anyone interested in flamenco, mariachi, and Hispanic culture will be immersed. I learned of the book through "Las Comadres" a Latino lit reading group at our bookstore.” Goodreads Review


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Jimmy is a guitar prodigy, wears hair long to cover scars, and walks with the wide swing of a drop-foot. The lanky, six foot musician is known on the east side as “Ojotriste,” the mariachi with one sad eye—the legacy of a horrific accident that resulted in a beautiful but heartsick glass-eye. He has made a living since childhood with two other boys, serenading in the resta Jimmy is a guitar prodigy, wears hair long to cover scars, and walks with the wide swing of a drop-foot. The lanky, six foot musician is known on the east side as “Ojotriste,” the mariachi with one sad eye—the legacy of a horrific accident that resulted in a beautiful but heartsick glass-eye. He has made a living since childhood with two other boys, serenading in the restaurants and bars from Mariachi Plaza to the famous Mercadito. At twenty, each boy in the trio is hungry. Jimmy is the best working guitarist on the street, but he is still undocumented, disabled and living on tips. He has fallen hard for a striking, Jewish flamenca from the Valley, and he wants to find a way into her world. Ray, the violinist in Jimmy’s trio, is refusing to accept the cancer they have found in his bones, and thinks music, not medicine, will keep him alive. Vic, the trio's handsome tenor, is dating a Vietnamese businesswoman, and needs music to become money. In a flamenco and mariachi odyssey, three young musicians in a half-painted low rider leave the east side and take on the city in search of love, money and a miracle. “Romantic in the biggest sense of the word.” Goodreads Review “Lovely novel about young mariachis finding their place in the world, soaked in a vibrant sense of place and time. Somehow captures that feeling of being twenty and seeing the world spread before you in a way I've rarely seen portrayed well.” Goodreads Review “Wrapped in the sights and sounds of 1970s Los Angeles, vibrant and nostalgic, Hernandez explores the complex intersections of race, love, poverty and coming of age…and through it all we are serenaded by his lyrical descriptions of the life and music of the mariachi.” Tate Hurvitz, Phd. Grossmont College Literature Dept. “Reminded me of Mambo Kings. Definitely for music lovers and romantics. Lyrical scenes - odd and memorable characters; lots of taste and smell (the author uses food like music). Anyone interested in flamenco, mariachi, and Hispanic culture will be immersed. I learned of the book through "Las Comadres" a Latino lit reading group at our bookstore.” Goodreads Review

41 review for The Music of Jimmy Ojotriste

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    I received the book from the author as a Goodreads's giveaway. Mr Hernandez-Sametier graciously signed my copy. The three main characters are endearing: Jimmy Ojotriste (sad eye) is a mariachi performer with only one eye, the other a beautiful but sad glass eye. Victor also plays guitar and drives a Galaxy that he dreams of turning into a low rider. Ray is a Chinese-Mexican violinist in this trio's mariachi group. They share music and their dreams. An area I struggled with was that the book was w I received the book from the author as a Goodreads's giveaway. Mr Hernandez-Sametier graciously signed my copy. The three main characters are endearing: Jimmy Ojotriste (sad eye) is a mariachi performer with only one eye, the other a beautiful but sad glass eye. Victor also plays guitar and drives a Galaxy that he dreams of turning into a low rider. Ray is a Chinese-Mexican violinist in this trio's mariachi group. They share music and their dreams. An area I struggled with was that the book was written mostly in dialogue. I would have appreciated more cues from the author about what his characters were feeling; perhaps through description of body language and vocal tone the characters used in their conversations with each other. I did enjoy the author's description of the mariachi and flamenco music and dance. He clearly has a deep love for and understanding of mariachi. I was fortunate enough to have taught in a school that has a mariachi after-school program. I really like listening to mariachi music and appreciate what a cultural icon it is for Mexicanos.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Megan Hex

    Lovely novel about young mariachis finding their place in the world, soaked in a vibrant sense of place and time. Somehow captures that feeling of being twenty and seeing the world spread before you in a way I've rarely seen portrayed well.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Jimmy Ojotriste (sad eye) is a twenty-year-old musician who plays mariachi to earn a living. He has a glass eye and a foot that drags because of a childhood accident and was given his nickname because of his eye. There are some interesting passages about the man who makes the eyes for him. Jimmy plays with two friends, Victor and Ray. The setting is 1970's Los Angeles. The book is chock-filled with Spanish idioms and terms although it can be followed even if you don't know Spanish and it added t Jimmy Ojotriste (sad eye) is a twenty-year-old musician who plays mariachi to earn a living. He has a glass eye and a foot that drags because of a childhood accident and was given his nickname because of his eye. There are some interesting passages about the man who makes the eyes for him. Jimmy plays with two friends, Victor and Ray. The setting is 1970's Los Angeles. The book is chock-filled with Spanish idioms and terms although it can be followed even if you don't know Spanish and it added to the story and the setting. The description of the neighborhood is so very well done, one can picture it all. There is a lot about Latin music and flamenco, so this would be of particular appeal to lovers of that music. It is a coming-of-age for these young men and you come to care about the characters. I really loved the cover art. I received this book for free through Goodreads First Reads.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey Carrier

    The Music of Jimmy Ojotriste is amazing A skillful author, Arturo Hernandez Sametier, has created a romantic, seductive, and suspenseful world that I am sure will excite everyone, not just for fans of musical artist, YA, and suspense. I was drawn in from the beginning by this alternate world and the young adults who race through it in this tale of struggle, self-discovery, perseverance, and surrender. The characters are compelling and thrilling to follow throughout their life journeys. Terrific r The Music of Jimmy Ojotriste is amazing A skillful author, Arturo Hernandez Sametier, has created a romantic, seductive, and suspenseful world that I am sure will excite everyone, not just for fans of musical artist, YA, and suspense. I was drawn in from the beginning by this alternate world and the young adults who race through it in this tale of struggle, self-discovery, perseverance, and surrender. The characters are compelling and thrilling to follow throughout their life journeys. Terrific read!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Very well worded.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jim Spellicy

  7. 5 out of 5

    Yvonne Flores

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sweetpea

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brian Jackson

  10. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kristi Jackson

  12. 4 out of 5

    Diane Hamel

  13. 4 out of 5

    Arturo Hernandez-Sametier

  14. 4 out of 5

    Angie Mcmillian

  15. 5 out of 5

    Fabiana Alvarez

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kennedy

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lora

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Gray

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jahranga Babb

  20. 5 out of 5

    Igrowastreesgrow

  21. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

  22. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lydia Bornschlegl

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sadie

  25. 5 out of 5

    S

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jinx:The:Poet {the Literary Masochist, Ink Ninja & Word Roamer}

  27. 4 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  28. 5 out of 5

    Carla

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ann Ellis

  30. 5 out of 5

    Margo

  31. 5 out of 5

    Stacia Chappell

  32. 4 out of 5

    Jackie Morris

  33. 5 out of 5

    Micielle

  34. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl Bradley

  35. 4 out of 5

    Dawn Obrien

  36. 4 out of 5

    Dayna

  37. 5 out of 5

    Linda Donohue

  38. 5 out of 5

    Emiley Allen Bowes

  39. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Heare Watts

  40. 4 out of 5

    Pegi Sweeney

  41. 5 out of 5

    Pam

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