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The Black Island comic book is a story of a money counterfeiting ring in Scotland, written by Hergé and first published in 1938. The Black Island is an exciting and very funny tale of intrigue in which a gang of international forgers leads Tintin to the Scottish town of Kiltoch, where a dreaded beast is rumored to live. Along the way, Tintin is framed and has to dodge the The Black Island comic book is a story of a money counterfeiting ring in Scotland, written by Hergé and first published in 1938. The Black Island is an exciting and very funny tale of intrigue in which a gang of international forgers leads Tintin to the Scottish town of Kiltoch, where a dreaded beast is rumored to live. Along the way, Tintin is framed and has to dodge the pursuit of his old detective friends Thompson and Thomson. He also meets Dr. Müller, who would return in Land of Black Gold. The Black Island is one of the earlier Tintin adventures comics, first appearing in Le Petit Vingtieme Comics magazine in 1937 and 1938, but it was revised and redrawn in 1966, which is why it has the more mature look of Herge's later comics work. The Black Island is the seventh volume of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. Commissioned by Le Vingtième Siècle Comics Magazine for its children's supplement Le Petit Vingtième, it was serialised weekly in the Tin tin comic magazine from April to November 1937. The story tells of young Belgian reporter Tintin and his dog Snowy, who travel to England in pursuit of a gang of counterfeiters. Framed for theft and hunted by detectives Thomson and Thompson, Tintin follows the criminals to Scotland, discovering their lair on the Black Island. The Black Island was coloured and re-drawn in Hergé's distinctive ligne-claire graphic comic style for republication. In the mid-1960s, Hergé's British publishers requested a major revision of the story, for which he sent his assistant Bob de Moor to Britain on a research trip; on his return, Studios Hergé produced a revised, third edition of the story, serialised in Tintin Comics Magazine. The Black Island introduces the recurring villain Dr. Müller, and has been widely cited as one of the most popular instalments in the series. The story was adapted for both the 1957 Belvision animation, Hergé's Adventures of Tintin, and for the 1991 Ellipse/Nelvana animated series The Adventures of Tintin. _______________ About the author; Hergé - creator of the characters Tintin, Captain Haddock and Professor Calculus - was an extremely successful author. Sales of Tintin books had surpassed 10 million copies worldwide. On 27 June 1962, for the occasion of Canada-Belgium week, Radio-Canada broadcast an interview with Hergé conducted by Judith Jasmin, recorded in the garden of the cartoonist's house in Céroux-Mousty. The interview shows Hergé discussing the beginning of his artistic career, Tintin's popularity with children and comic strip translations. Hergé's Adventures of Tintin, a series of adventure comics created from 1929 to 1976. The Tintin comics became increasingly popular throughout the mid-twentieth century, and their creator, Hergé, is still a subject of intrigue in the press and popular publications. Recent work in popular geopolitics has pioneered the use of comics as a new type of source material in critical geography. Hergé's approach to the comics format combines an iconic protagonist with detailed and textured environments that draw upon some of the geopolitical discourses of the twentieth century. Three forms of geopolitical meaning are identified within the Tintin comics: discourses of colonialism, European pre-eminence and anti-Americanism. These overlapping trends amount to different facets of one single discourse, which places European ideologies at the centre of its world-view. This is highlighted by focusing on three geographical spaces of the Tintin series, and by contextualising the life and selected works of Hergé.


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The Black Island comic book is a story of a money counterfeiting ring in Scotland, written by Hergé and first published in 1938. The Black Island is an exciting and very funny tale of intrigue in which a gang of international forgers leads Tintin to the Scottish town of Kiltoch, where a dreaded beast is rumored to live. Along the way, Tintin is framed and has to dodge the The Black Island comic book is a story of a money counterfeiting ring in Scotland, written by Hergé and first published in 1938. The Black Island is an exciting and very funny tale of intrigue in which a gang of international forgers leads Tintin to the Scottish town of Kiltoch, where a dreaded beast is rumored to live. Along the way, Tintin is framed and has to dodge the pursuit of his old detective friends Thompson and Thomson. He also meets Dr. Müller, who would return in Land of Black Gold. The Black Island is one of the earlier Tintin adventures comics, first appearing in Le Petit Vingtieme Comics magazine in 1937 and 1938, but it was revised and redrawn in 1966, which is why it has the more mature look of Herge's later comics work. The Black Island is the seventh volume of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. Commissioned by Le Vingtième Siècle Comics Magazine for its children's supplement Le Petit Vingtième, it was serialised weekly in the Tin tin comic magazine from April to November 1937. The story tells of young Belgian reporter Tintin and his dog Snowy, who travel to England in pursuit of a gang of counterfeiters. Framed for theft and hunted by detectives Thomson and Thompson, Tintin follows the criminals to Scotland, discovering their lair on the Black Island. The Black Island was coloured and re-drawn in Hergé's distinctive ligne-claire graphic comic style for republication. In the mid-1960s, Hergé's British publishers requested a major revision of the story, for which he sent his assistant Bob de Moor to Britain on a research trip; on his return, Studios Hergé produced a revised, third edition of the story, serialised in Tintin Comics Magazine. The Black Island introduces the recurring villain Dr. Müller, and has been widely cited as one of the most popular instalments in the series. The story was adapted for both the 1957 Belvision animation, Hergé's Adventures of Tintin, and for the 1991 Ellipse/Nelvana animated series The Adventures of Tintin. _______________ About the author; Hergé - creator of the characters Tintin, Captain Haddock and Professor Calculus - was an extremely successful author. Sales of Tintin books had surpassed 10 million copies worldwide. On 27 June 1962, for the occasion of Canada-Belgium week, Radio-Canada broadcast an interview with Hergé conducted by Judith Jasmin, recorded in the garden of the cartoonist's house in Céroux-Mousty. The interview shows Hergé discussing the beginning of his artistic career, Tintin's popularity with children and comic strip translations. Hergé's Adventures of Tintin, a series of adventure comics created from 1929 to 1976. The Tintin comics became increasingly popular throughout the mid-twentieth century, and their creator, Hergé, is still a subject of intrigue in the press and popular publications. Recent work in popular geopolitics has pioneered the use of comics as a new type of source material in critical geography. Hergé's approach to the comics format combines an iconic protagonist with detailed and textured environments that draw upon some of the geopolitical discourses of the twentieth century. Three forms of geopolitical meaning are identified within the Tintin comics: discourses of colonialism, European pre-eminence and anti-Americanism. These overlapping trends amount to different facets of one single discourse, which places European ideologies at the centre of its world-view. This is highlighted by focusing on three geographical spaces of the Tintin series, and by contextualising the life and selected works of Hergé.

30 review for Comics; "The Adventures of Tintin": Tintin and the Black Island: The original Tin tin comic book by Herge, Series 7

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    L'ile Noire = The Black Island (Tintin, #7), Hergé The Black Island (French: L'Île noire) is the seventh volume of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. Commissioned by the conservative Belgian newspaper Le Vingtième Siècle for its children's supplement Le Petit Vingtième, it was serialised weekly from April to November 1937. The story tells of young Belgian reporter Tintin and his dog Snowy, who travel to England in pursuit of a gang of counterfeiters. Framed L'ile Noire = The Black Island (Tintin, #7), Hergé The Black Island (French: L'Île noire) is the seventh volume of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. Commissioned by the conservative Belgian newspaper Le Vingtième Siècle for its children's supplement Le Petit Vingtième, it was serialised weekly from April to November 1937. The story tells of young Belgian reporter Tintin and his dog Snowy, who travel to England in pursuit of a gang of counterfeiters. Framed for theft and hunted by detectives Thomson and Thompson, Tintin follows the criminals to Scotland, discovering their lair on the Black Island. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: سال 1972 میلادی عنوان: جزیره سیاه داستانی از ماجراهای تن تن و میلو؛ نویسنده: هرژه؛ مترجم: خسرو سمیعی؛ تهران، یونیورسال، در 62 ص؛ موضوع: داستان مصور و فکاهی از نویسندگان و هنرمندان بلژیکی قرن 20 م تن‌تن توسط دو خلبان ناشناس هدف گلوله قرار می‌گیرد که پس از بهبودی در تعقیب آن دو به یک باند بزرگ جعل اسکناس در اسکاتلند می‌رسد. ا. شربیانی

  2. 4 out of 5

    Spencer Orey

    This one was fun too. It's a chase from start to finish that doesn't quite make sense but is nonstop action. My kid thought it was thrilling, and the humor really worked. This one was fun too. It's a chase from start to finish that doesn't quite make sense but is nonstop action. My kid thought it was thrilling, and the humor really worked.

  3. 5 out of 5

    B Schrodinger

    Tintin is a magnet for shenanigans. Out for a walk, comes across a landed plane in a field, shot at. It's a wonder that he doesn't turn into an agoraphobic. Tintin and Snowy cannot go anywhere without stumbling over diamond thieves, counterfeiters, smugglers and general goons. I guess it's natural that he is a reporter - no other reporter would believe his stories. This time Tintin get's caught up with some money counterfeiters. He also get's mistaken for a criminal himself and goes on the run. Un Tintin is a magnet for shenanigans. Out for a walk, comes across a landed plane in a field, shot at. It's a wonder that he doesn't turn into an agoraphobic. Tintin and Snowy cannot go anywhere without stumbling over diamond thieves, counterfeiters, smugglers and general goons. I guess it's natural that he is a reporter - no other reporter would believe his stories. This time Tintin get's caught up with some money counterfeiters. He also get's mistaken for a criminal himself and goes on the run. Unfortunately Snowy proves to be a very irresponsible dog and drinks whiskey every chance he gets and is thoroughly drunk for at least half the story. There is a wonderful sequence with Thompson and Thomson where they are in a plane with no pilot. There's also a very unusual security guard. And it all culminates in Scotland. So Tintin is in a kilt and one of these pompom hats. Lot's of fun. Lots of laughs although they might be corny and predictable.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Cbj

    I reread The Black Island today after more than two decades. I used to own all the Tintin comics when I was a kid. I lost all of them to school mates who borrowed but never returned them. I have spent many a childhood night in bed cursing and plotting revenge against those careless school mates. It's still very entertaining. Upto its neck in action with goats and magpies and gorillas and planes. Snowy gets drunk on whiskey. Boisterous and superstitious Scottish characters. Great illustrations of I reread The Black Island today after more than two decades. I used to own all the Tintin comics when I was a kid. I lost all of them to school mates who borrowed but never returned them. I have spent many a childhood night in bed cursing and plotting revenge against those careless school mates. It's still very entertaining. Upto its neck in action with goats and magpies and gorillas and planes. Snowy gets drunk on whiskey. Boisterous and superstitious Scottish characters. Great illustrations of idyllic Scottish villages and countrysides with pubs and the great outdoors. But something was missing. Tintin's relentless quest for justice was boring. He is a bit of a prick. He hardly has any friends. Only Snowy. Herge is no Graham Greene. And he is crap at drawing beer mugs. The smaller illustrations were better than the ones with larger canvases. Anyway, I guess I'm searching too deep for meaning in a comic book that is supposed to entertain. And it was pretty entertaining and hilarious and imaginative.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bhavik (Semi Hiatus)

    The only Tintin book I ever owned and my precious :') The only Tintin book I ever owned and my precious :')

  6. 4 out of 5

    Piyangie

    Interestingly, I didn't remember a thing about this installment of Tintin. I wonder whether I've missed it. Anyway, it felt novel. Nevertheless, it is yet another interesting adventure of Tintin. This time Tintin's battle is against a gang who forge and counterfeit money. There was quite enough pace and suspense for a one hour read. And there was some comicality too which helped few chuckles. Also now that the stories have a proper plot with a beginning and end, the adventures are more enjoyable Interestingly, I didn't remember a thing about this installment of Tintin. I wonder whether I've missed it. Anyway, it felt novel. Nevertheless, it is yet another interesting adventure of Tintin. This time Tintin's battle is against a gang who forge and counterfeit money. There was quite enough pace and suspense for a one hour read. And there was some comicality too which helped few chuckles. Also now that the stories have a proper plot with a beginning and end, the adventures are more enjoyable. Overall, though not a favorite Tintin adventure, I enjoyed the read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Iain

    Having read the English translation as a child and then again recently, I then discovered a version translated into Scots by Susan Rennie, and another version which explained some of the background to the story and Herge's workings. All very interesting, but mainly this remains a classic Tintin adventure,and as he ends up visiting my home country of Scotland, what could be better? Having read the English translation as a child and then again recently, I then discovered a version translated into Scots by Susan Rennie, and another version which explained some of the background to the story and Herge's workings. All very interesting, but mainly this remains a classic Tintin adventure,and as he ends up visiting my home country of Scotland, what could be better?

  8. 4 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    Tintin goes to Scotland 4 February 2012 Tintin is wondering through the Belgian countryside, out for a nice leisurely stroll, when he sees a plane making an emergency landing. Being the helpful young man that he is he goes to see if he can help but is immediately shot and left for dead. However, as we have discovered, it is very hard to kill Tintin, and it turns out that the bullet only grazed him, and he decides that he must go and investigate, so he jumps on a train and travels to England after Tintin goes to Scotland 4 February 2012 Tintin is wondering through the Belgian countryside, out for a nice leisurely stroll, when he sees a plane making an emergency landing. Being the helpful young man that he is he goes to see if he can help but is immediately shot and left for dead. However, as we have discovered, it is very hard to kill Tintin, and it turns out that the bullet only grazed him, and he decides that he must go and investigate, so he jumps on a train and travels to England after discovering that the same plane crashed near Cornwell. This is the first Tintin album (they seem to refer to the books as albums) in which I discovered that Tintin was not English. Up until that time I was always under the impression that Tintin lived in London (I guess the English versions suggested that, particularly implying that Thompson and Thomson worked at Scotland Yard). However, in this album it is clear that Tintin has to cross the English channel, and as a kid this left me confused, trying to work out where Tintin lived (turns out that it is Brussels). This is probably nowhere near the best of Herge's work, but it is still very amusing and quite quirky. In this album Tintin is on the trail of some counterfeiters and travels to Scotland to confront them. Once again the Thompson twins are on a false trail as they pursue Tintin for an alleged robbery on the train. We have seen this aspect of the twins before, where they would rescue Tintin because they wanted to be the ones that arrested him. In this album we are also introduced to Loch Lommond whiskey, and we discover that Snowy as a taste for it. This album has been revised a few times, and I suspect that the version that I read was one of the later versions. The reason I say this is because when he travels from Brussels to the English coast, the train travels on an electrified track. Also, at the end, when he leaves Scotland, he leaves by a large passenger jet, something that I do not believe was available in 1937 (though Hitler had begun using the plane as a means of campaigning, and large planes had been built to drop bombs on Germany during the war). I'm not sure if you could consider it anachronistic though since many of the later editions of Tintin had been moved into a 60s time period, though we do notice that he does travel by ship often (particularly in the Blue Lotus and Tintin in America where he travels by ship to China and America respectively). In the later albums we begin to see him travelling more by plane, to Flight 714 where we discover them in a modern airport travelling by Lear Jet. This album is still a good album, and scenes where the huge gorilla is running away from little Snowy is quite impressive. I note that Snowy seems to speak a lot less here, though the attitude of Tintin towards his dog has changed since the original album (where Tintin would constantly chastise him for not being obedient) however we see Tintin punish Snowy for his alcoholism in this particular story.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    Not my type of humour

  10. 5 out of 5

    Gary

    Tintin comes across a plane making an emergency landing. When he go's to investigate , he is shot at by the pilot. In hospital he is visited by the Thompson twins who inform him that they will be travelling to England to investigate a similar plane crash in Sussex. Travelling on a train in Belgium Tintin is framed for mugging and robbing a passenger and is arrested by the Thompson twins. He escapes from them and makes his way to England. There he is kidnapped by thugs who try to kill him , leadin Tintin comes across a plane making an emergency landing. When he go's to investigate , he is shot at by the pilot. In hospital he is visited by the Thompson twins who inform him that they will be travelling to England to investigate a similar plane crash in Sussex. Travelling on a train in Belgium Tintin is framed for mugging and robbing a passenger and is arrested by the Thompson twins. He escapes from them and makes his way to England. There he is kidnapped by thugs who try to kill him , leading him onto the trail of a gang of smugglers and counterfeiters , including Dr Muller . Meanwhile Tintin is hindred by Snowy , who is engaged in finding bones and drinking whisky. Finally Tintin makes his way to Scotland , where he discovers a mysterious island ,which the locals tell him nobody returns from , all who venture there being killed by an evil beast. Tintin ignores there warnings and makes his way to the Black Island , where he will uncover the mystery and bring the bad guys to justice. Magnificent artwork and lots of humour , although some of the later characters are missing.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Praxedes

    I have loved the Tintin books since childhood. The other day I came across a list on Pinterest naming the 50 best Graphic Novels and this was on it! I checked it out from my Library and re-read it...only to be a bit disappointed. There are some constants about Herge's work that have always drawn me in: Tintin's bravery, the handsome artwork, the colorful characters. But the best part was always Tintin's deductive and/or inductive reasoning to find a way out of trouble. In this book that was lack I have loved the Tintin books since childhood. The other day I came across a list on Pinterest naming the 50 best Graphic Novels and this was on it! I checked it out from my Library and re-read it...only to be a bit disappointed. There are some constants about Herge's work that have always drawn me in: Tintin's bravery, the handsome artwork, the colorful characters. But the best part was always Tintin's deductive and/or inductive reasoning to find a way out of trouble. In this book that was lacking. So was the Captain, with his 'blistering barnacles!'. All in all, it's still Herge, but not at his best.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Abhi

    The panel illustrations seemed more detailed, and the colors richer, than the other books before this one. But the plot and the characters were both weak and forgettable. 3 stars then in exchange for helping forget a broken ankle for 30 minutes on a pleasant Sunday morning.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    Okay now, there are a few things that Snowy gets up to in this particular adventure that I would advice against allowing your dog to do at home or abroad! Tintin is once again investigating a suspicious incident, dealing with danger and avoiding a mess with Thomson and Thompson. I forgot how enjoyable these are to read on a summer's evening. If you want to read these with your kids, then just bring up the fact that this is the way people used to see things and be sure to let them know that not Okay now, there are a few things that Snowy gets up to in this particular adventure that I would advice against allowing your dog to do at home or abroad! Tintin is once again investigating a suspicious incident, dealing with danger and avoiding a mess with Thomson and Thompson. I forgot how enjoyable these are to read on a summer's evening. If you want to read these with your kids, then just bring up the fact that this is the way people used to see things and be sure to let them know that not all people saw things this way, we can't deny history, it is part of who we are today and we can't keep changing all of our past literary works to suit our politically correct world today because we are then not sharing the real writer's creation. It's important that we are true to the time in which these were written and let us not deny our past. It also shows that we have made progress. Enjoy these stories for the true adventures that they are meant to be!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Maria Carmo

    The adventures continue, with Tin-tin meeting many of his same enemies and also some of his dutiful "friends" (like the Dupond and Dupont brothers). This time, travels include small, dangerous planes (in one case, piloted by a simple mechanic and carrying frightened Dupond and Dupont!) and also the Black Island, where a terrible "beast" awaits to frighten everybody... No, even though it is in Scotland, it is not Loch Ness! LOL Why not simply read these wonderful books??? Maria Carmo, Lisbon 6 Janu The adventures continue, with Tin-tin meeting many of his same enemies and also some of his dutiful "friends" (like the Dupond and Dupont brothers). This time, travels include small, dangerous planes (in one case, piloted by a simple mechanic and carrying frightened Dupond and Dupont!) and also the Black Island, where a terrible "beast" awaits to frighten everybody... No, even though it is in Scotland, it is not Loch Ness! LOL Why not simply read these wonderful books??? Maria Carmo, Lisbon 6 January 2015.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

    This is one of the best Tintins yet!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Young reporter Tintin doesn't find trouble, trouble finds him. Like Miss Marple or Hercule Poirot he just happens to be on hand when dastardly deeds are being committed; yet despite setback after setback he remains intrepidity personified. This is no more evident than when his efforts to help those in a stricken aircraft during a casual stroll in the Belgian countryside are viciously rebuffed, leading in time to an impromptu cross-channel trip to Sussex followed by a flight to Scotland. And all th Young reporter Tintin doesn't find trouble, trouble finds him. Like Miss Marple or Hercule Poirot he just happens to be on hand when dastardly deeds are being committed; yet despite setback after setback he remains intrepidity personified. This is no more evident than when his efforts to help those in a stricken aircraft during a casual stroll in the Belgian countryside are viciously rebuffed, leading in time to an impromptu cross-channel trip to Sussex followed by a flight to Scotland. And all the while we are left to wonder how a teenage newspaper reporter somehow always seems to be the subject of press reports but never the writer of them, and how the long arm of the law seems to always be grasping the wrong end of the stick. This version of the graphic novel, the last of several revisions, first appeared in 1956 and the English translation (by Leslie Lonsdale-Cooper and Michael Turner) ten years later. Our hero and his wire fox terrier Snowy feature from the start, of course, soon joined by the two identikit English detectives Thomson and Thompson. Ranged against them are an assortment of villains, Dr J W Müller, his chauffeur Ivan, the counterfeiter Puschov and other ne'er-do-wells. As all readers of Tintin's adventures will surmise the story proceeds through Tintin and his friends somehow surviving a series of hazardous though usually comic situations, picking up clues along the way and ending with the reporter's triumphant defeat and capture of the criminals. Hergé exhibits all his well-worn but satisfying tricks here. Tintin is frequently concussed but avoids lasting brain damage; Snowy expresses himself in canine language though, luckily, translations are always provided; the villains are completely unscrupulous, but their bad deeds are always found out; the English detectives are comically incompetent but always close on the tail of any action. Oh, and look out for Ranko! A principal delight of the comics is of course the artwork, visually very clear and precise, with a deliberate absence of shadows or indeed shading. Storytelling is of the essence, and that's what is delivered. The author apparently drew all the characters himself, but in this particular strip cartoon the Anglophile writer had a team of artists who researched scenes and features of British life and drew the technical aspects of motor vehicles, planes and so on. In fact, Tintin's journey from continental Europe to the top of the British Isles is a succession of journeys by train, plane, boat and foot, and so it must have been important to Hergé that all the details were as authentic as possible. My last comments must rest with the translation, which seems to me quite seamless even if the language is quite stilted for 21st-century tastes. Why names in the Tintin series are changed from the French I don't know (Snowy was originally Milou, for instance, Puschov was Wronzoff) but presumably what now appears arbitrary may be perfectly well justified somewhere, somehow. However, Muller's characteristic imprecation -- Kruzitürcken! -- is curiously misspelled (there should be no intrusive 'c') and I understand that in the original he swears ... in French.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chalice

    Still my favorite Tintin book. :)

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lili P

    Not as good as the others, but still great!

  19. 4 out of 5

    itchy

    snowy gets drunk and likes it, what a riot

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Capes

    One of the best, hands down. Not my all time fav but right up there among Tintin's top 5 adventures I reckon. There's so much to like here - it's one one of the more deft, tightly controlled plots with Herge bringing together his usual twists, humor, intrigue and scene-setting in a brilliant work that never lets up but never feels rushed. I won't rehash the plot but I was gripped instantly the first time I read this as a kid - Tintin is shot on the opening page! His investigation sends him eventua One of the best, hands down. Not my all time fav but right up there among Tintin's top 5 adventures I reckon. There's so much to like here - it's one one of the more deft, tightly controlled plots with Herge bringing together his usual twists, humor, intrigue and scene-setting in a brilliant work that never lets up but never feels rushed. I won't rehash the plot but I was gripped instantly the first time I read this as a kid - Tintin is shot on the opening page! His investigation sends him eventually to Scotland, sees him piloting a plane and taking on a gorilla, the poor, mistreated Ranko. In fact, I must say Tintin is VERY impatient with Snowy in this one too, thumping him a bit and generally being ungrateful. As ever, there are some wonderful panels and settings. I enjoyed seeing Snowy quite pleased with himself upon finding the bone and the detail inside Dr Muller's home was lovely too. The great vertical panels where the fire inspector climbs to the nest also stood out - or the medium shot of the island and the ruined castle. In fact I wish there'd been more time spent on the island, it's my only real issue with this volume - but as compensation, there were rakes - man's oldest foe.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    Honestly, Tintin is like the Archie comics with balls. It's playful and innocent, but it still includes whiskey and guns. It brings you into the era it was written and you feel like some imaginative boy in 1930s Belgium reading this at night, saying things to yourself like, "oh boy!" Tintin and his faithful dog Snowy foil a gang of counterfeiters and they do it by car, train and plane. Tintin ends up in the hospital twice and never lets his hero boy reporter instinct keep him away from figuring o Honestly, Tintin is like the Archie comics with balls. It's playful and innocent, but it still includes whiskey and guns. It brings you into the era it was written and you feel like some imaginative boy in 1930s Belgium reading this at night, saying things to yourself like, "oh boy!" Tintin and his faithful dog Snowy foil a gang of counterfeiters and they do it by car, train and plane. Tintin ends up in the hospital twice and never lets his hero boy reporter instinct keep him away from figuring out the truth. It's the first Tintin adventure tale I've read and I'm sure it was more ground-breaking when it debuted. I can see how this sense of adventure came to influence other storytellers of the 20th Century. It was fun and it reads like a serious throwback, though it's actually what anything from the last 50 years was referencing. It was a lot of fun, though I thought it was leading to a bigger finale, but the Tintin comic strip started in 1929, so this was before the era of "we need a big twist." It's just a innocent but pleasantly wild, sometimes funny, straight-forward, do-the-right-thing-at-all-costs, mystery-solving adventure serial.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Tintin and Snowy in Scotland! Hoots, mon! The stereotyped vernacular of the locals is amusing, but then I'm not Scottish! I like Snowy's thought bubbles - it's a pity Hergé didn't maintain them throughout the whole series. Thomson and Thompson continue to be twits! Hergé's illustrations of the Black Island and its castle are very atmospheric; I particularly liked them. Tintin and Snowy in Scotland! Hoots, mon! The stereotyped vernacular of the locals is amusing, but then I'm not Scottish! I like Snowy's thought bubbles - it's a pity Hergé didn't maintain them throughout the whole series. Thomson and Thompson continue to be twits! Hergé's illustrations of the Black Island and its castle are very atmospheric; I particularly liked them.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dianna Caley

    Lizzy and I just finished this one. She and I are really enjoying reading the series together. This one was very humorous and particularly funny when Thompsen and Thomson accidentally commandeer a mechanic instead of a pilot to fly their plane.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bettie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. On the trail of forgers, the intrepid boy reporter arrives at a mysterious castle. Stars Richard Pearce and Andrew Sachs. On the trail of forgers, the intrepid boy reporter arrives at a mysterious castle. Stars Richard Pearce and Andrew Sachs.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Carlye Krul

    Tintin gets shot in the chest and breaks some ribs. He walks out of the hospital to go on an adventure the day he wakes up. Must be the youthfulness.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Phil Jensen

    Good fun! By reputation, the early installments of Tintin are largely plotless, consisting mainly of single-page gags, while the later installments are intricately plotted epics. This one falls in-between. Plotwise, it is nothing but a long chase sequence, like an early Hitchcock movie. Structurally, Hergé often goes for a gag or conclusion panel at the end of every second page. It reads like a compilation of newspaper serials. Taken as it is, it's good at what it does- tell a highly unlikely adve Good fun! By reputation, the early installments of Tintin are largely plotless, consisting mainly of single-page gags, while the later installments are intricately plotted epics. This one falls in-between. Plotwise, it is nothing but a long chase sequence, like an early Hitchcock movie. Structurally, Hergé often goes for a gag or conclusion panel at the end of every second page. It reads like a compilation of newspaper serials. Taken as it is, it's good at what it does- tell a highly unlikely adventure story. The famous clear line art is the main attraction, and it made every page a delight. A few comments: * I was surprised at the number of times Tintin fired a gun at his adversaries. I thought he was supposed to be squeaky-clean, but here he is doing something American comics wouldn't touch until decades later. * People get KO'd constantly. I lost track of the number of times Tintin got whacked on the back of the head- he's going to have some brain issues later in life! Seriously, I would have liked Hergé to come up with a different plot device. * Much like a Hitchcock movie, the entire plot is glued together from coincidences. I'd be curious to see whether Hergé tries for more credibility in the later volumes. It works fine for this particular story, but it would invalidate a story that tried to establish Tintin's skills at detective work or planning ahead.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    When an unidentified airplane crashes Tintin goes out to investigate and gets caught up in the affair and get the Thompson brothers on his tracks again when Tintin is considered a suspect. Tintin does keep following the suspects all the way up to a Scottish haunted island where he finds out that he is dealing with counterfeiters and their pet to keep the Black Island clean from unwanted visitors. Once again a clear and well paced and funny written comic from the hands of Herge. For the background When an unidentified airplane crashes Tintin goes out to investigate and gets caught up in the affair and get the Thompson brothers on his tracks again when Tintin is considered a suspect. Tintin does keep following the suspects all the way up to a Scottish haunted island where he finds out that he is dealing with counterfeiters and their pet to keep the Black Island clean from unwanted visitors. Once again a clear and well paced and funny written comic from the hands of Herge. For the background Herge has hired a Edgar P. Jacobs who would continue creating the backgrounds for Herge until The Shooting Star The adventures of Tintin still bath in the innocence of a post WW2 glow in what seems like a more innocent era.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Biondatina

    I love this one!!! The story is Tintin investigates a plane that lands in a field. The crew of two man open fire against Tintin and flight away. Tintin follows the lead to Scotland but Thompson and Thomson are following him to arrest him. This books it differs cause Snowy has more main role to play by helping, saving or getting Tintin in trouble. My favorite parts was when Snowy as very naughty dog and irresponsible, was drinking or tried to drink some more...

  29. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    Relentless, and relentlessly charming, and relentlessly contrived. In the first 23 pages he's kidnapped 3 times and hospitalised twice. Random bad guys, accidentally discovered and accidentally confronted, over and over. Nice! The translator uses actual Scots and not the dwarf pastiche of most foreign treatments. I want to see what Hergé did to denote Scots in French... Relentless, and relentlessly charming, and relentlessly contrived. In the first 23 pages he's kidnapped 3 times and hospitalised twice. Random bad guys, accidentally discovered and accidentally confronted, over and over. Nice! The translator uses actual Scots and not the dwarf pastiche of most foreign treatments. I want to see what Hergé did to denote Scots in French...

  30. 5 out of 5

    Noah Litle

    One of my favorite Tintin books. For some reason I remember it as being longer and more complicated that it is. ~ That said, I still love it. It's the funniest Tintin book, in my opinion. I'm happy to own my own copy. ~ Another thing I noticed that rather amused me, was how many things Tintin does that are not "politically correct" anymore. I imagine they wouldn't let something like it get published today. One of my favorite Tintin books. For some reason I remember it as being longer and more complicated that it is. ~ That said, I still love it. It's the funniest Tintin book, in my opinion. I'm happy to own my own copy. ~ Another thing I noticed that rather amused me, was how many things Tintin does that are not "politically correct" anymore. I imagine they wouldn't let something like it get published today.

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