counter Big Blue Sky: A Memoir - Free Download Books
Hot Best Seller

Big Blue Sky: A Memoir

Availability: Ready to download

Peter Garrett's life has been fully and passionately lived. A man of boundless energy, compassion, intelligence and creativity, he has already achieved enough to fill several lives. From his idyllic childhood growing up in the northern suburbs of Sydney, to an early interest in equality and justice; from the height of 1960s culture shock at ANU to fronting iconic Australian Peter Garrett's life has been fully and passionately lived. A man of boundless energy, compassion, intelligence and creativity, he has already achieved enough to fill several lives. From his idyllic childhood growing up in the northern suburbs of Sydney, to an early interest in equality and justice; from the height of 1960s culture shock at ANU to fronting iconic Australian band Midnight Oil; from his time as a galvanising activist for the environment to being the only unaligned Cabinet minister in two Labor governments, Garrett has an extraordinary story to tell. He writes movingly about his lifelong mission to protect the environment and his connection with Aboriginal people, about his love for his family and his passion for our country: what it means to him and what it can become. Provocative, entertaining, impassioned and inspiring, this memoir goes to the heart and soul of a remarkable Australian and raises questions crucial to us all.


Compare

Peter Garrett's life has been fully and passionately lived. A man of boundless energy, compassion, intelligence and creativity, he has already achieved enough to fill several lives. From his idyllic childhood growing up in the northern suburbs of Sydney, to an early interest in equality and justice; from the height of 1960s culture shock at ANU to fronting iconic Australian Peter Garrett's life has been fully and passionately lived. A man of boundless energy, compassion, intelligence and creativity, he has already achieved enough to fill several lives. From his idyllic childhood growing up in the northern suburbs of Sydney, to an early interest in equality and justice; from the height of 1960s culture shock at ANU to fronting iconic Australian band Midnight Oil; from his time as a galvanising activist for the environment to being the only unaligned Cabinet minister in two Labor governments, Garrett has an extraordinary story to tell. He writes movingly about his lifelong mission to protect the environment and his connection with Aboriginal people, about his love for his family and his passion for our country: what it means to him and what it can become. Provocative, entertaining, impassioned and inspiring, this memoir goes to the heart and soul of a remarkable Australian and raises questions crucial to us all.

30 review for Big Blue Sky: A Memoir

  1. 5 out of 5

    Edward Rush

    I love the Oils, but never felt the lyrics authored by Garrett were particularly compelling. The big man ("Rock" to his friends; didn't know that) has written his autobiography the way he used to write the words to his songs: somewhat coldly, and not overly coherently. If I had not been so passionately interested in the author, the band he played in and the justifications he offered for his political career, this would have been a slog and I would have given up about 30% of the way in. Here's wha I love the Oils, but never felt the lyrics authored by Garrett were particularly compelling. The big man ("Rock" to his friends; didn't know that) has written his autobiography the way he used to write the words to his songs: somewhat coldly, and not overly coherently. If I had not been so passionately interested in the author, the band he played in and the justifications he offered for his political career, this would have been a slog and I would have given up about 30% of the way in. Here's what I learned: Garrett is an ALP conservative in the same mould as Bill Shorten. He has no time for socialists, resented Bob Brown for his ambivalence towards the Labor Party (doesn't Garrett realise the ALP is not even on the same planet as the Whitlam ALP he so admired?), dismisses the "expatriate" John Pilger and his film "Utopia" for the thinnest of reasons, and like all pollies, has managed to repudiate former items of conviction (e.g. strenuous opposition to Pine Gap) with a straight face and few regrets. In the case of Pine Gap, Garrett now thinks it is worth retaining for its contribution to the surveillance of disarmament programs. That's a huge stretch, and one that has alienated many of his fans, me included. On the positive side, Garrett has filled in the gaps about how the Oils got started, although he is never really able to bring to life the other band members or the stomping gigs they played. He does make the accurate observation that no one who grew up with the Oils is ever going to like the later catalogue as much as tracks off the first 3-4 albums, and you get the sense he wasn't as keen on the band's later work either given that he doesn't mention it much. He never gets to grips with the band and what it meant to people; never really does he transmit the joy of what it must have been to front this brilliant institution. Mostly he makes it sound like unstinting hard yakka. On the positive side, I am in awe at Garrett's emotional and physical strength. His mother died in a house fire while he was sleeping downstairs and his father essentially expired early through overwork and grog. Yet Garrett managed to overcome these huge, huge knocks to live a life of extraordinary meaning and interest. There are very few human beings in any culture who would have Garrett's self-conviction and capacity for hard work. I think Peter Garrett has changed a lot, which is sad for an Oils fan who always thinks of him in his passionate, uncomplicated role as a tremendous rock singer flailing away on top of a pylon at Goat Island as "Power and the Passion" comes to a thunderous close. This is now a bloke who tells chummy anecdotes about Sting and Bono and isn't too impressed when activists block the door to his office with woodchips. He's good on the bastard right wing Aussie media, and the dreadful Tory government/opposition, but I'm sad to say that Peter Garrett is now a successful gent aged 62 who loves his sweetheart and owns several properties. How dare he get old and comfortable, the turncoat!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn

    A slow read for me but I really enjoyed Peter Garrett’s memoir, having been inspired to read it after going to the fantastic Midnight Oil concert in the Hunter Valley. His account of his early years was good as was the Midnight Oil part but surprisingly I found the last part about his life in politics to be most interesting. At the time I was guilty of branding him a cop out and for not doing enough to stir things up and make big changes, particularly on the environmental front. It was really go A slow read for me but I really enjoyed Peter Garrett’s memoir, having been inspired to read it after going to the fantastic Midnight Oil concert in the Hunter Valley. His account of his early years was good as was the Midnight Oil part but surprisingly I found the last part about his life in politics to be most interesting. At the time I was guilty of branding him a cop out and for not doing enough to stir things up and make big changes, particularly on the environmental front. It was really good to read his account and understand how difficult real change can be and how just being a federal minister doesn’t mean you can wield power and make your own decisions. He definitely doesn’t rule out having another crack at politics and we’d all be better off to have his integrity and intelligence back in the arena but I hope for his and his family’s sake that he stays away and finds a less frustrating next chapter.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Inez Hamilton-Smith

    3.5 stars I was more interested in the activism and his involvement with politics - so I ended up skimming some of the chapters about Midnight Oil days. Not that I don't like his music, it's simply not as interesting to read about going to pubs and performing. Peter is an inspirational Australian and what an amazing impact he has had on our country and all our lives. I am so glad I read his memoir. 3.5 stars I was more interested in the activism and his involvement with politics - so I ended up skimming some of the chapters about Midnight Oil days. Not that I don't like his music, it's simply not as interesting to read about going to pubs and performing. Peter is an inspirational Australian and what an amazing impact he has had on our country and all our lives. I am so glad I read his memoir.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    When it's good, it's very good - there's some beautiful writing about the Australian landscape in particular. When it's not as good it's still a pretty interesting read about the history of Midnight Oil (from Peter's perspective) and Australian politics/conservation politics over the last 25 years or so. I suspect only big fans will make it all the way through, cover to cover, but just dipping in and out would have its rewards. (Yes, I made it all the way through, cover to cover.) When it's good, it's very good - there's some beautiful writing about the Australian landscape in particular. When it's not as good it's still a pretty interesting read about the history of Midnight Oil (from Peter's perspective) and Australian politics/conservation politics over the last 25 years or so. I suspect only big fans will make it all the way through, cover to cover, but just dipping in and out would have its rewards. (Yes, I made it all the way through, cover to cover.)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    Having been a fan of Midnight Oil since their early days in the 70s I was looking forward to reading Garrett's memoir. I have so many fond memories of my younger years involving the Oils music and so many of their songs take me back to particular times as songs have a habit of doing. Now in his sixties and having lived a very full life there is a lot to fit into 430 pages and as often happens in memoirs certain parts are skimmed over, others are given more detail and some are simply left out. Garr Having been a fan of Midnight Oil since their early days in the 70s I was looking forward to reading Garrett's memoir. I have so many fond memories of my younger years involving the Oils music and so many of their songs take me back to particular times as songs have a habit of doing. Now in his sixties and having lived a very full life there is a lot to fit into 430 pages and as often happens in memoirs certain parts are skimmed over, others are given more detail and some are simply left out. Garrett writes well and is very engaging which is no surprise. The fact our early years were spent in the same neighbourhoods (a suburb apart) but ten or so years apart made it very easy for me to visual his youth. It was a pleasure to read the early days simply because I was able to so easily relate to it. The major sections of the book are naturally his Oils years which also included his significant involvement in the ACF and other environmental causes and his time as a politician. Interestingly, I found much of his discussion about the Oils a little light. I was hoping he would provide greater insight into the other members of the band, guys that he spent so much time with, however there really wasn't a great deal on it. But when one stops to think about these guys are great mates of his and in true Oils style don't give a lot away. Garrett was always the spokesman (Rob Hirst to a lesser extent) and it was he we got to know as the great frontman. Further, there are so many great gigs and fabulous songs that I would have loved to have heard more about. But I expect having payed so many gigs and sung so many songs repeatedly there would have to be a blurring of the lines so to speak just like we experience in our careers. There is some good detail about a number of environmental causes, e.g. the whaling situation with the Japanese plus naturally he gave some good airtime to the insulation project that didn't go so well plus the Gonski eduction scheme. These and most of his political life were of less interest to me and even though he was engaging in how he presented it all I found it harder going in the last third of the book. I'm pleased I read it and if you're an Oils fan you'll enjoy it, well, the first two-thirds anyway. Peter Garrett is a great Aussie and should be congratulated for his tremendous contribution to music, the environment and the country in general. Long may he continue to contribute.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    Peter Garrett is a jangly sort of fellow. The overall impression I get of him from this book is that he is not a deep thinker. No, I will go further and say he is shallow. That is not to say he is not authentic. He very obviously wrote the book himself and to that extent, he has put himself on the line. For this I commend him. I imagine the sub-editors having words with him about not finishing thoughts off before he goes off onto the next thought and the next and the next. There is a certain inco Peter Garrett is a jangly sort of fellow. The overall impression I get of him from this book is that he is not a deep thinker. No, I will go further and say he is shallow. That is not to say he is not authentic. He very obviously wrote the book himself and to that extent, he has put himself on the line. For this I commend him. I imagine the sub-editors having words with him about not finishing thoughts off before he goes off onto the next thought and the next and the next. There is a certain incoherence that makes the book a chore to read. He does not write well and for that, I will not commend him. He should have listened to others advice. Young activists just go and do and perhaps think later about why they really did something. Garrett is now 62 and he still is unable to give a cogent, coherent reason for his activism. There are hints of him being an outsider at school being from a socially aware churchie background and even some parental influence. There is no why me? Why did I have to do that? Why do some crusades speak to me and yet not to others? He does not really answer why he was attracted to the ALP rather than the Greens besides a feeling that he could get more done from the inside of government. He is not great advertisement for the celebrity candidate. He had no power base or factional support. So he was left out on his own with only his environmental cred keeping him in the game. He felt somewhat abandoned and isolated which he probably was, but the ALP is a funny creature that does not hide its fierce tribalism. I cannot fathom that he thought he was going to get an easy ride. One of the few nuggets is Garrett's willingness, in an otherwise anodyne memoir, to really bag Kevin Rudd. He thinks he is probably mad. He also lays the blame for the disintegration of the ALP government firmly at Rudd's door.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Paul Lockman

    Being born just three years after Peter Garrett, I remember the music scene from the 1970s and 1980s very well, and being interested in indigenous issues and the environment, I was keen to read his memoir Big Blue Sky. I was generally satisfied with the book and I think Peter writes well and obviously put a lot of time and effort into it. However, I do feel it has a tone of restraint that keeps the reader at a distance and I don't feel like I know him much better than before I read the book. He s Being born just three years after Peter Garrett, I remember the music scene from the 1970s and 1980s very well, and being interested in indigenous issues and the environment, I was keen to read his memoir Big Blue Sky. I was generally satisfied with the book and I think Peter writes well and obviously put a lot of time and effort into it. However, I do feel it has a tone of restraint that keeps the reader at a distance and I don't feel like I know him much better than before I read the book. He seems to me to be overly cautious about disclosing too much about his personal life, life with the band as well as his later career as a politician in Canberra. It's like he's writing whilst being conscious of an imaginary person looking over his shoulder all the time and not wanting to say too much. We are left in no doubt about the issues that he is passionate about but we basically already knew these things about Peter. I must say though that I really do admire Peter Garrett and his willingness to speak out and act on issues that he really cares about. The world is a better place because of people like him.

  8. 4 out of 5

    David

    Peter Garrett, lead singer from the band Midnight Oil, tells his story from his childhood in Sydney to being a law student in Canberra, to rock and roll, and ultimately to becoming a Minister in the Australian Parliament. At times, the writing is dry, but it's a compelling journey and good to read about an artist and activist who stuck to his principals through a varied and interesting career. Peter Garrett, lead singer from the band Midnight Oil, tells his story from his childhood in Sydney to being a law student in Canberra, to rock and roll, and ultimately to becoming a Minister in the Australian Parliament. At times, the writing is dry, but it's a compelling journey and good to read about an artist and activist who stuck to his principals through a varied and interesting career.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tony

    One of the better memoirs I have read. Thoroughly entertaining and insightful. I can't believe the energy, drive and commitment of this bloke. I do not necessarily agree with all of his politics or ideas, but you can not deny his pragmatic approach to problem solving. I was fascinated about his views on Rudd and Gillard, and his candidness on the pink batts affair. Great book. One of the better memoirs I have read. Thoroughly entertaining and insightful. I can't believe the energy, drive and commitment of this bloke. I do not necessarily agree with all of his politics or ideas, but you can not deny his pragmatic approach to problem solving. I was fascinated about his views on Rudd and Gillard, and his candidness on the pink batts affair. Great book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kat Ashworth

    Peter Garret has had an undeniably active and fruitful life. I found his courage and dedication which is displayed in every chapter of this book inspiring and enlightening. It was not necessarily and easy or quick read as Peter has crammed an incredible amount of detail into every sentence. Covering 70’s and 80’s counter culture, activism and conservation, politics on the local, national and global stage and of course his own personal story. And the weaving together of his dual career created a Peter Garret has had an undeniably active and fruitful life. I found his courage and dedication which is displayed in every chapter of this book inspiring and enlightening. It was not necessarily and easy or quick read as Peter has crammed an incredible amount of detail into every sentence. Covering 70’s and 80’s counter culture, activism and conservation, politics on the local, national and global stage and of course his own personal story. And the weaving together of his dual career created a sense of jumping between topics as they are woven together. He rarely goes into the sentimental, romanticizing his experience, but quite clearly made the decision to stay with fact and experience, with moments of reflection on how events and decisions were made with hind sight. Getting a behind the scenes insight into some of Australia’s greatest conservation achievements was enlightening and a view into the political experience from the inside extremely educational. It cemented for me, what I realized from early adolescence, that the media rarely report the whole truth, if in fact the truth at all. And that vested interest through profit gain most certainly get in the way of progress for the greater good of now and the future.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jacinda

    I really enjoyed this book. It was interesting learning of Peter Garrett's childhood years all the way through the success of Midnight Oil and on to his political career as well. More so I enjoyed reading it in combination with reading Julia Gillard's autobiography and comparing notes and perspectives on the tumultuous Rudd/Gillard years - particularly on the side of things that seemed to go unsaid at the time. It was in some ways disappointing that things Garrett was protesting against and for I really enjoyed this book. It was interesting learning of Peter Garrett's childhood years all the way through the success of Midnight Oil and on to his political career as well. More so I enjoyed reading it in combination with reading Julia Gillard's autobiography and comparing notes and perspectives on the tumultuous Rudd/Gillard years - particularly on the side of things that seemed to go unsaid at the time. It was in some ways disappointing that things Garrett was protesting against and for many years ago are still things that have not reached a conclusion to this day.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Geo

    I could read anything written by Peter Garrett any day. I’ve heard him talk in real life about similar things he talks about in his book and he’s very easy to listen to. I also really enjoyed the insight into such an iconic Australian band and its frontman. The majority of the book was surprisingly political, I felt, but it was very interesting and he really is a great man. A bit long in some parts but otherwise just really enjoyable.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jim Dunedin

    One of the good guys of rock. A solid and thorough account of his life and times. Honest and forthright on both politics and music. The passion for conservation and democratic process burns. One error he attributes The Clash song Should I Stay or Should I Go to Joe Strummer when it’s Mick Jones on the lyric and vocal.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

    I might come back and give it five stars later if it keeps popping into my mind as it is at the moment.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Doug Gschwind

    I am an American and a big fan of Midnight Oil, and was thus motivated to read Peter's book. I have the edition of his memoir that was published in 2016 so the cover of my version is different than what you see posted here. Not sure if the text varies greatly between the version published in 2015 and that of 2016 or not. I was expecting to learn something about his time as the frontman for Midnight Oil as well as his stint in politics. I found it light regarding his time as frontman for Midnight I am an American and a big fan of Midnight Oil, and was thus motivated to read Peter's book. I have the edition of his memoir that was published in 2016 so the cover of my version is different than what you see posted here. Not sure if the text varies greatly between the version published in 2015 and that of 2016 or not. I was expecting to learn something about his time as the frontman for Midnight Oil as well as his stint in politics. I found it light regarding his time as frontman for Midnight Oil, but it was way deep in terms of demonstrating his passion for environmental, social, and economic issues of his native Australia and beyond. Clearly he cares deeply for the environment and the indigenous peoples of Australia. We all should have a countryman that cares so deeply about their country, and can direct attention to areas of neglect to right wrongs. After reading his memoir I have more respect for him and what he has done for Australia. In particular continuing to shed light on the situation with the Torres Strait Islanders, Papua New Guinea, and areas of Australia that do not get much attention like the Western desert. I do wish to see his contribution to the situation in Shoalwater Bay in the documentary film that he narrates on the topic back in 1992. Very cool that that film helped bring the situation into the public spotlight and turn public opinion in favor of protecting the area rather than allowing sand mining in the pristine area. I am not familiar with Australian politics, and Peter mentions many, many people with whom he worked. A good nod to those he held in favor. Clearly he is not a fan of Kevin Rudd. But, he has moved on, is out of politics, and back to being the frontman of Midnight Oil, saw them play a show back in May of this year in Oakland CA. Oils!

  16. 5 out of 5

    D.A. Cairns

    Big Blue Sky was another of those books which come from nowhere and blow your socks off. I didn't know Peter Garret had written a memoir. I was of course very familiar with him from Midnight Oil, a band I love and have seen live a number of times, then later as the Federal member for Kingsford Smith, Minister for the Environment and the Arts, and lastly Minster for Education. I was excited to find this on the shelf of Darwin Library. From the opening pages to the very end, Big Blue Sky is a power Big Blue Sky was another of those books which come from nowhere and blow your socks off. I didn't know Peter Garret had written a memoir. I was of course very familiar with him from Midnight Oil, a band I love and have seen live a number of times, then later as the Federal member for Kingsford Smith, Minister for the Environment and the Arts, and lastly Minster for Education. I was excited to find this on the shelf of Darwin Library. From the opening pages to the very end, Big Blue Sky is a powerfully poetic story of a remarkable man. A man of great passion and action. The presence of soapbox passages on the environment, indigenous affairs and education only occasionally detracted from Garrett's story. Overall, there was a nice balance between grandstanding and reflection, between political and personal. I loved reading behind the scenes tales of Midnight Oil and the Labour governments of Kevin Rudd, then Julia Gillard. As a songwriter, Garrett has a natural flair with words and some of the imagery, the sights, sounds of smells which he used to create a sense of place and time, were sublime. At times, Big Blue Sky was like a reading a political manifesto, at other times it was like reading intimate and timeless literature. My impression of Peter Garret is that he is selfless, passionate, hardworking and creative. I already held him in high esteem prior to reading Big Blue Sky, but his honest and entertaining memoir has lifted him higher in my eyes.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alison

    As soon as Peter Garrett announced that he was joining the Labor Party in 2004, I wanted to read this book. I didn't really know anything about him beyond Midnight Oil's music (and that not well), but I did consider myself lucky to have seen the Oils at the ANU Bar not long before. This is a very interesting read, especially for someone wanting to understand that decision. I now know that it wasn't such a bolt from the blue as I first supposed, and made a lot of sense in the context of Mr Garrett As soon as Peter Garrett announced that he was joining the Labor Party in 2004, I wanted to read this book. I didn't really know anything about him beyond Midnight Oil's music (and that not well), but I did consider myself lucky to have seen the Oils at the ANU Bar not long before. This is a very interesting read, especially for someone wanting to understand that decision. I now know that it wasn't such a bolt from the blue as I first supposed, and made a lot of sense in the context of Mr Garrett's previous political forays. As a songwriter Mr Garrett has produced some nice lyrical passages, although overall the writing felt a little awkward in places. I guess long-form memoir-writing is a long way from four-minute rock songs. One thing his writing has in common across both forms is that he is unflinching in his expression of the ugliness in politics, as well as celebrating the hard-won victories.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Marie Belcredi

    This book generated new respect for Peter Garrett from me. I had always known that he was the fall guy to the witch hunt, initiated and driven by Tony Abbott and his cohorts ending in the Royal Commission. The book reveals Peters boundless energy in the issues that he believes in: the environment, indigenous rights and finally in education as a right that every Australian must have access to. Peter also campaigns on restrictions to gambling until the pressure from the clubs and AHA is too much. This book generated new respect for Peter Garrett from me. I had always known that he was the fall guy to the witch hunt, initiated and driven by Tony Abbott and his cohorts ending in the Royal Commission. The book reveals Peters boundless energy in the issues that he believes in: the environment, indigenous rights and finally in education as a right that every Australian must have access to. Peter also campaigns on restrictions to gambling until the pressure from the clubs and AHA is too much. All in all he shows himself to be a genuine, principled but practical politician and activist and it's a great shame that we have lost him as a politician. We badly need honest and genuine politicians. Peter finishes with a touching tribute to Australia followed by a another to his wife and daughters. A good read and interesting insider's comments on the Gillard-Rudd Labor term. I'm very glad that the environmental movement has someone like Peter fighting for the cause.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ian

    Peter Garrett’s “Big Blue Sky” - truly outstanding, poetic, passionate. Quintessentially Australian. Highly recommend it. As a huge Midnight Oil and Peter Garrett fan, I read this book whilst living overseas and just prior to returning to Australia after five years away. Deep and meaningful writing made for the perfect guide for re-entry. Balanced coverage of the various forms Peter has taken throughout his life.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Hoskin

    Peter Garrett - a remarkable Australian I enjoyed learning about Peter the activist, the environmentalist, the artist and the politician - and of course, the family man. What an amazing and full life he has had. I think his contributions to the arts, the environment & supporting Australians and First Nation peoples are admirable.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sho

    Picked this up because I'm a huge Midnight Oil fan and i admired Peter Garrett greatly for putting his money where his mouth is and went into politics to try to change things. Although I'm interested in environmental politics, i don't really know that much about Australia so some of this left me a bit perplexed. But a good read and it comes from the heart. Picked this up because I'm a huge Midnight Oil fan and i admired Peter Garrett greatly for putting his money where his mouth is and went into politics to try to change things. Although I'm interested in environmental politics, i don't really know that much about Australia so some of this left me a bit perplexed. But a good read and it comes from the heart.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Steve Jones

    It was interesting in parts, particularly when he talks about his time in government. He does waffle on a bit which could be his artistic side coming through. Made me want to hear Midnight Oil's early albums and see them live. It was interesting in parts, particularly when he talks about his time in government. He does waffle on a bit which could be his artistic side coming through. Made me want to hear Midnight Oil's early albums and see them live.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dulcie

    Thoroughly engrossing viewpoint on Australia's recent cultural, social and political history. Garrett has been present through a broad swathe of our national life. He has lent a level of respect and dignity to us throughout and I salute his honesty and contribution. Thoroughly engrossing viewpoint on Australia's recent cultural, social and political history. Garrett has been present through a broad swathe of our national life. He has lent a level of respect and dignity to us throughout and I salute his honesty and contribution.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Donnette Marjoram

    This was a great read...particularly as an Australian living abroad. Peter tells his own story with passion and the book is revealing on many levels personal, political and musical. Thoroughly recommend it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Tupper

    A fairly well written memoir about a remarkable life.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sean Randall

    Inspiring but a bit dull (at times) memoir by the frontman of one of Australia's greatest bands. Inspiring but a bit dull (at times) memoir by the frontman of one of Australia's greatest bands.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Pat Kennedy

    Very good memoir about rock star turned politician. But would be difficult to follow if you didn't have experience with Australia. Very good memoir about rock star turned politician. But would be difficult to follow if you didn't have experience with Australia.

  28. 5 out of 5

    James

    Great read although there seemed to be less detail about his time with the oils and much more about his time in the ALP, not in percentage of the book, but definitely in more detail.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alex Kwong

    Nice +easy +pleasant read. I feel like it would benefit from being 2 separate books. I would have loved a more Oils heavy book and a separate more heavy activism and politics book.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Colleen Mulrooney

    Adore Peter Garrett. Interesting read about his life, how The Oils started and how he chose his political stance. Listened to the audio book which he narrated and felt his emotion about whaling and how Oz took on the Japanese about changes to the International Whaling Commission. He’s as passionate about his causes as he looked on stage in the 80s, singing about Aboriginal rights. Love the man.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...