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Batman: The War Years 1939-1945: Presenting over 20 classic full length Batman tales from the DC comics vault!

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For the first time, after 80 dark yet wonderful years, Batman: The War Years 1939-1945 tells all of The Dark Knight’s compelling stories about Robin and his involvement in World War II.  Batman's villains have always been sinister, and these are his origins in fighting villains real and fiction.   Through countless comic book issues, television series, and award winning mov For the first time, after 80 dark yet wonderful years, Batman: The War Years 1939-1945 tells all of The Dark Knight’s compelling stories about Robin and his involvement in World War II.  Batman's villains have always been sinister, and these are his origins in fighting villains real and fiction.   Through countless comic book issues, television series, and award winning movies, Batman has been a symbol of strength and perseverance. He was created in 1939, on the brink of World War II, at a volatile time when the world needed a hero most. Who better to come to the rescue than the Caped Crusader? The poor, little, rich boy. orphaned in a late-night robbery grew up to be one of the greatest super-heroes in the DC Universe. From that inspirational moment when a bat flies through the window and inspired an adult Bruce Wayne with a name and a motif, the world changed for the better. All of these are wonderful elements in a timeless tale. By early 1940, both Batman and Robin were up and running in no less than two hit comic books. Bob Kane hired a teenager that he happened to meet—Jerry Robinson—to help him churn out what looked like a nice long run of Batman stories.  A run that has continued, uninterrupted, to today.  As the Second World War loomed ever larger on the horizon, Batman was about to become big business, comic-book style.  These original stories show Batman and Robin in all of their original glory and allow the reader to relive the Golden Age of Comics.  Follow their pilot plots such as the following: The Strange Case of the Diabolical Puppet Master The Strange Case of Professor Radium The Case of the Laughing Death Harlequin Hoax Scarecrow Returns The Man with the Camera Eyes Crime Clinic Batman Bond Advertisements Atlantis Goes to War Blitzkrieg Bandits and more! Roy Thomas has been a comics writer since 1965, mostly for Marvel or DC. Among the thousands of comic books he has written are Conan the Barbarian, The Avengers, The X-Men, Fantastic Four, All-Star Squadron, Sub-Mariner, The Invaders, Dr. Strange, Red Sonja, Wonder Woman, and The Savage Sword of Conan.   Brush up on the history of the world's favorite billionaire vigilante, Batman, with Batman the War Years.  Part of The DC Comics War Years trilogy that celebrates the Golden Age of heroes.


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For the first time, after 80 dark yet wonderful years, Batman: The War Years 1939-1945 tells all of The Dark Knight’s compelling stories about Robin and his involvement in World War II.  Batman's villains have always been sinister, and these are his origins in fighting villains real and fiction.   Through countless comic book issues, television series, and award winning mov For the first time, after 80 dark yet wonderful years, Batman: The War Years 1939-1945 tells all of The Dark Knight’s compelling stories about Robin and his involvement in World War II.  Batman's villains have always been sinister, and these are his origins in fighting villains real and fiction.   Through countless comic book issues, television series, and award winning movies, Batman has been a symbol of strength and perseverance. He was created in 1939, on the brink of World War II, at a volatile time when the world needed a hero most. Who better to come to the rescue than the Caped Crusader? The poor, little, rich boy. orphaned in a late-night robbery grew up to be one of the greatest super-heroes in the DC Universe. From that inspirational moment when a bat flies through the window and inspired an adult Bruce Wayne with a name and a motif, the world changed for the better. All of these are wonderful elements in a timeless tale. By early 1940, both Batman and Robin were up and running in no less than two hit comic books. Bob Kane hired a teenager that he happened to meet—Jerry Robinson—to help him churn out what looked like a nice long run of Batman stories.  A run that has continued, uninterrupted, to today.  As the Second World War loomed ever larger on the horizon, Batman was about to become big business, comic-book style.  These original stories show Batman and Robin in all of their original glory and allow the reader to relive the Golden Age of Comics.  Follow their pilot plots such as the following: The Strange Case of the Diabolical Puppet Master The Strange Case of Professor Radium The Case of the Laughing Death Harlequin Hoax Scarecrow Returns The Man with the Camera Eyes Crime Clinic Batman Bond Advertisements Atlantis Goes to War Blitzkrieg Bandits and more! Roy Thomas has been a comics writer since 1965, mostly for Marvel or DC. Among the thousands of comic books he has written are Conan the Barbarian, The Avengers, The X-Men, Fantastic Four, All-Star Squadron, Sub-Mariner, The Invaders, Dr. Strange, Red Sonja, Wonder Woman, and The Savage Sword of Conan.   Brush up on the history of the world's favorite billionaire vigilante, Batman, with Batman the War Years.  Part of The DC Comics War Years trilogy that celebrates the Golden Age of heroes.

30 review for Batman: The War Years 1939-1945: Presenting over 20 classic full length Batman tales from the DC comics vault!

  1. 5 out of 5

    L.

    I can't seem to shake the feeling that I need to rush out and buy war bonds. I can't seem to shake the feeling that I need to rush out and buy war bonds.

  2. 4 out of 5

    tony dillard jr

    This collection of early Batman stories is the first of 3 volumes devoted to the World War II exploits of the of the DC Trinity. These books are edited by legend Roy Thomas, who also provides his unique take on the source material as a comics insider and devoted historian of the medium. Under Thomas' watch, 'The War Years' is divided into chapters focusing on each phase of the war effort such as life in the United States prior to Pearl Harbor, fifth column espionage, war bonds, and the spoils o This collection of early Batman stories is the first of 3 volumes devoted to the World War II exploits of the of the DC Trinity. These books are edited by legend Roy Thomas, who also provides his unique take on the source material as a comics insider and devoted historian of the medium. Under Thomas' watch, 'The War Years' is divided into chapters focusing on each phase of the war effort such as life in the United States prior to Pearl Harbor, fifth column espionage, war bonds, and the spoils of war itself, as it pertains to the evolution of the Batman. Most of these stories are pretty crude in regards to the art, dialogue, and plot. But I wouldn't change a single page. During World War II, every American was expected to make sacrifices. With rationing, shortages of able-bodied men drafted into the Armed Forces, and constant fear of an Axis invasion, if a mistake was made in a comic book it was nearly impossible to see it fixed in a timely manner if at all. Comics were considered a vital tool to providing morale, instruction, and patriotism to American's youth and our fighting men, so it was of the utmost importance that publication deadlines were met no matter what. That level of dedication to seeing our world kept free from tyranny allowed me to overlook any and all errors contained within this book. This volume contains about 20 stories and numerous covers that highlight the Batman's role in the second world war. As you witness Batman go from a brooding solo act to an optimistic duo with the addition of Robin, and finally merge into an icon of justice, you'll encounter fellow heroes such as Superman, George Washington, and President Roosevelt. Featuring villains such as the Joker and the Scarecrow, the truly evil guest stars of this book are Hitler, Emperor Hirohito and Mussolini and their enemy agents. All this and more comes to you from the deft hands of Bob Kane, Jerry Robinson, Bill Finger, and many more artists and writers who helped craft the Dark Knight into the legend he is today.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lucy Green

    So campy and typically war-era. Best section by far was the one about the year 3000 where the "Batman" character says, "The weapon of the Americans of '76 was not guns...but their overpowering love of liberty!" My roomates and I had a good laugh at that one. So campy and typically war-era. Best section by far was the one about the year 3000 where the "Batman" character says, "The weapon of the Americans of '76 was not guns...but their overpowering love of liberty!" My roomates and I had a good laugh at that one.

  4. 4 out of 5

    John Nelson

    I seem to have reviewing graphic novels and comic book anthologies on Goodreads this year, so why not add this monstrous tome. Contrary to the ignorance of some, old Batman comics are not only NOT dark, they're goofy as hell. But they're so full of heart and fun, and it was a pleasure experiencing the Golden era dynamic duo. There is a lot of nationalistic pride as patriotism found in these pages, for as the title of the anthology states, these are the *best of* during WWII. What is strange is h I seem to have reviewing graphic novels and comic book anthologies on Goodreads this year, so why not add this monstrous tome. Contrary to the ignorance of some, old Batman comics are not only NOT dark, they're goofy as hell. But they're so full of heart and fun, and it was a pleasure experiencing the Golden era dynamic duo. There is a lot of nationalistic pride as patriotism found in these pages, for as the title of the anthology states, these are the *best of* during WWII. What is strange is how they made monsters and the Joker are highly patriotic. (He steals a fighter jet to attack the Japanese) Different times, man, different times. To be honest, I this 1930-1940s era Batman would have been a better president than the one we have now. No, screw that, I think 1930-1940s Joker would have been a better one as well. Anyway, I feel like I'm just that more Batman smart from reading this.

  5. 4 out of 5

    David Zachariason

    Beautifully done, the printing is crisp and clear. Thomas has divided the book into 4 sections covering the war years, with an introduction to each section. He gives relevant data about what was happening in the world and how the editors dealt with stories about the war. In case you are not familiar with the war years he explains some things (like war bonds and stamps) that you need to know to understand the stories without being boring. The stories and the art are superbly reproduced on thick, Beautifully done, the printing is crisp and clear. Thomas has divided the book into 4 sections covering the war years, with an introduction to each section. He gives relevant data about what was happening in the world and how the editors dealt with stories about the war. In case you are not familiar with the war years he explains some things (like war bonds and stamps) that you need to know to understand the stories without being boring. The stories and the art are superbly reproduced on thick, glossy paper, probably looking better than they did when originally published. The best part for me was the reproduction of so many WWII covers, many of my favorites. If you're a Batman fan, a Golden Age comic book fan, or a WWII collector, this book is for you. Highly recommended!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Doctor Alpha

    More 3,5 stars than 3. The highest point of the book to me was the first part, with the pulpy roots of Batman and the MAGNIFICENT Joker characterization by Bill Finger, which is the archetype of all kinds of Joker to this day including the so much beloved version by Heath Ledger. It's also interesting to see some hints of the planet travelling Batman from the Silver Age and even the socially conscious Batman A.K.A. the best Batman ever by Dennis O'Neil from the 70's. More 3,5 stars than 3. The highest point of the book to me was the first part, with the pulpy roots of Batman and the MAGNIFICENT Joker characterization by Bill Finger, which is the archetype of all kinds of Joker to this day including the so much beloved version by Heath Ledger. It's also interesting to see some hints of the planet travelling Batman from the Silver Age and even the socially conscious Batman A.K.A. the best Batman ever by Dennis O'Neil from the 70's.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Taylor

    Years ago, when reprints were rare and fans used to write to their favorite comic requesting a "Golden Age" story, the reply DC used to give was that they were "too primitive for today's standards." This muddy reproduction is what they must have meant. Years ago, when reprints were rare and fans used to write to their favorite comic requesting a "Golden Age" story, the reply DC used to give was that they were "too primitive for today's standards." This muddy reproduction is what they must have meant.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chloe S

    I prefer the 1940 years of batman comics. they are the most classical and interesting to me. not all the drama of the new comics

  9. 4 out of 5

    Muhd Daniel

    Really enjoying this comics.

  10. 4 out of 5

    David Lambert

    Loved reading stories that were published during Bats formative years along with the push to keep morale up on the home front. A great book with some great and unusual stories.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    This is a good time capsule that you appreciate and admire more than anything it'll do to engage you in the stories themselves. Let's be honest: All of this was written at a time where writing for comics was still a vaguely defined art, if at all. How to write these stories and create compelling characters and storylines were pretty much open for interpretation still. To say that it shows is certainly not a knock. These writers and artists were trailblazers in a medium that was only in its infan This is a good time capsule that you appreciate and admire more than anything it'll do to engage you in the stories themselves. Let's be honest: All of this was written at a time where writing for comics was still a vaguely defined art, if at all. How to write these stories and create compelling characters and storylines were pretty much open for interpretation still. To say that it shows is certainly not a knock. These writers and artists were trailblazers in a medium that was only in its infancy. With that said, none of it makes reading these any more compelling. Aside from the dated culture and dialect of the time in which they were written, the stories are incredibly basic. Also, the pro-war sentiments and propaganda are as strong as you might guess and feel a little uncomfortable today even accounting for the time period. For whatever reason it doesn't bother me as much with Captain America. It's more quaint with Cap for obvious reasons. When other characters are doing the same shtick it feels worse, and maybe a little more underhanded. You can get a nice appreciation of how far comics have come by reading this while also developing an appreciation for the people who started it all. I probably wouldn't expect any more than that though. I was able to find a nice copy online for about $8.50 shipped, so no harm no foul experiencing this one. It just has its limits in terms of enjoyment.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Bart Hill

    Nice collection of comic stories culled from 1939--1945. Most of the stories are rather lengthy, and juvenile -- imagine that. But, there are aspects that will please any reader of early comics. For instance, Batman used a gun in several early stories before turning to fists and gadgets to stop criminals. Also, he killed several villains before he turned "soft" on crime. One thing I really liked are the essays located throughout the book that reflected America's determination to fight those bad Nice collection of comic stories culled from 1939--1945. Most of the stories are rather lengthy, and juvenile -- imagine that. But, there are aspects that will please any reader of early comics. For instance, Batman used a gun in several early stories before turning to fists and gadgets to stop criminals. Also, he killed several villains before he turned "soft" on crime. One thing I really liked are the essays located throughout the book that reflected America's determination to fight those bad Nazis. I found it interesting to read that by 1944 the United States began losing interest in the war effort once we knew the tide had changed with the Soviet involvement wearing down Germany. This aspect of the war was reflected in the comic book industry by having our heroes more often battle home-grown villains than the Axis powers.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Broderick

    Second time reading Marsden's Tomorrow series. As good as the first time. The overall story concerns a group of Australian high school students who went camping over Christmas break in a truly remote corner of their part of the country. While they're gone, most of Australia is overrun by the troops of an unidentified Asian nation. Left without family or any other support, they decide to fight back. Sounds like a Downunder version of "Red Dawn" but this is far from that gung-ho - Ellie, the unoff Second time reading Marsden's Tomorrow series. As good as the first time. The overall story concerns a group of Australian high school students who went camping over Christmas break in a truly remote corner of their part of the country. While they're gone, most of Australia is overrun by the troops of an unidentified Asian nation. Left without family or any other support, they decide to fight back. Sounds like a Downunder version of "Red Dawn" but this is far from that gung-ho - Ellie, the unofficial team leader and biographer, is always second guessing decisions, worried about her friends and family and all-too often feeling lost, alone and afraid.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    A collection of stories set during the WW2 years. Although it does kick off with the first Batman story from Detective Comics 27. the stories are pretty random after that. Some are pretty good for the time, I personally enjoyed the the one where a criminal decided he needed a Robin of his own. Others be a bit strange, there"s one set in the future. Except for a couple of stories most of them have something to do with the war effort in some way. Either stopping Nazi spies, getting people to buy w A collection of stories set during the WW2 years. Although it does kick off with the first Batman story from Detective Comics 27. the stories are pretty random after that. Some are pretty good for the time, I personally enjoyed the the one where a criminal decided he needed a Robin of his own. Others be a bit strange, there"s one set in the future. Except for a couple of stories most of them have something to do with the war effort in some way. Either stopping Nazi spies, getting people to buy war bond to dealing with criminals looking to benefit by capitalizing in some way. It might be a tad too old school for some but it is an interesting look at a bygone era.

  15. 5 out of 5

    V.J. Sr.

    Compiled with an intro and further info material by Roy Thomas. This book is a look back at Batman & Robin during WWII. What did the Caped Crusaders do to further the war effort and do their part? Batman was new at the start of the war and the book starts out appropriately with Detective Comics #27, the first appearance of Batman in the comics. Over 20 of the best stories are culled from Detective Comics, Batman, and Worlds Finest Comics during those years. The book is faithfully reprinted in vivid Compiled with an intro and further info material by Roy Thomas. This book is a look back at Batman & Robin during WWII. What did the Caped Crusaders do to further the war effort and do their part? Batman was new at the start of the war and the book starts out appropriately with Detective Comics #27, the first appearance of Batman in the comics. Over 20 of the best stories are culled from Detective Comics, Batman, and Worlds Finest Comics during those years. The book is faithfully reprinted in vivid color on heavy gauge paper, hardbound to preserve it. A must read if only for nostalgias sake. See the full review on my website http://bit.ly/1KTQAQU

  16. 4 out of 5

    ian witham

    There are three volumes in the set. This is the best because it is about Batman. Batman had the best writers and the best artists. He was one of the best characters because he could not leap tall buildings at a single bound. He was not more powerful than a locomotive or faster than a speeding bullet. Superman and Wonder Woman could have ended the War in a weekend. Batman was limited to fighting fifth columnists and black marketeers.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Paul Anderson

    Superb hardcover full-color reminiscence of early Batman. The stories are brilliantly displayed with ink so bright it nearly blinds the reader. Cogent introduction and commentaries by Roy Thomas. Lots of covers, great stories from more than just Detective Comics and Batman Comics, and enough new and rare material to make this a must-have even for people who own the Batman Chronicles.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sydney

    Some comics were definitely better than others. I couldn't give it a three, and a 3.5 is more accurate (I rounded up!). Not like anything else I have read, but I liked the change of pace. Some comics were definitely better than others. I couldn't give it a three, and a 3.5 is more accurate (I rounded up!). Not like anything else I have read, but I liked the change of pace.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jdetrick

    As stories, I'm not sure these are very good, but as a snapshot of the culture of the 1940s and how comic books published during that time reflected that culture, it's fascinating. As stories, I'm not sure these are very good, but as a snapshot of the culture of the 1940s and how comic books published during that time reflected that culture, it's fascinating.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  21. 5 out of 5

    Noah Riggs

  22. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Driscoll

  23. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Dutton

  24. 5 out of 5

    Zach

  25. 5 out of 5

    Yosef Shapiro

  26. 4 out of 5

    Emily Kirby

  27. 5 out of 5

    David Gleditsch

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ian

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Manley

  30. 4 out of 5

    Hektor Vokshi

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