counter The Year's Best Dark Fantasy & Horror, 2015 Edition - Free Download Books
Hot Best Seller

The Year's Best Dark Fantasy & Horror, 2015 Edition

Availability: Ready to download

The darkness creeps upon us and we shudder, or it suddenly startles and we scream. There need be no monsters for us to be terrified in the dark, but if there are, they are just as often human and as supernatural. Join us in this outstanding annual exploration of the year's best dark fiction that includes stories of quiet fear, the utterly fantastic, the weirdly surreal, at The darkness creeps upon us and we shudder, or it suddenly startles and we scream. There need be no monsters for us to be terrified in the dark, but if there are, they are just as often human and as supernatural. Join us in this outstanding annual exploration of the year's best dark fiction that includes stories of quiet fear, the utterly fantastic, the weirdly surreal, atmospheric noir, mysterious hauntings, seductive nightmares, and frighteningly plausible futures. Featuring tales from masterful authors and talented new writers sure to make you reconsider walking in the shadows alone . . .


Compare

The darkness creeps upon us and we shudder, or it suddenly startles and we scream. There need be no monsters for us to be terrified in the dark, but if there are, they are just as often human and as supernatural. Join us in this outstanding annual exploration of the year's best dark fiction that includes stories of quiet fear, the utterly fantastic, the weirdly surreal, at The darkness creeps upon us and we shudder, or it suddenly startles and we scream. There need be no monsters for us to be terrified in the dark, but if there are, they are just as often human and as supernatural. Join us in this outstanding annual exploration of the year's best dark fiction that includes stories of quiet fear, the utterly fantastic, the weirdly surreal, atmospheric noir, mysterious hauntings, seductive nightmares, and frighteningly plausible futures. Featuring tales from masterful authors and talented new writers sure to make you reconsider walking in the shadows alone . . .

30 review for The Year's Best Dark Fantasy & Horror, 2015 Edition

  1. 4 out of 5

    Leah Polcar

    I always love when people actually rate each of the short stories in a short story volume so I can see what I am getting into, but with 28 stories in 2015's The Year's Best Dark Fantasy and Fiction , it is really just too much to elaborate on for this poor girl so I will leave the detailed rundown for someone else who throws possible carpal tunnel syndrome to the wind. So, let me give you the condensed stats as I see them: Number of stories that I don't remember a week after finishing this antho I always love when people actually rate each of the short stories in a short story volume so I can see what I am getting into, but with 28 stories in 2015's The Year's Best Dark Fantasy and Fiction , it is really just too much to elaborate on for this poor girl so I will leave the detailed rundown for someone else who throws possible carpal tunnel syndrome to the wind. So, let me give you the condensed stats as I see them: Number of stories that I don't remember a week after finishing this anthology: 3 Number of awful stories: 0 Number of not terribly great stories: 4 Number of kick-ass stories: 3 Namely: The Screams of Dragons by Kelly Armstrong (Is the kid a changeling? Does human horror override supernatural horror?); The Cats of River Street (1925) by Caitlin R. Kiernan (Lovecraftian monsters kept at bay by cats -- do I need to say more? Definite two thumbs up given I normally hate Lovecraftian stuff); Running Shoes by Ken Liu (Not really horror, but really interesting tale of Chinese factory worker turned into running shoes -- I guess you sort of need to read it since reading that blurb, this sounds just awful); Number of pretty darn good stories: 1 Namely: The amazingly titled Mothers, Lock Up Your Daughters Because They Are Terrifying by Alice Sola Kim Number of so-so stories: 12 (but at least from one of these I learned about female factories: penal colonies in Australia) Number of I don't know what the f*** just happened stories: 2 (Notably: (Little Miss) Queen of Darkness and Combustion Hour) Number of I couldn't finish them stories: 2 One story that I can't figure out how to rate is Madam Damnable's Sewing Circle by Elizabeth Bear. This falls into the category of things I can't stand -- a part of a novel/longer work being schlepped out as its own story. It was interesting and well-written and did make me curious about the longer work it was taken from, but my general irritation at being sold to in this way makes me grumpy. So, I did not run the numbers, but I am thinking this should all balance out as a solid "it was good/I liked it". Three stars.

  2. 5 out of 5

    wendie toohey

    I loved it! This book was so good.I couldn't put it down.Some nights the kids had to make they're own dinner because I wouldn't put the book down.(my kids are older) I loved it! This book was so good.I couldn't put it down.Some nights the kids had to make they're own dinner because I wouldn't put the book down.(my kids are older)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jaffa Kintigh

    Ostracism, cruelty, loneliness and desperation rise to the top in this anthology of the best of the best of the new dark and dreary. A great many of these short stories and novellas are excellent in this 6th annual edition of this collection. Editor Paula Guran can be counted on cast a wide net when it comes to tone and genre, but to glean the best therein. Five stories rocked my world with their depth into the human condition, starting with V. H. Leslie's "The Quiet Room" in which a divorced fat Ostracism, cruelty, loneliness and desperation rise to the top in this anthology of the best of the best of the new dark and dreary. A great many of these short stories and novellas are excellent in this 6th annual edition of this collection. Editor Paula Guran can be counted on cast a wide net when it comes to tone and genre, but to glean the best therein. Five stories rocked my world with their depth into the human condition, starting with V. H. Leslie's "The Quiet Room" in which a divorced father claims his daughter after the death of his wife. The unresolved issues solidify into a haunting silence in the ghost story. "The Female Factory" by Lisa L. Hannett and Angela Slatter reveals the bleak conditions of a Tasmanian women's prison in the early 19th C. "The Cats of River Street (1925)" by Caitlyn R. Kiernan gives a 100-year update to Lovecraft's novella "The Shadow Over Innsmouth." A century later, and the residents are as singularly secluded as ever. Kali Wallace's "Water in Springtime" employs imagery not unlike a Miyazaki film centering on a strained mother-daughter relationship in a ravaged landscape. Finally, "The Floating Girls: A Documentary" by Damien Angelica Walters uses literalism to cast a fantastical light on real world problems when in the tale 300,000 teen girls from all over the world drift away into the ether never to be seen again. I've reviewed each story contained in the anthology. My honorable mentions meriting 4-stars are: Armstrong, Kelley--"The Screams of Dragons" Bear, Elizabeth--"Madam Damnable's Sewing Circle" Bowes, Richard--"Sleep Walking Now and Then" Gilbow, S. L.--"Mr. Hill's Death" Langan, John--"Children of the Fang" Marshall, Helen--"Death and the Girl from Pi Delta Zeta" Sanderson, Brandon--"Dreamer" Tem, Steve Rasnic--"The Still, Cold Air" Tidhar, Lavie--"Kur-A-Len" Also included: Bailey, Dale--"The End of the End of Everything"--3 stars Kim, Alice Sola--"Mothers, Lock Up Your Daughters Because They Are Terrifying"--3 stars Lee, Yoon Ha--"Combustion Hour"--3 stars Malik, Usman T.--"Resurrection Points"--3 stars Strantzas, Simon--"Emotional Dues"--3 stars VanderMeer, Jeff--"Fragments from the Notes of a Dead Mycologist"--3 stars Warren, Kaaron--"The Nursery Corner"--3 stars Bulkin, Nadia--"Only Unity Saves the Damned"--2 stars Files, Gemma--"A Wish from a Bone"--2 stars Headley, Maria Dahvana--"Who is Your Executioner?"--2 stars Wise, A. C.--"And the Carnival Leaves Town"--2 stars Barron, Laird--"(Little Miss) Queen of Darkness"--1 star Jones, Stephen Graham--"The Elvis Room"--1 star Liu, Ken--"Running Shoes"--1 star I received my copy of the anthology directly from Prime Books. This collection is highly recommended. Previously, I've reviewed three other Paula Guran edited, Prime Books anthologies: After the End: Recent Apocalypses --4 stars Extreme Zombies --4 stars Mermaids and Other Mysteries of the Deep --4 stars

  4. 5 out of 5

    James Reyome

    I've been commenting on these collections since I received my first one (the 2011 edition, I believe) as a Christmas gift. My reviews have been generally positive, with the exception of editing errors which have been all too prevalent. The quality of the work has been very good, however, and apart from issues of taste (dark fantasy isn't everyone's cuppa) each volume has been a must-have. Well. It is my distinct pleasure to proclaim this year's the best ever, and not just in terms of story conten I've been commenting on these collections since I received my first one (the 2011 edition, I believe) as a Christmas gift. My reviews have been generally positive, with the exception of editing errors which have been all too prevalent. The quality of the work has been very good, however, and apart from issues of taste (dark fantasy isn't everyone's cuppa) each volume has been a must-have. Well. It is my distinct pleasure to proclaim this year's the best ever, and not just in terms of story content, but in copy editing. Oh, sure, there's still too many typos for a professionally produced work—the editing in Caitlin Kiernan's splendid "The Cats of River Street (1925)" is particularly atrocious, a single paragraph somehow spans three pages a la a shorter "Ulysses"—but story wins out even in this example. Does Prime Books farm out individual stories in a collection to individual copy editors? I edited a section of a computer manual once and know it's done elsewhere. Somehow I doubt part 5 of this story was meant to be consumed in one gulp. But never mind. There are so many great stories in this collection that it's hard to single out even a few, but I will try and start with Kiernan's tale of cats defending a town against Lovecraftian beasts. A real gem, as is Stephen Graham Jones's "The Elvis Room", which would make for an outstanding episode of "The X-Files". V. H. Leslie's "The Quiet Room" is eerily haunting and is a great way to start a great book. "Resurrection Points" by Usman Malik is just indescribably wonderful (and awful) and must be experienced to be believed, and you don't want to spend too much time in Kaaron Walker's "The Nursery Corner", which has a faint whiff of the Great Ray Bradbury's wickedness to it. As does "And the Carnival Leaves Town" by A. C. Wise; awesome, both of them. There's also a tale of a girl dating Death which would also make a great X-Files episode (ideally Darin Morgan would do this one) that stands out. But the best of a truly great lot would have to be Lisa Hannett and Angela Slatter's "The Female Factory", which is not at all what you would imagine by the title. Or maybe it is. In any case, it's terrific. Nadia Bulkin's "Only Unity Saves the Damned" is epic and only just misses "Best of Show", but the crusher is delivered by Elizabeth Bear, who also takes Best Title honors with "Madam Damnable's Sewing Circle". A brilliant steampunk quasi-morality tale from one of the best that name-checks another…see if you can find it. I'll give you a hint, she's one of my faves and her initials often follow letters. Or do people even write letters anymore? So that's it. Sometimes these collections are a bit uneven. That's either attributable to the works of that particular year, or Paula Guran's peculiar choices. Hey, her anthology, her rules. But dammit, this time she's absolutely dead-on. This is the best of her series so far and goes on my list as a "You Must Read This". It is just outstanding from beginning to end and will provide hours (days, weeks) of gripping reading. Now, if we can just get the editing to match the content… Five stars, even with the editing issues, and unreservedly so. Great picks, Paula.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Baal Of

    I learned to love short stories from reading Ray Bradbury, Edgar Allen Poe, and Isaac Asimov back when I was a kid, absorbing those authors on the sly, while still under the thumb of my parents religion. One of the common threads for those three masters of the form, was the ability to write a well-crafted, self-contained story, that effectively communicated a central idea. And this is what I find missing from a lot of modern short story authors, specifically the ability to create a short story I learned to love short stories from reading Ray Bradbury, Edgar Allen Poe, and Isaac Asimov back when I was a kid, absorbing those authors on the sly, while still under the thumb of my parents religion. One of the common threads for those three masters of the form, was the ability to write a well-crafted, self-contained story, that effectively communicated a central idea. And this is what I find missing from a lot of modern short story authors, specifically the ability to create a short story that doesn't feel like a fragment, and this collection showcases that problem. A partial story can be fine, but repeatedly through this collection, I found myself frustrated by stories that had intriguing concepts wrapped in fragmentary narratives, with proliferation of loose threads, and an inability to focus an idea into sharp relief. And because of that, a fair number of these stories lacked any kind of gut-level punch, that really makes a fine horror story. Examples like The Floating Girls, The Elvis Room, and Water In Springtime all went nowhere, feeling like some kind of snapshot from a possible larger narrative, but not having any particular savor of their own. On the other hand, the closing story Kur-A-Len was a fascinating high-fantasy blend of Tanith Lee and Michael Moorcock, with a bisexual protagonist wandering a supremely weird world of undead barkeeps, and drugs made from the dust of mad, dead gods. Another favorite was The End Of The End Of Everything which reminded me of J.G. Ballard, without the celebrity-death-car-crash obsession, depicting a world in which something called The Ruin is slowly but inexorably wiping out all life, and detailing the lives of people driven to debauchery and despair, hosting suicide parties, and submitting themselves to torture. This was some visceral, nasty horror, and I loved it. The Carnival Leaves Town was another standout with characters of depth, a creepy gradual coalescing of clues leading to horrendous choices. It featured a film in which a man is flayed alive on cameras, voluntarily, his bones smashed to powder, and then reformed. Nice. Overall a decent collection, but it doesn't compare to the quality of the 2013 anthology.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    I usually like this series, but just didn't so much enjoy reading this edition. I hotly disliked more stories in this volume, including the final novella, than I seem to remember in prior years. The volume starts out strong: "The Quiet Room" by V.H. Leslie is a psychological suspense story about loss and grief. The ending is perfectly ambiguous and could be hopeful or horrible, depending on the reading. A strange hero emerges from "Mr. Hill's Death" by S.L. Gilbow, and this was my other favorite I usually like this series, but just didn't so much enjoy reading this edition. I hotly disliked more stories in this volume, including the final novella, than I seem to remember in prior years. The volume starts out strong: "The Quiet Room" by V.H. Leslie is a psychological suspense story about loss and grief. The ending is perfectly ambiguous and could be hopeful or horrible, depending on the reading. A strange hero emerges from "Mr. Hill's Death" by S.L. Gilbow, and this was my other favorite story of this collection. Other than that, many of the stories seem to have made it in to fill a quotient for various sub-genres: there's a steampunk story that's more of a Western than Fantasy ("Madam Damnable's Sewing Circle"); there's a George R.R. Martin-like novella ("Kur-a-Len"); the de rigueur carnival story; and so on. It also seemed as if a disproportionate number of stories involved children in peril. Looking through the table of contents, I count eight, which is only a little more than a quarter of the stories. Maybe I'm a sap this year; it seemed like every other story involved the death of children, and getting through this edition was a slog for me.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bill Wallace

    I may not be the audience for modern horror if this book really comprises the year's best. I could happily live the rest of my life without reading another story about magical cats, vampires with attitude, or stories set in metaphoric futures that would have been edgy 50 years ago. A couple of the offerings, those set in magical lands with lots of made-up vocabulary, I couldn't read at all. This is really what passes for horror these days? Nearly all the tales were well written but the stories t I may not be the audience for modern horror if this book really comprises the year's best. I could happily live the rest of my life without reading another story about magical cats, vampires with attitude, or stories set in metaphoric futures that would have been edgy 50 years ago. A couple of the offerings, those set in magical lands with lots of made-up vocabulary, I couldn't read at all. This is really what passes for horror these days? Nearly all the tales were well written but the stories themselves felt trite or weak or, as noted above, they contained plot elements that are outside my interest. Credit where due, I did like some of the stories; those by Alice Sola Kim, John Langan, Jeff VanderMeer, and especially Kaaron Warren's "The Nursery Corner," caught my fancy and made me want to read more by the authors.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rocío

    Una de las mejores antologías de varios autores que he leído desde hace tiempo, tanto por calidad media como por variedad. Quiero leer más de Slatter y Helen Marshall. Además, el cuento de Kiernan me ha abierto el apetito de lovecraftiana, que no era un subgénero que me apasionara, pero que sospecho que ahora me hará hacerle ojitos al She walks in shadows que tienen en Gigamesh.

  9. 4 out of 5

    David

    My first time reading a collection edited by Paula Guran so I'm not quite sure what to make of it. Either it was a weak year or my taste is not the same as hers. I still prefer Stephen Jones annual collections with their massive intros. I'll give Guran another shot with reservations. My first time reading a collection edited by Paula Guran so I'm not quite sure what to make of it. Either it was a weak year or my taste is not the same as hers. I still prefer Stephen Jones annual collections with their massive intros. I'll give Guran another shot with reservations.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Vince Darcangelo

    Faves: V.H. Leslie: "The Quiet Room" Laird Barron: "(Little Miss) Queen of Darkness" Stephen Graham Jones: "The Elvis Room" (freaking awesome) Dale Bailey: "The End of the End of Everything" Gemma FIles: "A Wish from a Bone" Faves: V.H. Leslie: "The Quiet Room" Laird Barron: "(Little Miss) Queen of Darkness" Stephen Graham Jones: "The Elvis Room" (freaking awesome) Dale Bailey: "The End of the End of Everything" Gemma FIles: "A Wish from a Bone"

  11. 4 out of 5

    Fatman

    Stories I liked in this collection: "The Screams of Dragons", Kelley Armstrong, "(Little Miss) Queen of Darkness", Laird Barron, "The Cats of River Street," Caitlin R. Kiernan, "The End of the End of Everything," Dale Bailey, "Mothers, Lock Up Your Daughters Because They Are Terrifying", Alice Sola Kim, "Resurrection Points", Usman T. Malik, "Mr. Hill's Death", S. L. Gilbow. Stories I liked in this collection: "The Screams of Dragons", Kelley Armstrong, "(Little Miss) Queen of Darkness", Laird Barron, "The Cats of River Street," Caitlin R. Kiernan, "The End of the End of Everything," Dale Bailey, "Mothers, Lock Up Your Daughters Because They Are Terrifying", Alice Sola Kim, "Resurrection Points", Usman T. Malik, "Mr. Hill's Death", S. L. Gilbow.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    All in all, a good collection of the weird, paranormal and fantastic. Some of the stories didn't quite pique my interest as much as the others, (hence, the theee star rating) but I did like most of them and even loved a number of them enough to make a note of the authors so I could find more of their work. So, overall, I liked it! All in all, a good collection of the weird, paranormal and fantastic. Some of the stories didn't quite pique my interest as much as the others, (hence, the theee star rating) but I did like most of them and even loved a number of them enough to make a note of the authors so I could find more of their work. So, overall, I liked it!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Arasibo Campeche

    Most of these stories weren't for me. Even the Novella at the end felt over extended. Too much of " Event A feels like this, but it could be the opposite, or maybe I don't know what it is." It got tiresome. Most of these stories weren't for me. Even the Novella at the end felt over extended. Too much of " Event A feels like this, but it could be the opposite, or maybe I don't know what it is." It got tiresome.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Duna Quasar

    Really solid storytelling by a list of authors I love, and more I would really love to check out.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Qualle

    Didnt finish it, the stories i read were not for me and smhw i couldnt bring myself to read the book after the first 4-5 stories :/

  16. 4 out of 5

    Skuli Saeland

    Flott smásagnasafn furðu- og hryllingssagna. Uppgötvaði fullt af nýjum og spennandi rithöfundum. Ólík stílbrigði og margar frábærar sögur. Elskaði sagnasafnið. :)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brad Hodges

    This years's Best Dark Fantasy & Horror was quite a feast. At almost six-hundred pages, and with 28 stories, some of considerable length, by the time I finished I had almost forgot some of the stories early in the book. Paula Guran, the series editor, much have hard a time winnowing this group down, but I would recommend a slimmer volume in the future. That being said, some of the long stories are the best. The last story, which is freshest in my mind, is "Kur-a-Len," by Lavie Tidhar. It is remin This years's Best Dark Fantasy & Horror was quite a feast. At almost six-hundred pages, and with 28 stories, some of considerable length, by the time I finished I had almost forgot some of the stories early in the book. Paula Guran, the series editor, much have hard a time winnowing this group down, but I would recommend a slimmer volume in the future. That being said, some of the long stories are the best. The last story, which is freshest in my mind, is "Kur-a-Len," by Lavie Tidhar. It is reminiscent of Stephen King's The Dark Tower series, with a combo of fantasy/noir/western, and parts of it made me confused, but I enjoyed the effort. There are a lot of great noirish lines, such as: "Gorel of Goliris had been asked to perform many strange deeds. Never, though, had he been given the task of obtaining a pair of living blue eyes for a nameless, dead, and quite possibly deranged god. He had to admit it made a change." I also enjoyed "Screams of Dragons," by Kelley Armstrong, about a boy with some very special powers, "Dreamer," about wraith-like spirits who play a tag-like game that is deadly to humans, and "Running Shoes," by Ken Liu, which is about a person who is transformed into a running shoe. In the ancient dug-up demons category, we have John Langan's "Children of the Fang," and Gemma Files' "Wish from a Bone." Both stories are set in the Middle East and involve things should that should be left alone. "The End of the End of Everything," by Dale Bailey, has one of the book's several great opening lines: "The last time Ben and Lois Devine saw Veronica Glass, the noted mutilation artist, was at a suicide party in Cerulean Cliffs, an artists colony far beyond their means." Other first-line winners are Steve Rasnic Tem for "The Still, Cold Air": "Russell took possession of his parents' old house on a cold Monday morning. The air was like a slap across his cheeks. The frost coating the bare dirt yard cracked so loudly under his boots he looked around to see if something else had made the sound." That's a great set-up, but unfortunately the pay-off is not nearly as good. In shorter great first lines, there's Alice Sola Kim's "Mothers, Lock Up Your Daughters Because They Are Terrifying," which goes: "At midnight we parked by a Staples and tried some seriously dark fucking magic." Again, the story does not live up to the that opening. A few stories I found to be duds, mostly because they were incomprehensible. I read "Combustion Hour," it's in English, but I have no idea what Yoon Ha Lee's story is about. Perhaps because there is a bad opening line: "This story is about the eschatology of shadow puppets." I was similarly puzzled by Laird Barron's "(Little Miss) Queen of Darkness." "Madam Damnable's Sewing Circle," by Elizabeth Bear, is a well-written story set in a brothel in Seattle, 1899, but I didn't get the horror or dark fantasy and it seemed to end in the middle. Three stories I consider the best in the collection: "The Female Factory," by Lisa L. Hannett and Angela Slatter, set in a women's prison in Australia; S.L. Gilbow's "Mr. Hill's Death," which has a Twilight Zone vibe to it, about a teacher who may just be seeing a You Tube clip of his own death; and, as she did in The Best Horror of the Year, Volume Seven, Caitlin R. Kiernan's "The Cats of River Street (1925)," a simple but elegant Lovecraft pastiche about household pets who hold off invading hordes. All in all, it's a fair collection, but some trimming was in order.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Joanna Chaplin

    Fewer likes to dislikes in this collection than I usually manage, but that's understandable, because my taste usually doesn't run toward the dark. But I like to push myself, and if I'm going to take horror at all, prose really is my preferred form. I think my favorite was probably "The Female Factory" by Lisa L Hannett and Angela Slatter, mostly because of the historical element. Maybe I should deliberately try reading more Australian authors. Fewer likes to dislikes in this collection than I usually manage, but that's understandable, because my taste usually doesn't run toward the dark. But I like to push myself, and if I'm going to take horror at all, prose really is my preferred form. I think my favorite was probably "The Female Factory" by Lisa L Hannett and Angela Slatter, mostly because of the historical element. Maybe I should deliberately try reading more Australian authors.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Finally! Worked through this collection of wonderfully weird stories and thoroughly enjoyed myself. As with all collections we had some hits and some misses, but I really do think that overall this collection has something for everyone. The last story was really, really strange and I'm not sure how I feel about it, but I really enjoyed (in no particular order): The Screams of Dragons, The Female Factory, The Elvis Room, and Resurrection Points. Finally! Worked through this collection of wonderfully weird stories and thoroughly enjoyed myself. As with all collections we had some hits and some misses, but I really do think that overall this collection has something for everyone. The last story was really, really strange and I'm not sure how I feel about it, but I really enjoyed (in no particular order): The Screams of Dragons, The Female Factory, The Elvis Room, and Resurrection Points.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nate Trier

    The 2014 collection blew my mind; this collection didn't engage me as much, unfortunately (maybe my expectations were too high?). Still, some stories were incredibly compelling and impossible to put down: Yoon Ha Lee's "Combustion Hour," Usman T. Malik's "Resurrection Points," and Lavie Tidhar's "Kur-A-Len." The 2014 collection blew my mind; this collection didn't engage me as much, unfortunately (maybe my expectations were too high?). Still, some stories were incredibly compelling and impossible to put down: Yoon Ha Lee's "Combustion Hour," Usman T. Malik's "Resurrection Points," and Lavie Tidhar's "Kur-A-Len."

  21. 5 out of 5

    Abbie

    Would rate it a 3.5 if I could. The beginning is dire but things do improve--though there isn't a truly great story, or a particularly scary one, in the lot this year, there are several very good ones. Would rate it a 3.5 if I could. The beginning is dire but things do improve--though there isn't a truly great story, or a particularly scary one, in the lot this year, there are several very good ones.

  22. 4 out of 5

    JJacy1

    Mixed bag. One really horrific tale, some decent slow burner suspense ones and far too many "meh" or ones I question the inclusion (I know every year the editor states upfront the definition of horror isn't concrete). Mixed bag. One really horrific tale, some decent slow burner suspense ones and far too many "meh" or ones I question the inclusion (I know every year the editor states upfront the definition of horror isn't concrete).

  23. 4 out of 5

    Florin Constantinescu

    2014 must've been a horrible year for short fiction, since absolutely all 'best of the year' anthologies were very disappointing, this one not making an exception. Half of the stories in here are simply unreadable, the other half are just too bland to bother with. Avoid 2014 in short fiction! :) 2014 must've been a horrible year for short fiction, since absolutely all 'best of the year' anthologies were very disappointing, this one not making an exception. Half of the stories in here are simply unreadable, the other half are just too bland to bother with. Avoid 2014 in short fiction! :)

  24. 4 out of 5

    Laronza Wiley-moore

    Hit or miss As with any anthology...you have the good and bad. Overall it was a good book but some stories I had to make myself power through.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    Quite solid. 3.5.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

    Kelley Armstrong's "The Screams of Dragons" is by far the best story in this collection, the only one that truly stayed with me. Kelley Armstrong's "The Screams of Dragons" is by far the best story in this collection, the only one that truly stayed with me.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Alex Baysinger

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Kuipers

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ashok Banker

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ben D

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...