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Captain America, the Sentinel of Liberty, in World War II era action. See America's greatest hero take to the front lines alongside his sidekick Bucky! Captain America, the Sentinel of Liberty, in World War II era action. See America's greatest hero take to the front lines alongside his sidekick Bucky!


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Captain America, the Sentinel of Liberty, in World War II era action. See America's greatest hero take to the front lines alongside his sidekick Bucky! Captain America, the Sentinel of Liberty, in World War II era action. See America's greatest hero take to the front lines alongside his sidekick Bucky!

30 review for Captain America Comics #1

  1. 5 out of 5

    thea

    2.5 || i've been extremely busy with unversity and won't get to read a proper book until finals are over but i'm glad i was able to squeeze this in! it wasn't the best captain america comic in the world but it might be the most important of all. if you could get your hands on this, electronically or physically, please do! it's a little hefty but really worth it. x 2.5 || i've been extremely busy with unversity and won't get to read a proper book until finals are over but i'm glad i was able to squeeze this in! it wasn't the best captain america comic in the world but it might be the most important of all. if you could get your hands on this, electronically or physically, please do! it's a little hefty but really worth it. x

  2. 4 out of 5

    PvOberstein

    Contrary to what the cover would have you believe, Captain America does not actually punch Hitler in this issue. He actually acts solely as a counter-espionage agent within America ("Captain America Nabs Spy", "Captain America Nation's No. 1 Spy Buster"), which I suppose was the most plausible plot they could fit him in pre-Pearl Harbor. I like to imagine that Professor Reinstein's supersoldier serum was really just a bunch of steroids. Also, it seems really inefficient to create a bona fide supe Contrary to what the cover would have you believe, Captain America does not actually punch Hitler in this issue. He actually acts solely as a counter-espionage agent within America ("Captain America Nabs Spy", "Captain America Nation's No. 1 Spy Buster"), which I suppose was the most plausible plot they could fit him in pre-Pearl Harbor. I like to imagine that Professor Reinstein's supersoldier serum was really just a bunch of steroids. Also, it seems really inefficient to create a bona fide supersoldier and then force him to live a double life as an ordinary Private. It's a character where the 'secret identity' schtick doesn't really make a lot of sense. Private Rogers stirred uneasily in his cot. His hand mechanically slid over the bed next to him -- he was reassured -- his young admirer, Bucky lay there, sound asleep. I swear that now that reads like something out of AO3. It's interesting how panel layout has changed over the years - I kept instinctively reading more vertically, but the panels have to be read left-to-right pretty rigidly. The abundance of directional arrows suggests that the zigzags weren't intuitive to contemporary reader, either. I appreciate how Red Skull is really anal about updating his checklist immediately after completing each task. Like doing groceries. The Hurricane comic is interesting as it looks like it has a lot of elements that would work to great effect in other, more famous comics. Tuk Caveboy is the real first Avenger.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Al Capwned

    Captain America's first appearance has shallow characters, flat plot and all that you expect from a superhero comic of its time. Interesting only for historical reasons. Captain America's first appearance has shallow characters, flat plot and all that you expect from a superhero comic of its time. Interesting only for historical reasons.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Noah White

    This was a revolutionary comic book. The art is more visual than anything that came before it, forever changing the landscape of how Comic Books are made. With only cross sketched lines and thinner/thicker lines, Jack Kirby is able to create the impression of bright and dark/shadows and light. It is a common practice now, but it was invented here and I frankly think used more meaningfully here than in many later comic books. He uses it to make a situation lighter or more intense like the flick o This was a revolutionary comic book. The art is more visual than anything that came before it, forever changing the landscape of how Comic Books are made. With only cross sketched lines and thinner/thicker lines, Jack Kirby is able to create the impression of bright and dark/shadows and light. It is a common practice now, but it was invented here and I frankly think used more meaningfully here than in many later comic books. He uses it to make a situation lighter or more intense like the flick of a switch, employing deeper shadows and darker colors to create an indiscernible environment that the characters must survive. It's a technique common with low budget film noirs, and it works equally well here. With what little budget and means at their disposal, Joe Simon and Jack Kirby were able to create an engaging, genuinely suspenseful espionage thriller. That, combined with its unique visual style, is why this comic book has stood the test of time when so many others from this time have not.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    This is a great artifact of pre-war pop culture. In most of the stories, the Nazis are the clear villains and they’re drawn as apelike monstrosities. The comic was a big hit, so Americans clearly saw the Nazis as Enemy #1 even before we actually went to war with them. There are a couple of other comix in this volume, as well. One’s about a character whose tropes will evolve into those of the modern Thor, and the other’s about the adventures of a prehistoric boy. Of note, both these characters and This is a great artifact of pre-war pop culture. In most of the stories, the Nazis are the clear villains and they’re drawn as apelike monstrosities. The comic was a big hit, so Americans clearly saw the Nazis as Enemy #1 even before we actually went to war with them. There are a couple of other comix in this volume, as well. One’s about a character whose tropes will evolve into those of the modern Thor, and the other’s about the adventures of a prehistoric boy. Of note, both these characters and Captain America are drawn as blonde-haired Aryan ubermenschen. Surely, there’s been at least one dissertation written about the iconography of mid-century comix. If not, get on it!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Simon Mac

    Impressive start to Captain America’s origins. A good few stories that don’t faff around like previous comics. The only let-down is that sometimes I felt a transition was rushed. E.g “By accident, they found the secret Nazi headquarters”. Also, not knowing much about Bucky, I find him to be a bad excuse for stupid decisions, although I get that it’s meant to appeal to the young boy comic readers.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Scott Rushing

    This is a collection of issues about Captain America fighting Hydra spies in the U.S. in the years leading up to WWII. In these early comics, I was surprised to see that Bucky is pretty much in the Robin role. But some of the ideas in here find there way into the first Captain America movie.

  8. 5 out of 5

    PD Parsons

    History made! The continued adventures of Captain America. Bucky was a burden, getting caught when he took off on his own. The origin of the Red Skull is also shared. The two other stories were pretty good also.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kevin King

    Enjoyable origin I had not read early Cap and Bucky, and this is definitely worth it. Lots of fun, nicely priced and excellent reproduction.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Abbie

    I was expecting a more dramatic beginning but hey, I love Cap.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

    Loved reading the original Captain America! It was fascinating to see where the character started and reflect on how he's changed Loved reading the original Captain America! It was fascinating to see where the character started and reflect on how he's changed

  12. 5 out of 5

    Vincent Harris

    Great story If you want to know the the story of Captain Americas origin this is a great place to start .

  13. 5 out of 5

    Somerset

    Despite the cover, Captain America does not actually meet Hitler in this volume. What we do get though is the origin of Captain America in his first comics appearance, and a whole lot of fun as he thwarts the Nazi's various plans to bring down the USA from the inside. We also get two completely uninteresting backup stories about Hurricane (who is fast) fighting the mob, and Tuk (who is a caveman) being a caveman. At times, the art is a clear reminder that this comic is old. There is nothing subtl Despite the cover, Captain America does not actually meet Hitler in this volume. What we do get though is the origin of Captain America in his first comics appearance, and a whole lot of fun as he thwarts the Nazi's various plans to bring down the USA from the inside. We also get two completely uninteresting backup stories about Hurricane (who is fast) fighting the mob, and Tuk (who is a caveman) being a caveman. At times, the art is a clear reminder that this comic is old. There is nothing subtle, for example, in the way Rathcone is drawn. They experiment with panel layouts here, resorting to little arrows to tell the reader how the page is supposed to be read—which is good, because sometimes it goes against the modern rules. The writing is classic: straightforward, funny, and heavy on the narration. Of note is that Cap's shield isn't the familiar disc in this volume.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Luiz Santiago

    O conjunto de histórias é sensacional, mas é tanto patriotismo que enche o saco.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    3.5 Stars

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

    Ah, my favorite comic series. I think it might be time for a reread. It's been far to long since I've sat down with a comic book in my hands and just escaped into another universe altogether. Ah, my favorite comic series. I think it might be time for a reread. It's been far to long since I've sat down with a comic book in my hands and just escaped into another universe altogether.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa Escorpion

  18. 5 out of 5

    Zaylie

  19. 5 out of 5

    German Bermúdez

  20. 5 out of 5

    Anna

  21. 5 out of 5

    Larisa I.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Scott Kinsky

  23. 5 out of 5

    Max

  24. 4 out of 5

    Martina

  25. 5 out of 5

    Júlia

  26. 4 out of 5

    Marvin

  27. 4 out of 5

    Maja Zidarević

  28. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mark Allen

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

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